Read F8168Mar11-orig.pdf text version

The Manager's Red Book Overview

Red Book Solutions and the National Restaurant Association have co-developed this book for the restaurant industry. This unique tool creates consistent habits for managers and staff to drive successful restaurant execution while keeping food safe and selling alcohol responsibly. Red Book Solutions has continued to provide:

· Easy-to-use top performance tools that ensure consistency for daily operations and create better practices and sustainability. · A communication vehicle to keep everyone on the team on the same page during every shift. · The ability to track food sales, costs, and employee trends, which provides a high level of accountability in the restaurant. The National Restaurant Association has lent its expertise to this book to help managers and staff provide comprehensive information regarding ServSafe® and ServSafe Alcohol®, the "Gold Standard" in food safety and responsible alcohol training, as well as Greener RestaurantsTM which provides ways to be more sustainable , and efficient in the operation. Throughout this book you will find useful information regarding food safety, responsible alcohol service, and tips regarding energy-savings, and efficiency, as well as helpful tools to help you continue your path to success. In addition to the National Restaurant Association help-line, information has been added on the following topics: · · · · Foodhandler's Illness Guidelines Preventative Maintenance and Cleaning Schedule Responsible Alcohol Information Greener Restaurants ­ "Focus on Energy" Checklist Look for these icons as an indicator of a Greener RestaurantsTM practice Energy icon Waste icon

SA MP

The ServSafe food safety tips are indicated by the following icons: 1. Purchasing food from approved sources 2. 3. 4. 5. Cooking food to the required minimum internal temperature Holding food at correct temperatures Using cleaned & sanitized equipment Practicing good personal hygiene ServSafe Alcohol tips are indicated by the following icon:

The Manager's Red Book

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©2010 National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. All rights reserved. May not be reproduced without permission of the National Restaurant Association. ServSafe, the ServSafe logo, ServSafe Alcohol, the ServSafe Alcohol logo, and ServSafe Starters are registered trademarks of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation, and used under license by National Restaurant Association Solutions, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Restaurant Association. Greener Restaurants and the Greener Restaurants logo are trademarks of the National Restaurant Association.

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Phone List

For consistent organization, move this page from your old Managers Red Book into your new book each time you change your book.

Number:

Page 1 of 2

· Poison Control · Minor Emergencies · Police/Fire · Red Book Solutions

____________________________________ · Hospital

____________________________________ · Alarm System

____________________________________ · Health Department

____________________________________ Contact: __________________________________________________________ 1-800-526-9635

· National Restaurant 1-800-765-2122 Association Help Line ____________________________________ Utilities

Phone Account #

· *Electric · *Water

_____________________ _____________________ · *Gas

_____________________ _____________________ · *Phone Co. _____________________ _____________________ *Safety Tip: Train all key employees to the location and method of shut-off, and have appropriate tools nearby. Phone Name Phone

Key Employees

Name

· _______________________________ __________________________ · ________________________________ __________________________ · _______________________________ __________________________ · ________________________________ __________________________ · _______________________________ __________________________ · ________________________________ __________________________ · _______________________________ __________________________ · ________________________________ __________________________

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Repair & Maintenance

Contact

Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office

Business Name

· Carpenter

___________________________

_____________________

· Contractor

___________________________

_____________________

· Electrician · Fix-It

___________________________

_____________________

Fold & Tear

___________________________

_____________________

· Grease Trap · HVAC

___________________________

_____________________

___________________________

_____________________

· Janitorial · Landlord

___________________________

_____________________

___________________________ ___________________________

_____________________ _____________________

· Landscape

· MIS/Computer Sup.___________________________ · Pest Control · Plumber

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

_____________________

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________

· Drain Cleaning · Signage

· Snow Removal

· Window Cleaning ___________________________ · Vent Hoods

___________________________

_____________________

_____________________

Locations For:

Main Water Shut Off: __________________________________

Main Circuit Breaker: __________________________________ Additional Breakers: ____________________________________

Additional Breakers: ____________________________________ Fire Alarm(s): ________________________________________

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Number: ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ Phone Account # _____________________ _____________________ Numbers:

Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other

Emergency and Other Important Numbers

___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

Fire Sprinklers: __________________________________________ Hold Up Alarms: ________________________________________

Hot Water Heater:________________________________________

Water Softener:__________________________________________ Outside Sprinkler Timer: __________________________________

Phone List

Food & Beverage

· CO2 · Food Vendor · Meat · Dairy · Bread/Bakery · Produce · Ice · Soft Drinks

___________________________ ___________________________ Business Name Contact Numbers:

Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other

Page 2 of 2

___________________________

___________________________

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

· Commissary/Cent. Dist. ___________________________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ Business Name

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Liquor, Beer & Wine

· ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________

Contact Numbers:

Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ Business Name

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_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________

Other Other Other Other

___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ Contact

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

Other Other Other Other

Fold & Tear

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Numbers:

Support Numbers

· Bank

Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office Office

Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other Other

___________________________

_____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

· Cable/Sat. Provider ___________________________ · Delivery (UPS, FedEx) ___________________________ · Knife Sharpening · Insurance

_____________________

_____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

___________________________ ___________________________

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________

· Benefit Provider #1 ___________________________ · Benefit Provider #2 ___________________________ · Linen

___________________________ ___________________________

_____________________ _____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

· Muzak.Music

· Printer/Copy Svc. · Taxi Service

___________________________

_____________________

___________________________

_____________________ _____________________

· Temporary Staffing ___________________________ · Trash Service

___________________________

_____________________

· ______________ · ______________ · ______________ · ______________

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

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Staff Phone List

Date: ___________________ Cooks

Page 1 of 2

Confidential

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Bus Person/Utility Phone Number Fold & Tear Greeters Phone Number

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Email Email

Phone Number

Email

Staff Phone List

Date: ___________________ Servers

Page 2 of 2

Confidential

Phone Number

SA MP

Bartenders Phone Number Managers Phone Number

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Email Fold & Tear Email Email

January M Tu W Th F

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

Sa Su

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

M Tu W Th F

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 2 9 16 23 3 10 17 24

April M Tu W Th F

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24

M Tu W Th F

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26

July M Tu W Th F

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31

M Tu W Th F

1 8 15 i 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25

SA MP

5 12 19 26

October

M Tu W Th F

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

Sa Su

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

M Tu W Th F

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24

Fold & Tear

7 14 21 28

Schedule Maintenance According to Keys 2 1 4

· Lubricate exhaust fan motor if needed · Check exhaust fan belts

2 Monthly/Period

· Inspect salt tank on water softener · Check exterior of building for paint/stain entrance and benches

1 Quarterly

· Check interior and exterior on a weekly basis to ensure that measures are in place to deny pests access into the operation. Contact PCO if problems are identified. For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 12.3-12.4

· Clean fryer hood, check grease collection reservoir and trough at least bi-weekly (recommended) · Check hood fan belts

· Lubricate hood bearings · Clean ice machine coils

· Clean all condenser coils

· Check all gaskets on cooling and warming units · Brix soda dispenser

· Check grease traps bi-weekly at minimum For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 10.9

· Inspect Fire Extinguisher

· Clean inside of ice machine, especially around the ice shoot. For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 11.2

· Water well testing For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 10.8

· Check drain lines for proper air gaps and indirect waste connections For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 10.8 to 10.9

· Check and clean cobra head, holder, and drain line for beverage dispenser weekly.

· Check and clean fountain dispenser heads weekly. For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 10.8 to 10.9

One person should be assigned to this area. These are suggested maintenance time lines. Indicate on the next pages what needs to be done this month.

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February March

3 10 17 24 31

2011 Preventative Maintenance/ Cleaning Schedule

Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

M Tu W Th F

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

4 11 18 25

4 11 18 25

May

June

2 9 16 23 30

Sa Su

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

M Tu W Th F

6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

3 10 17 24

August

September

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

Sa Su

6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

M Tu W Th F

6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

Sa Su

3 10 17 24 4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

November

4 11 18 25

December Sa Su

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

M Tu W Th F

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

4 Semi Annually

Annually · Change fans on exhaust and hoods · Clean burners on fryers · Complete ice machine service · Winterize sprinklers in the fall · Back flow checked domestic & fire · Fire extinguishers serviced · Boiler checked

· Inspect fire extinguishers · Inspect Ansul system

· Check HVAC condenser coils · Check HVAC drain fans · Clean salamander

· Change ice machine filters

· Calibrate oven, grill, and flat tops · Clean HVAC evaporator coils · Clean dish hood

· Meet with a PCO to set up an Integrated Pest Management program

· Pump on-site septic tanks

· External well construction inspection For information see ServSafe® 5E p. 10.8

· Clean ventilation duct work

2011 Annual Calendar

January M Tu W Th

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

February Sa Su

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

Sa-1 Th-6 M-17

March Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

F

7 14 21 28

M Tu W Th

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 2 9 16 23 3 10 17 24

New Year's Day Epiphany Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Groundhog Day Super Bowl XLV Lincoln's Birthday Valentine's Day Presidents' Day Washington's Birthday

April M Tu W Th

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

F

1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24

M Tu W Th

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26

SA MP

April Fools' Day Tax Day Palm Sunday Passover Begins Good Friday Easter Sunday Administrative Professionals Day F-1 F-15 Su-17 Tu-19 F-22 Su-24 W-27 Cinco de Mayo Mother's Day Armed Forces Day Memorial Day (observed) Th-5 Su-8 Sa-21 M-30

July

M Tu W Th

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

F

Sa Su

2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31

M Tu W Th

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25

1 8 15 22 29

Independence Day

M-4

Local schools and colleges begin this month. Watch for turnover. Plan for September labor and staffing changes.

October

M Tu W Th

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

F

Sa Su

1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30

M Tu W Th

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24

7 14 21 28

Yom Kippur Columbus Day (observed) National Boss Day Halloween

Sa-8 M-10 Su-16 M-31

General Election Day Veterans Day Thanksgiving Day Biggest Retail Shopping Day Advent Begins

Red Book Solutions®

4550 S. Windermere St. · Englewood, CO 80110 303-761-6975 · 800-526-9635 · Fax 303-761-6985 www.RedBookSolutions.biz

= Holidays = Days that may affect your business

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F M Tu W Th

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29 2 9 16 23 30 3 10 17 24 31

F

Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

4 11 18 25

4 11 18 25

W-2 Su-6 Sa-12 M-14 M-21 Tu-22

Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) Ash Wednesday St. Patrick's Day Spring Begins

Tu-8 W-9 Th-17 Su-20

May

June

2 9 16 23 30

F

Sa Su

7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

M Tu W Th

6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

F

Sa Su

4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

3 10 17 24

Children's Day Whit Sunday (Pentecost) Flag Day Trinity Sunday Father's Day Summer Begins

Su-12 Su-12 Tu-14 Su-19 Su-19 Tu-21

August

September F

2 9 16 23 30

F

Sa Su

6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

M Tu W Th

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

3 10 17 24 4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

Labor Day Grandparents' Day Independence Day (Mexico) Autumn Begins Rosh Hashanah Begins

M-5 Su-11 F-16 F-23 Th-29

November F

4 11 18 25

December F

2 9 16 23 30

Sa Su

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27

M Tu W Th

5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28 1 8 15 22 29

Sa Su

3 10 17 24 31 4 11 18 25

Tu-8 F-11 Th-24 F-25 Su-27

Hanukkah Begins Winter Begins Christmas Eve Christmas Day 2nd Biggest Retail Shopping Day Kwanzaa Begins New Year's Eve

W-21 W-21 Sa-24 Su-25 M-26 M-26 Sa-31

KEY:

Notes 1. Open 2. Mid 3. Mid 4. Close X--Off R--Request Off V--Vacation

Monday

1. _______________ _____

Encourage foodhandlers to report any health problems before they come to work, or ensure that they notify you immediately if they get sick while working.

2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

SA MP

Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday)

If:

A foodhandler has a sore throat with a fever.

Then:

66/299

· Restrict the foodhandler from working with or around food. · Exclude the foodhandler from the operation if you primarily serve a high-risk population.

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

If:

A foodhandler has at least one of these symptoms. · Vomiting · Diarrhea · Jaundice

Then:

· Exclude the foodhandler from the operation. Before returning to work, foodhandlers who vomited or experienced diarrhea must meet one of these requirements. · Have had no symptoms for at least 24 hours · Have a written release from a medical practitioner Foodhandlers with jaundice must have a written release from a medical practitioner before they can go back to work.

73/292

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

80/285

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

87/278

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Tuesday Wednesday

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

60/305

c

February 2011

Manager's Schedule March 2011

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

1

61/304

2

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

Ash Wednesday

7

67/298

8

68/297

9

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

14

74/291

15

75/290

16

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

21

81/284

22

82/283

23

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

28

88/277

29

89/276

30

Thursday

Friday

1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

62/303

3

63/302

1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

SA MP

69/296

10

70/295

1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

St. Patrick's Day Spring Begins

76/289

17

77/288

1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

83/282

24

84/281

1. _______________ _____ 2. _______________ _____ 3. _______________ _____ 4. _______________ _____

90/275

31

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Saturday Sunday

Manager's Schedule March 2011

y

April 2011

Mgr Int

4

64/301

5

65/300

6

11

71/294

12

72/293

13

18

78/287

19

79/286

20

25

85/280

26

86/279

27

Four-Year U.S. Holiday Planner

Use this page and your previous records to track and plan your holiday business.

2010

January

F-1 New Year's Day M-18 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

2011

January

Sa-1

New Year's Day

M-17 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

February

Tu-2 F-12 Groundhog Day Lincoln's Birthday

February

W-2

Groundhog Day

Sa-12 Lincoln's Birthday M-14 Valentine's Day M-21 Presidents' Day Tu-22 Washington's Birthday

Su-14 Valentine's Day M-15 Presidents' Day Tu-16 Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) W-17 Ash Wednesday M-22 Washington's Birthday

March

Tu-8 W-9

Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) Ash Wednesday

March

W-17 St. Patrick's Day Su-28 Palm Sunday Tu-30 Passover begins

Th-17 St. Patrick's Day

SA MP

Su-17 Palm Sunday F-22 Good Friday Su-1 F-6 Sa-7 Palm Sunday Good Friday

April

April

F-2 Su-4

Tu-19 Passover begins Su-24 Easter Sunday

Good Friday

Easter Sunday

W-21 Administrative Professionals Day

W-27 Administrative Professionals Day

May

W-5 Su-9

May

Th-5 Su-8

Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo

Mother's Day

Mother's Day

M-31 Memorial Day observed

M-30 Memorial Day observed

June

June

M-14 Flag Day

Tu-14 Flag Day

Su-20 Father's Day

Su-19 Father's Day

July

Su-4

July

M-4

Independence Day

Independence Day

August

None M-6

August

None M-5

September

Th-9

September

Labor Day

Labor Day

Rosh Hashanah begins

Th-29 Rosh Hashanah begins

Sa-18 Yom Kippur

October

Sa-8

October

Yom Kippur

M-11 Columbus Day Sa-16 Boss's Day Su-31 Halloween

M-10 Columbus Day Su-16 Boss's Day M-31 Halloween

November

Tu-2

November

Tu-8 F-11

Election Day

Election Day

Th-11 Veterans Day

Veterans Day

Th-25 Thanksgiving Day

Th-24 Thanksgiving Day

December

Th-2

December

Hanukkah begins

W-21 Hanukkah begins Su-25 Christmas M-26 Kwanzaa begins

Sa-25 Christmas

Su-26 Kwanzaa begins

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2012

Su-1

2013

Tu-1

January

January

New Year's Day

New Year's Day

M-16 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

M-21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

February

Th-2

February

Sa-2

Groundhog Day

Groundhog Day

Su-12 Lincoln's Birthday Tu-14 Valentine's Day M-20 Presidents' Day

Tu-12 Lincoln's Birthday/ Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) W-13 Ash Wednesday Th-14 Valentine's Day M-18 Presidents' Day F-22 Washington's Birthday

Tu-21 Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) W-22 Ash Wednesday W-22 Washington's Birthday

March April

March

Sa-17 St. Patrick's Day

Su-17 St. Patrick's Day Su-24 Palm Sunday F-29 Good Friday Tu-26 Passover begins Su-31 Easter Sunday

Passover begins

Su-8

Easter Sunday

April

W-24 Administrative Professionals Day

W-25 Administrative Professionals Day

May

Sa-5

May

Su-5 Cinco de Mayo Su-12 Mother's Day M-27 Memorial Day observed

Cinco de Mayo

Su-13 Mother's Day

M-28 Memorial Day observed

June

June

F-14 Flag Day Su-16 Father's Day

Th-14 Flag Day

Su-17 Father's Day

July

W-4

Independence Day

July

Th-4 None Independence Day

August

None M-3

August September

M-2 Th-5 Labor Day Rosh Hashanah begins

September

Labor Day

M-17 Rosh Hashanah begins W-26 Yom Kippur

October

M-8

Sa-14 Yom Kippur

Columbus Day

October

M-14 Columbus Day W-16 Boss's Day Th-31 Halloween

Tu-16 Boss's Day W-31 Halloween

November

Tu-6

Election Day

November

Tu-5 Election Day M-11 Veterans Day Th-28 Thanksgiving Day Th-28 Hanukkah begins

Su-11 Veterans Day

Th-22 Thanksgiving Day

December

Su-9

Hanukkah begins

Tu-25 Christmas

December

W-25 Christmas Th-26 Kwanzaa begins

W-26 Kwanzaa begins

NRA Members ­ Thanks for your continued support and please be sure to check www.restaurant.org often for new programs and services. If you are not a member of the NRA, join today and receive automatic membership in your state restaurant association ­ that's two memberships in one! Learn more at www.restaurant.org/join or call 800-424-5156.

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Phone

(334) 244-1320 (602) 307-9134 (907) 274-8133 (501) 376-2323 (916) 447-5793 (303) 830-2972 (860) 278-8008 (302) 738-2545 (202) 331-5990 (850) 224-2250 (404) 467-9000 (808) 944-9105 (208) 342-0010 (317) 673-4211 (312) 787-4000 (515) 276-1454 (316) 267-8383 (504) 454-2277 (207) 623-2178 (502) 896-0464 (410) 290-6800 (508) 303-9905 (517) 482-5244 (651) 778-2400 (601) 420-4210 (406) 256-1005 (402) 488-3999 (314) 576-2777 (702) 878-2313 (603) 228-9585 (609) 599-3316 (505) 343-9848 (518) 452-4222 (919) 844-0098 (701) 223-3313 (614) 442-3535 (405) 942-8181 (503) 682-4422 (787) 783-9640 (401) 223-1120 (803) 765-9000 (615) 385-9970 (512) 457-4100 (801) 274-7309 (802) 223-3443 (804) 288-3065 (304) 342-6511 (717) 232-4433 (605) 224-5050 (360) 956-7279 (608) 270-9950 (307) 634-8816 (340) 774-6835

National Restaurant Association (NRA) and State Restaurant Association (SRA) Membership Information

March

State

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA

State Restaurant Association Name

Alabama Restaurant Association Arizona Restaurant Association Arkansas Hospitality Association California Restaurant Association Colorado Restaurant Association Connecticut Restaurant Association Delaware Restaurant Association Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Georgia Restaurant Association Hawaii Restaurant Association Idaho Lodging and Restaurant Association Illinois Restaurant Association Indiana Restaurant Association Iowa Restaurant Association

Alaska Cabaret, Hotel, Restaurant and Retailers Association

Restaurant Association of Metropolitan Washington

SA MP

KS Kansas Restaurant and Hospitality Association KY LA Kentucky Restaurant Association Maine Restaurant Association Louisiana Restaurant Association ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ Restaurant Association of Maryland Michigan Restaurant Association Massachusetts Restaurant Association Minnesota Restaurant Association Missouri Restaurant Association Mississippi Hospitality and Restaurant Association Montana Restaurant Association Nebraska Restaurant Association Nevada Restaurant Association New Hampshire Lodging & Restaurant Association New Jersey Restaurant Association NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI PR SC New Mexico Restaurant Association New York State Restaurant Association North Dakota Hospitality Association Ohio Restaurant Association Oklahoma Restaurant Association Oregon Restaurant Association North Carolina Restaurant & Lodging Association Pennsylvania Restaurant Association Puerto Rico Restaurant Association (ASORE) Hospitality Association of South Carolina Rhode Island Hospitality and Tourism Association SD South Dakota Retailers Association Restaurant Division TN TX UT VT VA Tennessee Hospitality Association Texas Restaurant Association Utah Restaurant Association Vermont Hospitality Council of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce Virginia Hospitality and Travel Association Washington Restaurant Association Wisconsin Restaurant Association WA WI WV WY West Virginia Hospitality and Travel Association Wyoming Lodging & Restaurant Association USVI US Virgin Islands Hotel & Tourism Association

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Who has scheduled time off?

March

Requested Days Off

Friday, January 1st

1/364

December

1

· New Year's Day

36x

January

February

Notes from Management

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Name

Position

Reason For Request

Saturday, January 2nd

2/363

SA MP

Notes from Management

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2

Name

Position

Reason For Request

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Benefits

· Eliminates undocumented or forgotten requests. · Managers approve or deny all requests. · Reason for request helps managers determine flexibility and priority. · Increases accountability among employees. · Easy to understand and at-a-glance format.

Features

· The Requested Days Off Book is bound biannually and is available January­June and July­December or from October­March and April­September. · Each day features 15 lines per day to be filled in with employee's name, reason for request, date requested, and manager approval.

This is another tool for the manager who never stops in the search for better results. It is made with sturdy construction, attention to detail, and the devotion to customer service that Red Book Solutions® puts into every product.

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· 15 lines for each day · Bound bi-annually · Legal size

Date Requested Manager Approval

Other

Products

Sunday, January 3rd

3/362

3

Notes from Management

36x

January

December February

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Name

Position

Reason For Request

Date Requested

Manager Approval

Date Requested

Manager Approval

Monday, January 4th

4/361

4

Notes from Management

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Name

Position

Reason For Request

Date Requested

Manager Approval

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For more information, or to order the Requested Days Off book, visit our web site at www.RedBookSolutions.biz or call 800-526-9635

ServSafe Food Safety Tools

Food Safety Tools

Below is a list of recommended tools to help you keep food safe in your operation: · Thermometers (bimetallic or thermocouples with appropriate probes) · Storage labels

· Color-coded cleaning and sanitizing buckets (green for detergent solutions and red for sanitizer solutions)

· Color-coded cleaning towels (e.g., green towel for cleaning, white towel for rinsing, and red towel for sanitizing) · Color-coded utensils (to prevent contamination and cross-contact) · Color-coded cutting boards (to prevent cross-contamination) · Food-grade utensils and equipment

· Chemical labels (e.g., labels for small containers when chemicals from original containers are poured into them) · Single-use gloves (different sizes--small, medium, and large) · Temperature-controlled storage containers for off-site service · Hair restraints · Aprons

SA MP

· Bandages and finger cots · Clock with a second hand (in dishwashing area) · Hanging thermometer for coolers and freezers · Proper storage for ice scoops · Ice paddles · Labeled utensils for self-service areas · Handwashing signage (reminding employees to wash hands) · Shatter-resistant lightbulbs or protective covers over lights in food-prep areas · Cleaners that are appropriate for restaurant use · Appropriate test kits for the sanitizers being used · Nylon scouring pads · Copy of state and local food safety regulations · Food safety job aids and posters for employees

· Prep timers (to monitor the time that food stays in the temperature danger zone during preparation)

Master Cleaning Program

· What should be cleaned · Who should clean it

It is a best practice to have a master cleaning program that includes the following:

· When it should be cleaned · How it should be cleaned

Employees should receive training on the program, and the program itself should be monitored for effectiveness.

Training Employees

With regard to employee training, you should do the following:

· Provide initial and on-going food safety training for all employees. All employees need general food safety knowledge, while other knowledge will be task-specific. · Keep records of all food safety training that is carried out in your operation.

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This self-assessment can help you address the five risk factors identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as well as other food safety risks in your organization. It will also help you develop SOPs, policies, and useful food safety programs. Once you are finished, any question that is answered NO should be prioritized and addressed. This evaluation should be completed monthly, with a goal of reaching 100% compliance. Evaluated By: ______________________________ Time of Evaluation: _________________________

Question

CDC Risk Factor--Purchasing Food From Unsafe Sources

1. Are you purchasing food from suppliers that get their products from approved sources (sources that are government inspected)? 2. Do you ensure that your suppliers are reputable? 3. Have you reviewed the most recent inspection reports for your suppliers? 4. Are your products being received at proper temperatures? 5. Do your suppliers deliver during off-peak hours?

SA MP

CDC Risk Factor--Failing To Cook Food Adequately 6. Are time and temperature controls part of every employee's job? 7. Are time and temperature controls incorporated into your SOPs? 8. Are calibrated thermometers available to all foodhandlers? 9. Do you calibrate thermometers regularly and document results? 10. Do all employees know how to use thermometers? 11. Do you cook TCS food to the required minimum internal temperature? 12. Do you reheat TCS food that will be hot-held to 165ºF (74ºC) for fifteen seconds within two hours? CDC Risk Factor--Holding Food At Incorrect Temperature 13. Do you regularly check food that has been received to ensure it is at the correct receiving temperature? 14. Do you document product temperatures in a temperature log or line check? 15. Do you store TCS food at its required storage temperature? 17. Do you thaw food correctly? 16. Are you discarding food properly if you use time as a method of control? 18. Do you hold TCS food at the right temperature (41ºF [5ºC] or lower or 135ºF [57ºC] or higher)? 19. Do you cool cooked TCS food according to the required time and temperature requirements? CDC Risk Factor--Using Contaminated Equipment 20. Do you use only food-grade equipment? (Recommend NSF mark or the UL classified or UL EPH listed marks). 21. Do your employees store wiping cloths in a sanitizer solution between uses? 23. Do your employees know how to use the sanitizer in your operation? 24. Are your chemicals properly labeled and stored? 22. Do your employees know how often to clean and sanitize food-contact surfaces? 25. Do your dishwashing employees know how to use the dishwashing machine? 27. Do your employees know how to clean nonfood-contact surfaces? 29. Do you have a master cleaning schedule in place? 26. Do your dishwashing employees know how to clean and sanitize in a three-compartment sink? 28. Do your employees know how to store clean and sanitized utensils, tableware, and equipment? 30. Do you assign specific equipment to each type of food product used in your operation? 31. Do you clean and sanitize all work surfaces, equipment, and utensils after each task?

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Evaluation Yes No 6.2 Yes No 6.2 6.4 6.2 Yes No 6.2 Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No 5.4 5.4 5.8 5.9 to 5.10 5.6 to 5.11 7.9 7.16 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No 6.4 to 6.6 5.4 6.9 to 6.10 8.3 to 8.4 7.2 8.2 7.14 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No 10.5 11.13 11.3 4.9 11.14 11.7 and 11.8 11.9 11.12 11.10 11.15 5.3 5.3

March 2011 ServSafe® Food Safety Evaluation Checklist

Page 1 of 2

Date of Evaluation: ______________________________ M.O.D. Signature: _______________________________

Page Reference in ServSafe® Essentials 5th Edition

Question

CDC Risk Factor--Practicing Poor Personal Hygiene

32. Do your handwashing stations have the necessary tools and supplies? 33. Are all employees aware of how they can contaminate food? 35. Are all employees aware of when handwashing is required? 34. Do all employees follow the correct procedure for handwashing?

36. Do all employees follow hand maintenance procedures, such as keeping nails short and clean, covering cuts and sores, and removing jewelry from hands and arms? 37. Do you provide the right type of gloves for handling food in your operation? 38. Do employees change gloves when necessary? 40. Do your employees wear hair restraints? 39. Do your employees meet the requirements for proper work attire? 41. Do you require employees to maintain personal cleanliness?

SA MP

42. Do you prohibit employees from eating, smoking, and chewing gum or tobacco in food-prep and dishwashing areas? 43. Do you have policies to address employee illnesses? 44. Do you model proper foodhandling behaviors at all times? General Food Safety Practices 45. Do you minimize the amount of time food spends in the temperature danger zone (41°F to 135°F [5ºC to 57ºC])? 46. Do you store raw meat, seafood, and poultry and ready-to-eat food in ways that prevent cross-contamination? (i.e., storing ready-to-eat above raw product, and covering stored food, etc.) 47. Do you properly label all food prepped in house? 48. Do your employees avoid bare hand contact with ready-to-eat food? (i.e., using gloves, tongs, deli sheets, etc.)

Fail Number

Corrective Actions Steps

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________ _____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

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Evaluation Yes No 10.7 4.5 4.6 Yes No 4.2 and 4.3 Yes Yes No No Yes No 4.7 Yes No 4.8 Yes No 4.9 Yes No 4.10 4.9 4.11 4.12 4.4 Yes No 4.10 Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No 5.4 6.11 6.8 4.11

March 2011 ServSafe® Food Safety Evaluation Checklist

Page 2 of 2

Page Reference in ServSafe® Essentials 5th Edition

Completed By ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________ ___________________

March ServSafe® Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Checklist

There are three basic rules for an IPM program. 1. Deny pests access to the operation. 2. Deny pests food, water, and a hiding or nesting place. 3. Work with a licensed Pest Control Operator (PCO) to eliminate pests that do enter the operation. This checklist will help you identify problems, so you can communicate them to your PCO.

Date:____________________________________ Completed By:____________________________________

Question Evaluation

PCO

1. Do you have a PCO? 2. Is your PCO licensed (if required by the state)? 3. Have you checked references for your PCO? 4.

SA MP

Interior 5. Are there openings around pipes in walls? Are there cracks in floors and walls? 6. Are floor drains covered with hinged grates? 7. 8. Are there spaces or cracks where stationary equipment is fitted to the floor? Are garbage containers clean and in good condition? 9. 10. Are food and supplies stored away from walls and at least 6 inches (15 cm) off the floor? Are products stored according to First-In-First-Out (FIFO)? Are cleaning tools and supplies clean and dry? 11. 12. 13. Are wet mops stored on hooks instead of on the floor? Exterior 14. Are all deliveries checked for pests or signs of pests (egg cases or body parts) before they enter the operation? Do all exterior doors have self-closing devices and door sweeps? Are there openings around pipes in walls? Are there cracks in floors and walls? 15. 16. 18. 20. 21. Are all windows and vents screened with at least sixteen mesh per square-inch screening? 17. Are there cracks and gaps in doorframes and thresholds? Do ventilation pipes and ducts on the roof have screens? 19. Are all exterior openings closed tightly when not in use? (i.e., self-closing drive-thru windows) Are outside garbage containers tightly covered with drain plugs in place? 22. 23. Are recyclables stored in clean, pest-proof containers? 24. Are recyclables stored as far away from the building as local regulations allow? Do you see droppings that look like grains of black pepper? Signs of Pests 25. 26. 27. 29. 30. Do you see capsule-shaped egg cases that are brown, dark red, or black and appear leathery, smooth, or shiny? Do you smell a strong oily odor? Do you see gnaw marks? Have you seen cockroaches during daylight? 28. Do you see dirt tracks along light-colored walls? 31. Do you see nests? (i.e., made of materials such as cloth, hair, feathers, grass, scraps of paper) 32. Do you see holes next to the building? 33. Do you see droppings that are grey or shiny and black?

Before signing a contract, has the PCO done the following? · Explained what the pest problem is · Determined how bad the problem is · Identified what must be done to correct it

Fail Number

Corrective Actions Steps

_____________________ _____________________ _____________________

___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________

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Yes No 12.6 Yes No 12.6 Yes No 12.6 Yes No 12.6 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No No 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.4 12.2 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.3 12.4 and 10.11 12.4 12.4 12.6 12.6 12.6 12.6 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.7 12.7 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Page Reference in ServSafe® Essentials 5th Edition

Completed By

___________________ ___________________ ___________________

Repair and Maintenance Log

Invoice # Date Completed Follow Up Needed

Date

Manager

Equipment

Repair/Maintenance Needed

Vendor Called for Repair

Estimated Cost

Actual Cost

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

$

SA MP

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Total $___________________

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March · 2011 Monthly Sales and Cost Tracking

Week 1

LY TY Goals TY Actual Variance *

Lunch Sales Week 2

LY TY Goals TY Actual Variance *

Dinner Sales

Lunch Sales Week 3

LY TY Goals TY Actual Variance *

Dinner Sales

SA MP

Lunch Sales Dinner Sales Total Sales FOH Labor % Week 4

LY TY Goals TY Actual Variance *

Lunch Sales

Dinner Sales

Week 5

LY

TY Goals

TY Actual

Variance *

Lunch Sales

Dinner Sales

Month End

LY

TY Goals

TY Actual

Variance *

If a goal is not met resulting in a variance ­ indicate reason for variance and assign action needed.

Category

Reason for Variance and Action Needed

GM: _____________________

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Total Sales FOH Labor % HOH Labor % Total Sales FOH Labor % HOH Labor % HOH Labor % Total Sales FOH Labor % HOH Labor % Total Sales FOH Labor % HOH Labor % Assigned To

/

Lunch Sales

Dinner Sales

Total Sales

FOH Labor %

HOH Labor %

Total Labor %

Total Labor %

Total Labor %

Total Labor %

Total Labor %

Total Labor %

Complete Date/Initial

______________________

______________________

Food & Liquor Cost Analysis

Beginning Inventory

Grocery/ Staples Produce Dairy Beef Poultry Pork Seafood Beverages

+ Purchases

­ Ending Inventory

= Cost of Goods Sold

Food Cost %

Goal

Variance

Total Food Beginning Inventory

Bar Supplies Wine Beer

+ Purchases

­ Ending Inventory

SA MP

Liquor

Total Alcohol

Total Cost of ÷ Goods & Alcohol Sold

Total Gross Sales

=

Dollar Impact (Sales × Variance) %_______________ Theoretical Food Cost %_______________ Last Month's Food Cost %_______________

Food Cost Variance Action Steps

Food Category Assigned To

1 2 3 4 5 6

Monthly Waste $: ____________________________ ÷ Food Sales = Waste %: __________________________

___________________________________________

________________________________ ___________________________________________ Areas to Watch (Portioning, Purchases, Waste, Comps., Theft, Receiving)

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Kitchen Lead:________________________________________________ Bar Lead:________________________________________________ Owner/Operator:________________________________________________

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÷ Gross Food Sales $_________ = Cost of Goods Sold Food Cost % Goal ÷ Gross Alcohol Sales $_________ Total Cost % Goal Variance Action Steps

Variance

Going Green can save restaurants thousands of dollars a year.

10

Ways

under running water.

Simple Ways to begin Saving Energy Dollars

Savings

Eight incandescent lights used for 16 hours a day at $0.13 per kWh costs $607 per year vs eight CFL's at the same rate costs $164 per year.

1. Replace incandescent lights with compact fluorescents.

SA MP

2. Label all equipment with turn on and off times. 3. Turn off equipment during off peak hours.

save around $450 annually.

4. Allow time for product to thaw in the walk-in instead of

5. Use programmable thermostats. 6. Close the lid on your prep table.

7. Use a broom instead of a hose to clean sidewalks. 8. Switch to low-flow pre-rinse spray valves. 9. Wash full loads of dishware.

10. Use strip curtains and automatic door closers on

walk-ins and freezer.

Use the following "Focus on Energy" Checklist to see where your restaurant stands.

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Reducing a broilers "on" time by one hour each day can annually for a gas fryer and $350 for an electric fryer. energy as a 60 watt light bulb for 14 hours. According to Energy Star estimates, proper use of a programmable thermostat can save up to $100 annually. Leaving the lid up on your prep table could increase electricity consumption by up to 50%. of water. Low spray valves can save up to $1000 annually. You pay the same amount for a half load as a full load. Washing only full loads can save hundreds of dollars annually. infiltration by up to 75%.

It's Time To Go Green

FSTC has observed that kitchen fryers spend 75% of the day idling. Reducing idle time by four hours a day can save $250

Running a water faucet for 5 minutes uses nearly as much

Using a broom instead of a hose can save up to 80 gallons

They are inexpensive, easy to install and can cut outside air

"Focus on Energy " Checklist

Page 1 of 3

This self-assessment can help you manage your energy usage and cost. The foodservice industry uses five times more energy than any other retail segment. Typically, most of a restaurant's energy is used in the back of the house, or the kitchen. Equipment, refrigeration, exhaust hood systems, lighting, water heating, HVAC and appliances are some of the largest consumers of energy in your restaurant, so why not begin there in order to start becoming a little bit Greener?! Performed By: _______________________________________________ Date: _______________________________________________________ Time of Evaluation: __________________________________________ Manager: ___________________________________________________

Question Task Completed

Lighting

1. Front of the House Lighting ­ Dining Room, Host and Server Areas, Restrooms: a. Do you turn "on/off" Dining Room lights as needed before the start and after the end of operating hours? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm

GREENER TIP: Turn Dining Room lights "on" 10­15 minutes before the start of the business day and "off" after the conclusion of the business day. Turn "on/off" after business hours as needed. Turn "on/off" any decorative lighting, neon signs, menu boards, and all other signage that utilizes lighting. Keep any additional lighting "off" until needed or desired by guests. Example: table lamps, patio lighting, accent lighting, warmers, etc. b. Are occupancy sensors or lighting set on timers and programmed correctly? (Typically, these are found in the restrooms and other places of low volume or that experience long stretches of unoccupied time.) Y / N

2. Back of the House Lighting: Are you ensuring any lighting located on the back dock, receiving area, and/or waste collection area are being used as needed or are set on timers? 3. Parking Lot Lights: If you have your parking lot lights on a timer, are the "on" and "off" times set correctly? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm

SA MP

Refrigeration -- Walk-in Coolers/Freezers/Line Units/Specialized Refrigeration

5. Walk-in Doors: Have you inspected, maintained, and/or repaired walk-in doors? 7. Defrost: Are defrost controls set correctly to ensure the defrost cycle works properly? 9. Ice Machine: If your ice machine operates on a timer, are your "on/off" times set correctly? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm

4. Maintaining and Replacing Lights: Have you identified, maintained, and/or replaced any dining room and/or outdoor lighting that is no longer functioning correctly?

GREENER TIP: When replacing light bulbs, whenever possible use CFL or LED lighting in both the front and back of the house. Both CFL and LED lighting use less energy than incandescent lighting and come in a variety models, colors, shapes, sizes, and wattages.

GREENER TIP: 1. Inspect doors periodically throughout the business day and ensure that the auto-close door hinge is engaged and functioning properly. 2. Inspect door to ensure it closes properly, is aligned properly, and can seal properly each time it's used. 3. Inspect, maintain, repair and/or replace door gaskets. Make sure gaskets are not cracked and are free of any debris. 4. Inspect, maintain, repair and/or replace air curtains. Make sure air curtains are securely mounted, and that they are cleaned and sanitized. 6. Refrigeration and Freezer Temperatures: Are walk-ins set to the proper temperature in order to ensure food safety and reduce overall energy usage? (If the walk-in temperature is set too low, the walk-in will be over-cooled and use more energy than needed.) Y / N

8. Coils and Evaporator Fans: Are they functioning without any additional stress being placed on compressors due to accumulated debris?

GREENER TIP: Install a timer on your ice machine so that it can be regularly powered down during off-peak hours to save energy and potentially a lot of money!

Diswashing Area

10. Dishwasher: Do you turn "on" the dishwasher as needed or 30 minutes prior to opening? a. Do you run only full racks of dishes through the dishwasher whenever possible? a. Is your booster water heater set to the correct temperature?

11. Booster Heater: Do you turn "on/off" the booster water heater in conjunction with turning "on/off' the dishwasher?

Appliances -- Start-Up/Shut-Down Schedule

12. Appliances: a. Do you inspect, calibrate, repair, and maintain all equipment/appliances? Do you adjust air shutters and pilot lights to proper flame length on gas appliances? (You want flames to be hard and blue, not soft and yellow.) b. Do you inspect all appliances and check/set temperatures for each piece of equipment as applicable? c. Do you turn "on/off" equipment as needed or at times designed?

GREENER TIP: Stagger-start appliances and equipment whenever possible by setting 15-30 minute intervals between powering up each piece of equipment/appliance. Stagger-starting equipment not only reduces your overall energy usage, it can also reduce the rate in which your restaurant is charged per kilowatt hour.

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Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N

"Focus on Energy " Checklist

Question

Page 2 of 3

Appliances -- Start-Up/Shut-Down Schedule (cont.)

d. Exhaust Hood On time ___________am/pm e. Griddle On time ___________am/pm f. Holding Cabinets On time ___________am/pm g. Ovens On time ___________am/pm h. Dishwasher On time ___________am/pm i. Fryer #1 On time ___________am/pm j. Fryer #2 On time ___________am/pm k. Fryer #3 On time ___________am/pm

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

SA MP

Off time ___________am/pm or to volume l. Line Reach-In Cooler #1 On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume m. Line Reach-In Cooler #2 On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume n. Line Reach-In Freezer On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume o. Broiler On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume Flame p. Salamander On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume Flame q. Steamer On time ___________am/pm Off time ___________am/pm or to volume r. Mixer On time ___________am/pm or as needed Off time ___________am/pm or to volume s. Heat Lamp(s) On time ___________am/pm or as needed Off time ___________am/pm or to volume

GREENER TIP: After you have powered down the equipment for the business day, unplugging equipment/appliances will also help you reduce energy consumption. Equipment, appliances, and many electrical devices use energy even when they are not on. This energy consumption is called "phantom load." Some examples of devices and appliances that contribute to phantom loads include some brewing machine models, appliances with a digital display and/or stand-by function, receipt printers, etc.

General/HVAC/Other

13. Room Temperatures: Are your temperatures for occupied and unoccupied room temperature set correctly on your programmable or manual thermostat and is your thermostat functioning properly? a. Occupied temperature (during business hours) set to _________° b. Unoccupied temperature set to _________° Note: If you have a manual thermostat, do you have a daily schedule to change the temperature setting for occupied and unoccupied time periods? Consider installing a programmable thermostat. a. Occupied temperature set to _________°

14. Energy Management System: If you have a system, are the system settings programmed and functioning correctly? b. Unoccupied temperature set to _________°

GREENER TIP: Set Occupied Heating Setpoints to 68°F and Unoccupied Heating to 55°F Set Occupied Cooling Setpoints to 75°F and Unoccupied Cooling to 85°F

15. TVs and Monitors/Dining Room Music: a. Do you turn televisions and/or monitors "on" as needed or 10­15 minutes before the start of business and "off" whenever possible or following the conclusion of business? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm b. Do you turn on your dining room music system 10­15 minutes before the start of business and "off" following the conclusion of business? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm

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Clean filters daily Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Temperature___________° Y / N Y / N Y / N

If connectionless, fill with ________ of water before turning on steamer.

Task Completed

Y / N

Y / N

Y / N

Y / N

Y / N Y / N

Y / N

Y / N

"Focus on Energy " Checklist

Question

Page 3 of 3

General/HVAC/Other (cont.)

16. Ceiling Fans: Do you turn ceiling fans "on" as needed or 10­15 minutes before the start of business and "off" as needed and/or following the conclusion of the business day? Time on ___________am/pm Time off ___________am/pm

Other Opportunities to be Greener in the Kitchen

17. Exit Signs: Do you have LED exit signs? 18. Hot Water Heaters: Do you optimize your hot water heater? b. Is the hot water heater insulated? c. Are your hot water pipes insulated?

a. Is the thermostat set to the lowest temperature required by your equipment and allowed by the health codes?

d. Do you have a timer control on the recirculation pump?

19. Dipper Wells: Do you turn "on" dipper well only when needed? b. Do you use only cold water? c. Do you turn "off" per volume?

a. Do you set water flow rate to the slowest rate possible while maintaining a constant stream?

Action Items

Item # Action

SA MP

Resources Available to Assist in Becoming a Greener Restaurant

Greener Restaurants - Sustainability Education for the Foodservice Industry National Restaurant Association Conserve: Solutions for Sustainability U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) ENERGY STAR

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_________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________ _________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________

Pacific Gas & Electric's Food Service Technology Center ­ Promoting Energy Efficiency in Foodservice (FSTC)

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Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N Y / N

Task Completed

Assigned To

Website

www.greenerrestaurants.com http://conserve.restaurant.org/ http://www.fishnick.com/ http://www.energystar.gov/

Monthly Notes

SA MP

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Fold & Tear

(Remove and retain in file cabinet)

Restaurant: ________________________

Signature of "Deposit Ticket Verified By"

Store Deposit Log March · 2011

Verification Date on Ticket GM Initial

Date

Deposit Amount

Signature of "Prepared By"

Signature of "Taken to Bank By"

Deposit Bag #

Date Taken to Bank

Armored Car Pick Up

3/1/11 3/2/11

3/3/11

3/4/11 3/5/11

3/6/11 3/7/11

3/8/11 3/9/11

3/10/11 3/11/11

3/12/11 3/13/11

3/14/11 3/15/11

3/16/11 3/17/11

3/18/11 3/19/11

SA MP LE

3/20/11 3/21/11

3/22/11 3/23/11

3/24/11 3/25/11

3/26/11 3/27/11

3/28/11 3/29/11

3/30/11 3/31/11

Deposit log must be completed immediately before and after each trip to the bank.

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Fold & Tear (Remove and retain in file cabinet)

Date Drawer 1 Cash Received Deposit Amount +/Mgr. Drawer 2 Drawer 1 Drawer 2 3/1/11 3/2/11 3/3/11 3/4/11 3/5/11 3/6/11 3/7/11 3/8/11 3/9/11 3/10/11 3/11/11 3/12/11 3/13/11 3/14/11 3/15/11 3/16/11 3/17/11 3/18/11 3/19/11 3/20/11 3/21/11 3/22/11 3/23/11 3/24/11 3/25/11 3/26/11 3/27/11 3/28/11 3/29/11 3/30/11 3/31/11

Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results: Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results:

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Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results: Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results:

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Morning

Petty Cash

Safe Cash Log March · 2011

Mid Shift

Cash Received Deposit Amount +/-

Any variance over or under $___________ must be reported to ____________________ and documented below.

Night

Petty Cash

Mgr.

Drawer 1

Drawer 2

Petty Cash

Cash Received

Deposit Amount

+/-

Mgr.

Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results: Date: Shift: Mgr.: Results:

Guest Incident or Accident Report

Restaurant Location: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Day, Date and Time: _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Name: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone Number(s): ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Email: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Occurrence: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

SA MP

Witnesses Statement:

Name:_____________________________________ Phone #: (_______) _______-__________ Fold & Tear

Address: ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Statement: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Fill out this section of this report if alcohol was involved and intervention was requested

Beer Wine Liquor

Number of drinks served (exact or approximate):_______________ within _______________ hours Check One:

NOTE: If a copy of the bill is available, attach it to this report.

1.

What was the first change in the guest's behavior that suggested that an intervention strategy was appropriate? __________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2.

Describe the intervention strategies used (check all that are appropriate): Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No Alternative drinks offered

Alternative drinks accepted Food offered

No No

Food accepted

Alternative transportation offered (please list options discussed): ____________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________

Yes Yes Yes

No No No

Alternative transportation accepted Police called

Medical Attention required

Intervention strategies used other than above:

Bartender Signature_______________________________________ M.O.D. ______________________________________________

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Report Number: _______________________________

Use this form to report any personal injuries, near misses, dangerous occurrences, accidents or guest illness that took place in or around the restaurant.

If yes, list items? _______________________________________

Track shift changes

Shift XChange

This Week's Priorities and Notes from Management

1) __________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

January February

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

6x

Shift & Arrival Time

1

Initial #

Friday, January 1st

Name

is working for

· New Year's Day

Name

#

Initial

Mgr. Approval

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· 9 or 19 lines per day · Bound bi-annually · Legal size

· New Year's Day Initial #

Other

Products

FOH

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2

Initial #

Saturday, January 2nd

Name

is working for

1

Friday, January 1st

Name

is working for

Name

#

Initial

Shift & Arrival Time

6x

January February

Mgr. Approval

SA MP

3

Sunday, January 3rd

Name

is working for

Name

#

Initial

Shift & Arrival Time

Mgr. Approval ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Initial

#

Name

#

Initial

Shift & Arrival Time

Mgr. Approval

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2

#

Saturday, January 2nd

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Initial

Name

is working for

Name

#

Initial

Shift & Arrival Time

6x

January February

Mgr. Approval

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Benefits

· Both formats include planning calendars for special scheduling requirements, requesting time off, scheduling vacations, or whatever you choose. · Holds employees and managers accountable when switching shifts!

Features

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· Shift XChange Book is bound bi-annually and is available from January­June and July­December or from October­March and April­September. · The SCB1 (above left) features 9 lines per day and the entire week at a glance. It is recommended for restaurants with 1­60 employees. · The SCB2 (above right) features 19 lines per day and 4 days at a glance. It is recommended for restaurants with over 60 employees.

For more information, or to order a Shift XChange book, visit our web site at www.RedBookSolutions.biz or call 800-526-9635

This is another tool for the manager who never stops in the search for better results. It is made with sturdy construction, attention to detail, and the devotion to customer service that Red Book Solutions® puts into every product.

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Local Store Marketing

How to Get Started

· Local store marketing is primarily people talking to people. People buy from people · LSM is all about teamwork · Using a team means everyone does a little

· Select the best and the brightest to represent your restaurant

· What you are doing outside the restaurant is the same thing you do inside ­ building relationships · You and your team should look their very best so grooming and clothing are critical Team Member Area & Activities · Who is your Local Store Marketing Team? What areas and activities are they responsible for?

1. ___________________________________ 2. ___________________________________ 3. ___________________________________ FOH 4. ___________________________________

How to Make Your Approach

Every time you meet a contact remember the following: 2. Be brief when talking about the restaurant a) Name of the restaurant b) Your name and position

1. Make sure you have sample menus, business cards, any special offer, food sample, or treat you wish to provide.

SA MP

c) What the restaurant is known for, hours of operation a) How long has the business been here? b) How long you have been here? c) How many people do you employ? 3. Ask Questions...I'm curious d) Do you have business lunches we could cater? e) Do you have team building affairs we could host? 4. Personally invite them to your restaurant. Ask for me!

Team Member Role Play (Practice makes Perfect)

Team Member____________________________ Role Play ________________________________________________ Ideas for Improvement ______________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________ Team Member____________________________ Role Play ________________________________________________ Ideas for Improvement ______________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________

Types of Businesses to Consider

Banks Retail

Sports Organizations Hospitals

Non Profits

Apartment Complexes Residential Areas

Office Parks/Industrial Car Dealerships

Schools/Colleges

Other: ________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________

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1. ___________________________________ 2. ___________________________________ 3. ___________________________________ 4. ___________________________________

Local Businesses

(Businesses should be in a 3 to 5 mile radius) ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________

Weekly Local Store Marketing

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Meeting notes (review):

Business to Business Marketing

Businesses to Visit Phone #

Assigned To

SA MP

Goals this week, Business to Business: Special Coupons or Incentives for B to B Marketing: Promo Code #:

Other Markets

Offer

# Sent

Door Hangers Flyers Newspapers Coupons Other

Location

Date

Weekly Menu Sampling Menu Item

Goals this week, other marketing activities:

Special Coupons or Incentives:

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Date Completed Response # Returned Response Assigned To Results

Team members in attendance:

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Business Effects: ________________________________________

Manager AM ________________________ Mid ________________________ PM ________________________ Tuesday's Reminders ServSafe® & ServSafe Alcohol® Tips:

Hot food must be held at 135°F (57°C) or higher. This will prevent pathogens from growing to unsafe levels.

Upcoming March Holidays and Events: Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday) (8th), Ash Wednesday (9th), St. Patrick's Day (17th), Spring Begins (20th)

Sales Tracking

Lunch Sales Actual Goal LY Variance Dinner Sales

End of Day Totals

Avg. Wait:___________________ Catering Events #:_______________ $______________ To Go Orders: #_______________ $______________

Labor Tracking

Bar Host Labor % Labor $ Goal MTD %

SA MP

Server FOH Total Cook Variance

Pre-shift Meetings/Specials/Training Tips

A.M. MID P.M.

To Be Done Today (Yesterday's Undones · Priorities)

Task

______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________

Messages

Big Parties (BP)/Catering (C)/To Go (TG)/Special Reservation (SR)

Type Size Time Phone Name Event

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Total Sales Guest Count Lunch Dinner Bus/Dish

Assigned To

1

Legal Alcohol Date 3/1/90

Weather Notes: ________________________________________

Daily Page 1 of 2

Avg. $ Per Guest Lunch Dinner

BOH Total

Completed

B B B B B

Tuesday, March 1st, 2011

Daily Page 2 of 2

Daily Checklist

B B B B B B

AM

Opening Checklist Safe Count $ _________________ PM Deposit Verified $ ______ ____ AM Line Check ____________________________ ____________________________

B B B B B B

Mid

Safe Count $ _________________

____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________ ____________________________

Personnel Issues (Training · Interviews · Performance)

Interviews/Evaluations

Time Time Name Name

__________/________________________________________________ __________/________________________________________________

Development (Training · Recognition)

SA MP

Recruitment (Hiring the best)

Safety and Sanitation

B B B B B B

Initiated

________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Repair & Maintenance Concerns (Inspect · Clean · Fix · Prevent)

Concern

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Communication

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B B B B B B

Close

Closing Checklist AM Line Check

Time Time Name Name

Safe Count $ _________________ Deposit $ ______ ___________ ____

____________________________ ____________________________

__________/________________________________________________ __________/________________________________________________

Completed

B B B B B B

||

| | | | |

Action Taken

Completed

B B B B B B B

Weekly Manager's Meeting Notes

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Upcoming

(Events, Marketing, Promotions, etc.)

Food Cost/Liquor Cost

(How did we compare to our goal?)

Labor Cost

(Are we on track to meet budget?)

Personnel/Training

(Employee Issues, Staffing Needs)

SA MP

R&M

(On Going Issues, Review Monthly R&M Log)

Safety/Sanitation

(# of Incidents, Concerns)

Other

Action Needed

______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________

Manager's Initials: ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________ ________________

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Assigned To Completed

B B B B

Opening Procedures

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Opening Procedures Equipment

1. Turn on stoves @ ______________ (30 min. before opening) 2. Turn on exhaust system @ ______________ 3. Turn on oven and deck oven @ ______________ 4. Turn on fryer, test oil @ ______________ 5. Turn steam kettle on @ ______________ 6. Turn grill on, clean with brush @ ______________ 7. Clean each walk-in and reach-in refrigerator 8. Check ice machines 9. Turn on heat lamps @ _____________ (once 1st order has been received)

Stewarding and Dishwashing

10. Turn on dish machine heater @ ______________ 11. Check detergent and rinse agent levels 12. Check temperature levels (before and throughout operating hours) 13. Turn on plate warmers @ ______________

SA MP

14. Line check taste & temp. 15. Portion out high food cost items 16. Supervise pantry production 17. Test quality of the desserts 18. Review prep list Initials General & Entry Area 19. Unlock doors and cabinets 20. Turn on music (to a moderate volume), TV and set AC/Heat 21. Turn on external light when needed 22. Set host/hostess stand 23. Check reservations (VIPs coming? Special Parties?) 24. Check answering machine & set for day 25. Inspect parking lot and exterior 26. Set up bank(s) & drawers, with back ups 27. Inspect restrooms, look for leaks Dining Room 28. Verify dining room & bar are business ready 29. Inspect table settings 30. Check plants and flowers Initials Cross Communication 31. Confer w/ Staff regarding specials & set special boards 32. Note any items 86'd 33. Conduct pre-opening meeting with wait staff Initials Initials Service Area 34. Turn on warmers & coffee equipment @ ______________ 35. Check and distribute table top items 36. Assign wait staff side work from checklist & cleaning 37. Assign bus side work & cleaning Manager on Duty Initial

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Menu Preparation

Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________ Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________ Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________

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Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Initials Initials Initials

Sun.

Closing Procedures

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Closing Procedures Equipment 1. Turn off stoves and wipe down 2. Turn off exhaust system & clean hood filters 3. Turn off oven and deck oven & clean 4. Turn off fryer, strain oil 5. Turn steam kettle off 6. Shut off grill and brush clean ­ empty grease catcher 7. Wipe hand sinks down 8. Inspect each walk-in and reach-in refrigerator

Stewarding and Dishwashing Initials 9. All dishes completely washed through machine (full loads) 10. Turn off machine heaters 11. Clean machine inside & out, empty traps & leave doors open 12. Refill soap and rinse agent 13. Pot sink emptied and cleaned 14. All pots, dishes and equipment stored 15. Pot soap and sanitizer dispensers filled 16. Remove garbage to trash bin or recycle bin

SA MP

Service Issues 20. Note any problems with food timing & quality Initials Administrative 21. Record any waste on waste sheet & track in database 22. Note any food or invoices due, but not received 23. Note staff performance in log 24. Review orders placed for next day Initials End of Night 25. Floor dry and de-greased 26. Linen sorted and placed in proper receptacle 27. Check ice machines 28. Lock coolers & freezers Initials Cross Communication 29. Review shift with staff 30. Note any needs or problems in Red Book Service Area 31. Turn coffee machines and warmers off @ ______________ 32. Assign waitstaff/bus staff closing sidework 33. Clean POS area & re-stock Dining Room 34. Inspect dining room & note needs 35. Note any maintenance & repairs needed in book 36. Lock cabinets and storage areas 37. Check all sidework General & Entry Area 38. Turn off lights/lock doors - external @ ______________ 39. Turn off music/sound & TV systems & adjust AC/Heat 40. Clean host stand & special board 41. Clean and inspect foyer/entry 42. Run POS reports & clear before turning off 43. Count and record banks (witnessed) 44. Fill out reports & deposits, sign & drop in safe Manager on Duty Initial

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Menu Preparation 17. Remove, wrap and store food 18. Wipe the stainless steel 19. Clean under-counter shelving

Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________ Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________ Item # _________ Action taken: _______________________________________________________________

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Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Initials Initials

Sun.

Did you know?

The National Restaurant Association has partnered with Red Book Solutions to create a suite of tools that, along with ServSafe® and ServSafe Alcohol®, place best practices in front of your teams every day. Including:

Manager's Red Book

The National Restaurant Association Edition · Drive key strategies with defined tactics

· Maximize productivity through increased focus · Improve efficiencies with guided action plans

SA MP

· Increase food safety awareness · Review trends to reduce waste · Conduct and record line checks

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Heart of the House

©2009 Dataworks, LLC® All rights reserved. Unlawful to reproduce by any means.

To perform like the best, you have to act like the best.

Heart of the House Yellow Book

The National Restaurant Association Edition

Bar Green Book

The National Restaurant Association Edition · Teach responsible alcohol service daily · Improve financial controls with ordering guides · Increase accountability with your bar managers

To order or for more information on any of these solutions, call one of our Sales Representatives at 800-526-9635.

National Restaurant Association members receive 10% OFF when they order any of these tools.

To become a National Restaurant Association member, please visit www.restaurant.org

We make good managers better.

Two trusted industry leaders have joined to create powerful tools that drive: · better execution · better sustainability · better results Simply better.

Call us at 800.526.9635 or visit www.RedBookSolutions.biz

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Heart of the House

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ServSafe® Receiving Guidelines

You must take steps to ensure the receiving and inspection process goes smoothly and keeps the food safe. Make sure enough trained staff are available to promptly receive, inspect, and store food. Authorize staff to accept, reject, and sign for deliveries. Inspect deliveries carefully and immediately and put them away as quickly as possible. Use thermometers to check food temperatures during receiving. When inspecting food you should check temperature, packaging, and product quality. Temperature Checking the Temperature of Various Types of Food Meat, poultry, and fish Insert the thermometer stem or probe directly into the thickest part of the food. The center is usually the thickest part. ROP food (MAP, vacuum-packed, and sous vide food) Insert the thermometer stem or probe between two packages.

SA MP

Inspection Stamps Meat and Poultry Egg Products

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Deliveries should meet the following temperature criteria. · Receive cold TCS food at 41ºF (5ºC) or lower, unless otherwise specified. · Receive hot TCS food at 135ºF (57ºC) or higher. · Receive frozen food frozen. Reject frozen food for the following reasons. · Fluids or frozen liquids appear in case bottoms. · There are ice crystals on the product or the packaging or water stains on the package. This may be evidence of thawing and refreezing. Packaging The packaging of food and nonfood items should be intact and clean, and protect the food from contamination. Reject food if you see the following problems. · Tears, holes, or punctures in packaging. · Cans with swollen ends, rust, or dents. · Broken cartons, seals or dirty wrappers. · Leaks, dampness, or water stains on packages. · Signs of pests or pest damage. · Items with expired code or use-by dates. Product Quality Poor food quality can be a sign that the food has been time-temperature abused and, therefore, may be unsafe. Reject food if it has any of the following problems. · Abnormal color. · Meat, fish, or poultry that is slimy, sticky, or dry. Also reject it if it has soft flesh that leaves an imprint when you touch it. · Abnormal or unpleasant odor. · Any item that does not meet your company's standards for quality. Products Requiring Inspection Stamps Checking for inspection stamps is a way to make sure food is coming from an approved source. The inspection stamps for meat and poultry and for egg products are shown below.

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If the package allows, fold it around the thermometer stem or probe. Be careful not to puncture the package. Other Food Open the package and insert the thermometer stem or probe into the food. The sensing area must be fully immersed in the food. The stem or probe must not touch the package. Packaging must have a USDA or a state department of agriculture's inspection stamp. This stamp indicates that the product and the processing plant have met certain standards. The stamp at left is for meat. Packaging must have an inspection stamp indicating that Federal Regulations have been enforced to maintain quality and reduce contamination.

Controlling time-temperature abuse and preventing cross-contamination are critical for keeping food safe throughout the flow of food in your operation. Another growing concern is serving customers with food allergies. Below are tools and practices to help you deal with these potential problems in your operation.

Time and Temperature Abuse

Most foodborne illnesses happen because TCS food has been time-temperature abused. Remember, food has been time-temperature abused any time it remains at 41°F to 135°F (5°C to 57°C). This is called the temperature danger zone, because pathogens grow in this range. Food is being temperature abused whenever it is handled in the following ways. · Cooked to the wrong internal temperature · Held at the wrong temperature · Cooled or reheated incorrectly

SA MP

Employees should avoid time-temperature abuse by following the procedures below.

The longer food stays in the temperature danger zone, the more time pathogens have to grow. To keep food safe, you must reduce the time it spends in this temperature range. If food is held in this range for four or more hours, you must throw it out. · Ensure foodhandlers know how to check food temperatures and when to do so. · Ensure foodhandlers have the right kind of thermometer. Have them use timers in prep areas to check how long food is in the temperature danger zone. · Have foodhandlers log temperatures regularly. · Limit the amount of food that is removed from a cooler when prepping it. · Make sure foodhandlers know what to do when time and temperature standards are not met.

Cross-contamination

Pathogens can be spread from food or unwashed hands to prep areas, equipment, utensils, or other food. Employees can avoid cross-contamination by following the procedures below.

· Use separate equipment when prepping different types of food. Colored cutting boards and utensil handles can help keep equipment separate. The different colors tell foodhandlers which equipment to use with each food item. · Clean and sanitize all work surfaces, equipment, and utensils after each task. · Prep raw meat, fish, and poultry and ready-to-eat food at different times. · Buy food items that don't require much prepping or handling.

Preventing Allergic Reactions

Both service staff and kitchen staff need to do their parts to avoid serving food that can cause an allergic reaction. Here are some guidelines that should be followed. Service Staff · · · ·

Tell customers with food allergies about menu items that contain potential allergens. Tell customers how the item is prepared. Identify any "secret" ingredients. Suggest simple menu items.

Kitchen Staff

· Staff must ensure that allergens are not transferred from food containing an allergen to the food served to the customer. This is called cross-contact. · Avoid cooking different types of food in the same fryer oil. · Do not put food on surfaces that have touched allergens. · Wash, rinse, and sanitize cookware, utensils, and equipment before prepping food. · Wash hands and change gloves before prepping food. · Assign specific equipment for prepping food for customers with allergies.

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ServSafe® Preventive Measures for Time and Temperature Abuse, Cross-contamination and Serving Customers with Food Allergies

Fold & Tear

Prep List

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Chef: ______________________

O/H ­ How many or how much currently on hand Par ­ How many or how much needs to be on hand Prep ­ How many or how much needs to be prepared to meet par When properly tracked there is a history of menu item usage. Example: If you use one case of fresh sliced tomatoes on Tuesday you should prepare enough to have one case on hand.

Saturday Prep On Hand Par Prep On Hand Sunday Par Prep Completed By

Monday Par

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

SA MP

Prep On Hand Par Prep On Hand Par Prep On Hand

Item

On Hand

Par

Prep

On Hand

Par

LE

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Fold & Tear

O/H ­ How many or how much currently on hand Par ­ How many or how much needs to be on hand Prep ­ How many or how much needs to be prepared to meet par When properly tracked there is a history of menu item usage. Example: If you use one case of fresh sliced tomatoes on Tuesday you should prepare enough to have one case on hand.

Monday Prep On Hand Par Tuesday Wednesday Prep On Hand Thursday Par Prep On Hand Item On Hand On Hand

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Prep List

Par

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Chef: ______________________

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Par

Prep

Par

Prep

On Hand

Par

Prep

On Hand

Par

Prep

Completed By

Waste Sheet

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Chef: ______________________

GM: ______________________

SA MP

Initials Total # Total $

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58.

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Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

Sun

Week Total $: ________________

ServSafe® Daily Checklist

3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Page 1 of 2

CDC Risk Factor #1--Purchasing Food From Unsafe Sources

Directions: Place a Yes in the column if the criteria were met and No if they were not. For any criteria that were not met, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Criteria Mon. 1. Received product was from approved supplier list. 2. Delivered products were inspected based on ServSafe receiving guidelines. 3. Products were received at the proper temperature. (Reject product if not.) 4. Products met packaging and quality requirements. Check done by: Actions Taken: CDC Risk Factor #2--Failing to Cook Food Adequately Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

Directions: Check each piece of equipment based on your SOPs to ensure that it is operating at the proper temperature. Record the temperature in the appropriate column. For each piece of equipment that is not operating to standard, explain the action that was taken in the space provided and initial it. Cooking Equipment Check Grills Ovens Fryers Stove Checked by: Actions Taken: Equipment Standard Based on SOP Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

SA MP

Criteria 5. Foodhandlers have a calibrated thermometer. 6. Thermometers are cleaned and sanitized between uses. 7. TCS food that will be hot-held is reheated to 165ºF (74ºC) for 15 seconds within 2 hours. Check done by: Actions Taken: Mon. Tues.

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Directions: Place a Yes in the column if the criteria were met, or No if they were not. For any criteria that were not met, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

Directions: Food must be cooked to required minimum internal temperatures. The FDA standards are listed below. Record final temperatures in the chart. If food products are not at the proper temperature, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Temperature Product 165ºF (74ºC) for 15 seconds · Poultry · Stuffed meat, seafood, poultry, or pasta 155ºF (68ºC) for 15 seconds · Ground meat (including beef, pork, and other meat): · Eggs that will be hot-held for service 145ºF (63ºC) for 15 seconds · Seafood · Steaks/chops of pork, beef, veal, and lamb · Eggs that will be served immediately 135ºF (57ºC) · Fruits/vegetables that will be hot-held for service Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Item--Minimum Internal Temperature AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Check done by: Actions Taken:

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified the five most common risk factors that cause foodborne illness. These include: 1. Purchasing food from unsafe sources 4. Using contaminated equipment 2. Failing to cool food adequately 5. Practicing poor personal hygiene 3. Holding food at incorrect temperatures You can help prevent foodborne illness by controlling these five risk factors in your operation. Using the ServSafe® Daily Checklist can help you do this.

ServSafe® Daily Checklist

3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Page 2 of 2

CDC Risk Factor #3--Holding Food at Incorrect Temperatures

Directions: Place a Yes in the column if the criteria were met or No if they were not. For any criteria that were not met, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Criteria 8. Food is covered to maintain internal temperatures. 9. Hot-holding units are being used correctly (i.e., not being used to reheat food). Check done by: Actions Taken: Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat.

SA MP

CDC Risk Factor #4--Using Contaminated Equipment Criteria 10. Wiping cloths are stored in a sanitizer solution between uses. 11. Food-contact surfaces are cleaned and sanitized before foodhandlers work with a different type of food. 12. Sanitizer solutions are checked using the appropriate test kit. 13. Chemicals are properly labeled and stored. 14. Dishwashing machines are operated according to manufacturers' recommendations. 15. Items are cleaned and sanitized properly in three-compartment sinks. 16. Items that have been cleaned and sanitized are stored properly. Check done by: Actions Taken: Mon. Tues. CDC Risk Factor #5--Practicing Poor Personal Hygiene Criteria 17. Handwashing stations are properly stocked. (i.e., soap, proper means for drying hands, handwashing signage, etc.) 18. Proper handwashing procedures are being followed by employees. 19. Employees have nails that are short, clean, and without nail polish. 20. Foodhandlers have removed jewelry from hands and arms. 21. Employees are changing gloves when necessary. 22. Foodhandlers are wearing appropriate work attire. 23. Employees are eating, smoking, and chewing gum or tobacco in the appropriate areas. 24. Foodhandlers do not have the following symptoms: · Sore throat with fever · Diarrhea · Vomiting · Jaundice Check done by: Actions Taken: Mon. Tues.

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Directions: Hot food must be held at 135ºF (57ºC) or higher. Cold food must be held at 41ºF (5ºC) or lower. Record temperatures in the chart below. If food products are not at the proper temperature, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Temp. Item Being Held AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Check done by: Actions Taken:

Directions: Place a Yes in the column if the criteria were met or No if they were not. For any criteria that were not met, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

Directions: Place a Yes in the column if the criteria were met or No if they were not. For any criteria that were not met, explain the action that was taken and initial it. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. Sun.

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Sun.

AM Line Check

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Mon

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58.

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

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Initials # Immediate Action MGR.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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Sat Sun

X = Ok

O = Needs immediate action record O's below

Chef: ______________________

GM: ______________________

PM Line Check

Week of: 3/1/11 ­ 3/6/11

Chef: ______________________

GM: ______________________

SA MP

Initials #

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58.

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Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Immediate Action

X = Ok

O = Needs immediate action record O's below

Sun

MGR.

Liquor Cost Control

Security

· · · ·

Is all back up beer and liquor locked up? Do only managers have keys? Do you have locking beer taps? Is liquor locked up at night?

Inventory Control

· · · · ·

Are bottle pars set and verified every night?

Do only managers pull bottles for bottle requisitions? Does one person do all the ordering?

SA MP

Do only managers receive and check in deliveries? Are weekly inventories done?

Training

· · ·

Is your bar team aware of current costs as well as goals? Is the bar team held accountable for cost goals?

Do your bartenders know proper pouring techniques?

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Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No

Bar

Are you following these guidelines for great liquor cost?

Management

· · · · ·

Has inventory pricing been checked this month? Do you use bar spotters on a regular basis?

Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No Yes / No

Do you use liquor waste sheets consistently?

Do you audit tickets for accuracy and correct pricing? Do you keep track of bartender over/shorts?

Areas for Improvement

Action Needed

Person Responsible

Completion Date ___ /___/ ___ ___ /___/ ___ ___ /___/ ___ ___ /___/ ___ ___ /___/ ___

_____________________________________________ ____________________ _____________________________________________ ____________________ _____________________________________________ ____________________ _____________________________________________ ____________________ _____________________________________________ ____________________

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Bar

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ServSafe Alcohol® Service Information­ID

Acceptable Forms of Identification

In most states, the following forms of ID are acceptable: · Driver's license · State ID card · Passport · Military ID

Using the Birth Date to Verify a Guest's Age

Almost all state IDs include the date that the minor will turn 21-years-old. This eliminates the need to calculate the guest's age from his or her birth date. At the top of each daily page is a box highlighting the legal alcohol date. This is the date that a guest must have been born on or before to be served alcohol in your establishment.

Determining if an ID is Valid

SA MP

Verifying that the ID is Genuine Stopping Service to Intoxicated Guests

1. Alert a backup. 2. Enlist the help of other guests (if possible). 3. Wait until the guest orders the next round before stopping service. 4. Tell the guest you are stopping service. 5. Offer nonalcoholic alternatives. "Our company policy doesn't allow me to serve you any more alcohol." "I'm not able to serve you any more alcohol this evening." "We would be responsible if something were to happen." "It is against the law for me to serve you any more alcohol." "I just want to make sure you get home OK." "We want you to come back again." "Why don't we call it a night? We'll see you tomorrow." Express empathy. Show the guest you understand how he or she is feeling. Say things like:

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An ID must be valid before you can accept it. A valid ID has the following features: · Contains the birth date · Is current · Contains the owner's photo · Contains the owner's signature · Is intact

The key to spotting fake IDs is to know what the valid IDs in your state and neighboring states look like. · Talk to your manager about the valid IDs issued by your state. · Use an ID-checking guide. These guides provide full-size samples and descriptions of current state drivers' licenses. They also include detailed descriptions of minor and state ID cards.

There are several things you can do to avoid a confrontation when stopping service to a guest. What you say and how you say it is important. Don't be judgmental. Never use "You" statements, such as, "You've had enough." These sound judgmental and may offend the guest. Say things like:

Express concern and be genuine. Tell the guest that you are concerned about his or her safety. Say things like:

"I know this is frustrating, but I am concerned about your safety." "I know you're upset. I would be upset too, but we just want to make sure that nothing happens to you." "I'm sorry I can't serve you. Let me call you a cab so you get home safely."

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ServSafe Alcohol® Service Information

Criminal Liability

As a server or seller of alcohol, you may face criminal charges if you break state, county, or municipal alcohol laws. Most states may hold you criminally liable if you: · Serve alcohol to a minor. · Serve a guest who is or appears to be intoxicated. · Possess, sell, or allow the sale of drugs on the premises.

Depending on the state in which you work, you could be placed on probation, fined, or even given jail time.

Physical and Behavioral Signs of Intoxication

When large amounts of alcohol reach the brain, it can no longer function normally. This causes physical and behavioral changes, including: relaxed inhibitions, impaired judgment, slowed reaction time, and impaired motor coordination. Relaxed inhibitions. Inhibitions prevent people from saying or doing things that may be unacceptable to others. As people drink, their normal inhibitions will become relaxed. Guests with relaxed inhibitions may: · Be overly friendly. · Be unfriendly, depressed, or quiet. · Use foul language. · Become loud. · Make rude comments. Impaired judgment. A guest's ability to make sensible decisions will be affected. Guests with impaired judgment may: · · · · Complain about the strength of a drink after drinking others of the same strength. Begin drinking faster or switch to larger or stronger drinks. Make irrational or argumentative statements. Become careless with money (e.g., buying drinks for strangers).

SA MP

· · · · Talk or move slowly. Be unable to concentrate, lose their train of thought, or become forgetful. Become drowsy. Become glassy-eyed, lose eye contact, or become unable to focus. · · · · · Stagger, stumble, fall down, bump objects, or sway when sitting or standing. Be unable to pick up objects or drop them. Spill drinks or miss their mouths when drinking. Slur their speech. Have difficulty lighting a cigarette.

Slowed reaction time. A guest's reaction time and responses will become slower. Guests with slowed reaction time may:

Impaired motor coordination. A guest's motor skills will be affected. Guests with impaired motor coordination may:

The Importance of Observation and Communication

Monitor guests from the moment they arrive until they are ready to leave. Tell management and the appropriate coworkers if a guest shows signs of intoxication. If guests move to another location in the establishment, pass along any information about the amount of alcohol they have consumed. To be successful when evaluating guests, you will need input from coworkers who have come in contact with them.

Preventing Guests from Becoming Intoxicated

Offer food Offer water Avoid overpouring when mixing drinks Avoid serving the guest more than one drink at a time.

· · · ·

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ServSafe Alcohol® Counting Drinks

To count drinks, you need to know how much alcohol the drinks contain. The beverages below serve as the standard measure when counting drinks. They contain about the same amount of alcohol and should be counted as one drink.

SA MP

For example, whiskey on the rocks containing three ounces of 80-proof whiskey would be counted as two drinks. Here's why: 3 ÷ 1.5 = 2 ounces of 80-proof whiskey ounces of 80-proof whiskey in 1 drink Total number of drinks Here's another example. You now know that a 12-ounce beer is counted as one drink, but how many drinks are there in a 24-ounce beer? The answer is two. Here's why: 24 ÷ 12 = 2 ounces of beer ounces of beer in 1 drink Total number of drinks

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There are a few other things to keep in mind when counting drinks.

· Some beers, flavored malt beverages, and wines have a higher alcohol content. You must count them differently than the standard beverages listed above. · The size of the drink and the amount of alcohol in it will affect the count. · Mixed drinks may contain multiple liquors making them harder to count. This is especially true if the liquors have different proofs. It is always better to round up when counting drinks. Don't worry too much about the math. Most establishments will make these calculations for you.

To count beverages correctly, you need to figure out the actual number of drinks in them. To do this, divide the liquor in the beverage by the standard amount of that liquor found in one drink.

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Whiskey 24-ounce beer

March 2011 Weekly Liquor/Wine Ordering Guide

Week 1

O/H OD INV

Week 2

O/H OD INV

Week 3

O/H OD INV

Week 4

O/H OD

SA MP

Completed By:_____ Completed By:_____ Completed By:_____ Completed By:_____ Completed By:______ Approved By:______ Approved By:______ Approved By:______ Approved By:______ Approved By:______

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Week 5

OD INV O/H INV

O/H = On Hand

OD = Order

INV - Ending Inventory

March 2011 Weekly Liquor/Wine Ordering Guide

O/H

SA MP

Completed By:_____ Completed By:_____ Approved By:______ Approved By:______

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Week 1

OD

O/H = On Hand

OD = Order

INV - Ending Inventory Week 5

OD INV

Week 2

OD

Week 3

OD

Week 4

OD

INV

O/H

INV

O/H

INV

O/H

INV

O/H

Completed By:_____ Completed By:_____ Completed By:______

Approved By:______ Approved By:______ Approved By:______

Notes

SA MP

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Standard Drink Recipes Top 24

Drink: oz oz oz oz

Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz

SA MP

Drink: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Fold & Tear Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Actual drink count:

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Actual drink count:

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Drink: oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz Actual drink count:

* Actual drink count ­ Divide the liquor in the beverage by the standard liquor amount found in one drink

Standard Drink Recipes Top 24

Drink: oz oz oz oz

Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz

SA MP

Drink: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Actual drink count:

F8168,71027nk

Actual drink count:

LE

Drink: oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Drink: oz oz oz oz Actual drink count: Fold & Tear

* Actual drink count ­ Divide the liquor in the beverage by the standard liquor amount found in one drink

SA MP LE

Information

F8168Mar11-orig.pdf

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