Read ELL_TG_Q_1-24.indd text version

R I G B Y

ELL ASSESSMENT

KIT

Level Q

Administration Guide

Listening Speaking Reading Writing

The California Gold Rush

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Level Q Administration Guide

Rigby ELL Assessment Kit: Administration Guide Photo Credits: p.2 ©Getty Royalty Free; p. 3 Sharon Hoogstraten/HA Collection. 9992775793 © 2007 Harcourt Achieve Inc. All rights reserved. This book is intended for classroom use and is not for resale or distribution. Each blackline master in this book may be reproduced, with the copyright notice, without permission from the Publisher. Reproduction for an entire school or district is prohibited. No other part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the Publisher. Requests for permission should be mailed to: Paralegal Department, 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887. Rigby is a trademark of Harcourt Achieve Inc. Printed in the United States of America 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 054 12 11 10 09 08 07 06 05

Contents

Contents

Getting Ready Listening Assessment 2­3 4­5

Teacher Directions...................................................................................................................................4 Listening Performance Chart .............................................................................................................5 Listening Proficiency Chart..................................................................................................................5

Speaking Assessment

6­7

Teacher Directions...................................................................................................................................6 Speaking Performance Chart .............................................................................................................7 Speaking Rubric .......................................................................................................................................7 Speaking Proficiency Chart .................................................................................................................7

Reading Assessment

8­15

Teacher Directions...................................................................................................................................8 Reading Accuracy Record and Reading Accuracy Level Charts ..........................................9 Word Study and Reading Comprehension Answer Guides................................................ 10 Reading Comprehension Proficiency and Reading Level Placement Charts ............. 11 Results to Grade-Level Proficiency in Reading .......................................................................... 12 Nonfiction Features Answer Guide................................................................................................ 12 Overall Comprehension Level Chart............................................................................................. 12 Reading Comprehension and Word Study Test.................................................................13-15

Writing Assessment

16­19

Teacher Directions................................................................................................................................ 16 Student Graphic Organizer: Cause and Effects Chart ........................................................... 17 Writing Rubric ........................................................................................................................................ 18 Writing Level Placement Chart ....................................................................................................... 19 Results to Grade-Level Proficiency in Writing............................................................................ 19

TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Reports 20­24

Listening/Speaking .............................................................................................................................. 21 Reading: Fiction..................................................................................................................................... 22 Reading: Nonfiction............................................................................................................................. 23 Writing....................................................................................................................................................... 24

GETTING READY

The Rigby ELL Assessment Kit provides you with tools for authentic in-classroom assessment of your English language learners in the four domains of Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing. The assessment results will inform your instruction and support your students' academic progress. This Administration Guide provides specific instruction for assessing your students using Level Q student book, The California Gold Rush.

Assessment Times

The assessments in the four sections of this Administration Guide can be completed in one or several sessions. Teacher administration for the Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing sections of the assessment takes approximately 20 minutes.

Assessment Listening Speaking Reading Writing Total: Approximate Administration Time

3 minutes 3 minutes 12 minutes 2 minutes 20 minutes

STEP 1: BEFORE THE ASSESSMENT

Materials Needed

Student Book with Cards for Listening and Speaking, and this Administration Guide

Preparation

Review the Student Book. Preview this Administration Guide. Make photocopies of the pages in this Administration Guide marked with this symbol.

Photocopied pages of this Administration Guide showing this symbol

Pencil and paper for the student

2

Getting Ready ­ Level Q

STEP 2: DURING THE ASSESSMENT

Sit with the student in a quiet place with few distractions. Provide the student with the Student Book. Follow detailed directions in this Administration Guide. Record results on the forms photocopied from this Administration Guide.

STEP 3: AFTER THE ASSESSMENT

Scoring

Use the forms photocopied from this Administration Guide to determine assessment results. The Data Management Tool will easily compute assessment results and track the student's progress.

Next Steps

Each of the four sections in this Administration Guide refers you to Next Steps on specific pages of the Teacher's Manual for effective instructional techniques that will help the student make academic progress.

TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards Summaries

Use the TESOL English Language Proficiency Summary Reports on pages 21­24 of this guide to summarize the student's performance in each of the four language domains: Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing.

Progress Tracking and Data Management

Use the Student Tracking Folder to record the student's assessment results over the school year. You can also use the Data Management Tool to easily compute assessment results and track the student's progress.

Getting Ready ­ Level Q

3

LISTENING ASSESSMENT

PREPARATION

TEACHER DIRECTIONS

1 Open the student book to the Listening and Speaking Mat on pages 2­3.

Photocopy pages 5 and 21. Get student book Level Q, The California Gold Rush, and take out the Listening and Speaking Cards from the inside back cover.

Look at the picture. This picture shows a gold miners' camp during the California Gold Rush.

Allow the student a moment to examine the picture. 2 Give the student the Listening and Speaking Cards.

Here are some cards to go with the picture. Look at the cards.

Allow the student a moment to examine the cards. 3 Then introduce the task.

Student Book

4

Now listen carefully because you are going to put some of the cards on the picture.

Read the prompts in the Listening Performance Chart on page 5. Repeat each prompt once if necessary. Before reading each new prompt, remove any cards the student has put on the mat. For each prompt, check the box in the Student Response column that corresponds to the student's response. Once the assessment is administered, add up the points to find the student's listening score. Then use the Listening Proficiency Chart to determine the student's Stage of Listening Proficiency.

Listening and Speaking Mat pages 2­3

5 6

Listening and Speaking Cards inside back cover

STANDARDS

1: Communicate for social, intercultural, and instructional purposes 2: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in English language arts

4

Listening Assessment ­ Level Q

Listening Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Listening Performance Chart

Read each prompt and score the student's response. Before reading each new prompt, remove any cards the student has put on the mat. Add up the points to determine the student's listening score.

Prompts A Correct Response Student Response Points

Put the gold in the picture.

Student puts the piece of gold in the picture. Student puts the wagon next to the horses.

Student completes task correctly. Student does not complete task correctly. Student completes task correctly. Student either puts the wrong card in the correct place (next to the horses) or puts the correct card (the wagon) in the wrong place. Student does not pick the correct card (the wagon) and does not put it in the correct place (next to the horses).

1 0 2 1 0 2 1

B

Put the wagon next to the horses.

C

A miner in the picture is using a special pan to look for gold in the river. Put the pan that he is using next to the miner.

Student puts the pan next to a miner by the river.

Student completes task correctly. Student either puts the wrong card in the correct place (next to a miner by the river) or puts the correct card (the pan) in the wrong place. Student does not pick the correct card (the pan) and does not put it in the correct place (next to a miner by the river).

0 2 1

D

It is evening, and some miners are cooking a meal in a large pot over a fire. When they're done, they'll all eat together. Soon it will get dark, and the miners will use something to help them see in the dark. Put the thing that they'll use next to the miners who are cooking.

Student puts the lantern next to the miners who are cooking.

Student completes task correctly. Student either puts the wrong card in the correct place (next to the miners who are cooking) or puts the correct card (the lantern) in the wrong place. Student does not pick the correct card (the lantern) and does not put it in the right place (next to the miners who are cooking).

Listening Score:

0

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Listening Proficiency Chart

Based on the student's listening score, find the corresponding Stage of Listening Proficiency in the chart below and circle it.

If the student's listening score is . . . 0­1 2­3 4­5 6 7 then the student's Stage of Listening Proficiency is . . . Stage 1: Stage 2: Stage 3: Stage 4: Stage 5: Understands little academic oral language related to the Gold Rush when presented with a short sentence Understands limited academic oral language related to the Gold Rush and simple grammatical structures when presented with a long sentence Understands some academic oral language related to the Gold Rush but experiences occasional difficulty with understanding both vocabulary and grammar when presented with 2 to 3 sentences Understands most academic oral language related to the Gold Rush and some grammatical structures with minimal difficulty when presented with several sentences Understands academic oral language related to the Gold Rush and complex grammatical structures without difficulty when presented with an extended number of sentences

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on pages 80­87 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction. TESOL Standards For summary reports of the student's listening proficiency for social/intercultural/instructional purposes

and language arts, see page 21.

Listening Assessment ­ Level Q 5

SPEAKING ASSESSMENT

PREPARATION

TEACHER DIRECTIONS

1 Give the student the Listening and Speaking Cards.

Photocopy pages 7 and 21. Get student book Level Q, The California Gold Rush, and take out the Listening and Speaking Cards from the inside back cover.

Look at the cards. They show things from a miners' camp during the California Gold Rush.

Allow the student a moment to examine the cards. 2 Then introduce the task.

Now put the cards into groups. You can do it any way that makes sense to you.

Allow the student a moment to put the cards into groups. 3 When the student has finished grouping the cards, read aloud Prompt A in the Speaking Performance Chart on page 7. If the student needs further prompting, read Prompts B and C as needed. As the student is speaking, note your observations in the chart. Once the assessment is administered, use your observations and the Speaking Rubric to determine the points earned for Message, Fluency and Sentence Structure, and Word Choice and Academic Language. Add up the points to determine the student's overall speaking score. Then use the student's speaking score and the Speaking Proficiency Chart to determine the student's overall Stage of Speaking Proficiency.

Student Book

4

Listening and Speaking Cards inside back cover

5

STANDARDS

1: Communicate for social, intercultural, and instructional purposes 2: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in English language arts

6

Speaking Assessment ­ Level Q

Speaking Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Speaking Performance Chart Follow steps 1­3 on page 6 for using this chart.

Prompts A B Teacher Observations

Tell me about the groups of cards. You put these cards together in a group. Tell me why you put these cards in a group. You put [the pan] with [the gold]. Tell me why you put [the pan] with [the gold].

C

Speaking Rubric

Use your observations from the Speaking Performance Chart and the rubric below to determine the number of points for Message, Fluency and Sentence Structure, and Word Choice and Academic Language. The points represent a Stage in each of the three areas. Add up the points to determine the student's overall speaking score.

Points Conveys his or her message successfully when speaking about the Gold Rush. Engages in everyday discourse when speaking about the Gold Rush. Although errors may be present, they generally do not hinder communication. Student successfully communicates most of message. Participates in everyday discourse when speaking about the Gold Rush. Although speech contains errors that sometimes hinder communication, student can convey his or her basic message. Uses routine expressions and relies on gestures to communicate message when speaking about the Gold Rush. Communicates ideas primarily through gestures or single word utterances. Student is able to communicate only the most rudimentary message. Fluency and Sentence Structure Engages in speech that seems to be fluent and effortless when speaking about the Gold Rush. Speech approaches that of proficient English speakers. Engages in everyday discourse when speaking about the Gold Rush. Uses some complex sentences. Some grammatical errors are present, but they do not hinder communication. Produces long and complete phrases as well as some sentences when speaking about the Gold Rush. Uses some basic words and simple phrases when speaking about the Gold Rush. Produces little, if any, spoken English. Uses vocabulary related to the Gold Rush, academic language, and idioms in speech approaching that of proficient English speakers. Uses a range of vocabulary related to the Gold Rush, academic language, and some idioms. Student may occasionally use inappropriate terms or rephrase to work around unknown vocabulary. Relies on high-frequency words and sometimes cannot fully communicate ideas due to a lack of sufficient vocabulary related to the Gold Rush. Uses some academic language although not always successfully. Relies on routine expressions and may use some vocabulary related to the Gold Rush in isolation. Produces very few, if any, words in spoken English. Speaking Score: 5 4 3 2 1 5 4 3 2 1 5 4 3 2 1

Speaking Proficiency Chart

Based on the student's speaking score, find the corresponding overall Stage of Speaking Proficiency below and circle it.

If the student's speaking score is ... then the student's overall Stage of Speaking Proficiency is ... 3­4 Stage 1 5­7 Stage 2 8­10 Stage 3 11­13 Stage 4 14­15 Stage 5

TESOL Standards For summary reports of the student's speaking proficiency for social/intercultural/instructional purposes and language arts, see page 21.

Speaking Assessment ­ Level Q 7

Word Choice and Academic Language

Message

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NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on pages 80­87 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

READING ASSESSMENT

PREPARATION

TEACHER DIRECTIONS

Fiction

1 Open the student book to page 5, The Gold Rush Game.

Copy pages 9­15 and pages 22­23. Get student book Level Q, The California Gold Rush.

This story is about a brother and sister who use their imaginations to take a trip back in time to the period of the California Gold Rush.

2 Read aloud the title. Ask the student to read aloud page 5. As you listen, record errors in the Fiction column of the Reading Accuracy Record on page 9.

Student Book

Nonfiction

1 2 Introduce the social studies passage, In Search of Gold, on pages 12­15. Explain that the passage is about the California Gold Rush. Introduce the science passage, What Is Gold?, on pages 16­17. Explain that the passage is about some facts about gold. Introduce the math passage, Hunting for Gold: My Journal, on pages 18­19. Explain that the passage is about a girl's journal entries about her family's panning for gold in California.

Fiction, pages 4­11

3

Nonfiction--Social Studies, pages 12­15

The student will read the nonfiction passages later when taking the test. Optional: You can have the student read aloud pages 12­13 of the social studies passage, In Search of Gold, now if you want to do a reading accuracy record. Record the errors in the Nonfiction column of the Reading Accuracy Record on page 9. The words in the title, map, and box on pages 12 and 13 are not counted.

Reading Comprehension and Word Study Test

1 Nonfiction--Science, pages 16­17 2 Give the student a copy of the Reading Comprehension and Word Study Test on pages 13­15 of this guide. Direct the student to read the nonfiction passages independently and complete the test. Remind the student to use the passages to answer the questions. When the student has finished the test, follow the directions on pages 10­12 to score the test and complete the Reading Assessment.

Nonfiction--Math, pages 18­19

Reading Fluency

To assess the student's Reading Fluency, see pages 58­63 of the Teacher's Manual.

STANDARDS

2: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in English language arts 3: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in mathematics 4: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in science 5: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in social studies

8

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

Reading Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Reading Accuracy Record

To assess the student's reading accuracy with fiction, use page 5 from the passage The Gold Rush Game. Optional: To assess the student's reading accuracy with nonfiction, use pages 12­13 from the social studies passage In Search of Gold. Listen to the student read aloud. Make a tally to indicate an error when · a student reads a word that is different than what is written. · a student omits a word from the text. · a student inserts a word that is not in the text. Do not make a tally to indicate an error when · a student self-corrects. · an error sounds like the student's oral English.

Fiction Tally of Errors Nonfiction Tally of Errors (Optional), pp 12-13 Social Studies: In Search of Gold Tally of Errors Total Number of Fiction Errors:

/ 115 words

Total Number of Nonfiction Errors:

/ 130 words

Teacher Observations:

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Fiction Reading Accuracy Level Chart

Based on the total number of errors from the fiction section of the Reading Accuracy Record above, find the student's Reading Accuracy Level (Frustration, Instructional, or Independent) in the chart below and circle it.

If the student's total number of errors for fiction is . . . then the student's Reading Accuracy Level is . . . 13 or more Frustration (below 90%) 7­12 Instructional (90­94%) 6 or fewer Independent (95­100%)

Nonfiction Reading Accuracy Level Chart (Optional)

Based on the total number of errors from the social studies nonfiction section of the Reading Accuracy Record above, find the student's Reading Accuracy Level (Frustration, Instructional, or Independent) in the chart below and circle it.

If the student's total number of errors for nonfiction is . . . then the student's Reading Accuracy Level is . . . 14 or more Frustration (below 90%) 8­13 Instructional (90­94%) 7 or fewer Independent (95­100%)

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on pages 88­92 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q 9

Reading Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

WORD STUDY PROFICIENCY

Word Study Answer Guide

Use the chart below to score the student's answers to the word study questions (1­3) on the test. Circle 1 point for each correct answer and 0 points for each incorrect answer. Add up the points to determine the student's word study score.

Question 1. 2. 3. Correct Answer C A B Skill Understands the meaning of the prefix unUnderstands the meaning of the prefix reUnderstands the meaning of the suffix unPhonics Score: Points 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on page 93 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

READING LEVEL PLACEMENT

Reading Comprehension Answer Guide

Use the chart below to score the student's answers to the comprehension questions (4­13) on the test. Circle 1 point for each correct answer and 0 points for each incorrect answer. Add up the points to determine the student's fiction and nonfiction scores. Then add up the fiction and nonfiction scores to determine the student's total reading comprehension score.

Question 4. 5. Fiction 6. 7. 8. Correct Answer C B B C A Skill Literal: Identify Details Inferential: Recognize Cause and Effect Literal: Identify Details Inferential: Recognize Cause and Effect Critical: Draw Conclusions Fiction Score: 9. Nonfiction 10. 11. 12. 13. A A B A C Literal: Identify Details Critical: Draw Conclusions Literal: Identify Details Inferential: Recognize Cause and Effect Inferential: Recognize Cause and Effect Nonfiction Score: Total Reading Comprehension Score: 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 Points 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0

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NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on page 94 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction. TESOL Standards For summary reports of the student's reading proficiency for fiction and nonfiction, see pages 22­23.

10 Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

Reading Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Reading Comprehension Proficiency Chart

Based on the student's total reading comprehension score on page 10, find the student's Reading Comprehension Proficiency (Beginning, Developing, or Proficient) in the chart below an circle it.

If the student's reading comprehension score is... then the student's Reading Comprehension Proficiency is... 4 or below Beginning (49% and below) 5­6 Developing (50­69%) 7­10 Proficient (70­100%)

Reading Level Placement Chart

Use the chart below to determine the student's Reading Level. · Go to the fiction Reading Accuracy Level Chart on page 9 to get the student's Reading Accuracy Level: Frustration, Instructional, or Independent. · Go to the Reading Comprehension Proficiency Chart above to get the student's Reading Comprehension Proficiency: Beginning, Developing, or Proficient. · Find the row in the chart below that represents both the student's Reading Accuracy Level and Reading Comprehension Proficiency. Circle the corresponding Reading Level in the last column of the chart.

If the student's Reading Accuracy Level for fiction is . . . and the student's Reading Comprehension Proficiency is . . . Beginning Frustration Developing Proficient Beginning Instructional Developing or Proficient Beginning or Developing Independent Proficient Move the student up one reading level for instruction. R

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then . . . Move the student down two reading levels for instruction. Move the student down one reading level for instruction. Keep the student at this reading level for instruction. Move the student down one reading level for instruction. Keep the student at this reading level for instruction. Keep the student at this reading level for instruction.

Reading Level O P Q P Q Q

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

11

Reading Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Results to Grade-Level Proficiency in Reading

Use the chart below to determine the student's grade-level proficiency in reading. Based on the student's current grade level and Reading Level (See page 11), circle whether the student is above, on, or below grade level.

Grade 3 4 5 6 Reading Levels Level O slightly above grade level on grade level one grade below grade level two grades below grade level Level P above grade level on grade level one grade below grade level two grades below grade level Level Q above grade level on grade level one grade below grade level two grades below grade level Level R above grade level on grade level one grade below grade level two grades below grade level

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on pages 88­92 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

NONFICTION FEATURES PROFICIENCY

Nonfiction Features Answer Guide

Use the chart below to score the student's answers to the nonfiction features questions (14­18) on the test. Circle 1 for each correct answer and 0 for each incorrect answer. Add up the points to determine the student's nonfiction features score.

Question 14. Fiction 15. 16. 17. 18. Correct Answer C B B C A Skill Interprets a map using multiple-element key Interprets information on a time line Calculates elapsed time using a time line Uses captions and pictures to interpret information Interprets order of events on a flowchart Nonfiction Features Score:

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Points 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0 1 / 0

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on page 95 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

OVERALL COMPREHENSION LEVEL OPTIONAL

Enter below the Stage of Listening Proficiency from page 5 and the Total Reading Comprehension Score from page 10. Add these two numbers to determine the total Overall Comprehension Score. Stage of Listening Proficiency (from page 5) Reading Comprehension Score (from page 10) +

Total Overall Comprehension Score: Based on this total, find the student's Overall Comprehension Level in the chart below and circle it.

Overall Comprehension Level Chart

If the total comprehension score is . . . then the student's Overall Comprehension Level is . . . 1­5 Beginning 6­10 Developing 11­15 Proficient

12

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

Name:

Date:

The California Gold Rush

READING COMPREHENSION AND WORD STUDY TEST

Write your name and the date on each page. Read the questions and answer choices. Fill in the bubble next to the best answer.

Look at these words. 1. Which of the following means "not explored"? A. misexplored B. inexplored C. unexplored Look at these words. 2. Which of the following means "sift again"? A. resift B. unsift C. presift Look at these words. 3. Which of the following means "not usual"? A. reusual B. unusual C. nonusual

Open the book to The Gold Rush Game on pages 4­11. 4. Which one best describes the old wagon beneath the tree? A. made of wood, no bench, big wheels B. made of metal raised bench, broken wheels C. made of wood raised bench, no wheels 5. What makes the dust blow everywhere? A. the strong wind in the backyard B. the moving wagon wheels C. Fernando walking in the dirt 6. What do Amelia and Fernando find in the river? A. two small red rocks B. two small yellow rocks C. two small blue rocks

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Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

13

Name:

Date:

The California Gold Rush

READING COMPREHENSION AND WORD STUDY TEST

7. Why are Amelia and Fernando happy to get to the river? A. They are eager to begin looking for gold. B. They know that it will soon be lunchtime. C. They are hot and thirsty after crossing the desert. 8. What can you conclude from this story? A. Amelia and Fernando traveled back in time to the Gold Rush. B. Amelia and Fernando found gold and will make money. C. Amelia and Fernando were gone for several days. Open the book to In Search of Gold on pages 12­15. 9. What made looking for gold difficult for immigrants? A. A law was passed requiring them to pay taxes on the gold they found. B. They didn't know how to find gold. C. Everyone was looking for gold in the wrong places.

10. What can you conclude from this article? A. Many immigrants found other ways to make money. B. Most immigrants stayed in California. C. Most immigrants made their fortunes by finding gold. Open the book to What is Gold? on pages 16­17. 11. How is gold formed? A. It is formed in the water and shaped by the sun. B. It is formed in rocks by fire or intense heat. C. It is formed in rocks by extreme cold. 12. Why is gold able to be used for so many things? A. It is soft, flexible, and can be heated to high temperatures. B. It is very hard but can be heated to high temperatures. C. It can be used for decorating.

14

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

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Name:

Date:

The California Gold Rush

READING COMPREHENSION AND WORD STUDY TEST

Open the book to Hunting for Gold: My Journal on pages 18-19. 13. Why did miners search through 160 pans of dirt? A. to search for coins B. to find something they lost C. to find gold Open the book to page 13. Look at the map and map key. 14. What do the colored lines on the map show? A. areas where gold was found B. different trails and lakes C. trails, routes, streams, and rivers Open the book to page 14. Look at the time line. 15. When was the law passed requiring immigrants to pay taxes on gold? A. 1848 B. 1850 C. 1858

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16. How long did the Gold Rush last? A. 10 years B. 9 years C. 1 year Open the book to page 16. Look at the photos and the caption. 17. Which uses of gold are pictured? A. decorating and making electrical connectors B. making jewelry and decorating C. making jewelry and restoring teeth Open the book to page 17. Look at the flowchart. 18. What should you do right after putting special glue on the bowl? A. Use a brush to put gold leaf on the bowl. B. Use a brush to take off any glue. C. Use a brush to put varnish on the bowl.

Reading Assessment ­ Level Q

15

WRITING ASSESSMENT

PREPARATION

TEACHER DIRECTIONS

Student Cause and Effects Chart and Writing Model

1 2 Open the student book to pages 20­21. Point to the student cause and effects chart model on page 20.

Photocopy pages 17­19 and 24. Get student book Level Q, The California Gold Rush. Gather a pencil and paper for the student's writing.

This is a chart that a student filled in to plan his writing. He wrote labels to go with his pictures about the effects of the California Gold Rush.

3 Point to the Student Writing Model on page 21.

This is what the student wrote after he filled in his chart.

4 Read aloud to the student the Student Writing Model on page 21.

Student Book

Writing Choices

(You may opt to allow the student to bypass using the graphic organizer for planning his or her writing--see number 2 below.) 1 Turn to page 23. Introduce the Writing Choices using the prompt below.

Student Cause and Effects Chart and Writing Model, pages 20­21

These pictures show different events, or causes, that have an effect on people and places. Choose one of these causes to write about. You can also choose another cause other than the California Gold Rush that has had an effect on people and places to write about.

2 Give the student the photocopy of the Cause and Effects Chart from page 17 of this guide and some writing paper and a pencil.

Writing Choices pages 22­23

Use this chart to help you plan your writing. In the cause box, write the Cause and draw a picture of it. Then draw three effects of that cause. Label your pictures. When you are finished, use your chart to help you write about the cause and it's effects.

STANDARDS Give the student as much independent time as needed to fill in the Cause and Effects Chart and to write. Tell the student to refer to the student cause and effects chart model and Student Writing Model on student book pages 20­21 as needed. Remind the student that he or she can write more than is represented in the Student Writing Model on page 21 of the Student Book. 3 After the student has completed the writing independently, use the Writing Rubric on page 18 of this guide and the Student Writing Samples on pages 44­49 of the Teacher's Manual to evaluate the student's writing and determine the student's writing score. Use the Writing Level Placement Chart on page 19 to determine the student's Writing Level. Then use the student's Writing Level to determine the student's grade-level proficiency using the Results to Grade-Level Proficiency in Writing chart.

1: Communicate for social, intercultural, and instructional purposes 2: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in English language arts 5: Communicate information, ideas, and concepts for academic success in social studies

4

16

Writing Assessment ­ Level Q

Name:

Date:

The California Gold Rush

CAUSE AND EFFECTS CHART

Effects

Cause

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Writing Assessment ­ Level Q

17

Writing Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Writing Rubric

Analyze the student's writing using the rubric below. For each category (Message and Content, Conventions, Word Choice and Academic Language, and Sentence Structure), circle the points under the description that best matches the student's writing. Then add up the points to determine the student's writing score. See page 19 to determine the student's Writing Level.

Emergent Message and Content No response; Drew picture or dictated message; Or copied writing model from page 21 of student book instead of generating own writing 1 Correct print direction; Some correct letter/word correspondence; Or copied writing model from page 21 of student book instead of generating own writing Environmental print; Labeled drawings or wrote simple message Early Writing clearly connects with graphic organizer; Simple phrases or sentences Early Fluency Graphic organizer supports writing with beginning, middle, and end; Writing has a single topic Paragraph has cohesive structure and connected sentences Fluency Several pages; Paragraphs have logical sequence; Descriptions coherently developed

2 Spaces between words; Sound/ symbol letter relationships used to produce temporary spelling

3 Sound/symbol relationships used to spell/ group words in phrases/sentences; Uppercase and lowercase used; Spelling errors reflect nonnative English pronunciation/ spelling patterns 3

4 Spells words from common word families; Most punctuation used correctly

5 Accurate spelling and punctuation; Some complex verb tenses; First/third person used

6 Conventions match grade level; Complex verb forms used correctly

Conventions

1 Word Choice and Academic Language

2

4

5

6 Wide range of vocabulary and matches audience, purpose, and style; Grade level academic language used correctly 6 Range of sentence structures; Complex sentences; Connecting words used effectively

Some academic Academic language terms used in is imprecise labeling or dictation

Vocabulary matches Range of audience and vocabulary; Varied purpose word choice; Some academic language used correctly

2

3 Simple phrases or sentences can be understood; Word order reflects home language

4 English word order used; Simple sentences complete; Some sentences loosely connected or are run-ons 4

5 Some compound sentences; Connecting words used, some imprecisely

3

5 Writing Score:

6

18

Writing Assessment ­ Level Q

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Sentence Structure

Writing Assessment: The California Gold Rush

Student Name: Grade: Teacher: Date:

Writing Level Placement Chart

Based on the student's writing score from the Writing Rubric on page 18, find the corresponding Writing Level in the chart below and circle it.

If the student's writing score is... then the student's Writing Level is...

2­5

6­9

10­13

14­17

18­21

22­24

Writing Level 1

Writing Level 2

Writing Level 3

Writing Level 4

Writing Level 5

Writing Level 6

TESOL Standards For a summary report of the student's writing proficiency, see page 24. Results to Grade-Level Proficiency in Writing

Based on the student's Writing Level and the student's current grade level, circle whether the student is on or below grade level in the chart below.

Writing Levels Grade 1 K on grade level one level below grade level two levels below grade level three levels below grade level 2 3 4 5 6

1

on grade level Above grade level one level below grade level two levels below grade level three levels below grade level

2

on grade level one level below grade level two levels below grade level three levels below grade level three levels below grade level

3

on grade level one level below grade level two levels below grade level two levels below grade level

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4

on grade level one level below grade level one level below grade level

5 Significantly below grade level 6

on grade level

on grade level

NEXT STEPS See Next Steps on pages 96­102 of the Teacher's Manual for follow-up instruction.

Writing Assessment ­ Level Q

19

TESOL

TESOL ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY STANDARDS SUMMARY REPORTS

English Language Proficiency Standards in Core Content Areas

The TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Reports on the following pages help you understand the results you obtained from administering the assessments in each part of the Rigby ELL Assessment Kit.

What Are the TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards?

The TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards in the Content Areas provide a tool for teachers to use as they assess their English language learners. The Rigby ELL Assessment Kit is aligned to these TESOL Standards. These standards bridge ESL/ELD content standards and core curriculum content areas, which include English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Each English language proficiency standard is divided into the four domains of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each summary report is divided into five levels of English language proficiency: 1. Starting 2. Emerging 3. Expanding 4. Developing 5. Bridging The highest level, Bridging, is aligned with state and national academic content standards, allowing you to know whether the student has reached a level of English language proficiency that supports academic achievement.

How to Use the TESOL Standards Summary Reports

Each section in this Administration Guide helps you place each English language learner in an English language proficiency level for each of the four domains: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Within each box of the TESOL charts, you will find a description of the student's English language proficiency. This description helps you understand what the student is able to do within each domain. These TESOL English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Reports are designed for use after completing the assessments on pages 5, 7, 10, and 19. You will need to transfer the results from those pages onto the summary reports in order to find out the corresponding TESOL English language proficiency level for your student in each domain.

20

TESOL ­ Level Q

TESOL

Student Name:

English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Report: Level Q

Grade:

Teacher:

Date:

LISTENING/SPEAKING TESOL Standard 1: Academic Success for Social, Intercultural, and Instructional Purposes

Circle the box in each row that best describes your classroom observations, including how the student followed your directions during the assessment. The column heading above each of the two boxes you circle provides you with the student's TESOL proficiency levels for Listening and Speaking per Standard 1.

LEVELS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY Emerging Developing Expanding Responds non-verbally to questions pertaining to multiple-step classroom instructions Responds nonverbally to explicit language pertaining to classroom instructions Responds nonverbally to idiomatic expressions pertaining to classroom instructions (e.g., "Take your seats.") Initiates and responds to idiomatic expressions or slang in conversation

Starting Responds nonverbally to questions, statements, commands, or social courtesies given orally Listening

Bridging Responds nonverbally to figurative language pertaining to classroom instructions

TESOL Standard 2: Academic Success in the Area of English Language Arts

Circle the box in each row that corresponds with the student's Listening and Speaking Proficiency results from pages 5 and 7. The column heading above each of the two boxes you circle provides you with the student's TESOL proficiency levels for Listening and Speaking per Standard 2.

LEVELS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY Emerging Developing Expanding LISTENING LISTENING LISTENING LISTENING PROFICIENCY RESULT: PROFICIENCY RESULT: PROFICIENCY RESULT: PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 4 STAGE 3 STAGE 2 STAGE 1 With oral prompts, With oral prompts, With oral prompts, With oral prompts, understands most understands many understands some understands few vocabulary words vocabulary words vocabulary words vocabulary words related to the related to the related to the related to the Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Gold Rush Starting SPEAKING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 1 Communicates ideas related to the Gold Rush primarily through gestures or single word utterances SPEAKING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 2 Uses some basic words and simple phrases to communicate ideas related to the Gold Rush SPEAKING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 3 Uses language to explain ideas related to the Gold Rush SPEAKING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 4 Uses language to compare/contrast ideas related to the Gold Rush

Speaking

Asks for assistance with Asks questions or a task exchanges information with peers

Initiates or engages in conversation with peers or within a small group

Expresses or responds to figurative language in conversation

Bridging LISTENING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 5 With oral prompts, understands all vocabulary words related to the Gold Rush SPEAKING PROFICIENCY RESULT: STAGE 5 Uses language to analyze/categorize ideas related to the Gold Rush

Speaking

Listening

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TESOL ­ Level Q

21

TESOL

Student Name:

English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Report: Level Q

Grade:

Teacher:

Date:

READING: FICTION TESOL Standard 2: Academic Success in the Area of English Language Arts

Find the row for the student's current grade level. Then circle the box that corresponds to the student's fiction score from page 10. The column heading above the box you circle provides you with the student's TESOL proficiency level for Reading in fiction.

LEVELS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY Emerging Developing Expanding (0­1 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text (2­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with some comprehension

Grade

Starting

Bridging (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text

4

Not applicable

5

(0­1 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension (0­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension

(2­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with some comprehension (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text

Student's current reading placement does not align with these TESOL levels.

6

22

TESOL ­ Level Q

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TESOL

Student Name:

English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Report: Level Q

Grade:

Teacher:

Date:

READING: NONFICTION IN THE CORE CONTENT AREAS TESOL Standards 3, 4, and 5: Academic Success in the Areas of Math, Science, and Social Studies

Find the row for the student's current grade level. Then circle the box that corresponds to the student's nonfiction score from page 10. The column heading above the box you circle provides you with the student's TESOL proficiency level for Reading in nonfiction.

LEVELS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY Emerging Developing Expanding (0­1 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text (2­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with some comprehension

Grade

Starting

Bridging (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text

4

Not applicable

5

(0­1 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension (0­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with limited or no comprehension

(2­3 points) Reads fourth grade fiction text with some comprehension (4­5 points) Reads and comprehends fourth grade fiction text

Student's current reading placement does not align with these TESOL levels.

6

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TESOL ­ Level Q

23

TESOL

Student Name:

English Language Proficiency Standards Summary Report: Level Q

Grade:

Teacher:

Date:

WRITING TESOL Standard 2: Academic Success in the Area of English Language Arts

Find the row for the student's current grade level. Then circle the box that corresponds to the student's Writing Placement Level Result from page 19. The column heading above the one box you circle provides you with the student's TESOL proficiency level for Writing.

LEVELS OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY Emerging Developing Expanding Level 1 Student draws a picture and dictates a message Level 1 Student draws a picture and uses some conventional symbols Level 2 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 2 Student produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message Level 3 Student writes a paragraph with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 3 Student writes a paragraph with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 3 Student writes a paragraph with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 4 Student writes 2­3 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 1 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 2 Student writes a simple message

Grade

Starting Level 1 Student draws a picture

Bridging Levels 1 and above Student writes a simple message

K

1

Level 1 Student draws a picture and dictates a message

Level 1 Student draws a picture and uses some conventional symbols Level 1 Student writes a simple message

Levels 2 and above Student produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message Levels 3 and above Student writes a paragraph with cohesive structure and connected sentences Levels 4 and above Student writes 5­6 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Levels 5 and above Student writes 5­6 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Levels 5 and above Student writes 5­6 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences

2

Level 1 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 1 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 1 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 1 Student copies environmental print and/or labels drawings Level 1 or 2 Student labels drawings and/or produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message

Level 3 Student produces a piece of writing that has a beginning, middle, and end Level 3 Student writes 2­3 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 4 Student writes 2­3 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Level 4 Student writes 2­3 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences Levels 5 and above Student writes 2­3 paragraphs with cohesive structure and connected sentences

3

Level 2 Student produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message Level 2 Student produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message Level 2 Student produces phrases or simple sentences that convey a message Level 3 Student writes a paragraph with cohesive structure and connected sentences

4

5

6

Student's current reading level makes writing at this TESOL level unlikely.

24

TESOL ­ Level Q

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