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8th Reading Test B

Eighth Grade Reading Test

Practice Test

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

Dear Charmaine, How are you doing? I am writing to invite you to come hear poet Maya Angelou speak at my school. She is going to give a poetry reading and then answer audience questions about her poems. It is going to be next Thursday at 3:30 P.M. After the reading, we are having a reception for Ms. Angelou. She will be signing books and meeting the students! I hope you can come. There will be a $1.00 charge to get in, but all the proceeds will go to purchase books for children in underprivileged countries. Please invite your family and friends. It is open to the whole community. The mayor is even coming! I look forward to receiving your letters, and hope to see you at the poetry reading.

1. Why did Michelle write to her friend Charmaine? A. B. C. D. to ask how to obtain a guest speaker to get help with a school assignment to sell children's books and posters to give an invitation to a special event

2. What will Maya Angelou do at Michelle's school? A. B. C. D. She will talk about writing as a career. She will help the students write reports. She will give a poetry reading. She will critique a school play.

3. What is Michelle's attitude towards the special event? A. B. C. D. She is excited about the famous speaker. She is worried that people will not attend. She thinks that the evening will be boring. She feels a higher admission should be charged.

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

4. According to the passage, why will Maya Angelou answer questions from the audience? A. B. C. D. She wants people to understand her poetry. She wants to boost the number of books she sells. She gets paid extra for each question she answers. She wants to get as much publicity as she can.

5. According to the passage, how will school officials boost attendance at this event? A. B. C. D. They will invite the local newspapers to cover the event. They will open the event to the entire community. They will give free admission to the first fifty guests. They will hold a raffle for a luncheon with Maya Angelou.

6. Which of the following is an opinion? A. B. C. D. Maya Angelou is the best contemporary poet. The school will host a reception for its guest. The event is scheduled for a Thursday afternoon. Michelle would like to see her friend at the event.

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, was not the typical First Lady. She could shock, surprise, or delight her critics. Breaking tradition, Eleanor entertained White House guests by greeting them at the door instead of waiting for everyone to arrive before making a grand entrance. Once when her servants were at work rearranging the furniture, Eleanor pitched in to help. She surprised the former first lady, Lou Henry Hoover, by walking to a meeting instead of taking a limousine. Eleanor's independent way, open opinion, and political involvement drew both admiration and criticism from people. However, Eleanor Roosevelt was not always such a confident person. She was born into a wealthy family on October 11, 1884. Her father, Elliott Roosevelt was the brother of Theodore Roosevelt. Eleanor's mother, Anna Hall, was also from a prominent family. This attractive woman had difficulty accepting Eleanor's plain looks and inability to clearly express herself. Eleanor sensed her mother's disappointment in her and grew up insecure, incredibly shy, and starved for affection. Her father, however, loved her as she was, and they spent as many hours together as they could. Unfortunately, he frequently left home for long periods. Eleanor's mother died of diphtheria when she was eight, and her father died two years later. Relatives arranged for her and her two brothers to move in with their grandmother, Mrs. Valentine Hall, a rich society lady of tradition, who decided to raise the young Roosevelts with rigid discipline. She also expected Eleanor's governess to keep strict rules with her young charge. Under their stern eyes, Eleanor completed school work, learned French, and read often at home. She spent these early school years striving for high grades in order to please her elders. However, Eleanor confessed, her "real education" started when she was fifteen and her grandmother allowed her to continue her studies in England. There, Eleanor attended Allenswood, a finishing school designed to teach the arts and social graces to young women. Eleanor took to her new, less restrictive world immediately. Mademoiselle Marie Souvestre, the respected Frenchwoman who ran Allenswood, soon recognized Eleanor's special talents and gave her the extra attention she needed. Mademoiselle Souvestre taught Eleanor how to dress, entertain with selfassurance, and focus her love for learning. By the end of her two-year stay, Eleanor emerged a confident and thoughtful young woman. Returning to New York at eighteen, Eleanor faced her "coming out," a social event on which her grandmother insisted. Eleanor was now a debutante and spent her winter socializing at society teas, dinners, and parties. She was expected to exhibit her best etiquette and social skill, but she became bored and dissatisfied. Eleanor considered herself a poor dancer and a wall flower, lacking the poise and beauty Eighth Grade Reading 4 Test

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

of her mother. At this time, Franklin Roosevelt came down from Harvard University to run the party circuit and was attracted to Eleanor. In November 1903, he asked for her hand in marriage. He told her he "would amount to something some day" with her at his side. The proposal surprised Eleanor. "Why me?" she is supposed to have said. "I am plain, I have little to bring you." But Franklin insisted that he loved her, and she soon realized she loved him in return. They were married on March 17, 1905. Her uncle, President Theodore Roosevelt, gave the bride away. In the following years, Eleanor stood by Franklin's side as he held the offices of New York Senator, Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy, and Governor of New York. She worked tirelessly teaching children, visiting factories, and caring for those injured in World War I. She was totally committed to improving the living standard of the less fortunate. Known for her political activities and her desire to learn, Eleanor created a great deal of controversy when she entered the White House in 1933. She continued to speak out against social injustice, occasionally contradicting her husband. She strove for tolerance, racial equality, child labor laws, and women's rights. Her work for world peace helped create the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The public loved her, but her critics were often cruel in their judgments against her. However, Eleanor continued to give her time, effort, and compassion to help right the wrongs of society until the day she died.

7. What type of literature is this passage? A. B. C. D. fiction nonfiction drama myth

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

8. The passage is mostly about how A. B. C. D. Eleanor grew up and became a teacher Eleanor stood by her husband's side Eleanor helped the poor and wounded Eleanor became confident and contributed to society

9. The author of the passage A. B. C. D. is critical of Eleanor's lifestyle doesn't understand why Eleanor was shy shows admiration for Eleanor disagrees with Eleanor's politics

10. The author's purpose in writing this passage is to A. B. C. D. inform persuade debate issues stimulate thought

11. The passage begins with Eleanor as wife of the president and then goes back to an earlier time of her life. The literary term for this is A. B. C. D. foreshadow flashback allusion hyperbole

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

12. Eleanor's confidence began when A. B. C. D. Franklin proposed she sensed her mother's disappointment her parents died she completed her two-year education

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

13. According to the map, Georgia is in which regions? A. B. C. D. forests and tropics tropics and cotton industrial and dairy grazing and cotton

14. What do the symbols in the Grazing region represent? A. B. C. D. cattle sheep horses buffalo

15. Which of the following pictures is only used one time? A. B. C. D. palm tree corn stalk the Capitol factory building

16. What do the ship pictures most likely represent? A. B. C. D. trade with other countries fishing in the North Pacific deep-sea science expeditions tourist boats to the Caribbean Sea

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

17. What could be another suitable name for this map? A. B. C. D. The Corn Belt United States Finances Farming and Factories A Manufacturing Economy

Jim and the Stallion

Jim turned the young stallion toward the stable, watched the horse's ears pick up, and sensed a quick tightening of it's muscles. The black horse was eager to take them both home at a rushing gallop. Jim slightly eased his pressure on the taut rein, and the stallion almost leaped into his takeoff. Gripping with knees and thighs, Jim found himself urging the horse to top speed. It was almost like flying! At the stable, everyone grinned when Jim told his story. They seemed to have expected it of the black horse, and of Jim as well.

18. What is the author's purpose in this passage? A. B. C. D. to persuade to analyze to entertain to inform

19. What is the tone of this passage? A. B. C. D. excited annoyed polite helpless

Eighth Grade Reading

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8th Reading Test B Practice Test

20. How would you describe Jim's relationship with the horse? A. B. C. D. The horse disliked Jim and tried to throw him off its back. Jim was embarrassed by the horse's awkwardness. Jim trusted the horse to return to the stable. The horse appreciated Jim's caution.

21. What is the definition of taut as used in the passage? A. B. C. D. loose tight smooth light

22. Another title for this passage might be A. B. C. D. "Learning to be a Jockey." "The Speed of a Stallion." "Jim Exaggerates Once Again." "Jim: Boy Jockey."

Eighth Grade Reading

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