Read Microsoft Word - GMGN2589 Iss 1.doc text version

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010 Guidance Note Railway Group GM/GN2589

Issue One Date April 2004

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Synopsis This document gives guidance on the design of wagons to meet the requirements of Railway Group Standards. It also outlines the design scrutiny process for wagons incorporating previously used design features.

Signatures

removed from electronic version

Submitted by Vicki Austen Acting Standards Project Manager Authorised by Anne E Blakeney Acting Department Head Railway Group Standards Management This document is the property of Rail Safety and Standards Board Limited. It shall not be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the Department Head of Railway Group Standards, Rail Safety and Standards Board. Published by: Rail Safety and Standards Board Evergreen House 160 Euston Road London NW1 2DX © Copyright 2004 Rail Safety and Standards Board Limited

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

This page has been left blank intentionally

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 1 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Contents

Section Part A A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 Part B B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10 B11 B12 B13 B14 B15 B16 B17 Appendices A B C D E References Description Page

Issue record Implementation of this document Responsibilities Health and safety responsibilities Technical content Supply

2 2 2 2 2 2

Purpose Application of this document Definitions and acronyms Introduction Size of wagons Wheels and axles Axleboxes Springs and suspensions Buffing and drawgear Fittings on ends of wagons and clearances for operating staff Braking Structures Load restraint Curtain sides Earthing Wagon identification and marking Wagons with on-board equipment

3 3 3 7 10 12 14 14 16 18 19 19 21 22 22 22 23

Route availability ­ freight stock minimum dimensions Check list for UK wagons Check list for international wagons Sample livery diagram Width reduction calculations in accordance with data relating to W6A gauge

24 30 33 36 37 38

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

1

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 2 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Part A

A1 Issue record

Issue One Date April 2004 Comments Original document which replaces GM/RC2519

This document will be updated when necessary by distribution of a complete replacement.

A2 Implementation of this document

The publication date of this document is 03 April 2004. This document supersedes the following Code of Practice: Railway Group Code of Practice GM/RC2519 Issue No. 1 Title GN sections superseded by this document All sections Date(s) as of which sections are superseded 03 April 2004 (Whole document withdrawn as of this date)

Code of Practice ­ Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

A3 Responsibilities

Railway Group Guidance Notes are non-mandatory documents providing helpful information relating to the control of hazards and often set out a suggested approach, which may be appropriate for Railway Group* members to follow. * The Railway Group comprises Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd, Rail Safety and Standards Board Limited, and the train and station operators who hold Railway Safety Cases for operation on or related to infrastructure controlled by Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd. Network Rail Infrastructure Ltd is known as Network Rail. Rail Safety and Standards Board Limited is known as RSSB.

A4 Health and safety responsibilities

Each Railway Group member is reminded of the need to consider its own responsibilities to ensure health and safety at work and its own duties under health and safety legislation. RSSB does not warrant that compliance with all or any documents published by RSSB is sufficient in itself to ensure safe systems of work or operation or to satisfy such responsibilities or duties.

A5 Technical content

The technical content of this document has been approved by: Haydn Peers, Principal Traction and Rolling Stock Engineer. Enquires to be directed to RSSB ­ Tel: 020 7904 7518 or e-mail [email protected]

A6 Supply

Controlled and uncontrolled copies of this document may be obtained from the Industry Safety Liaison Dept, Rail Safety and Standards Board, Evergreen House, 160 Euston Road, London NW1 2DX or e-mail [email protected] Railway Group Standards can also be viewed at www.rssb.co.uk. 2 RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 3 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Part B

B1 Purpose

This document gives guidance on the design and acceptance of wagons intended for use on Network Rail controlled infrastructure.

B2 Application of this document

This document contains guidance which is applicable to the duty holders of the train operator category of Railway Safety Case. Specifically the contents of this document apply to the design of new, life extended or modified wagons for operation on Network Rail controlled infrastructure. Wagons in international service should comply with UIC and RIV regulations. International wagons operating predominantly within UK should additionally comply with Railway Group Standards.

B3 Definitions and acronyms

Acceptance testing A series of tests to demonstrate conformance of rail vehicles with mandatory requirements. Conformance certification body A qualified body with authority from Rail Safety and Standards Board to issue certificates of conformance for rail vehicles on its behalf. Certificate of authority to operate Written notification by the infrastructure controller to a train operator of its acceptance of successful completion of the route acceptance process. This notification specifies the equipment, the equipment configuration, operational requirements and limitations, route constraints and network factors within which acceptance has been granted for network operations. Certificate of conformance The formal declaration by a conformance certification body that the rail vehicle conforms to the relevant mandatory requirements within a specific area of certification, that is to say by design, as constructed, or as planned to be maintained. Certificate of engineering acceptance The formal declaration by a vehicle acceptance body (VAB) that the rail vehicle(s) conform(s) to all the relevant mandatory requirements. Cyclic top Cyclic top is the term used to describe a series of regular dips in the vertical alignment of one or both rails. They may not always be apparent visually because other top irregularities may obscure the cyclic pattern. Cyclic irregularities in track geometry have the potential, when combined with a vehicle's natural vertical response for a given speed and load, to cause a derailment. Design All the detail, (including drawings, calculations, test results, materials, and systems and component specifications) required to establish that a rail vehicle and its component parts will meet the engineering and operational requirements for system safety and safe interworking.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

3

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 4 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Design scrutiny The process of assessing a design to determine its conformance with the mandatory requirements. Engineering acceptance The process whereby conformance of rail vehicles to the mandatory requirements is confirmed and certificated. Engineering change A change to a rail vehicle, including control software, in the area of design, construction or maintenance, which affects conformance to the mandatory requirements. Mandatory requirements The requirements mandated in the Railway Group Standards listed in the current catalogue of Railway Group Standards, including the additional engineering acceptance list. Modification Engineering change to a rail vehicle that has the potential to affect a rail vehicle's conformance with the mandatory requirements. Private Owner Circular Letters Written engineering instructions as a means of communication between Network Rail (formerly British Rail) and operators/owners of Private Wagon Registration Agreement wagons. Private Owner Circular Letters is commonly abbreviated to PO/CL. RIV Regolamento Internazionale Veicoli. International vehicle regulations in association with UIC. Railway Group member Railway Group members (RGM) are infrastructure controller(s), train and station operators who hold Railway Safety Cases for operation on, or related to, the controlled infrastructure (as set out in The Railway Group Standards Code, Issue 1, January 2004) and Rail Safety and Standards Board. Rolling Stock Library The national central database of rail vehicle design and operational data, which is maintained by the infrastructure controller's authorised agent. Route acceptance The process leading to acceptance by the infrastructure controller, and formalised by the issue of a certificate of authority to operate. It confirms all safety issues associated with the physical and operational characteristics of specified rail vehicles (and their compatibility with the infrastructure on defined routes) have been examined, and that the associated risks have been reduced to a level which is as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP). Route availability The vertical static and dynamic loads of rail vehicles or the static load characteristic of a rail vehicle type, expressed as a route availability (RA) number as set out in GE/RT8006. Route availability number Route availability number is the number derived in accordance with the provisions GE/RT8006 to express either of the following: a) b) the static load characteristics of a rail vehicle type the assessed capacity of an underline bridge or route in terms of its capacity to carry the vertical static and dynamic loads due to different types of rail vehicle. RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

4

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 5 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Swept envelope A cross-sectional profile, taken at right angles to the track, enclosing all dynamic movements, static deflections and overthrows of all points along the surface of the vehicle, that can reasonably be expected to occur under the appropriate range of operating conditions as it sweeps past a theoretical track location. A family of swept envelopes is required to define a vehicle's performance on a route. Technically competent authority A company, or person, having proven competence in a particular technology or process and being independent of the company requiring the services of the technically competent authority. UIC Union Internationale des Chemins de Fer (International Union of Railways). Vehicle acceptance body A qualified body acting on behalf of Rail Safety and Standards Board with authority to issue certificates of engineering acceptance for rail vehicles operating or intended to operate on Network Rail controlled infrastructure.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

5

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 6 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B4 Introduction

This document primarily gives guidance on the design of wagons to meet Railway Group Standards, to operate on Network Rail controlled infrastructure, and does not constitute a complete specification for any particular wagon. It is intended as a reference to direct designers towards appropriate Railway Group Standards and enable them to benefit from the accumulated best practice of modern wagon design, which has been included in this Guidance Note. This document also contains guidance for designers based on experience from previous designs, but it is not intended to be a complete repository of all previous design experiences. This document gives guidance on the UK engineering acceptance process. There are currently three potential acceptance processes: a) b) The current situation for vehicles that spend all or the predominant time in the UK is that they are accredited by the engineering acceptance process. Wagons in international traffic are registered by RIV and have an engineering acceptance certificate endorsed as such for the UK. Vehicles that operate on only UK domestic journeys should be accredited by the engineering acceptance process too, even if they are internationally registered. In the future European Conventional Interoperability for freight vehicles will describe a process for accreditation by a Notified Body.

c)

B4.1 TSI Precedence The Technical Specification for Interoperability (TSI) for Freight Wagons is due to be published for consultation in April 2004. The Department for Transport has published the draft Regulations on Conventional Interoperability. Once these regulations are enacted and the TSI is published in the Official Journal of the European Community (OJEC), it has the force of law in Great Britain for those wagons within its scope. Once the TSI is published, the requirements it contains will take precedence over Railway Group Standards (and other standards mentioned in this Guidance Note). Where there is a conflict between a requirement of the TSI and RGS, the TSI is to be complied with for wagons in international traffic. However as currently written the TSI permits the building of wagons for use solely within Great Britain to continue in accordance with the national standards (or their subsequent replacements) identified in this Guidance Note. The TSI and associated Regulations on Conventional Interoperability will change the process of vehicle acceptance and route acceptance approval process. There will also be some new concepts introduced which enable some components to be approved separately from the vehicle. B4.2 Operation on Network Rail controlled infrastructure Currently wagons can operate on Network Rail controlled infrastructure only after compliance with Railway Group Standard GM/RT2000, which sets out the requirements for the engineering acceptance of vehicles, note the impending publication of TSI referred to in previous paragraph. Guidance on the compliance arrangements within Railway Group Standards is set out in GM/GN2561. Early in the design phase the designer should consider if the vehicle is a freight wagon or an on-track machine and hence needs to comply with GM/RT2400. A definition is set out in GM/RT2000, but the designer is strongly advised to seek guidance and reach agreement with a vehicle acceptance body (VAB). The designer is reminded that if a non compliance or derogation is required against an existing Railway Group Standard (using the process set out in The Railway Group Standards Code, Issue 1, January 2004), the application to Rail Safety and Standards Board is required to be made by a Railway Group member holding the train operator's Railway Safety Case for operation of that vehicle. 6 RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 7 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Each application is considered by the Traction and Rolling Stock Subject Committee, who approve or reject the application. In addition vehicles are required to obtain route acceptance in accordance with GE/RT8270. Railway Group Standard GE/RT8270 sets out details of the procedure to be followed by operators when new wagons are to be introduced onto the Network Rail controlled infrastructure; the procedure may also apply to wagons which have undergone engineering change or when operation on new routes is proposed. The designer is advised of the need for early consultation with Network Rail in respect of route availability. Should any bridge assessment studies or work be required to the structures to accommodate the wagons on the proposed routes, such work is likely to be on the critical path for acceptance. Users of this Guidance Note are advised to check the application of additional Railway Group Standards by reference to the latest issue of the Catalogue of Railway Group Standards. B4.3 Compliance with UK health & safety legislation It is emphasised that Railway Group Standards set out only the minimum requirements for safe interworking and do not affect the responsibility of builders, owners and operators of the wagons for the safe design, construction, maintenance and use thereof. It is a requirement of GM/RT2468 that a whole vehicle design risk assessment is carried out, and certificate issued by the manufacturer, for the design against all UK health and safety legislation. There is also an HMRI acceptance process in addition to the engineering acceptance process set out in GM/RT2000 ­ see Figure 1.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

7

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 8 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Figure 1 Acceptance of railway vehicles

ORGANISATIONS INVOLVED Engineering acceptance process GM/RT2000 Certificates of conformance Other route specific and operational vehicle issues Vehicle design Vehicle construction Maintenance

Train operator or third party and conformance certification body

Certificate of engineering acceptance

Train operator or third party and vehicle acceptance body

Certificate of technical acceptance - optional (see GE/RT8270)

Train operator or third party and the infrastructure controller

Route acceptance panel (RSAB) certificate of authority to operate (see GE/RT8270) HMRI approval of vehicle (see Transport & Works Act)

Train operator or third party and the infrastructure controller

Train operator or third party and HMRI

Registration as `operational' on RSL (see GM/RT2453)

Train operator and Rolling Stock Library

VEHICLE APPROVED FOR OPERATION

8

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 9 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B4.4 Vehicle testing To meet the requirements of the engineering acceptance process it may be necessary to check conformance of the design with mandatory requirements by acceptance testing, or validated simulation, as set out in GM/RT2000 and RSSB Approved Code of Practice GM/RC2510. It is the appointed design conformance certification body who decides what testing, and the level of testing that is required. B4.5 Design for maintenance Designers should give consideration to future maintenance requirements in the design of wagons. The maintenance requirements are reviewed as set out in GM/RT2004. B4.6 The design submission The conformance certification body undertaking the scrutiny of the design is required to certify that, `the design ... has been scrutinised in accordance with GM/RT2001 and that the design complies with the appropriate mandatory requirements as defined by Railway Group Standards'. To assist designers in ensuring that they have considered all necessary requirements check lists have been prepared (set out in Appendix B) for wagons to operate predominantly on Network Rail controlled infrastructure, and Appendix C for wagons in international traffic. (Note that both appendices B and C apply to international wagons in predominantly domestic operation). It should be noted that the checklists in these appendices are current at time of publication and will not be updated unless this Guidance Note is amended.

B5 Size of wagons

B5.1 Overall dimensions B5.1.1 Gauge The requirements for the overall (gauge) dimension of wagons are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2149; additional guidance will be provided by proposed Guidance Note GE/GN8573. Appendix E sets out a worked example of gauge reductions for a bogie wagon using the W6-A gauge, which is the common freight loading gauge. The use of the W6-A gauge ensures optimum route access; however it should be noted that certain locations are more restrictive than the W6-A gauge. It is possible to operate wagons that exceed the W6-A gauge, but they could be subject to route restriction. This could require further swept envelope calculations. Compliance with a gauge is also to be taken into account with suspension displacements. Design Guide BASS 501 sets out full details and guidance on the preparation of swept envelopes. Railway Group Standard GM/RT2149 makes it clear that the operation of a wagon cannot commence until the kinematic considerations of the wagon have been assessed for the intended route or routes over which the wagon is to operate, although this does not necessarily require a swept envelope to be produced. If a wagon is designed to W6-A gauge it will clear the swept envelope requirements of route acceptance for the majority of routes. As a wagon's dimensions increase beyond W6-A more work is required to gain acceptance. The underclearance requirements of the gauge should be considered at all times. In this respect, bottom doors of empty wagons should clear the gauge when in the open position, thus permitting wagons with defective door gear to pass on Network Rail controlled infrastructure. Wagons that fail this requirement should be lettered to show that the wagon is not permitted on Network Rail controlled infrastructure when the doors are open. The effect of vehicle body underframe deflection under load conditions giving the worst deflections, minimum wheel diameter and worn suspension should also be taken into account.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

9

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 10 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B5.1.2 Mechanical handling and lineside equipment Existing wagons, which interface with mechanical handling or lineside equipment, for example `merry-go-round' trains, should conform, additionally, to the requirements set out in CP-PM-2 and CP-PM-1 respectively. Note that trackside equipment associated with mechanical handling may be closer to gauge than normal and care should be taken to assess each location the wagon is likely to be used. Particular attention is drawn to the possible conflict between the underclearance requirements of W6-A and the mechanical handling equipment gauge. Any advice concerning static structures should be obtained from the infrastructure controller of the location. B5.1.3 Route availability system The route availability number allocated to a particular wagon is dependent upon various factors such as axleload, wheel spacing, etc and determines the lines over which the wagon may operate. Railway Group Standard GE/RT8006 sets out the procedures to be observed when assessing wagons for specific routes. In general, two-axle wagons and wagons with two-axle bogies designed to the parameters set out in Appendix A have been accepted with few or no restrictions, although it cannot be guaranteed that compliance with Appendix A will achieve acceptance over a particular route. In particular wagons with an axle loading in excess of 22.5 tonnes could have operating speed restrictions applied which can have an impact on the availability of suitable track access. Early advice to Network Rail RSAB of the proposed design should elicit comments that can then be considered in the design process. B5.1.4 Maximum dimensions The maximum dimensions set out in Appendix A for bogie wagons covering overhang and inner wheelbase are those specified to avoid infringement of track circuit and signalling requirements in GM/RT2149. Care should be taken in designing long wheelbase 2-axle wagons in view of the problems that they present in negotiating small radius track curves. B5.1.5 Minimum dimensions The minimum dimension of 4572 mm (15' 0") for the wheelbase of 2-axle wagons having axle loads of 20.5 t and above, set out in Appendix A, has been found to result in riding problems on jointed track and the effects of cyclic top. Careful selection of suspension is important for the design of a wagon having a wheelbase that is a sub-multiple of rail lengths (normally 60 ft). Further guidance is set out in Appendix A of this Guidance Note and in UIC pamphlet 530-2. It is recommended that the ratio of wheelbase to length over buffers is not less than 0.54. It has been found that the risk of derailment due to end loads significantly increases with lower values. B5.2.1 Derailment and roll-over The combination of wheels and suspension, set out in sections B6 and B8 of this document, should be designed to ensure acceptable resistance against flange climbing derailment and against roll-over induced by overspeeding, as set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2141. The vehicle wheelset and suspension combination has to be designed to withstand track twist to the limits set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2141. B5.2.2 Stability in extreme winds Railway Group Standard GM/RT2142 sets out the requirements to resist the overturning of railway vehicles in extreme wind conditions. Consideration should be given to keeping the centre of gravity as low as possible.

10

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 11 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B5.3 Exterior design The designer should consider the potential damage caused to other vehicles in the event of a collision. Where possible sharp edges and rigid protrusions should be avoided, although this is not a mandated requirement.

B6 Wheels and axles

B6.1 General The requirements for the design and manufacture of wheels and axles are set out in the following Railway Group Standards: GM/RT2466 GM/RT2470 GM/TT0088 Railway Wheelsets Wheelset Supplier Qualification Permissible Track Forces

Additional guidance to these standards is given in the following documents: GM/RC2513 GM/RC2566 Commentary on Permissible Track Forces Recommendations for Railway Wheelsets

B6.2 Permissible axleloads and wheel diameter The relationships between axleload and wheel diameter that have been previously accepted are set out in Appendix A. Alternative relationships are acceptable provided that compliance with the requirements set out in GM/TT0088 can be demonstrated. Where the vehicle is not fully compliant with the requirements of GM/TT0088, then the details set out in GE/RT8270 require that the vehicle should undergo route acceptance. It is possible to obtain derogations from these standards; the process is set out in the Railway Group Standards Code, Issue 1, January 2004. Derogations have previously been granted in respect of wheel diameter and axleload, but it should be noted that the train operator will have to apply for a new derogation for each new design. B6.3 Journal size The journal size should be designed to suit for each application. As a guide the following journal size and load have previously been successfully used: Journal diameter 120 mm 130 mm x 217 mm long Type A 130 mm x 191 mm long Type B 140 mm 150 mm Load on rail/axle 18 t 20.5 t 22.5 t 23 t 25.4 t

B6.4 Inboard bearings If inboard bearings are considered it should be noted that this will increase the size of bearing, see document TM/TC0001 'Design Guide for the Calculation of Stresses in Axles with Inboard Journals', Issue 1, Revision A, August 1990. Where inboard bearings are used in a vehicle design they will not be visible to existing trackside hot axle box detectors, see B7.2, and an alternative means of bearing temperature monitoring should be provided. B6.5 Track circuit actuation To ensure satisfactory operation of track circuits, wagon wheelsets should provide an electrically conductive path between wheel treads. Whilst stationary, when new, the maximum dc resistance allowed is 10 m, as set out in GM/RT2466.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

11

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 12 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B6.6 Wheel tread profiles B6.6.1 Selection The application of the appropriate wheel tread profile is essential to ensure satisfactory ride performance with the chosen suspension arrangement. Wheel tread profiles approved for operation on the Network Rail controlled infrastructure are defined in GM/RT2466. To assist in selection of the most suitable tread profile for a suspension arrangement a list of the typical applications of the approved tread profiles is set out in section B6.6.2. The suitability of a tread profile and suspension arrangement combination on a vehicle can be demonstrated by a dynamic study. Guidance on the suitability of tread profiles can be obtained from a Technically Competent Authority. B6.6.2 Wheel tread profiles appropriate to wagon and suspension types Historically the following combinations of profile and suspension type have been found to give satisfactory performance. Profile Ident P1 Description The 1 in 20 coning of the P1 profile is required to ensure the lateral stability of the older types of wagon with simple suspensions. The P5 profile, with a 60° flange angle and a thicker flange, when compared with the P6 profile, gives a reduced wheelset/track lateral clearance which has been found to promote improved lateral ride. The flange of the P6 profile incorporates a 68° flange angle, important on torsionally stiff wagons with positively located wheelsets. Use of the 68° flange means that a higher lateral/vertical wheel force ratio can be sustained before flange climbing occurs. The problem of poor lateral ride quality found when this profile has been used with certain types of suspension has prevented its widespread use. The P8 profile has a `worn' (hollow) tread in addition to a `worn' flange (68°) and thus during service the profile changes shape very little. This profile with suitable wheelset yaw stiffness, ensures good curving performance with a resultant reduction in flange wear on large and medium radius curves and also gives vehicle stability over very high mileage when applied to appropriate suspension types. Example Applications The use of this profile on new designs is now discouraged, because modern profiles result in better ride quality. Wagons fitted with Y25 type bogies and derivatives of this bogie, for example FBT6, Y33 etc, also the AM3 bogie has used this profile successfully.

P5

P6

This profile was extensively used in the past for wagons up to 60 mph. For bogie wagons, which operate at speeds in excess of 60 mph, the use of P5 profiles is recommended.

P8

New suspensions specially designed to accept high conicity wheel tread profiles, for example 25.4 t axleload taperleaf and cross-braced bogies. LTF and TF25 bogies.

12

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 13 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Profile Ident P10 Description The P10 profile is derived from the standard UIC profile detailed in leaflet 510-2. It has a thick flange combined with a 70° flange angle. Modified version of P10 profile with larger flanges, to assist negotiation of obtuse crossings.

Example Applications 2-axle and bogie wagons in international traffic having a wheel diameter in the range 760 mm - 1000 mm. Also as an alternative to P5 for Y25 type bogies in domestic traffic only. UIC profile used by vehicles with small wheel diameters, that is to say below 760 mm.

S1002SW

B6.6.3 Application of profiles All the wheels on a vehicle should have the same profile. Note: Where a change from any other profile type to P5/P10 is required, it should be noted that to turn this profile from any other type requires a large amount of metal removal. B6.6.4 Identification of profiles on vehicles The appropriate profile identification should be painted on the solebar of 2-axle wagons and on the bogie frame of bogie wagons as set out in Appendix D.

B7 Axleboxes

B7.1 Bearings New wagons should be fitted with roller bearing axleboxes or cartridge bearing units with cast steel adaptors, which should be those that have already proven to be satisfactory in service, or are acceptable to the conformance certification body. When using cartridge bearing units on two-axle wagons with laminated or parabolic spring suspensions, experience has shown that use of adaptors with a full bore feature, providing a close fit around the outside of cartridges, minimises incorrect bearing loadings from whatever source. Consideration should be given to prevention of corrosion by water ingress of full bore adaptors. B7.2 Hot axle bearing detection Wagons should be designed to permit the requirements set out in GE/RT8014 for hot axlebox detectors to view specific areas of the bearing and journal. On board detection will be required if the detectors cannot view the specified areas. The vehicle design should include shielding if hot cargoes are being carried, to prevent spurious hot axlebox detector activation.

B8 Springs and suspensions

B8.1 Coil springs B8.1.1 Design It has been found that satisfactory results are obtained when coil springs are designed to BS Specification 1726 Part 1 1964 - Design and Specification of Coil Springs. There is also a European standard, EN13906-1 (formerly DIN 2089-1) ­ Cylindrical helical springs made from round wire and bar - Calculation and design ­ Part 1: Compression Springs. B8.1.2 Manufacture Guidance for the manufacture of springs is set out in BR Specification 151. B8.1.3 Material The use of steel to BS EN 10089:2002 has been found to give satisfactory performance. RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD 13

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 14 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B8.1.4 Dynamic load range To allow for dynamic displacement caused by track irregularities, the springs should be designed to cater for full load ± 30%, and ± 50% in tare. B8.2 Laminated springs B8.2.1 Design Laminated bearing springs designed in accordance with BR Report P9 have previously been accepted, but their use now is not recommended because of the superior performance of coil springs. B8.3 Parabolic taperleaf springs B8.3.1 Design Although, like laminated springs, the use of parabolic taperleaf springs is not now recommended, if parabolic taperleaf springs are used, special attention should be paid to the bump stop clearance to avoid overstressing the spring. If they are used then careful attention should be given to friction augmentation to damping, problems have been encountered with non-clamped friction augment devices. Parabolic taperleaf springs should only be purchased from well established suppliers as early failure of spring leaves has occurred on some parabolic springs. B8.3.2 Minimum tare when new To mitigate against the risk of derailment, it has been found that the minimum tare weight of a 2-axle wagon fitted with parabolic springs and hydraulic buffers should be 10.5 t. B8.4 Suspension At the present time the Office of the Rail Regulator sets the track access charges. A proportion of the charge is levied in accordance with the perceived track damage a vehicle may cause. This has been based on the following parameters that affect the level of vertical force imparted into the track: a) b) c) d) e) unsprung mass vertical forces generated from the general ride of the vehicle axleload dirt factor (for example coal spillage) speed.

In the usage charge formulae produced by the Office of the Rail Regulator the vertical forces component, shown in b) above, is called the `rolling stock factor', and this depends on suspension type. The charges against the generic suspension types used are spread across seven bands as shown below: Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 Band 4 Band 5 Band 6 Band 7 4 wheel wagon with pedestal suspension 4 wheel wagon having leaf springs and friction damping Bogie wagon with three piece bogie 4 wheel wagon with parabolic springs, and bogie wagon with enhanced three piece bogie for example `swing motion' Bogie wagon with primary springs for example Y25 Bogie wagon with enhanced primary springs for example LTF, TF25 and `Axlemotion' bogies Bogie wagon with enhanced primary springs and steering

Band 1 attracts the highest cost and band 7 the lowest. The spread of cost across the seven bands is 20%. Up-to-date information and freight usage charge formulae can be found on the website of the Office of the Rail Regulator.

14

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 15 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B8.4.1 Bogie suspension design Some guidance on bogie position and axle weights is given in Appendix A of this document. Figure A2 of that appendix sets out some maximum and minimum dimensions. Figure A3 sets out some worked examples of compliant and noncompliant static wheel loads and minimum wheel diameters derived in accordance with the requirements set out in GM/TT0088. Attention is drawn to the need to provide a means to lubricate the contact faces of centre pivot castings where there is metal to metal contact. The lubrication of non-metallic centre pivot liners should be prevented. B8.4.2 Bogie suspension movement Care should be taken to ensure suitable clearances for bogie rotation and pitch. This is a route acceptance issue, as set out in GE/RT8270, but a pitch allowance of between 1.5 o and 3 o is normal. The designer should calculate the clearance of moving parts for the minimum curve likely to be encountered and it has been found beneficial to then add 6 mm clearance. The design should ensure that mechanical, pneumatic or electrical connections between body and bogie do not foul or restrict bogie movement. B8.4.3 Existing two axle suspension designs Industry experience has shown that new designs of two-axle wagon suspensions are unlikely to achieve 60 mph running due to stability issues, and their use is discouraged. It should be noted that there is no known design that complies to current Railway Group Standards. Designers should be aware that two-axle wagons with stiff suspensions are known to react adversely with cyclic top track conditions. B8.4.4 Two axle suspension axleguards The lateral stiffness of the axleguard assembly is important for the correct functioning of many 2-axle wagon suspensions. UIC leaflet 517 sets out design criteria.

B9 Buffing and drawgear

The requirements for coupling systems are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2190. Typical arrangements of mechanical coupling systems are set out in Code of Practice GM/RC2509, which will be replaced by GM/GN2690. B9.1 Buffers B9.1.1 Type It has been found that the use of hydraulic buffers provides improved protection to vehicles and contents, and confers an improved ability to propel the wagons safely around curves, when compared with other buffer types. To prevent damage from the commodity being carried, care should be taken in the application of certain buffer types where they will be exposed to an abrasive environment. B9.1.2 Head size The attention of designers is drawn to the importance of ensuring that buffer heads are of a sufficient size to enable safe negotiation of the following track geometry: a) b) c) straight track to 75 m radius - no transition continuous curve of 75 m radius reverse (`S') curve of 120 m radius with 3 m intermediate straight.

The above should apply with screw couplings adjusted such that the buffer faces are just in contact with the vehicle on straight and level track or with the Instanter coupling in the `short' position. RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD 15

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 16 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

UIC leaflet 527-1 sets out a method for assessing buffer head size, and guidance for reverse curve layouts set out in UIC leaflet 530-2. However, it should be noted that 75 mm is considered to be the minimum desirable overlap to prevent buffer locking. As part of the route acceptance process set out in GE/RT8270, consideration will be given to wagons having dimensions that result in only being capable of negotiating larger radius curves. In such instances the applicable radius for continuous curve negotiation should be marked on the wagon. B9.1.3 Energy absorption Buffers are selected on their ability to absorb kinetic energy (KE) and differing buffer designs have been developed for wagons of differing commodities, longitudinal strength and gross laden weight (GLW). Experience has indicated that KE absorption values of 40 kJ and 80 kJ applied to wagons of 51 t and 102 t GLW respectively have provided protection with conventional train formations. However, designers should satisfy themselves that these values will provide sufficient protection for the planned mode of operation of the wagons, particularly in long, heavy trains. It can be assumed that the wagon and load together absorb 25% of the KE. B9.1.4 Buffer heights The maximum and minimum allowable buffer heights are set out in GM/RT2190. The maximum height should be taken in tare condition with new wheels, and minimum height with wagon laden and minimum size wheels. The suggested target buffer height for new wagons is 1054 mm, to permit the upward adjustment which is sometimes necessary, and allows for some suspension settlement. Wagons intended for light payloads or which have a limited tare to laden deflection could be set at a lower new height provided that the fully worn laden height does not fall below the 940 mm minimum. B9.2 Drawgear B9.2.1 Typical assemblies The range of standard designs is set out in the appendices of the RSSB Approved Code of Practice GM/RC2509 (to be superseded by GM/GN2690). Greater detail is shown in the following drawings: C1-S-9006276 C1-A0-9006687 F-A0-8892 F-S-12338 B1-C0-9029821 B1-C0-9029843 B1-C0-9029844 - Swivel type 620 mm buffer projection - Swivel type 520 mm buffer projection - Rigid drawgear using BR screw couplings - Rigid drawgear using instanter couplings - Couplings - Hooks - Draw springs

B9.2.2 Couplings for 56 t traction load The couplings listed below have been found to give satisfactory results in a 56 t traction application. C1-A2-9000275 - International screw coupling, rated at 56 t - It should be noted that the standard UIC screw coupling does not meet the 56 t traction load F-A0-13970 - `BR' screw coupling B9.2.3 Auto couplers The only centre couplers previously accepted by BR are AAR approved designs with Type E and F heads. These incorporate safety features to prevent coupler disengagement in the event of derailment or a pull-out. In the event of a derailment, the vehicles tend to remain upright and in line. 16 RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 17 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

When selecting the new wagon coupler height and knuckle size the designer should be mindful of other vehicles to which the wagon may be required to be coupled. The knuckle size selected should allow for adequate overlap in all load and height conditions likely to be encountered. Designers should be aware of the effect on coupler engagement of large suspension displacements. It has been found that the fitment of lower shelf brackets is helpful in preventing inadvertent uncoupling. Swinghead, rather than drophead, couplings assist in improving manual handling. The swinghead should swing to the left (when viewed from the front), and should be capable of locking in either position. The uncoupling mechanism, if only mounted on one side, should be on the left-hand side.

B10 Fittings on ends of wagons and clearances for operating staff

B10.1 Lamp bracket In order to comply with the requirement set out in GM/RT2180 to show a red tail light, any wagon that can be formed as the last wagon in a train should be fitted with a lamp bracket. An acceptable design is shown in UIC leaflet 532. B10.2 Clearance for operating staff B10.2.1 Berne rectangle Clearances for operating staff to couple and uncouple should be provided. It is recommended that compliance with UIC leaflet 521 is achieved, even though it is not mandated for UK domestic wagons. UIC leaflet 521 gives full details of the clearance requirements, commonly known as the Berne rectangle. B10.2.2 Restricted clearance Where 520 mm projection buffers are used it is known that brake couplings and hoses project into the space described in clause B10.2.1. Swinghead couplings also infringe the Berne rectangle on one side. B10.3 Overhanging superstructure B10.3.1 General principles Wagon bodies and superstructure could, subject to the provisions of clause B10.2.1, project beyond the headstock. To prevent contact between adjacent vehicles, they should not project beyond the vertical line through the face of the buffers when compressed with the wagon standing on an incline of 3º 30', and the adjacent vehicle is on straight and level track. These principles should also be observed when the wagons are standing on level track and on the minimum lateral curve specified for the vehicles. B10.3.2 Specific exceptions Recesses in the ends of wagons designed to accommodate projections on adjacent wagons are acceptable only if the wagons are permanently coupled as a single unit. Excessive overhang is acceptable, but only if permanently coupled to a suitable match wagon. B10.4 Access ladders Access ladders fitted to wagons should wherever possible comply with BS4211: 1994 Class A or B. Cross platforms at a height of more than 1400 mm above rail level, and intended to be accessed while the wagon is under overhead electric wires, should have a protective canopy. Safety considerations may dictate that cross platforms positioned lower than 1400 mm or not normally intended to be used under overhead electric wires may still require a canopy because of the operational activity.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

17

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 18 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B10.5 Air isolating cock and connections B10.5.1 Position The position of air isolating cocks and connections at headstocks should be as shown on the following drawings: a) b) C1-A0-9001687 C1-A1-9016094 - for 2 pipe brake system - for 1 pipe brake system

B10.5.2 Through air pipe wagons Wagons having only a through air pipe should have the cock positioned as set out in clause B10.5.1 b). Note that Railway Group Standard GM/RT2045 requires that all new vehicles are fitted with a power brake. B10.5.3 Colour coding The colour of vehicle end air couplings should be: Valve & handle a) b) c) Train brake pipe Air reservoir pipe Through air pipe RED YELLOW WHITE Coupling head RED YELLOW RED

B11 Braking

B11.1 Braking policy The braking policy for freight wagons is set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2045. The Freight Technical Committee business standard 001 (which replaces the former British Rail document MT227) gives further guidance and brake test procedures. B11.2 Braking performance and system requirements B11.2.1 Performance Railway Group Standard GM/RT2043 sets out the requirements for the braking system and performance for freight vehicles running solely within UK. For international wagons the more onerous requirements of UIC 544-1 should be met. B11.2.2 Brake force GM/RT2040 sets out how the standard value of brake force data should be calculated for inclusion in the Rolling Stock Library database. B11.2.3 Parking brake The parking/hand brake wheel should apply the brake with the minimum of turns, consistent with the design of vehicle. It is beneficial that the wheel should take approximately 10 to 15 turns from being released to an application (sufficient to hold laden vehicle on a 1 in 40 incline) using reasonable force to the wheel. Depending on the design of brake applied, a reasonable force could be considered to be 500 N. The parking brake application should be maintained during loading and unloading of the wagon.

B12 Structures

B12.1 Proof and fatigue loads Railway Group Standard GM/RT2100 sets out the structural requirements for wagon bodies, underframe and superstructure, and bogies. Guidance Note GM/GN2560 sets out guidance on structural requirements. Designers should note that UIC wagons do not meet the requirements of GM/RT2100 due to lateral fatigue issues. Specific requirements for the tanks of tank wagons are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2101. 18 RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 19 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B12.2 Finite element analysis Designers are recommended that, to demonstrate compliance to Railway Group Standard GM/RT2100, a finite element analysis should be undertaken. In the case of modifications the analysis should include as much of the vehicle structure as necessary to be assured that the modification is not increasing stress levels above the acceptance limits in adjacent areas. B12.3 Jacking and lifting The strength requirements for jacking and lifting points are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2100. B12.4 Recovery after accidents Requirements for the design of wagon structures to enable safe recovery after accidents are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2260. B12.5 Door, floor and side wall proof load cases B12.5.1 Side wall loads Wagon side walls should be designed to accept an internal loading of 0.4 g, the load being distributed over the full fixed wall area. B12.5.2 Doors Wagon doors should be designed to withstand the load case shown below: B12.5.2.1 Door areas of wagon sides (two leaved doors) With the door in position and locked, a transverse force simulating the shifting of the load should be applied at the centre of each door leaf and over an area of 2 1 m , simultaneously applied on each leaf, increasing loads up to 8 kN. No significant permanent deformation or deterioration in elements of the door or its securing / rolling / sliding / guiding gear should be permitted. B12.5.2.2 Full length side doors (sliding walls) With the sliding doors in the closed position a transverse force simulating the shifting of the load should be applied to each of the doors in the following manner: a) b) 20 kN force uniformly distributed over a square surface of 1m side length situated in the centre of the door. 20 kN force uniformly distributed over a rectangular surface area equal to the length of the door with a width of 1.2 m situated immediately above the top surface of the floor.

No significant permanent deformation or deterioration in elements of the door or its securing / rolling / sliding / guiding gear should be permitted. B12.5.2.3 Hopper doors Hopper doors should be fitted with primary and secondary locking systems to prevent a single point failure causing doors to open. Pneumatically powered doors may be supplied with air from the wagon's air reservoir pipe provided that it does not affect the wagon braking performance. B12.5.3 Internal load restraints In those cases where the above loads produce deflections of the door or wall, the magnitude of which causes gauge infringement, internal load restraints should be fitted and used. B12.5.4 Floors Floors should be designed to be suitable for the purpose intended. Floor loading specifications and tests can be found in the following documents:

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

19

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 20 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

BS3951-2.1 : 1991 ERRI DT 135 (B 12) section A.3 (currently shown only available in French and German) Consideration should be given during floor design to the additional fork lift truck loadings, which have been known to cause problems.

B13 Load restraint

B13.1 Containers and swap bodies B13.1.1 Twist locks The location of Twist locks is given in the latest issue of UIC 571-4, at time of publication. a) Fatigue loadings The location devices and associated mountings should be capable of withstanding fatigue loads resulting from the application of the following accelerations, applied to the maximum gross weight load unit capable of being conveyed. The derived load should to be applied at the base plane of the load unit, when restrained by the quantity of Twist locks indicated, these being assumed to share the load evenly: i) ii) iii) In longitudinal direction ± 0.2 g In transverse direction ± 0.25 g In vertical direction ± 0.6 g ) restrained ) at four ) locations

As set out in GM/RT2100 these should be considered as the sum of the 7 three fatigue load cases for 10 cycles. b) Proof loadings These location devices and associated mountings should be capable of withstanding proof loads resulting from the application of the following accelerations, applied to the maximum gross weight load unit capable of being conveyed. The derived load should to be applied at the base plane of the load unit when restrained by the quantity of Twist locks indicated: i) ii) iii) in longitudinal direction 2 g in transverse direction 1 g in vertical down direction 2 g restrained at two locations restrained at two locations restrained at four locations restrained at two locations

iv) in vertical up direction 1 g

B13.1.2 Holland auto locks Holland auto locks should be treated the same as Twist locks. B13.1.3 UIC type spigots Spigots designed and located as set out in the latest issue of UIC 571-4 are acceptable. It should be noted that containers less than 1.6 t should not be carried on spigots, further guidance is set out in GO/RM3056 Working Manual Rail Staff ­ Freight Operations Manual. It should be noted that there is additional lateral movement compared to Twist locks, which should be taken into account when gauging. B13.2 Winches and webbing B13.2.1 Winches Load restraint winches for use with load restraint webbing should generally accord with that depicted on drawing C1-A1-9013025. The attachment of the winch and fastening points should accord with its rating of 76 kN. 20 RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 21 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

B13.2.2 Webbing Load restraint webbing should conform to BS5759 having a strength rating of at least 45 kN.

B14 Curtain sides

B14.1 Gauge considerations B14.1.1 Tensioning When in the closed position, curtains should be tensioned in both planes to prevent flapping or billowing out of gauge. A positive locking device should be incorporated into the tensioning device. B14.1.2 Internal restraint The wagon contents should not be permitted to move into contact with the curtain, that is to say the load should not be restrained by the curtain. For this reason some method of load restraint should be fitted to prevent movement of the load, for example: a) b) c) d) e) load restraint webbing and winches cradles stanchions side raves cargo netting.

B14.2 Strength considerations The strength of the side assembly should be at least in accordance with the guidance set out in clause B12.5 of this document. B14.3 Materials of construction Curtains should be manufactured to BS3408 Type 14 or an alternative acceptable to the conformance certification body.

B15 Earthing

B15.1 General requirements Railway Group Standard GM/RT2304 sets out the requirements to be met for equipotential bonding of wagons. Additional information is set out in RSSB Approved Code of Practice GM/RC2514, and EN50153 and UIC 533-0. It has been found successful to provide 35 mm2 cable for some vehicles, and 95 mm2 for vehicles that travel over lines supplied with 750 Vdc third rail. B15.2 Requirements for tank wagons Additional requirements for tank wagons are set out in Railway Group Standard GM/RT2101.

B16 Wagon identification and marking

B16.1 Location An example of labelling requirements is set out in Appendix D. B16.2 Identification Railway Group Standard GM/RT2210 sets out the requirements for the display of a vehicle identification number. B16.3 Safety markings Railway Group Standards GM/RT2177 and GM/RT2459 set out the requirements for emergency and safety notices.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

21

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 22 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

It is recommended that as a minimum, the following markings are included: a) b) c) d) e) f) g) h) i) j) identification of wheel tread profile, as set out in clause B6.6.4 of this document the minimum curve radius that the wagon can negotiate the jacking and lifting points set out in GM/RT2260 a method of identifying wheel positions tare weight capacity (derogations currently exist against this requirement of GM/RT2459) brake force (derogations currently exist against this requirement of GM/RT2459) brake components (derogations currently exist against some requirements of GM/RT2459) overhead live wire warning set out in GM/RT1041 dangerous goods specified in GM/RT2101 and GO/RM3053.

B16.4 Label clips Label clips should be positioned on each solebar as near as possible over the centre of the left hand wheel when facing the wagon.

B17 Wagons with onboard equipment

B17.1 Internal combustion engines Railway Group Standard GM/RT2462 sets out the requirements that should be met, particular attention is drawn to the exhaust outlet positions allowed. Compliance with GM/RT2120 is required for risks arising from fires. Designers should give consideration to the noise created by internal combustion engines. Noise measurements are taken externally to BS EN ISO 3095 and internally to BS EN ISO 3381. B17.2 Electrical circuits Railway Group Standard GM/RT2300 sets out the signage required on electrical equipment, and GM/RT2304 sets out the bonding requirements. Infrastructure support vehicles electrical circuitry requirements are set out in GM/RT2307. Whilst not mandatory on all vehicles it does provide some best practice as guidance. Any electrical circuit should not interfere with railway signalling or other equipment, and should not be affected by the railway electrical environment. Railway Group Standard GE/RT8015 sets out these requirements, and GE/RT8016 sets out the verification process requirements. Network Rail also has requirements for demonstrating compatibility with track circuits.

22

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 23 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix A

Route availability - freight stock minimum dimensions

1 Introduction This appendix gives guidance on the limits of axle loading, overhang and axle spacing, wheel diameters and maximum speeds relative to freight vehicle design. Adherence to these parameters should ensure optimum route access for the wagon design concerned. 2 Dimension relative to axle spacings and loads on two-axle vehicles See Figure A1 of this appendix. 2.1 The dimensions are recommended for future builds of wagons to maintain optimum route availability for vehicles having the axle weight specified. It should be noted that vehicles designed to this chart have an extensive, but not universal, route availability. Some railway structures have more onerous restrictions, with no diversionary routes (for example, the Royal Albert Bridge, Saltash), and vehicles for passage over such structures will be required to have greater axle spacings or reduced axle loadings. It is the responsibility of the train operator to ensure that the proposed vehicle is compatible with the routes envisaged for the traffic. 2.2 The dimensions applicable to wagons with intermediate axleloads will be those applicable to the next higher axleload set out in Figure A1. 2.3 Maximum speeds shown are subject to satisfactory ride and braking performance. 2.4 It should not be assumed that wagons conforming to these minimum dimensional requirements will necessarily operate satisfactorily at the speeds shown. The wagon designer should consider separately the question of vehicle stability. 2.5 The end overhang dimension of any wagon should not exceed 3226 mm, as set out in Figure A1 to avoid infringement of track circuiting and signalling. However, the implication for the safe negotiation of small radius curves by wagons incorporating this maximum dimension should also be considered. 2.6 Designs that have smaller values of overhang will be considered for acceptance down to a limiting value equal to half of the wheelbase of a bogie of the same axleload (for example 1000 mm min for 25.5 t axleload). Such proposals should reflect a corresponding increase of the minimum distance over buffers as prescribed. Note: No part of the wheel should project beyond the headstock at any time.

2.7 The wheel diameters and axleloads quoted in UIC 510-2, for the range 1000 mm diameter to 760 mm diameter, are acceptable for operation on Network Rail controlled infrastructure with the axle spacing shown on this chart.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

23

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 24 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix A continued

3 Dimensions relative to axle spacings and loads on bogie freight vehicles See Figure A2 of this appendix. 3.1 The dimensions are recommended for future builds of wagons to maintain optimum route availability for vehicles having the axle weight specified. It should be noted that vehicles designed to this chart have a wide, but not universal, route availability. Some railway structures have more onerous restrictions, with no diversionary routes (for example, the Royal Albert Bridge Saltash), and vehicles for passage over such structures will be required to have greater axle spacings or reduced axle loadings. It is the responsibility of the train operator to ensure that the proposed vehicle is compatible with the routes envisaged for the traffic. 3.2 The dimensions applicable to wagons with intermediate axleloads will be those applicable to the next higher axleload set out in the table, Figure A2. 3.3 Maximum speeds shown are only permitted subject to the braking and ride performance being acceptable. The conformance certification body could impose a lower maximum speed, dependent upon ride performance. 3.4 It should not be assumed that wagons conforming to the minimum dimensional requirements will necessarily operate satisfactorily at the speeds shown. The wagon designer should consider separately the question of vehicle stability. The dimensions shown are largely those determined by infrastructure structural requirements. 3.5 The inner wheelbase of any bogie wagon should not exceed 17510 mm. The end overhang of any wagon should not exceed 3226 mm. These are to avoid infringement of track circuiting and signalling standards and the implications for the safe negotiation of small radius curves by wagons incorporating these maximum dimensions should be considered. The effects of curve overthrow on the width of very long wagons needs also to be considered. 3.6 The maximum dimensions specified for inner wheelbase and overhang are separately determined, and can not necessarily be jointly used to develop a vehicle of maximum dimensions. 3.7 The minimum overhang dimension for axleloads of 14 to 18 t is not critical to infrastructure requirements. The limiting factor to be considered under these circumstances is that no part of the bogie may project beyond the headstock further than the back plane of the Berne rectangle, UIC 521. The vehicle should be considered both on straight track and curved track down to the minimum radius applicable to the vehicle. This requirement should also be observed for those axleloads where minimum overhangs are specified. At higher axle loads small end overhangs can be the limiting factor on RA number 3.8 Wheel diameters below those specified for each axleload may be specially accepted for vehicles exhibiting good dynamic characteristics. For example TF 25 bogied vehicles are accepted for 25.4 t axleload with 840 mm diameter wheels, up to 60 mph.

24

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 25 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix A continued

3.9 Proposals for the use of cascaded three piece bogies on new wagons should include details of the side bearer arrangements as part of the design submission. To ensure acceptable levels of track forces, the relationship between bogie unsprung mass, wheel diameter and static/dynamic wheel forces should be supported by calculations. Careful selection of bogie rotational resistance is required to provide acceptable flange wear and ensure bogie/wagon lateral stability, within the operating speed range and wagon service life. Non resilient side bearers have previously not been accepted. Resilient sidebearer assemblies should help the vehicle to meet Q/Q and rotational resistance requirements in service. Experience has shown that the stiff single chevron type (64 t/inch) are unsuitable on aggregate and similar wagons due to increased sidebearer loads resulting from small amounts of the wear of centre pivot components. Their use on other vehicles is not recommended and any such proposals should be supported by evidence of their suitability, for example long-term pivot wear predictions and Q/Q calculations. 3.10 The wheel diameters and axleloads quoted in UIC 510-2, for the range 1000 mm diameter to 760 mm diameter are acceptable for operation on Network Rail controlled infrastructure with the axle spacing shown in Figure A2.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

25

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 26 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix A continued

Figure A1 Minimum dimensions ­ two axle wagon

WORN 749 746 876 876 18 20.5 23 25.5 mm 1067 1371 1371 1524 mm 3658 4572 4572 4572 mm 2134 2743 2743 3048 Mile/h 75 75 60 60 Km/h 120 120 96 96 NEW 813 813 953 953

2 AXLE WAGON

26

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Axle Load Tonnes

Overall Length L min mm 5792 7314 7314 7620

Min Overhang

Max 3226 mm

Min. Wheel base

Max 11000 mm

L Min

Min. Dimensions Adjacent wagons

Max 6400 mm

Max Speed

Min. Wheel Diameter

BOGIE WAGON

L min

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Max. 17510 mm Min. Dist. Between Inner Wheels Max. 6400 mm Min. Dimensions Adjacent Wagons Max Speed Min Wheel Diameter mm mm NC NC NC 2300 2400 2740 2900 3450 Mile/h 75 75 75 75 75 60 60 60 Km/h 120 120 120 120 120 96 96 96 NEW 724 724 813 813 813 914 953 953 Worn 686 686 749 749 749 838 876 876 Min. Wheel base mm 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 2000 2000 mm NC NC NC 5060 5230 5985 5700 6520 Min. wheel base mm 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 2000 2000

Max. 3226 mm

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Axle Load Tonnes

Min. Overhang

14 16.5 18 20 20.5 22.5 23 25.5

Overall Length L min mm 7670 9040 9865 10960 11230 12325 12600 13970

mm NC NC NC 1150 1200 1370 1450 1725

GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 27 of 40

Figure A2 Minimum dimensions ­ bogie wagon

Railway Group Guidance Note

NOTE:- NC = NOT CRITICAL WITH RESPECT TO INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRAINTS

27

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 28 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix A continued

Figure A3 Worked examples for bogied vehicles

Axle load Tonnes

Actual static wheel load kN

Allowable static wheel load kN

New wheel diameter mm 724 724 813 813 840 813 840 914 953 953 953 953 953

Worn wheel diameter mm 686 686 749 749 776 749 776 838 876 876 876 876 876 # # # # #

Result/comment

14 16.5 18 20 20 20.5 20.5 22.5 23 25.5 25.4 25 23.21712

68.6700 80.9325 88.2900 98.1000 98.1000 100.5525 100.5525 110.3625 112.815 125.0775 124.587 122.625 113.88

89.18 89.18 97.37 97.37 100.88 97.37 100.88 108.94 113.88 113.88 113.88 113.88 113.88

Compliant Compliant Compliant Non-compliant Compliant Non-compliant Compliant Non-compliant Compliant Non-compliant Non-compliant Non-compliant Compliant

#

New case considered.

Notes: The worn wheel diameters are used to derive the permissible static wheel loads. It is possible to control the permissible static load by increasing the worn wheel diameter and controlling this through the maintenance regime for the wagon type.

28

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 29 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix B

Check list for UK wagons

This appendix contains a list of related documents by subject heading and clause reference. TOPIC CLAUSE REF 4 4.1 RSSB DOCUMENT OTHER DOCUMENT

General Engineering acceptance

Route acceptance Design scrutiny Testing Design for maintenance Design submission Dimensions Gauge Mechanical handling and lineside equipment Route availability Maximum dimensions Derailment and rollover Stability Wheels And Axles

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 5 5.1.1 5.1.2 5.1.3 5.1.4 5.2.1 5.2.2 6

GM/RT2000 GM/RT2400 GM/RT2453 GM/GN2561 GA/RT6001 GA/RT6006 GE/RT8270 GM/RT2468 GM/RT2000 GM/RC2510 GM/RT2004 GM/RT2001

GM/RT2149 GE/GN8573

BASS501 CP-PM-2 CP-PM-1

GE/RT8006 GM/RT2149 GM/RT2141 GM/RT2142 GE/RT8014 GM/RT2466 GM/RT2470 GM/TT0088 GM/RC2513 GM/RC2566 GM/RT2476

TM/TC0001 UIC 510-2

Track circuit actuation Axleboxes Bearings Hot axlebox detection Springs And Suspensions Helical compression springs

6.5 7 7.1 7.2 8 8.1

GE/RT8014

Laminated springs Parabolic taperleaf springs Bogie suspension

8.2 8.3 8.4

EN13906-1 BS EN 10089 BS1726 BR151 GE/RT8270 GM/TT0088 UIC 517

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

29

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 30 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix B continued

TOPIC

CLAUSE REF 9

RSSB DOCUMENT GM/RT2190 GM/RC2509 GE/RT8270

OTHER DOCUMENT UIC 527-1

Buffing And Drawgear

Fittings On Ends Of Wagons And Clearances For Operating Staff Lampbracket 10.1 Clearance for operating staff 10.2 Overhanging superstructure 10.3 Access ladders 10.4 Air cut-off cock and connections 10.5 Braking Braking policy Braking performance and system requirements 11 11.1 11.2

GM/RT2180

UIC 503 UIC 521 BS4211

GM/RT2045 GM/RT2040 GM/RT2043

FTC001 UIC 544-1

Structures Proof and fatigue loads

12 12.1

Recovery after accidents Door, floor, end and side walls

12.4 12.5

GM/RT2100 GM/GN2560 GM/RT2101 GM/RT2260 BS3951 UIC 592-1 ORE DT 135

Load Restraints Containers and swap bodies Winches and webbing Curtain Sides Materials of construction Earthing General requirements Requirements for tank wagons Marking

13 13.1 13.2 14 14.3 15 15.1 15.2 16

GO/RM3056

UIC 571-4 BS5759

BS3408

GM/RT2304 GM/RC2514 GM/RT2101 GM/RT1041 GM/RT2101 GM/RT2177 GM/RT2210 GM/RT2260 GM/RT2459 GO/RM3053

EN50153

30

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 31 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

Appendix B continued

TOPIC

CLAUSE REF 17 17.1 17.2

RSSB DOCUMENT

OTHER DOCUMENT

On Board Equipment Internal combustion engines Electrical circuits

GM/RT2120 GM/RT2462 GM/RT2300 GM/RT2304 GM/RT2307 GE/RT8015 GE/RT8016

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

31

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 32 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix C

Check list for international wagons

This appendix contains a list of related UIC documents applicable to wagons required to be registered for international traffic.

REF 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

ITEM Conformity to Gauge etc Conformity to gauge Minimum tare weight Ratio wheelbase/length Max W/B Kinematic gauge, underclearances, etc Suspension Min curve negotiable 60 m Underclearances on ferry boat and link span Wheels Axles Axleboxes Bogies Suspension gear Delta Q/Q Buffing and Drawgear Geometry check for auto coupler Drawgear Buffers

SOURCE UIC 503-0 App 1 UIC 503-0 App 4 UIC 432 - 2.2.1 UIC 530-2 App 7 UIC 511-0 UIC 512 - 1.5 UIC 511-0 UIC 505-1 UIC 505-5

ISSUE 5 5 9 4 7 8 7 8 2

AMENDMENT 1 1 4 1 2 1 4

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8

UIC 503-0 - 1.4 UIC 507 UIC 510-1 sect 1 UIC 510-2 UIC 510-1 sect 2 UIC 510-1 sect 4 UIC 510-1 sect 6 UIC 517 UIC 530-2

5 1 9 3 9 9 9 6 4

1 1 14 14 14 14 10 4

3.1 3.2 3.3

3.4 3.5

Buffer head sizes Clearance for shunters

UIC 530-2 App 6a & para 3.1.4 UIC 520 UIC 526-1 series UIC 526-3 UIC 526-2 UIC 527-1 UIC 527-2 RIV para 23 plate 2 UIC 521

4 6 2 2 1 2 2 1

4

2 4 3 1

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 32

Underframe Holding down brackets Auto coupler pocket Underframe end fittings Crossing gangway for working to UK Towing hooks Spark arrestors

UIC 503-0 App 3 UIC 530-1 UIC 535-2 sect D UIC 535-2 App 18 sect D (c) UIC 536 & UIC 535-2 UIC 543

5 2 3 3 3 3 12

1 3 7 7

7

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 33 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix C continued

REF 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 4.11 ITEM Jacking points Number of vehicles to be fitted with screw brakes and gangways Label clips Wagon stresses Standardisation of steps and handrails on wagons Body Earthing of body Tank wagons (design) Underframe end fittings Crossing gangways for working to UK SOURCE UIC 581 UIC 535-3 UIC 575 UIC 577 UIC 535-1

ISSUE 1 1 4 2 5

AMENDMENT 1

2

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4

UIC 533 UIC 573 UIC 535-2 sect D UIC 535-2 App 18 sect D (c)

2 5 3 3

4 7 7

6.1 6.2 6.3

Power & Handbrake Calculations Min % brake weight etc Handbrake for traffic to UK Brakes, power & hand, forces and calculations Brake Equipment Goods/pass mandatory Brake components Headstock cock position Power Brake Air brakes for freight Brake beams

UIC 543 UIC 549 UIC 544-1

12 4 3

9

7.1 7.2 7.3

UIC 432-2.1.3 UIC 542 UIC 541 series

9 4

4

8.1 8.2

UIC 540 UIC 542 UIC 833

4 4 2

4

9.1 9.2 9.3

Handbrake Handbrake for traffic to UK Number of vehicles to be fitted with screw brakes and gangways Handbrakes general

UIC 549 UIC 535-3 UIC 543

4 1 12

10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5

Painting and Lettering Marking of inner wheelbase Painting and lettering Wagon numbering, exchange codes etc Label holders Interchangeable parts identification mark

UIC 512 8 RIV para 34-2.4.2 RIV para 34 & sect VIII UIC 438-2 6 UIC 575 UIC 583-0 4 5

2

13

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

33

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 34 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix C continued

REF 10.6 10.7

ITEM Label clips Lamp irons

SOURCE UIC 575 UIC 532 UIC 534

ISSUE 4 9 4

AMENDMENT

2

11.1

11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9

Other Items Conversion of wagons to `S' condition and suitability of wagons for `90' (refers to a speed of 90 km/h) Wagons for transit to and from Spain Wagons for transit to and from Finland Containers/swap bodies Loading regulations Standard wagons accepted for running in international traffic Protection by the earthing of metal parts of vehicles `Private owners' wagons conditions for registration Carriage of goods in large containers under temperature controlled conditions

UIC 432 App 2 para 2.2.5 UIC 430-1 UIC 430-3 UIC 592 series RIV para 50 RIV sect 11 UIC 571 series UIC 533 UIC 433 UIC 431-1

9

2 2

2 19 10

4

34

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 35 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix D

Sample livery diagram

This appendix shows livery and labelling applicable to wagons.

GM/RT2177 GM/RT2260

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

35

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 36 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons Appendix E

Width reduction calculations in accordance with data relating to W6A gauge

Calculation of Width Reduction (Vehicles)

Where a vehicle is to be built to a vehicle gauge, the lateral dimensions defined by the gauge should be reduced if the overall length or bogie centres exceed those specified in the gauge. Where reduced vehicle length or bogie centres are used, it is not generally permissible to increase the vehicle build profile. In the following calculations, the variables are: A Ni The wheelbase / bogie centres in metres The distance of the cross section being calculated from the bogie pivot / axle position (in metres) where this is inside of the wheelbase / bogie centres The distance of the cross section being calculated from the bogie pivot / axle position (in metres) where this is outside of the wheelbase / bogie centres The curve radius (in metres) at which the reduction is to be calculated The overthrow allowed at the defined radius (in metres) Inner Width Reduction (in metres) Outer Width Reduction (in metres)

No

R K EI Eo

Formulae: Ei = ((ANi ­ Ni ) / 2R) ­ K Eo = ((ANo + No ) / 2R ) ­ K Note: Ei and Eo may not be negative Example: Consider a vehicle to be compliant with W6a gauge, but having bogie centres of 13.5 metres and a length over headstocks of 19.092 metres. On a 200 m (R) curve, W6a allows a 0.102m (K) overthrow. Ni = 6.75 No = 2.796 Ei = ((13.5 x 6.75 ­ 6.75 ) / 200 x 2 ) ­ 0.102 = 0.0119 Eo = ((13.5 x 2.796 + 2.796 ) / 200 x 2 ) ­ 0.102 = 0.119 According to the width reduction formula, Ei at the centre would be 0.012 m and Eo at the ends would be 0.012 m. The maximum overall width of the vehicle would thus be 2.820 ­ 0.024 = 2.796

2 2 2 2

36

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 37 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons References

Railway Group Standards and other Railway Group documents

The Railway Group Standards Code, Issue 1, January 2004 GE/RT8006 GE/RT8014 GE/RT8015 GE/RT8016 GE/RT8270 GE/GN8573 GM/GN2560 GM/GN2561 GM/RC2509 GM/RC2510 GM/RC2513 GM/RC2514 GM/RC2566 GO/RM3053 GO/RM3056 GM/RT1041 GM/RT2000 GM/RT2001 GM/RT2004 GM/RT2040 GM/RT2043 GM/RT2045 GM/RT2100 GM/RT2101 Interface between Rail Vehicle Weights and Underline Bridges Hot Axle Bearing Detection Electromagnetic Compatibility between Railway Infrastructure and Trains Verification of Electrification Systems and Interactions Route Acceptance of Rail Vehicles including changes in Operation or Infrastructure Guidance on Gauging (Currently in draft form) Guidance on Structural Requirements for Railway Vehicles Guidance Note: Compliance with RGSs - New Railway Vehicles Code of Practice for Traction & Rolling Stock Mechanical Coupling Systems (to be superseded by GM/GN2690) Code of Practice for the Acceptance Testing of Rail Vehicles Commentary on Permissible Track Forces for Railway Vehicles Code of Practice ­ Rail Vehicles ­ Equipotential Bonding Code of Practice for Railway Wheelsets Working Manual for Rail Staff - Handling and Carriage of Dangerous Goods (Pink pages) Working Manual for Rail Staff - Freight Operations (White Pages) Warning Signs and Notices for Electrified Lines Engineering Acceptance of Rail Vehicles Design Scrutiny for the Engineering Acceptance of Rail Vehicles Requirements for Rail Vehicle Maintenance Calculation of Brake-Force Data For Rolling Stock Library Braking System and Performance for Freight Trains Braking Principles for Rail Vehicles Structural requirements for Railway Vehicles Requirements for the Design, Construction, Test and Use of the Tanks of Rail Tank Wagons Requirements for the Control of Risk Arising from Fires on Ralway Vehicles Resistance of Ralway Vehicles to Derailment and Roll-Over Resistance of Ralway Vehicles to Roll-Over in Gales

GM/RT2120 GM/RT2141 GM/RT2142

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

37

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 38 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

GM/RT2149 GM/RT2177 GM/RT2180 GM/RT2190 GM/RT2210 GM/RT2260 GM/RT2300 GM/RT2304 GM/RT2307 GM/RT2400 GM/RT2453 GM/RT2459 GM/RT2462 GM/RT2466 GM/RT2468 GM/RT2470 GM/RT2476 GM/TT0088 Requirements for Defining and Maintaining the Size of Railway Vehicles Emergency and Safety Equipment and Signs on Rail Vehicles Visibility and Audibility Requirements for Trains Mechanical and Electrical Inter-Vehicle Coupling Systems Identification of Rail Vehicles Design for Recovery of Rail Vehicles After Accidents Warning Signs and Labels Fitted to Electrical Equipment on Rail Mounted Vehicles Equipotential Bonding of Rail Vehicles to Running Rail Potential Self-Contained Electrical Power Supply Systems fitted to Infrastructure Support Vehicles Engineering Acceptance and Design of On-Track Machines Registration and Mandatory Data for Rail Vehicles Data to be Displayed on Rail Vehicles Internal Combustion Engines in Rail Vehicles Railway Wheelsets Rail Vehicles ­ Overall Design, Risk Assessment and Certification Wheelset Supplier Qualification Vehicle Requirements for the Reliable Operation of Track Circuits Permissible Track Forces for Railway Vehicles The Catalogue of Railway Group Standards and the Railway Group Standards CD-ROM give the current issue number and status of documents published by RSSB. This information is also available at www.rssb.co.uk.

Other references

BASS 501 BR Specification 151 BR Report P9 BS1726 BS3408 BS3951 BS4211 Swept Envelope and Curve Overthrow Calculations Springs Laminated Springs Design and Specification of Coil Springs Specification for Tarpaulins Freight Containers Specification for Ladders for Permanent Access to Chimneys, Other High Structures, Silos and Bins Specification for Webbing Load Restraint Assemblies for use in Surface Transport Noise (internal) Noise (external) RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

BS5759

BS EN ISO 3095 BS EN ISO 3381 38

Uncontrolled When Printed Document to be withdrawn as of 05/03/2011 To be superseded by GMGN2688 Iss 1 published on 04/12/2010

Railway Group Guidance Note GM/GN2589 Issue One Date April 2004 Page 39 of 40

Guidance Note: The Design and Construction of Freight Wagons

CP-PM-1

Code of Practice for the Installation, Testing and Acceptance of Lineside Equipment Installation of Appliances Handling Wagons and Similar Type Rolling Stock Required to Travel Over the BR System Cylindrical Helical Springs Made from Round Wire and Bar - Calculation and Design ­ Part 1: Compression Springs Equipotential Bonding FTC Brake Design and Testing Procedure (B12 Committee) General Calculation Methods for the Study of New Wagon Types or New Bogies Design Guide for the Calculation of Stresses in Axles with Inboard Journals Continental Wagons Running in Great Britain Trailing Stock. Conditions Concerning the Use of Wheels of Various Diameters with Running Gear of Different Types Wagons - Suspension Gear - Standardisation Coaches and Vans, Wagons, Tractive Stock Coaches, Vans and Wagons - Dimensions of Buffer Heads - Track Layout on SCurves Wagons - Running Safety Protection by Earthing of Metal Parts of Vehicles Braking Performance for International Freight Trains

CP-PM-2

EN13906-1

EN50153 FTC001 ORE DT 135

TM/TC0001 UIC 503 UIC 510-2

UIC 517 UIC 521 UIC 527-1

UIC 530-2 UIC 533-0 UIC 544-1

Also see appendices B and C.

RAIL SAFETY AND STANDARDS BOARD

39

Information

Microsoft Word - GMGN2589 Iss 1.doc

41 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

520580


You might also be interested in

BETA
Title
Introduction.p65
Control of Unwanted Voltages on Telecommunications Equipment at Stations