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Forest Management Public Summary for Gary Paul Consulting Forester

Certification Code: SW-FM/COC-212 Date of Certification: November 15, 2002 Date of Public Summary: November 2002, updated for 2003, 2004 This document was produced according to the guidelines of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the SmartWood Program. No part of the report should be published separately.

Certifier: SmartWood Program1 c/o Rainforest Alliance 665 Broadway, 5th Floor New York, New York 10012 U.S.A. TEL: (212) 677-1900 FAX: (212) 677-2187 Email: [email protected] Website: www.smartwood.org

SmartWood is implemented worldwide by the nonprofit members of the SmartWood Network. The Network is coordinated by the Rainforest Alliance, an international nonprofit conservation organization. The Rainforest Alliance is the legally registered owner of the SmartWood certification mark and label. All uses of the SmartWood label for promotion must be authorized by SmartWood headquarters. SmartWood certification applies to forest management practices only and does not represent endorsement of other product qualities (e.g., financial performance to investors, product function, etc.). SmartWood is accredited by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) for the certification of natural forest management, tree plantations and chain of custody.

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To earn SmartWood certification, a forest management operation must undergo an on-site field assessment. This Public Summary Report summarizes information contained in the initial assessment report, which is produced based on information collected during the field assessment. Annual audits are conducted to monitor the forest management operation's activities, to review the operation's progress toward meeting their certification conditions, and to verify compliance with the SmartWood standards. Addenda providing the updated information obtained during these annual audits are included as attachments to the Public Summary Report.

1. GENERAL SUMMARY 1.1. Name and Contact Information

Source Name: Contact Person: Address: Tel: Fax: E-mail: Gary Paul Forestry Gary Paul, RPF 303 Potrero # 42-202 Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (831) 426-6415 (831) 426-6485 [email protected]

1.2. A.

General Background Type of operation

Resource Manager. Gary Paul, RPF, is a consulting forester. He offers forestland owners a full range of services: management planning (Management Plans, Timber Harvest Plans, Nonindustrial Timber Management Plans, California Forest Improvement Plans, and Stewardship Incentive Plans), wildlife surveys, silviculture, timber sales and administration, harvesting layout and supervision, harvest road and skid trail monitoring, aforestation and reforestation. Other services include management plan implementation, pre-commercial thinning and release, creation and maintenance of fuelbreaks, installation and maintenance of erosion control measures, timber cruises and appraisals. He encourages landowners to accept full responsibility for long-term stewardship by continuing landowner education and allowing implementation and/or monitoring of all of the above services.

B.

Years in operation

Gary Paul has been working as a consulting forester since 1982. He worked with Ed Tunheim for a number of years. Mr. Tunheim is a SmartWood certified Resource Manager and has moved to Sonoma County. A number of Mr. Tunheim's clients in the Santa Cruz area are now within Mr. Paul's pool of clients.

C.

Date first certified

November 15, 2002 D. Latitude and longitude of certified operation 37° 00 N, 122° 00 W

1.3. A.

Forest and Management System Forest type and land use history

Gary Paul, Consulting Forester managed properties are composed primarily of second and third

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growth redwood and Douglas fir forests with a component of hardwoods. The forest type found on these lands is redwood/mixed conifer. Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and hardwoods, tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflora), madrone (Arbutus menziesii) and live oak (Quercus agrifolia) are the primary tree species. There are some residual old-growth trees left in the stands. The lands classify primarily as site III. Slopes are moderate to steep with moderate erosion potential. Most of the properties were clear cut and burned about 100 years ago. Some were harvested again in the 1940-1960's, while others were harvested for the second time under Mr. Tunheim's direction.

B.

Size of forest management unit certified and forest use and area in production forest, conservation, and/or restoration Table I. Land use Natural or Semi Natural Forest Plantation Protected area Special Management Areas Water Infrastructure Other uses Total Certified Area

Area (ha) 2879 0 40 200 Not available

2879

Definitions: Natural and semi-natural forest: Forest areas where many of the principal characteristics and key elements of native ecosystems such as complexity, structure and diversity are present, as defined by the FSC P&C. Forest Plantations: Forest areas lacking most of the principal characteristics and key elements of native ecosystems, as defined by the FSC P&C, which result from human activities of either planting, sowing or intensive silvicultural treatments. Protected Areas: Areas of natural vegetation that will not be subject to human intervention, including the harvesting of timber and non-timber forest products. Also included are those areas, designated as permanent vegetative buffer or protection zones around wetlands, water bodies, or that are used to permanently protect specific areas with properties that make them unsuitable for extractive management (e.g. steep lands, erodible soils etc). Protection is the primary, unequivocal objective and extractive uses are not permitted, other than for research purposes and in these cases, of extremely light intensity. Protected areas have formal designations in planning documents and maps and have associated protection strategies. Human use is either excluded or of an itinerant, non-intrusive manner. If used for recreation (including hunting, boating and fishing) these activities are controlled and no major ecosystem alteration occurs (flora and fauna). If area of roads has been calculated, roads within protected areas should be removed and included under the Infrastructure category. Protected areas should, as a general rule, be established in areas of natural vegetation. In the case of planting or natural re-generation ­ preference should be given to native species and the goal to move towards natural systems.

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Special Management Areas: Areas of forest or natural vegetation managed for protection purposes but where harvesting is permitted. Stream riparian zones (e.g. SMZs) and buffer strips where harvesting is allowed under special terms are included in this category. Water: Areas of open water bodies larger than 1 ha. Does not include forested wetlands, which should be classified as forest. Infrastructure: Areas within certified forest areas including roads, buildings, nurseries, log yards or forest based processing facilities.

C.

Annual allowable cut and/or annual harvest covered by management plan

Being a resource manager, annual harvest will vary depending on the periodic harvest of small landowners in the certified pool. AAC for Gary Paul clients is approximately 4MMBF of conifer harvest and 1000 cords of hardwood harvest.

D.

General description of details and objectives of the management plan/system

All forestlands under Gary Paul management are managed similarly. Mr. Paul manages his clients' forestlands using very careful single-tree selection, in identified units on the managed properties. Removal amounts to no more than 25 to 35 % of the volume, and units are entered every 12 to 15 years. Remnant old-growth trees, including both softwoods and hardwoods, and other special resources are protected. Areas of exceptional biodiversity or threatened/endangered species are set aside and protected from disruption. Loggers utilize both ground skidding equipment (tractor and rubber-tire skidders) and skyline yarders. Roads, skid trails and landings are built on the contour with minimal soil disturbance. Roads generally have less than 15 % grade and are a maximum of 12 feet wide with an outsloped surface and rolling dips for erosion control. Cable yarding is accomplished with narrow, widely-spaced corridors, about 10 feet wide and at least 200 feet apart. Mr. Paul selects logging contractors carefully to insure that timber harvest is done to his specifications. He marks the timber, lays out all operations, and has an experienced forester inspect the logging operations weekly, or as often as is necessary to ensure compliance. The harvest operations are excellent, with minimal residual stand damage. Hardwood removal is prioritized around redwood clumps. Fifty percent of the hardwood canopy is to be retained, with no openings larger than 1/2 acre. All live oak trees to be retained. Tanoak and madrone trees over 24" DBH will be retained where growing in openings. In groups or clumps of hardwoods, the larger tree in the group will be retained. Where there is a choice to retain a madrone or tanoak in a group, the madrone will be retained. Hardwoods with cavities or multiple trunks will be retained. Pure hardwood stands will not be converted to conifer. Spraying of chemical herbicides is restricted to invasive exotic species and only as long as large groups are present. Once invasive species are reduced to occasional individuals, they are hand-pulled.

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1.4.

Environmental and Socioeconomic Context

In the past, large tracts of land within the Redwood region of California were clearcut and burned, usually by timber and ranching interests. Most old-growth redwood and Douglas-fir trees were harvested at the turn of the 20th century. Watercourses were often used as log transportation corridors. Cull logs and logging slash accumulated in most streams, often forming log jams and becoming barriers to upstream passage of adult salmonids. Human-caused fires associated with past ranching and logging activities converted some previously timbered areas to open grasslands, now used for ranching, urban development and agriculture. These historical activities, along with pollution from urbanization, agriculture and industries, have had significant adverse effects on fish and wildlife; witnessed by the growing list of rare, threatened and endangered species in the region. To protect these species, wildlife and conservation laws have been implemented in an attempt to restore native forest ecosystems (e.g. the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, the Wildlife Conservation Law of 1947 {which set policy for conservation of wildlife in California} and the Z'Berg-Nejedly Act of 1973). In particular, the federal listing of the Northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, coho and steelhead salmon as endangered species has had significant affect on forest management throughout the Pacific Northwest. Additionally, California also has some of the most rigorous forest practice regulations in the United States. These regulations are the result of the passage of the Z'Berg-Nejedly Forest Practices Act of 1973, developed by a governor appointed Board of Forestry and administered by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF). Compliance by land managers with these, and other, rules has become very challenging, especially for the small landowner. The effectiveness of these rules is always a topic of debate in California. Since the mid-1980's conflicts over forest management within the human community, particularly in the redwood region of California, have been commonplace. Santa Cruz County has become increasing sub-urbanized as a bedroom community for growing population in Santa Clara County. Natural conflicts arise from such a diversity of cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds of the local residence. Chainsaw noise, dust and log truck traffic sometimes conflicts with residents who want to enjoy the serene ambiance of the redwood forest after a days work in the fast paced environment of the Silicon Valley. Santa Cruz County has special forest practice rules that try to address these issues, however, foresters in the county must go far beyond the rules in order to promote an atmosphere of cooperation and trust so that they maintain the social license to continue to practice forestry. In addition, forest related employment in Santa Cruz County is minimal. There is only one sawmill and it is relatively small in size (in comparison to sawmills in other northern California counties, the mill is CoC certified as is its timberlands). The minimal size of the timber industry is in part due to the urbanization of the county (shifting public policies) and diminished log supplies from overharvesting earlier in the middle half of the century.

1.5. A.

Products Produced and Chain of Custody Chain of custody certificate

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B.

Species and volumes covered by the certificate

Table II: Certified Production Species Scientific name Volume (m3 per yr) Product Redwood 10,000 Logs Sequoia semprevirens Douglas fir Pseudotsuga menziesii 6,000 Logs Tanoak 4,000 Firewood Lithocarpus densiflora Madrone Mixed in above figure Firewood Arbutus menziesii

C.

Description of current and planned processing capacity covered by the certificate

2. CERTIFICATION ASSESSMENT PROCESS 2.1. · · · · · · · · · · · · Assessment Dates May 18, 2002 ­ Stakeholder notification June 11, 2002 ­ Stakeholder interview June 18, 2002 ­ Field visits and interview with Gary Paul June 19, 2002 ­ Preliminary scoring and team findings. June 19, 2002 ­ Further interview with Gary Paul August 7, 2002 ­ Stakeholder interview August 8, 2002 ­ Stakeholder interview August 28, 2002 ­ Final Draft Report to Gary Paul August 28, 2002 ­ Final Draft Report sent to peer reviewers September 2002 ­ Receive Gary Paul comments and peer reviews September 2002 ­ Final report to SW Western Regional Manager for decision September 2002 ­ Decision made, contracts sent to Gary Paul Assessment Team and Peer Reviewers

2.2.

Walter Smith, Team Leader, Senior Technical Specialist. Walter has seventeen years experience in logging, training and forest resource management and twelve years experience in Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) forest management and chain of custody certification. Walter is a pioneer of the FSC system and considered a senior authority on certification. He developed an FSC type certification system with the Institute for Sustainable Forestry before the establishment of the FSC. He is a founding member of the FSC and was on the original FSC Principles and Criteria Working Group with Richard Donovan, Chief of Forestry of the Rainforest Alliance. Walter began working with the Rainforest Alliance SmartWood program in 1995. Since then he has been a team leader on over 70 forest management and chain of custody assessments, audits and scopings in Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Vietnam and all regions of the United States. He is a principal instructor for the SmartWood Assessor Training Program and has participated in 14 training workshops in North America and Asia and is the co-author of a book on certification with Chris Maser, Forest Certification in Sustainable Development, Healing theLandscape. Bill Eastwood, Geologist, Salmonid Restoration Professional: Bill is a geologist with 25 years experience in various aspects of watershed restoration and sustainable forestry. He has a Master's degree in geology from the University of California at Berkeley. He is the codirector of the Eel River Salmon Restoration Project. Since 1983 he has directed watershed

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planning projects, stream habitat improvement projects, a wild broodstock salmon and steelhead rearing suplementation program, salmon in the classroom educational projects, and studies of fish. Bill is a founding member of the Institute For Sustainable Forestry (ISF) and served on the staff for ten years. In 1990, he helped develop the Ten Elements of Sustainable Forestry and the ISF's forest certification program, which later was absorbed into the SmartWood program. He has participated in SmartWood's Assessor and Lead Assessor Training Programs. He has been an assessor on seven forest management certification assessments, one reassessment, three audits and several peer reviews.

2.3.

Assessment Process

Table III. Summary of Forest Areas & Areas Visited by SmartWood Assessors Forest/Block Name Forested Area in Hectares Assessment Site Landowner 1 2429 Yes Landowner 2 243 Yes Landowner 3 42 Yes Landowner 4 47 Yes Landowner 5 65 Landowner 6 53 TOTALS 2879 4/6

2.4.

Standards

The standards used for this assessment was the FSC Pacific Coast Working Group Draft Standards Version 7.8.

2.5.

Stakeholder consultation process and results Issues Identified Through Stakeholder Comments

The stakeholder consultation activities were organized to give participants the opportunity to provide comments according to general categories of interest based upon the assessment criteria. The table below summarizes the issues identified by the assessment team with a brief discussion of each based upon specific interview. A stakeholder notice was sent to individuals in SmartWood's database and individuals and organizations recommended by the candidate organization. Several stakeholders responded to the notice and were responded to directly by the SmartWood assessors. Other individual local stakeholders were interviewed by telephone.

Table IV: Stakeholder Comments

FSC Principle P1: FSC Commitment/ Legal Compliance Stakeholder Comments Issue concerning forester licensing Forestry consulting services for non-compliant landowners Wanted to know what FSC standards were to be used None SmartWood Response Forester licensing issues were investigated. See condition 6 See public summary section 2.4 None

P2: Tenure & Use Rights & Responsibilities

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P3 ­ Indigenous Peoples' Rights P4: Community Relations & Workers' Rights P5: Benefits from the Forest P6: Environmental Impact P7: Management Plan P8: Monitoring & Assessment P9: Maintenance of High Conservation Value Forest P10 - Plantations

None None

None None

None None None None None

None None None None None

None

None

3. RESULTS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 3.1. General Discussion of Findings

Table V: Findings by FSC Principle

Principle/Subject Area P1: FSC Commitment and Legal Compliance P2: Tenure & Use Rights & Responsibilities P3 ­ Indigenous Peoples' Rights P4: Community Relations & Workers' Rights · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Strengths Providing public and sharing information. Prevention of illegal activities. Respecting the law. Boundaries are flagged Customary rights of community maintained Archeological site protected Tribes notified of operations Contractors and workers are local Tries to provide year round work Communicates well with neighbors Grants any "reasonable request" in allowing neighbor input to management practices. Buy local goods and services Optimizes financial benefit given the balance of environmental and social concerns Financially able to maintain management infrastructure, activities and implement restoration Harvest below growth RT&E species surveyed and protection measures developed Ecologically appropriate silviculture Low impact logging Road rehabilitation · Weaknesses Past landowner acted outside of management scheme (see condition 6)

None noted

None noted · Some workers not wearing appropriate safety equipment. See condition 3

P5: Benefits from the Forest

None noted

P6: Environmental Impact

· · ·

Recruitment of snags, LWD and legacy trees and instream structure. See conditions 7, 8 & 10 Explicit protection measures for habitat Integrated pest management scheme

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P7: Management Plan

P8: Monitoring & Assessment

P9: Maintenance of High Conservation Value Forest P10 - Plantations

· · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Environmental assessments Limited use of herbicides Comprehensive timber inventory Cumulative effect analysis Identification of RT&E species Mitigation measures Forest description Maps Timber growth and yield Financial data Impacts of harvesting Water quality Properties in the pool provide open space and tree cover in suburban environment. · Maintain ecological function for wildlife within suburban environment. The certified pool of lands does not include any plantations - P10 is not applicable.

· · · ·

Herbicide use policies See conditions 11,12,13 Owner friendly management plan See conditions 17 & 20 Owner-friendly maps Inventory of biological resource

· ·

Written monitoring procedures See condition 15 & 23 Habitat changes see condition 14, 18

None noted

The certified pool of lands does not include any plantations - P10 is not applicable.

3.2.

Certification Decision

Based on a thorough field review, analysis and compilation of findings by the SmartWood assessment team Gary Paul Consulting Forester is recommended to receive joint FSC/SmartWood Forest Management and Chain of Custody (FM/COC) Certification with the stipulated conditions. In order to maintain certification, Gary Paul Consulting Forester will be audited annually onsite and required to remain in compliance with the FSC Principles and Criteria. Gary Paul Consulting Forester will also be required to fulfil the conditions as described below. Experts from SmartWood will review continued forest management performance and compliance with the conditions described in this report during scheduled annual or random audits.

3.3.

Conditions and Recommendations

Conditions are verifiable actions that will form part of the certification agreement that Gary Paul Consulting Forester will be expected to fulfill at the time of the first audit or as required in the condition. Each condition has an explicit time period for completion. Non-compliance with conditions will lead to de-certification. The conditions are sequenced in order of their scheduled compliance, e.g., conditions due first through conditions do at or near the end of the certification contract period.

1. Condition: Throughout the certification period, prepare annual reports, which summarize

pesticide application activities and results of the decision making protocol that lead to pesticide use.

2. Condition: Before the first load of certified logs are shipped, develop a trip ticket or

rubber stamp that indicates the certification code number. In addition, develop a brand for the logs that indicates that they are certified. The design of any shipping document (or any document) using the FSC and SmartWood label must first be approved by SmartWood staff before use.

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3. Condition: By next logging season (May 2003), all employees must wear appropriate

safety equipment (hardhats, gloves, chaps) for their job description (4.2)

4. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop written management

goals and guidelines to guide forestry activities, and include a statement of commitment to managing forests in the spirit of the FSC P&C

5. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop procedures and

rules of entry and exit from the certified pool.

6. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, Mr. Paul must drop any

client that does not (has not) conform to his management directions as written in a THP or NTMP. (1.1.a)

7. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop retention and

recruitment policy for legacy trees (trees left in the forest that are at or will reach late seral status) (6.3.a.2)

8. Conditions: Within one year from the award of certification, develop a policy for

identifying, recruiting and retaining snags and large down wood (6.3.e.1)

9. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, analyze the financial

implications of potentially removing areas from harvest (because of extremely steep ground, critical stream habitat, elimination of crossings, etc.). Balancing environmental and economic considerations compare the benefits of harvesting vs. not harvesting (6.5.c).

10. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop a policy for

determining priority leave trees in the stream zone of Category A & B (the classifications in the PCWG standards). (6.5.m)

11. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, establish a decision-making

protocol for establishing the need for using herbicides and for the selection of the chemical to be used. (6.6.a) (6.6.e)

12. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, make a written commitment

in the management plan to the reduction of use and examination of alternatives that could lead towards eventual elimination of herbicides. (6.6.b)

13. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop an inventory system

that will include empirical information on biological resources. (7.1.b.2)

14. Condition: Within one year from the award of certification, develop consistent and

replicable monitoring procedures and protocols (concurrently with 7.1.b.2) (8.1)

15. Condition: Within two years from the award of certification, develop a written integrated

pest and pathogen management strategy. (6.6.g)

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16. Condition: Within two years from the award of certification, develop, for each member

of the certified pool, a comprehensive statement of the landowners' goals and objectives. (7.1.a.1)

17. Condition: Within three years from the award of certification, inventory habitat types

and their structural elements and develop a Gary Paul Consulting Forester company protocol for surveying for RT &E species (including "species of concern") and protocol for monitoring and protecting these species and their habitat (6.2).

18. Condition: Within three years from the award of certification, develop a map, in

conjunction with the inventory of habitat types in condition 6.2, which shows habitat types. Additionally, develop a conservation plan for maintaining or enhancing the functionality of those habitats (6.2.c). .

19. Condition: Within four years from the award of certification, provide each landowner

with a revised management plan that has a table of contents and is structured more similarly to a Stewardship plan (7.1)

20. Condition: Within four years from the award of certification, add more user-friendly

maps to the management plans to coincide with condition 19 (7.1.h)

21. Condition: Begin implementing the monitoring protocols at the next inventory cycle.

(8.1)

22. Condition: At the next inventory cycle for each property include an inventory of

biological resources. Biological resources should include but not be limited to snags by species, diameter, height and decay class, large woody debris by species diameter, length and decay class and legacy trees, aquatic and wildlife habitat, soil productivity. These elements are included in projections for future needs (much like growth and future yield). (7.1.b.2)

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SmartWood Certification Annual Addendum to the Public Summary for Gary Paul Consulting Forester, 2003 1.1 Audit Process

A. B. C.

Audit year: 2003 Dates of Audit: October 16, 2003 Audit Team: Claralynn R. Nunamaker, RPF #2606, a consulting forester from Mendocino County, California. Previous involvement in certification includes having been a SmartWood-certified Resources Manager and having been involved in a number of assessments, scopings, or audits as well as SmartWood Team Leader training. Audit Overview: The audit began at the office of Gary Paul in Santa Cruz. At the office, general questions were discussed and documents reviewed. These included several 1-page statements developed by Mr. Paul since the assessment, namely statements on: · Use of Herbicides; · Management Goals and Guidelines; · Written Procedures for Entry and Exit from Certified Pool; · Policy for Legacy Trees, Snags, and LWD; · Policy for Determining Priority Leave Trees in Stream Zones; · Inventory System for Empirical Information on Biological Resources; and · Monitoring Procedures and Protocols. From the office, Mr. Paul and the assessor proceeded to the RMC property and the Moore property before returning briefly to the office in Santa Cruz.

D.

E.

Sites Visited: On the RMC property, the following areas were visited: · a shaded fuel break · hardwood opening · class I watercourse and lake protection zone · class II watercourse crossing · a pulled class II watercourse crossing · an area where workers were lopping slash · pulled class III crossing · special treatment area for Santa Cruz manzanita (a listed species) · a truck road that will be abandoned On the Moore property, portions of the main access road were walked to assess the overall condition of the road, the drainage structures, and to view the general management of the property.

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F.

Personnel Interviewed: The following people were consulted during this audit:

Person interviewed Gary Paul Miguel Romero Shane Miller

Position/Organization Forester Worker for LTO Lee Locatelli Trucker

G.

Documentation reviewed: Documents reviewed before conducting the audit included: · the initial assessment report for Mr. Paul; · The Pacific Coast region standard (V7.9), downloaded from the fscstandards.org website.

1.2 General Audit Findings and Conclusions Organizational transition. Mr. Paul took over the southern portion of the client pool from SmartWood certified forester Ed Tunheim. Mr. Tunheim and his employee, Matt Green, remain available to help Mr. Paul as needed with specific tasks such as wildlife surveys. Staff and contractors. Mr. Paul maintains a one-forester office with part-time office help. He works with two logging contractors and has hired them for a number of seasons (3 years and over 5 years respectively). He also hires local contractors for non-logging projects as needed and sometimes hires his son. A contractor is used for herbicide application. Additionally, he hires several seasonal full-time workers to work on tasks such as tree planting and erosion control monitoring. Certified client pool. There have been no changes in the certified client pool since the assessment. The only certified property not visited on the assessment or this audit is the La Cima Homeowners property (should visit in 2004). Most clients go for many years without active operations. Mr. Paul may or may not have reason to visit the property between harvests. Because these harvests may be many years apart, there is some need for Mr. Paul to have access to the property or somehow keep himself apprised of the condition of the property so that he can respond to issues ­ erosion, pests, disease, trespass, etc. ­ that may arise between harvests. A CAR has been issued to address this issue. Harvest. Only one property, RMC, had an active harvest in 2003. The harvest was approximately 1.5 mmbf net, which Mr. Paul estimates is about half the growth. Firewood harvested was about 1000 cords. Both cable and tractor yarding are used. Cable yarding corridors were viewed that appeared to be fairly wide, in the range of 15-25 feet, as well as some damage to residuals. The logger is getting to know the cable system and may be able to narrow the size of these corridors in the future. Silviculture. Mr. Paul continues to practice selection silviculture. Southern sub-district rules require selection silviculture with maximum openings of ¼-acre. Openings are created in hardwoods to let more light in. The result is that redwood stump-sprouts grow faster, while under the partial-shade conditions in these openings, growth of hardwoods is limited. For conifers, thinning of fir is done to favor redwood. Smaller redwoods and some firs are left to become future crop trees. The goal is to mark approximately 30-35% of the volume. After harvest, tree planters are instructed to plant seedlings on a 12x12 foot spacing. Plantings are done where soil has been disturbed by heavy equipment, so planters do not

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typically do scarification. This far exceeds the minimum standards, which require no planted. Planting is done by contractors. Seedlings have been purchased from the California Department of Forestry's Magalia reforestation center, which has recently been closed. The source of seedlings for plantings in the future will be a matter of concern. Mr. Paul did indicate he has hired contractors in the past to collect local seeds. Roads and landings. Erosion control measures were in place and functioning properly. Rolling dips and waterbars were in place and functioning. Roads were seeded and rocked as necessary. Pulled crossings were mulched and in one case had mesh in place to prevent movement of soil and mulch. Where needed, large rock was put in place to stabilize the outlet existing as well as pulled crossings. The main haul road on the RMC property will be rocked later this year. On the Moore property, roadwork had been done in conjunction with construction of a house. In one area, runoff from the road had caused significant erosion before an effective erosion control structure and piping were installed that could carry the water down the gully past the area of active erosion. Wildlife and listed species. Surveys are done for wildlife and botanical species as needed. On the RMC property, Santa Cruz manzanita, a listed species, was identified as occurring. Though the species colonizes disturbed areas and generally benefits from harvesting activities, Mr. Paul flagged off an area that was not to be entered to serve as a seed source. Non-timber forest products. No change since the assessment. Community service and relations. Mr. Paul hires local contractors and seasonal employees. Through competitive bidding, the 2003 harvest ended up going to the local mill. A local anti-logging activist has been commenting on Mr. Paul's plans and attending public hearings. Mr. Paul's concern is that, while the comments tend to be emotional rather than substantive in nature, that activists are very good at creating a regulatory environment in which decisions are made politically. It would be very helpful if SmartWood could make a presentation to, for example, the Central Coast Water Quality Control Board, explaining what certification is and means in terms of good forest management. Feedback to SmartWood. There is a concern that some information and actions requested are more of a "wish list" than serving a concrete need. For example, requiring the forester to prepare stewardship plans for landowners who do not even want them does not serve a real need. It is critical for assessors and auditors to, as they do in other areas of the country and the world, balance the cost of conditions and CARs in terms of time and money with the size and scale of the operation. Additionally, what was required for several conditions was not clear to the auditor or to Mr. Paul. It is recommended that assessors and auditors explain to the FM, ideally during the assessment or audit but certainly before the report is finalized, what is being required and why so that the FM has some guidance as to how to meet the condition or CAR. Finally, the auditor recommends that a biologist conduct the 2004 audit in order to provide guidance to the client, particularly on conditions 14, 17, 18, and 22. Based on the management of the properties visited and office review of documents, Mr. Paul's operations have maintained certifiable performance and should remain certified. 1.3 Status of Conditions and Corrective Action Requests (CARs) A. Compliance Summary of Previously Issued Conditions and CARs

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Conditions fully met and closed Condition 3: By next logging season (May 2003), all employees must wear appropriate safety equipment (hardhats, gloves, chaps) for their job description (4.2) Condition 6: Within one year from the award of certification, Mr. Paul must drop any client that does not (has not) conform to his management directions as written in a THP or NTMP. (1.1.a) Condition 9: Within one year from the award of certification, analyze the financial implications of potentially removing areas from harvest (because of extremely steep ground, critical stream habitat, elimination of crossings, etc.). Balancing environmental and economic considerations compare the benefits of harvesting vs. not harvesting (6.5.c). Condition 10: Within one year from the award of certification, develop a policy for determining priority leave trees in the stream zone of Category A & B (the classifications in the PCWG standards). (6.5.m) Condition 11: Within one year from the award of certification, establish a decision-making protocol for establishing the need for using herbicides and for the selection of the chemical to be used. (6.6.a) (6.6.e) Condition 12: Within one year from the award of certification, make a written commitment in the management plan to the reduction of use and examination of alternatives that could lead towards eventual elimination of herbicides. (6.6.b) Conditions Partially met, CARs Issued Condition 5: Within one year from the award of certification, develop procedures and rules of entry and exit from the certified pool. CAR 2-03 Condition 8: Within one year from the award of certification, develop a policy for identifying, recruiting and retaining snags and large down wood (6.3.e.1) CAR 3-03 Condition 13: Within one year from the award of certification, develop an inventory system that will include empirical information on biological resources. (7.1.b.2) CAR 4-03 Condition 14: Within one year from the award of certification, develop consistent and replicable monitoring procedures and protocols (concurrently with 7.1.b.2) (8.1) CAR 1-03 Conditions Met/ongoing Condition 1: Throughout the certification period, prepare annual reports, which summarize pesticide application activities and results of the decision making protocol that lead to pesticide use. Condition 2: Before the first load of certified logs are shipped, develop a trip ticket or rubber stamp that indicates the certification code number. In addition, develop a brand for the logs that indicates that they are certified. The design of any shipping document (or any document) using the FSC and SmartWood label must first be approved by SmartWood staff before use.

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Condition 4: Within one year from the award of certification, develop written management goals and guidelines to guide forestry activities, and include a statement of commitment to managing forests in the spirit of the FSC P&C. Condition 7: Within one year from the award of certification, develop retention and recruitment policy for legacy trees (trees left in the forest that are at or will reach late seral status) (6.3.a.2) Partially met/Not due. Condition 17: Within three years from the award of certification, inventory habitat types and their structural elements and develop a Gary Paul Consulting Forester company protocol for surveying for RT &E species (including "species of concern") and protocol for monitoring and protecting these species and their habitat (6.2). Condition 18: Within three years from the award of certification, develop a map, in conjunction with the inventory of habitat types in condition 6.2, which shows habitat types. Additionally, develop a conservation plan for maintaining or enhancing the functionality of those habitats (6.2.c). Conditions not due. Condition 15: Within two years from the award of certification, develop a written integrated pest and pathogen management strategy. (6.6.g) Condition 16: Within two years from the award of certification, develop, for each member of the certified pool, a comprehensive statement of the landowners' goals and objectives. (7.1.a.1) Condition 19: Within four years from the award of certification, provide each landowner with a revised management plan that has a table of contents and is structured more similarly to a Stewardship plan (7.1) Condition 20: Within four years from the award of certification, add more user-friendly maps to the management plans to coincide with condition 19 (7.1.h) Condition 21: Begin implementing the monitoring protocols at the next inventory cycle. (8.1) Condition 22: At the next inventory cycle for each property include an inventory of biological resources. Biological resources should include but not be limited to snags by species, diameter, height and decay class, large woody debris by species diameter, length and decay class and legacy trees, aquatic and wildlife habitat, soil productivity. These elements are included in projections for future needs (much like growth and future yield). (7.1.b.2) B. New CARs Issued in this Audit CAR 1-03. By the 2004 audit, develop an approximate timeline and method for revisiting properties or otherwise staying informed as to the condition of properties in the certified pool on which no active harvesting is being done (Condition 14).

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CAR 2-03. By the 2004 audit, write the letter regarding rules for exit from the certified pool and send copies to existing clients (Condition 5). CAR 3-03. By the 2004 audit, expand the current written guidelines for identifying, recruiting and retaining snags and large down wood) to include some detail as to what constitutes a live cull or deformed tree to be retained so that there is consistency in marking now and into the future (Condition 8). CAR 4-03. By the 2004 audit, develop a more detailed inventory system that may be used for new or existing clients. This inventory system should include some detail for empirical information on biological resources (snags, LWD, legacy trees, etc.) that will be collected (Condition 13).

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SmartWood Certification Annual Addendum to the Public Summary for Gary Paul Consulting Forester, 2004 1.1 Audit Process

A. B. C.

Audit year: 2004 Dates of Audit: October 25, 2004 Audit Team: Kenneth Baldwin is a California Registered Professional Forester with 40 years of experience, the past 33 in the forests of northern California. He has been involved in land and resource management planning, fire and fuels management planning, timber sale planning and preparation, watershed analysis, forest inventory and design, stocking and survival surveying, reforestation, forest worker training, forest research, fire control, fire damage appraisals, forest recreation, forestry and environmental advocacy, and fisheries restoration. He worked as a seasonal employee for the U.S. Forest Service until 1976 and after that as a contractor/consultant for the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Natural Resources Conservation Service, two Resource Conservation Districts, Trinity Resource Conservation & Development Council, Hayfork Watershed Research and Training Center, Institute for Sustainable Forestry, various religious and non-profit organizations, and private landowners. As a SmartWood consultant he has participated in 8 certification assessments, 1 certification reassessment, 17 audits, and 3 peer reviews in California and Oregon.

D.

Audit Overview: Prior to the meeting with Mr. Gary Paul, the auditor reviewed the certification assessment report, the audit from the previous year, and the SmartWood Pacific Coast standards. The auditor met with Mr. Gary Paul in his office. Conditions that were designated `ongoing' and `partially met' in the 2003 audit and conditions and CARs due in the 2004 audit were discussed and documents reviewed. Conditions that were not due were also briefly discussed. From the office, Mr. Paul and the auditor drove to The Ranch property to view a 2004 selection timber harvest and then to the RMC Pacific Materials property to view a 2004 selection harvest, before returning briefly to the office.

E.

Sites Visited: On The Ranch property a 2004 tractor-yarded timber harvest was visited. This was the first entry since a diameter limit harvest in the `60s and the last entry for this harvest cycle (10-15 years). This property has an oil lease that is serviced year around, so traffic on the mainline road is heavy. Road maintenance

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measures, watercourse and wildlife habitat protections, slash disposal and silvicultural treatments, and logging practices were observed. On the RMC property a 2004 tractor-yarded timber harvest was visited. This was the first entry since the `60s. Road maintenance measures, watercourse and wildlife habitat protections, slash disposal and silvicultural treatments, and logging practices were observed.

F.

Personnel Interviewed: The following people were consulted during this audit: Person interviewed Position/Organization CA RPF #1829

Gary Paul

G.

Documentation reviewed: Documents reviewed before conducting the audit included: "SmartWood Certification Assessment Report for Gary Paul Consulting Forester, Santa Cruz, California, USA" "SmartWood Forest Management Annual Audit Report (2003) for Gary Paul, Consulting Forester" "Pacific Coast (USA) Regional Forest Stewardship Standard (V7.9)" Gary Paul's documents reviewed during the audit included: 2004 Herbicide Use Report Integrated Pest and Pathogen Management Strategy Letters to Clients Outlining Procedures for Exit from the Certified Pool Guidelines for Identifying, Recruiting and Retaining Snags and Large Down Wood Inventory System for Empirical Information on Biological Resources Schedule and Procedure for Monitoring Client Properties Statement of Certified Clients' Goals and Objectives

1.2 General Audit Findings and Conclusions Mr. Paul's staffing and contracting arrangements have not changed since the 2003 audit. There have been no changes in the certified client pool since the certification assessment He maintains an office in Santa Cruz, CA for himself and his part-time help. He hires seasonal workers as needed for reforestation and monitoring and sometimes hires his son. He uses local logging contractors. Limited herbicide applications for control of non-native, invasive plants is done by a licensed pesticide applicator. Mr. Paul visits every property in his certified client pool on an annual basis to determine whether it is being maintained in accordance with SmartWood standards. CAR 1-03, which was issued during the 2003 audit to address this problem, has been fully met and is closed.

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Timber harvests were conducted in 2004 on The Ranch and the RMC properties. A total of 2 mmbf of redwood and Douglas-fir sawlogs were harvested. About 1000 cords of tanoak and madrone firewood were also harvested. Harvesting was by tractor and tractor longlining. Conditions on the harvest areas visited were well within SmartWood standards. Mr. Paul continues to practice selection silviculture. Tree density and canopy closure are managed to enhance the growth rates of conifers and limit hardwood growth. Douglas-fir is thinned to favor redwood. Approximately 30-35% of the volume is removed during harvesting, which is less than what grew since the previous harvest. Regeneration of conifers is achieved by both natural and artificial means. Redwoods and hardwoods sprout vigorously following harvest. Redwood sprouts are thinned to enhance growth. Both conifers and hardwoods seed in naturally. To insure regeneration in a timely manner, conifers are generally inter-planted following harvests. Erosion control measures on roads, including waterbars, rolling dips, and surface rock, were adequate to prevent erosion of the road prism and sedimentation into the watercourses. The main road into The Ranch property was being rocked. Roads into the properties are gated to limit use during the wet season. Surveys for rare, threatened, and endangered species and California "species of concern" are done during timber harvest preparation. Populations and nest sites are protected from disturbance during harvesting operations. Based upon harvesting and management viewed at the sites visited, documents reviewed in the office, the certification assessment report, and the 2003 audit report, Mr. Paul has maintained SmartWood standards and should remain certified. 1.3 Status of Conditions and Corrective Action Requests (CARs) A. Compliance Summary of Previously Issued Conditions and CARs Condition 1: Met/Ongoing Condition 2: Closed Condition 3: Closed Condition 4: Closed Condition 5/CAR 2-03: Closed Condition 6: Closed Condition 7: Closed Conditions 8/CAR 3-03: Closed Condition 9: Closed Condition 10: Closed Condition 11: Closed

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Condition 12: Closed Condition 13/CAR 4-03: Closed Condition 14/CAR 1-03: Condition 15: Closed Condition 16: Closed Condition 19: Closed Condition 20: Closed Closed

B. New CARs Issued in this Audit None

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