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Chapter 12 -- Academic Programs and Courses Department of Sociology

Department of Sociology

College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs

Library Building, Room 171 http://sociology.boisestate.edu E-mail: [email protected] Phone: (208) 426-3406 Fax: (208) 426-2098

Social Science *Bachelor of Arts or **Bachelor of Science

Course Number and Title ENGL 101-102 Introduction to College Writing and Research Area I -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area I core course in one field Area I core course in a second field Area I core course in third field Area I core course in any field

(B.A. must complete 3 credits of Area I core literature)

Credits 6 3 3 3 3

Chair and Associate: Martin Orr. Professors: Blain, McCarl. Associate Professors: Husting, Patrick. Assistant Professors: Romero, Scarritt.

Degrees Offered

· A.A. in Social Science · B.A. and Minor in Multi-Ethnic Studies · B.A. and B.S. in Social Science · B.A., B.S., and Minor in Sociology · B.A. in Sociology, Social Science, Secondary Education · B.A. in Sociology, Social Studies, Secondary Education Emphasis · Mexican-American Studies Minor

Area II -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area II core course in one field Area II core course in second field Area II core course in third field Area II core course in any field

(B.A. must complete 3 credits of Area II core history)

3 3 3 3

Area III -- see page 45 for list of approved courses Area III core course in mathematics Area III core course in a second field Area III core course in any field *Bachelor of Arts One year of college level foreign language in sequence

Language equivalency required by the Sociology Department will be determined by the Department of Modern Languages and Literature or the classical language program director.

Department Statement

The faculty of the Department of Sociology are committed to the democratic belief in the power of scientific reason to solve human social problems. As a faculty, we believe that an ability to think critically about public affairs is one of the marks of an educated person and a key to the resolution of many important problems. Consistent with these beliefs and commitments, the faculty's primary aims are to provide high quality teaching, research, and public service in social science. The degree programs administered by the Department of Sociology are central to the State Board of Education's mandate that Boise State University be the lead institution in social sciences and public affairs. Departmental programs include five baccalaureate degrees, one associate of arts degree in social science, and three minors. Faculty also participate in the following interdisciplinary studies programs: gender studies, Canadian studies, a gerontology minor, and the master of interdisciplinary studies degree program.

3-5 4 4 8

**Bachelor of Science Area II or III electives

These courses do not have to be selected from the approved core list, but are to be chosen from anthropology, biology, chemistry, communication, criminal justice, economics, ED-CIFS, engineering, geography, geosciences, history, mathematics, physical science, physics, political science, psychology, social work, and sociology.

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SOC 201 Theories of Society SOC 210 Computer Applications in Social Science SOCSCI 498 Senior Seminar -- 493 Internship or -- 496 Independent Study Methods course: COMM 302, GENDER 302, POLS 398, PSYC 321, SOC 311, or SOC 412 Upper-division first field Upper-division second field

Select from the following for first and second fields of study: anthropology, communication, criminal justice, economics, gender studies, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Only three (3) credit hours in each field may be workshops, special topics, independent study courses, or internships.

3 4 3 3 3 12 12

Degree Requirements

The social science degree is a cooperative program involving the departments of anthropology, communication, criminal justice, economics, gender studies, history, political science, psychology, and sociology. Its purpose is to provide students with the opportunity to pursue an interdisciplinary program of study in social science tailored to their specific academic and/or vocational interests.

*Bachelor of Arts Upper-division electives to total 40 credits Electives to total 128 credits Total **Bachelor of Science Statistics course: PSYC 295, POLS 298, or SOC 310 Upper-division electives to total 40 credits Electives to total 128 credits Total _____________________________ 3-4 3-10 22-32 128 7-10 27-32 128

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Chapter 12 -- Academic Programs and Courses Department of Sociology

Sociology is a social science devoted to the empirical analysis of human societies. The goal of the sociology degree program is to train students to engage in social scientific analysis and to think critically about public affairs. Each student is required to complete courses in theory, social research methods, computer-applications, and statistical analysis. The social science, secondary education emphasis programs are cooperative, multidisciplinary programs involving the Departments of Economics, History, Political Science, and Sociology. Students choosing this emphasis must: 1. Complete a minimum of 39 credits in sociology. 2. Complete a minimum of 21 credits in one of the departments listed above (other than sociology) to satisfy graduation requirements. See the department listings for each of these departments for additional information. 3. Meet the requirements and standards for admission to teacher education, which are described fully under the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies or at http://education.boisestate. edu. Students are expected to meet all knowledge, skill, and dispositional requirements for continued enrollment in the program. This program is designed to assist students in developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions essential for success in teaching sociology in secondary schools. Course work combines content knowledge, theories of learning and human development, study of curriculum, and methodology. The program is grounded in the conceptual framework of the Professional Educator. Professional educators adjust their teaching approaches and learning environment to the needs and backgrounds of their students. Candidates who complete this program demonstrate evidence of meeting the Idaho Beginning Teachers Standards and are eligible for recommendation for state certification.

Sociology *Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science

Course Number and Title ENGL 101-102 Introduction to College Writing and Research Area I -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area I core course in one field Area I core course in a second field Area I core course in third field Area I core course in any field

(B.A. must complete 3 credits of Area I core literature)

Credits 6 3 3 3 3

Area II -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area II core course in one field Area II core course in second field Area II core course in third field Area II core course in any field

(B.A. must complete 3 credits of Area II core history)

3 3 3 3

Area III -- see page 45 for list of approved courses Area III core course in mathematics Area III core course in a second field Area III core course in any field B.A. Area I or II courses OR B.S. Area II or III courses SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology SOC 210 Computer Applications in Social Science SOC 301 Sociology Theory I SOC 302 Sociology Theory II SOC 310 Elementary Social Statistics SOC 311 Social Research SOC 490 Senior Practicum OR SOC 496 Independent Study SOC 498 Sociology Seminar Upper-division sociology electives Upper-division electives to total 40 credits Electives to total 128 credits Total

NOTE: *The B.A. degree requires one year of a foreign language.

3-5 4 4 9 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 15 6 29-31 128

Sociology, Social Science, Secondary Education Emphasis Bachelor of Arts

Course Number and Title ENGL 101-102 Introduction to College Writing and Research Area I -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area I core course in literature Area I core course in a second field Area I core course in a third field Area I core course in any field Area II -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area II core course in U. S. History POLS 101 American National Government Area II core course in a third field Area II core course in any field Area III -- see page 45 for list of approved courses Area III core course in mathematics Area III core course in a second field Area III core course in any field ED-CIFS 201 Foundations of Education *ED-CIFS 301 Teaching Experience I *ED-CIFS 302 Learning and Instruction *ED-CIFS 401 Professional Year -- Teaching Experience II *ED-CIFS 405 Teaching Secondary Social Studies *ED-LTCY 444 Content Literacy for Secondary Students *ED-SPED 350 Teaching Students with Exceptional Needs at the Secondary Level *Teaching Experience III/IV

NOTE: *You must apply for admission to secondary teacher education in order to enroll in these upper-division education courses. Completion of all requirements for graduation with a secondary education option may require more than 128 credit hours. See "Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies" for more information.

Credits 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 4 2 3 3 3 16

_____________________________ Any Boise State baccalaureate student may earn a minor in sociology by satisfying the requirements listed below (in addition to requirements for a major and university requirements).

Sociology Minor

Course Number and Title SOC 101 Intro to Sociology SOC 301 Sociological Theory I SOC 311 Social Research Upper-division Sociology courses Sociology course Total _____________________________ Credits 3 3 3 9 3 21

EDTECH 202 Educational Technology: Classroom Applications SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology SOC 210 Computer Applications in Social Sciences SOC 301 Sociological Theory I SOC 302 Sociological Theory II SOC 310 Elementary Social Statistics SOC 311 Social Research SOC 498 Sociology Seminar -- continued --

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Sociology, Social Science, Secondary Education Emphasis (continued) Upper-division Sociology courses Social science field other than sociology Total _____________________________ The B.A. in Sociology, Social Studies, Secondary Education Emphasis is designed to meet the Idaho state standards in Social Studies, provide students with multiple endorsements, and ensure upper- division coursework in the three disciplines most commonly taught at the secondary level. This multidisciplinary, professional degree entails a 32-hour major emphasis in Sociology, 21 hours in Social Studies and government, and 12 hours in History. Students choosing this emphasis must: 1. Complete a minimum of 32 credits in sociology; 2. Complete nine credits in U.S. history and three credits of world history for certification requirements; 3. Complete a minimum of 21 credits in social studies (other than sociology) including one three-credit course each in geography, psychology, economics and sociology, and six credits of American government and three credits of comparative government/politics; 4. Meet the requirements and standards for admission to teacher education, which are described fully under the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies or at http://education. boisestate.edu. Students must meet all knowledge, skill, and disposition requirements to remain in the program. The program combines content knowledge, theories of learning and human development, study of curriculum and methodology, to help students develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions essential for success in secondary school teaching. The program is grounded in the conceptual framework of reflective practitioner. Reflective practitioners adjust their teaching approaches and learning environment to the needs and backgrounds of their students. Candidates who complete this program have demonstrated evidence of meeting the Idaho Beginning Teacher Standards and are eligible for recommendation for state certification. 16 21 140 Sociology, Social Studies, Secondary Education (continued) *ED-CIFS 301 Teaching Experience I *ED-CIFS 302 Learning and Instruction *ED-CIFS 401 Professional Year -- Teaching Experience II *ED-CIFS 405 Teaching Secondary Social Studies *ED-LTCY 444 Content Literacy for Secondary Students *ED-SPED 350 Teaching Students with Exceptional Needs at the Secondary Level *Teaching Experience III/IV

NOTE: *You must apply for admission to secondary teacher education in order to enroll in these upper-division education courses. Completion of all requirements for graduation with a secondary education option may require more than 128 credit hours. See "Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Foundational Studies" for more information.

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EDTECH 202 Educational Technology: Classroom Applications HIST 112/212 United States History U.S. History World History (Any non-U.S. History course)

(Must complete 9 credits U.S. History and 3 in World History)

3 3 3 3 3 3 12 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 9 135-137

POLS 102 State and Local Government Comparative Government chosen from: POLS 311, 321, 324, 325, 329, 333 Social Studies Requirement

(Social Studies State Certification requires that at least one course be completed in each of the following disciplines: Economics, Geography, Psychology)

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology SOC 210 Computer Applications in Social Sciences SOC 301 Sociological Theory I SOC 302 Sociological Theory II SOC 310 Elementary Social Statistics SOC 311 Social Research SOC 498 Sociology Seminar Upper-division Sociology courses Total

Sociology, Social Studies, Secondary Education Emphasis Bachelor of Arts

Course Number and Title ENGL 101-102 Introduction to College Writing and Research Area I -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area I core course in literature Area I core course in a second field Area I core course in a third field Area I core course in any field Area II ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics ED-CIFS 201 Foundations of Education HIST 111/211 United States History POLS 101 American National Government Area III -- see page 45 for list of approved courses Area III core course in mathematics Area III core course in a second field Area III core course in any field -- continued -- 3-5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 6

Sociology Teaching Endorsement

Course Number and Title SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology SOC 210 Computer Applications in Social Science SOC 301 Sociological Theory I SOC 302 Sociological Theory II SOC 311 Social Research Upper-division sociology courses Total Credits 3 4 3 3 3 6 22

The sociology minor in Mexican-American studies requires a student to complete 18 hours of core courses in specified Mexican-American studies courses and an additional 6 credits in related topics selected from other disciplines. Students will be introduced to the issues and problems facing Mexican-Americans in the United States and Idaho. Students will have the opportunity to explore Mexican-American culture and how America's social institutions and social organizations relate to and react to the MexicanAmerican population. Special emphasis in the sociology classes is placed on examining the work of practitioners from applied sociology, clergy, legal profession, and social service agencies to ameliorate the problems facing Mexican-Americans.

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Mexican-American Studies Minor

Course Number and Title HIST 363 History of Mexico SOC 230 Introduction to Multi-Ethnic Studies SOC 332 Introduction to Mexican-American Studies SOC 333 Contemporary Issues of Chicanas/Chicanos SOC 493 Internship (emphasis on Hispanic placements) Courses chosen from: ANTH 419 Prehistory of Mexico ARTHIST 359 Pre-Columbian Art ED-BLESL 202 Mexican-American Tradition and Culture ED-BLESL 305 Spanish for the Bilingual Classroom ED-BLESL 306 Field Experience in the Bilingual or ESL Classroom FORLNG 360 Topics in Hispanic Literature HIST 361 Colonial Latin America HIST 362 Modern Latin America POLS 325 Latin American Politics SPANISH 202 Intermediate Spanish II SPANISH 203 Intermediate Spanish for the Native or NearNative Speaker SPANISH 303 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition SPANISH 304 Introduction to Hispanic Literature SPANISH 313 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition for Native Speakers SPANISH 377 Latin American Civilization and Culture SPANISH 385 Mexican American Civilization and Culture SPANISH 403 Survey of Latin American Literature I SPANISH 404 Survey of Latin American Literature II SPANISH 425 Mexican American Literature SPANISH 430 Topics in Latin American Literature SPANISH 490 Topics in Hispanic Cinema Total _____________________________ The Multi-Ethnic Studies major is an interdisciplinary program leading to a B.A. degree. The primary emphasis of the major is producing professionals capable of identifying sources of intercultural conflict, promoting intercultural conflict resolution, and advocating multicultural access to all facets of U.S. society. Course work examines current issues, trends, controversies, and practices involving multiculturalism and diversity in the U.S. To develop a program of study, prospective majors must contact the Department of Sociology. Credits 3 3 3 3 3 9-11 Area I or II courses SOC 230 Introduction to Multi-Ethnic Studies SOC 305 Race and Cultural Minorities SOC 480 Seminar in Multi-Ethnic Studies BASQ-STD/SOC 493 Internship

Ethnic Organization/Ethnic Issues Organization

Multi-Ethnic Studies (continued) 9 3 3 3 3 3

COMM 302 Research Methods OR GENDER 302 Research Methods and Perspectives OR SOC 311 Social Research Methods Content Areas (at least one course from each of the three following categories, totaling a minimum of 9 courses): History ANTH 307 Indians of North America ANTH 312 Prehistory of North America ANTH 419 Prehistory of Mexico ARTHIST 359 Pre-Columbian Art BASQ-STD 377 Basque History to 1700 BASQ-STD 378 Modern Basque History HIST 341 The Indian in United States History HIST 349 History of Multicultural America HIST 361 Colonial Latin America HIST 362 Modern Latin America HIST 363 History of Mexico HIST 366 History of Modern Africa: 1750-Present Literature and Culture ANTH 411 Language, Culture and Society BASQ-STD 335 Basque Culture BASQ-STD 353 The Arts in the Basque Country COMM 351 Intercultural Communication ED-BLESL 200 Cultural Diversity in the School ED-BLESL 202 Mexican-American Tradition and Culture ED-BLESL 305 Spanish for the Bilingual Classroom ENGL 213 African-American Literature ENGL 216 Cultural Exchange in Transnational Literatures ENGL 391 North American Indian Folklore and Literature ENGL 412 Women Writers FORLNG 310 Japanese Culture and Society FORLNG 320 China Today FORLNG 321 Chinese Culture Through Film FORLNG 360 Topics in Hispanic Literature GENDER 300 Introduction to Gender Studies GENDER 303 Introduction to Women's Studies GENDER 480 Seminar in Gender Studies SPANISH 202 Intermediate Spanish II SPANISH 203 Intermediate Spanish for the Native or NearNative Speaker SPANISH 303 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition SPANISH 304 Introduction to Hispanic Literature SPANISH 313 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition for Native Speakers SPANISH 377 Latin American Civilization and Culture SPANISH 385 Mexican American Civilization and Culture SPANISH 403 Survey of Latin American Literature I SPANISH 404 Survey of Latin American Literature II SPANISH 425 Mexican American Literature SPANISH 430 Topics in Latin American Literature SPANISH 490 Topics in Hispanic Cinema Modern Language

Two courses in a foreign language sequence

27-31

24-26

Multi-Ethnic Studies Bachelor of Arts

Course Number and Title ENGL 101-102 Introduction to College Writing and Research Area I -- see page 44 for list of approved courses Area I core course in literature Area I core course in a second field Area I core course in a third field Area I core course in any field Area II -- see page 44 for list of approved courses COMM 101 Fundamentals of Speech Communication Area II core course in history Area II core course in a third field Area II core course in any field Area III -- see page 45 for list of approved courses Area III core course in mathematics Area III core course in a second field Area III core course in any field -- continued -- 3-5 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 6

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Multi-Ethnic Studies (continued) Social and Political Issues BASQ-STD 323 Basque Politics BASQ-STD 379 Basque Migration to the Americas BASQ-STD 380 Colloquium in Basque Studies ED-BLESL 306 Field Experience in the Bilingual or ESL Classroom GENDER 301/SOC 471 Feminist Theory GENDER 371/SOC 371 The Social Psychology of Gender GENDER 380 Colloquium in Gender Studies POLS 325 Latin American Politics SOC 306 Sociology of African Americans SOC 307 The Asian American Social Experience SOC 332 Introduction to Mexican-American Studies SOC 333 Contemporary Issues of Chicanas/Chicanos SOC 421 Social Inequality SPANISH 475 Latin America Today SPANISH 476 Human Rights in Latin America Upper-division electives to total 40 credits Electives to total 128 credits Total 1-25 5-35 128 and confronts, challenges, and motivates students to know themselves better and understand some societal problems: for example, racism, prejudice, etc. The course deals with the degree to which ethnic relations involve questions of economic and political power and the distribution of the power. It looks at American society's institutional role in maintaining and perpetuating systematic inequality. SOC 278 MEXICAN-AMERICAN TRADITION AND CULTURE (3-0-3) (S). This class provides an exploration of Mexican-American traditions and culture. It explores the history of the Mexican-American people including their influence on contemporary American language, customs and beliefs. SOC 279 CONTEMPORARY MEXICAN SOCIETY (3-0-3)(F/S) (Diversity). The course will consist of an examination of the major social institutions in modern Mexico. The course will also focus on the social life and problems facing contemporary Mexico. Students will study the cultural diversity of contemporary Mexico and review Mexican social thinkers who analyze its national character. The complex relationship of Mexico with the United States will be explored including such topics as undocumented workers, drug trafficking, international politics, and transnational corporations. SOC 290 SOCIAL CONFLICT AND PEACEMAKING (3-0-3)(F). An introductory survey course covering broadly the kinds of conflict that occur between persons, groups, organizations, and societies, with attention to why these conflicts arise, and a range of peaceful solutions to conflicts using nonviolent, nonadversarial methods. The course ranges from inner personal conflict to the international nuclear arms race. Upper Division SOC 301 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY I (3-0-3)(F). Examination of the development of sociological theory from its philosophical precursors through the first decades of the twentieth century. PREREQ: SOC 101. SOC 302 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY II (3-0-3)(S). Examination of the development of sociological theory in the twentieth century and of the state of sociological theory today. PREREQ: SOC 301. SOC 305 RACIAL AND CULTURAL MINORITIES (3-0-3)(S). Comparative study of inter-ethnic relations. Problems and possibilities of genocide, oppression, integration, pluralism and equality. PREREQ: SOC 230 and upper-division standing. SOC 306 SOCIOLOGY OF AFRICAN AMERICANS (3-0-3)(F/S) (Diversity). Examination of the African American presence and experience in the contemporary United States will emphasize political, socio-economic, and cultural issues. Sociological and other perspectives will be introduced which offer promise in reconciling problems that separate peoples. SOC 307 THE ASIAN AMERICAN SOCIAL EXPERIENCE (3-0-3) (F/S)(Alternate years)(Diversity). Examination of the Asian presence and experience in the United States emphasizing current social, economic, political, and cultural issues. SOC 310 ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STATISTICS (3-2-4)(F/S). The application of measurements to social research data. Basic statistical measures, and techniques for their application, meaning, and use in research. Recommended for majors to be taken in the junior year and followed by SOC 311. PREREQ: SOC 101, high school algebra, and upper-division status. SOC 311 SOCIAL RESEARCH (3-0-3)(F,S). Introduction to the design of sociological research and the statistical analysis of social data. PREREQ: SOC 101 and SOC 310. SOC 312 POPULATION DEMOGRAPHY (3-0-3)(F/S)(Diversity). Techniques and methods for analyzing population growth, trends, and movement as reflected in actuarial data, birth-death rate; mobility, fertility and fecundity as these affect the societal patterns, especially planning for human service programs. SOC 320 RADICAL SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)(F)(Alternate years). Analysis of contemporary radical power theory and its application in the study of modern socioeconomic problems. This course will examine issues of social importance from the perspective of conflict theory, neo-Marxian and Elitist theory. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 325 SOCIOLOGY OF AGING (3-0-3)(F/S). Analysis of aging as a social process, emphasizing the changing roles as a result of the process, the demands made on and by society because of the way it defines and deals

Multi-Ethnic Studies Minor

Course Number and Title HIST 349 History of Multicultural America SOC 230 Introduction to Multi-Ethnic Studies SOC 305 Race and Cultural Minorities Multi-Ethnic studies electives chosen from at least two of the three content areas listed for the Multi-Ethnic Studies major Total Credits 3 3 3 12-14 21-23

Course Offerings

See page 63 for a definition of the course-numbering system. SOC --Sociology Lower Division SOC 101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)(Area II) (Diversity). An introduction to groups, organizations, and societies, and their impact on human behavior. Emphasis is on sociological perspectives, concepts, methods, and applications in areas such as organization, socialization, inequality, institutions, intergroup relations, change, etc. SOC 102 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (3-0-3)(Area II)(Diversity). A study of problems that arise due to breakdown of norms and value consensus in society, the causes and solutions to these problems. The student is challenged to continually reexamine his/her own values in reference to the problems under consideration. SOC 121 DATING AND MARRIAGE (3-0-3)(S). An informative study and discussion of mate selection, marital relationships and adjustments, parenthood and related subjects, each exploited at length in popular culture but usually ignored as a serious subject of academic examination. The course will emphasize factual knowledge, self understanding, and a sociological perspective on marriage in a changing society. SOC 201 THEORIES OF SOCIETY (3-0-3)(F). Introduction to the major analytical and interpretive theories of society, history, and human behavior, with an emphasis on the common theoretical concerns of the specific disciplines within the social sciences. PREREQ: SOC 101. SOC 210 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE (3-2-4) (F/S). The objectives of this course are (a) to develop an understanding of computer applications of social science data, and (b) to provide students an experience in the collection and analysis of social data with increased ease via the computer. SOC 230 INTRODUCTION TO MULTI-ETHNIC STUDIES (3-0-3)(F/S) (Area II)(Diversity). This course views majority and minority relations

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with age, and the problems created for society and for the aged as a result of values, attitudes, and beliefs. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 330 SOCIOLOGY OF VIOLENCE (3-0-3)(F)(Alternate years). The incidence of deliberate injury of one human by another is analyzed in terms of social and cultural patterns that act to produce, alter, or discourage acts of violence. The various forms violence may take are examined from a sociological perspective. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division status. SOC 331 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR (3-0-3)(F)(Alternate odd years). Analysis of behaviors which violate the norms of society, and the causes of and solutions for these forms of behavior. The challenge for students is to decide where the problem lies with those labeled deviant or with those doing the labeling. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division status. SOC 332 INTRODUCTION TO MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES (3-0-3) (F). Social, historical, and political experiences of Mexican-Americans. Attention is given to history, culture, identity, and contemporary issues of Mexican-Americans. PREREQ: SOC 102 or SOC 230 or PERM/INST. SOC 333 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES OF CHICANAS/CHICANOS (3-0-3)(S)(Diversity). Comparative analysis of contemporary socioeconomic and political issues confronting Mexican Americans in U.S. society. Topics include study of community, gender, labor, immigration, heterogeneous identity, environmental justice, and social change. Special attention given to comparing the Mexican American experience with other racial-ethnic groups. Institutional and social responses to contemporary issues will also be examined. PREREQ: SOC 230 or SOC 332 or PERM/INST. SOC 340 SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY (3-0-3)(F/S). An analysis of courtship, marriage, kinship, and family patterns in the United States and selected societies. Theories and facts about the relationships of these patterns to the larger society. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division status. SOC 351 SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS (3-0-3)(F)(Alternate years). Comparative analysis of the ways societies organize behavior around those values deemed necessary for survival, including family, religion, economy, government, etc. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 361 SOCIOLOGY OF WORK (3-0-3)(F/S)(Alternate even years). The social organization of work is examined in historical and contemporary perspectives. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 362 (CJ 362) CORRECTIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE (3-0-3) (F). The historical development, processes, and methods of operating the adult correctional system. Detailed study of the philosophy and development of treatment strategies in local, state, and federal correctional institutions. May be taken for CJ or SOC credit, but not both. PREREQ: Upper-division criminal justice standing. SOC 370 SOCIOLOGY OF LAW (3-0-3)(S)(Alternate years). Law enactment, enforcement, and adjudication are studied as social acts with social consequences. Theories and practices of legal action are reviewed as emerging from and impacting on the social structure. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 371 (GENDER 371) THE SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (3-0-3)(F/S) (Alternate years)(Diversity). Multinational social psychological research and theories are used to explore the processes by which societies apply gender definitions, social change, institutional policies, and relationships between women and men. May be taken for GENDER or SOC credit, but not for both. PREREQ: PSYC 101 or SOC 101, and upperdivision standing. SOC 380 POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)(F)(Alternate years). A survey of research literature and theory in political sociology, including attitudes, values, power structure, parties, and political participation in the U.S. This course will examine the pluralistic nature of society from the sociological perspective. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 390 (COMM 390) CONFLICT MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)(S). Examination of the causes of conflict, conflict management theory, and conflict management techniques applied in interpersonal, intergroup, organizational, and community settings. Discussion and skill development through experiential learning will focus on such conflict management techniques as interpersonal management, mediation, arbitration, negotiation, and reconciliation. May be taken for COMM or SOC credit, but not both. PREREQ: COMM 101 or SOC 290, upper-division standing. SOC 395 THE SOCIOLOGY OF PEACE AND WAR (3-0-3)(S). This course will focus on resolving violent conflicts between nations. It will survey the interpretations of sociologists and others in two basic areas: (1) the relationship between the enabling institutions of war and the nature and evolution of modern societies, and (2) emergent proscriptions, strategies, and social movements which invoke actions, attitudes, and ways of life directed towards creating a more peaceful future. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 403 SOCIAL CHANGE (3-0-3)(F/S)(Alternate years). Social factors which generate innovation, influence its acceptance or rejection, and determine its effects on society. Planning, collective behavior, diffusion, conflict, and other efforts to create change. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upperdivision standing. SOC 407 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION (3-0-3)(F/S)(Alternate years). Social science perspectives on religion. Religion viewed as human activity influencing and being influenced by social organization and social conditions. SOC 410 ADVANCED SOCIAL STATISTICS (3-0-3)(S). The methods of nonparametric statistics in the analysis of sociological data are examined in depth with application to research. PREREQ: SOC 101 and SOC 310 or equivalents as determined by consultation with department chair. SOC 412 QUALITATIVE SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS (3-0-3)(F). An intensive course in interpretive social science, covering the practice of field work ethnography, the use of computers in qualitative research, techniques of qualitative data analysis, and the writing of qualitative research reports. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 415 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY (3-0-3)(S). Social causes of juvenile delinquency. Solutions that are discussed arise from theories which suggest changing society more than the individual delinquent. Positive and negative activities of the juvenile justice system are also reviewed. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 417 CRIMINOLOGY (3-0-3)(F). An examination of the social and intellectual heritage of criminological theory. The student is challenged to understand crime as a sociological problem which is "explained" by theories that can be tested scientifically and evaluated critically. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 421 SOCIAL INEQUALITY (3-0-3)(S)(Alternate years). How inequalities of wealth, income, and prestige occur. How such inequalities affect behavior, personal philosophy, and life chances. Arguments for and against more equality will be examined in relation to issues such as: constraint and mobility; education and opportunity; consumerism and poverty; public policy and the politics of wealth and welfare. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 425 URBAN SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)(F/S)(Diversity). Examination of urban processes with a comparative examination of metropolitan and other urban communities. Emphasis is on urbanization and the institutions and policies shaping metropolitan life. SOC 431 (PSYC 431) SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0-3)(S). The primary focus is the individual; the unit of analysis, the interpersonal behavior event. A study of individual motives, emotions, attitudes, and cognitions with reference to interactions with other human beings. May be taken for either psychology or sociology credit, but not for both. SOC 101 and a course in statistics or research design are strongly recommended. PREREQ: PSYC 101, SOC 101, and upper-division standing. SOC 435 DRUGS IN SOCIETAL CONTEXT (3-0-3)(F/S). This class applies the sociological perspective on social problems to drug use. It examines how different social groups use drugs, attempt to control and prohibit the use of drugs, and the societal effects of using and controlling the use of drugs. SOC 440 ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)(F/S). Sociological approach to the study of environmentalism, social implications of environmental policy, environmental conflicts, and the distributive justice nature of environmental issues. SOC 471 (GENDER 301) FEMINIST THEORY (3-0-3)(F/S)(Diversity). Students encounter new perspectives by examining major theories directly useful to scholars in search of understanding and explaining gender relations.

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Chapter 12 -- Academic Programs and Courses Department of Sociology

May be taken for GENDER or SOC credit, but not for both. PREREQ: GENDER 300 and upper-division standing, or PERM/INST. SOC 480 SEMINAR IN MULTI-ETHNIC STUDIES (3-0-3)(F/S)(Alternate years). A capstone course for majors. Through advanced interdisciplinary reading from the social sciences as they pertain to ethnic issues in the United States, students will gain an appreciation of other cultures, examine complex ethnic issues and explore strategies to reduce interethnic tensions. SOC 481 SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER AND AGING (3-0-3)(F/S). A sociological examination of the myths and stereotypes that impact men and women as they age. The course will explore research efforts focused on aging in a gendered society and examine the myths and stereotypes; seek to discover the source of cultural beliefs, social structures of gendered identities, and how gender stratification creates disadvantage for older men and women. PREREQ: SOC 101 and upper-division standing. SOC 487 (POLS 487) ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND BUREAUCRATIC STRUCTURE (3-0-3)(F/S). Sociopolitical analysis of theories and concepts of complex social organizations, their application to public administration, and the inter-relationship between political science and sociological organizational theory. May be taken for SOC or POLS credit, but not for both. PREREQ: senior standing, PERM/INST. SOC 490 SENIOR PRACTICUM (V-V-3)(F/S). A capstone course where senior sociology majors complete experiential learning at sites selected in consultation with advisor and/or internship coordinator. Students meet weekly with internship coordinator or designee to discuss academic relatedness and progress of experiential learning. PREREQ: Senior sociology major with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. SOC 493 INTERNSHIP (V-V-V)(F/S). Upper-division students may select an internship program in consultation with department faculty and internship coordinator. The intent of the internship is to provide an experiential learning experience for students in a variety of settings in the community or on campus. PREREQ: upper-division standing and a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better. SOC 498 SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR (3-0-3)(S). Intensive study of selected problems in sociology. PREREQ: Senior standing in sociology major. SOC 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES (3-0-3) (F/S). As the culminating course for the Mexican-American Studies minor students will examine advanced theoretical and research issues concerning Mexican-Americans in a seminar setting. One objective will be for students to utilize their previous course work in the minor to enable them to read specialized studies in specific topics and case studies such as the dropout problem facing Mexican-American students; the role of fundamentalist religions in the Mexican-American community; and employment patterns of Mexican-Americans. The primary objective of the readings and class discussions will be to integrate the diverse course materials from the previous required classes in this minor. SOCSCI -- Social Science Upper Division SOCSCI 498 SEMINAR: SOCIAL SCIENCES AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS (3-0-3)(S). An intensive seminar focusing on selected topics from theory and research, which bear on the contributions of the social sciences to public affairs. Completion of a research methods course strongly recommended.

Spanish -- see Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

258

Boise State University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog

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