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MASS MEDIA IN INDIA 2009

MASS MEDIA IN INDIA 2009

Compiled and Edited by Research, Reference and Training Division National Documentation Centre on Mass Communication

PUBLICATIONS DIVISION MINISTRY OF INFORMATION AND BROADCASTING GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

2010 (Saka 1932)

© Publications Division

ISBN : 978-81-230-1614-6 REF-ENG-OP-077-2009-10

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Published by Additional Director General (Incharge), Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India, Soochna Bhawan, CGO Complex, Lodhi Road, New Delhi-110 003 http://www.publicationsdivision.nic.in Publications Division Editing: Nitima Shiv Charan Cover Design: R.K. Tandon Research, Reference and Training Division Compiled and edited by: S.M. Khan Surendra Kumar H.M. Sharma S.S. Thakur Indexing by Sushma Gautam

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FOREWORD

The media is the Fourth pillar of a democratic system, the legislature, executive and judiciary being the other three. While legislature enacts the law for the society and the executive takes steps for implementing them, the third stepping-stone is the judiciary, which has to ensure legality of all actions and decisions. The Fourth Estate i.e. the press has to operate within the framework of these statutes and constitutional provisions to act in public and national interest. This is indicative of the fact that nobody is above law. When the Constitution of India guaranteed freedom of speech and expression to its citizens, it ensured that the freedom was not absolute and any expression, by way of words, speech or visual medium, did not violate constitution or any statutory provisions enacted by legislature in public interest or in the interest of sovereignty and integrity of India. Media has to be responsible to the needs and requirements of people as an important institution and a strong pillar of democracy. What media may strive for is free, fair and truthful reporting devoid of sensationalism and prejudices. The Media has to act as representative for all one billion plus people irrespective of region, religion, caste, sex or any other consideration. It has to contribute in a significant manner to the empowerment of people as there is a new awakening in the society, in which it plays a very important role. The media also acts as a catalyst in evolving a consensus on many issues of national importance, thereby playing a very important role in the process of consensus building. The present edition focuses on the Media and Laws and includes articles written by eminent media persons on the subjects like `Media and Criminal Justice'; `Trial by Media'; `Media Laws: A Historical Perspective' and `Trial by Media' and `Trial of Media'. These articles cover various issues relating to the relationship between mass media and law of the land. The volume also includes information pertaining to media organizations of central and state government & union territories and a comprehensive Bibliography. The cooperation received from various organizations/agencies in the compilation of the book is gratefully acknowledged. The views expressed in the articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the government. I hope that the Mass Media in India-2009 will be useful source of information for media practitioners, policy makers, researchers, teachers and students of mass communication.

Suggestions for any improvement on this publication are welcome and may be e-mailed to the address: [email protected] or sent to the Additional Director General, Research, Reference and Training Division, Room No. 447, Fourth Floor, Soochna Bhawan, CGO Complex, Lodi Road, New Delhi-110003.

(S.M. Khan) Additional Director General

CONTENTS

ARTICLES 1. Media and Criminal Justice A. K. Upadhyay Trial by Media (Sting Operation) R.P. Tyagi Media Laws: A Historical Perspective K. M. Shrivastava Trial by Media and Trial of Media Prof. (Dr.) Ranbir Singh 1

2.

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3.

22

4.

35

MEDIA ORGANIZATIONS 5. 6. 7. Central Government State Government Professional Organisation 44 199 297 300 372 413

APPENDICES Bibliography Index

MEDIA AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE

A. K. Upadhyay* Introduction

The term `media' are a composite of print, sound and electronic. Print media remains as powerful as ever along with newspapers, books, periodicals, etc. But Electronic media or cable television, telecommunications and satellite broadcasting offer a rich mix of all that is available around the world. News of crime is a staple of 24-hour TV channels in order to lure viewers to their channels. Sexual assaults, sensational murders, road accidents, dowry deaths and police actions, etc., are all prominent features. The media starts giving its version even before the police interrogate the suspect/come to the scene of incident. Such crime news demands the arrest of a suspect/severe punishment before the police collect sufficient evidence. Suspect and witnesses are interviewed/their pictures are shown; televised debates are held about the guilt or innocence of the suspect or quantum of punishment to be awarded in case of conviction. Some websites provide information service on criminal records of crimes/criminals or persons concerning a criminal trial. Many exposures of crimes by websites/TV channels are the example. Some times an accused goes before the media, states his version of the commission of offence/confession and asks the police to come to arrest him. On the other hand, some times police presents the suspects before the media with their news. Many people believe that these kinds of crime news/websites are true and might prejudice potential judges and fair trial. Thus, such crime news/programmes generate legal problems for the media and accused, especially when overzealous media go beyond legal limits. In India `Freedom of speech and expression' is a fundamental right under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution and `Right to fair trial' has also been brought under the purview of Article 21- as a Fundamental Right. The Right to Information Act, 2005 has become a very important tool for journalists to seek information. The courts have had occasions to explore the nexus

* I.L.S., Law Commission of India, M/o Law and Justice, GOI, New Delhi. The views expressed by the author in this paper are his personal views only and have no official bearing whatsoever.

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between `Freedom of speech and expression' and `Fair trial'. In 1997 the Supreme Court of India held that a trial by press, electronic media or by way of a public agitation is the very anti-thesis of rule of law and can lead to miscarriage of justice. A Judge is to guard himself against such pressure and he is to be guided strictly by rule of law. If he finds the person guilty of an offence he is then to address himself to the question of sentence to be awarded to him in accordance with the provisions of law1. Recently addressing the final session of a two-day workshop on "Reporting of Court Proceedings by Media and Administration of Justice" at New Delhi, the Chief Justice of India Hon'ble Justice K. G. Balakrishnan said regarding cases pending in court, the media should refrain from attempts to "prejudice the trial".2 Thus, a few questions that arise for consideration are - (i) Is news gathering and prejudicial publicity related to a criminal trial protected by `Freedom of speech and expression'? (ii) Is prejudicial publicity about a criminal case jeopardizes the rights of the suspect/accused person to enjoy a fair trial? (iii) Is there any impact of pretrial or during trial prejudicial publicity on judges in a criminal case? These questions have not yet been answered satisfactorily. Is newsgathering and prejudicial publicity related to a criminal trial protected by `Freedom of speech and expression'? The Constitution of India does not separately refer to the freedom of the press or of the electronic media in Part III. But the law treats these rights as part of the `Freedom of speech and expression'. The demand for a specific reference to press freedom was made even at the time of framing of the Constitution. Dr. K. M. Munshi had proposed the freedom of press as a separate right.3 However, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar explained the position: "The press has no special rights which are not to be given or which are not to be exercised by a citizen in his individual capacity. The editor of a press and the manager are all citizens and, therefore, when they choose to write in newspapers, they are merely exercising their right of expression and...... No special mention is necessary of the freedom of press at all"4 and the Constituent Assembly agreed with this reasoning and rejected the demand for a specific reference to press freedom. The freedom of press which, though not separately and specifically guaranteed, has been read as part of Article 19(1)(a).....the basic structure.5 The "freedom of speech and expression" in Article 19(1)(a) means the right to express one's convictions and opinions freely, by word of mouth, writing, printing, pictures or electronic media or in any other manner.6 The right under Art 19(1)(a) includes the right to information and the right to

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disseminate through all types of media, whether print, electronic or audiovisual.7 Freedom of speech and expression includes right to publish as journalist a faithful report or proceedings witnessed and heard in court.8 Article 19(1)(a) guarantees only citizens the right to freedom of speech and expression. A non-citizen, (e.g. foreigner) who runs a newspaper cannot claim the freedom of press as a fundamental right.9 The Second Press Commission (1982) and the Law Commission of India (1984) have recommended amending Article 19 of the Constitution by adding Indian Companies/Corporations as a citizen.10 This right is not absolute though it is fundamental and it is subject to certain restrictions that may be imposed by the State. Article 19(2) of the Constitution of India subject to `reasonable restrictions', which can be made by legislation to the extent, permits the guarantee of freedom of speech and expression. The Article reads: 19(2) Nothing in sub-clause (a) of clause (1) shall affect the operation of any existing law, or prevent the State from making any law, in so far as such law imposes reasonable restrictions on the exercise of the right conferred by the said sub-clause, in the interest of the sovereignty and integrity of India, the security of the State, friendly relations with foreign States, public order, decency or morality, or in relation to contempt of court, defamation or incitement to an offence". Clause(2) of Article 19 clearly permits restrictions on the freedom of speech and expression when such restrictions are imposed by a law and thus the Right is subject to law of contempt.11 On the freedom of speech and expression, the law of contempt imposes a significant limitation by prohibiting publication of any matter which prejudices a fair trial and a reckless and scurrilous attack against judge imputing oblique motive amounts to criminal contempt of court.12 Contempt vis-à-vis freedom of speech - maintenance of dignity of court is cardinal principle of rule of law. Criticism, which undermines dignity of court, cannot be permitted under cloak of freedom of speech.13 The freedom of the press is extolled as one of the great bulwarks of liberty. It is entrenched in the constitutions of the world. But it is often misunderstood. I will first say what it does not mean. It does not mean that the press is free to ruin a reputation or to break a confidence, or to pollute the course of justice or to do anything that is unlawful. I will next say what it does mean. It means that there is to be no censorship. No restraint should be placed on the press as to what they should publish. Not by a licensing system. Nor by executive direction. Nor by court injunction. It means that the press is to be free from what Blackstone, calls `prior

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restraint'. The press is not to be restrained in advance from publishing whatever it thinks right to publish. It can `publish and be damned'. Afterwards, after the publication, if the press has done anything unlawful they can be dealt with by the courts. If they should offend by interfering with the course of justice they can be punished in proceedings for contempt of court. If they should damage the reputation of innocent people, by telling untruths or making unfair comment, they may be made liable in damages. But always afterwards. Never beforehand. Never by previous restraint.14 The law of contempt aims to prevent interference with the administration of justice.15 The powers of contempt conferred on the Supreme Court and High Courts by Articles 129 and 215 are constitutional powers. It did not affect the law relating to a High Court's power to punish for contempt to its subordinate courts that continued to be governed by the Contempt of Courts Act of 1926, until the Contempt of Court Act, 1952, replaced it. However, the Act of 1952 was found inadequate in view of the fundamental rights such as freedom of expression, etc. Therefore in 1961 a committee headed by then Additional Solicitor General was constituted to examine the entire law on the subject. This committee submitted its report in February 1963. In 1969-70 the Joint Committee also examined in its report 111. Finally, the Contempt of Courts Act, 1971 was passed to replace the Act of 1952. Section 15 (1) of the Contempt of Courts Act, 1971 provides that the power of a court of record to punish for contempt of itself is to prevent any unlawful interference with the administration of justice and to preserve the dignity of the legal system in the interest of the general public. Under subsection (2) High Court may take action for criminal contempt of a subordinate court. There is no definition of the expression `contempt of court' in the Constitution of India. But Section 2(c) of the Contempt of Court Act, 1971 defines `Criminal Contempt' as: "Section 2(c): `Criminal contempt' means the publication, (whether by words, spoken or written or by signs, or by visible representations, or otherwise), of any matter or the doing of any other act whatsoever which (i) ... ... ... ...

(ii) prejudices or interferes or tends to interfere with, the due course of any judicial proceedings; or (iii)interferes or tends to interfere with, or obstructs or tends to obstruct, the administration of justice in any other manner".

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Sections 3 to 7 enumerate certain specified acts which shall not, subject to the provisions thereof, constitute contempt of court. Section 3 reads as under: 3. Innocent publication and distribution of matter not contempt (1) A person shall not be guilty of contempt of Court on the ground that he has published (whether by words spoken or written or by signs or by visible representations or otherwise) any matter which interferes or tends to interfere with, or obstructs or tends to obstruct, the course of justice in connection with any civil or criminal proceedings pending at the time of publication, if at that time he had no reasonable grounds for believing that the proceeding was pending. (2) Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in this Act or any other law for the time being in force, the publication of any such matter as is mentioned in sub-section (1) connection with any civil or criminal proceedings which is not pending at the time of publication and shall not be deemed to constitute contempt of Court. (3) A person shall not be guilty of contempt of Court on the ground that he has distributed a publication containing any such matter as is mentioned in subsection (1), if at the time of distribution he had no reasonable grounds for believing that it contained or was likely to contain any such matter as aforesaid. Provided that this sub-section shall not apply in respect of the distribution of (i) any publication which is a book or paper printed or published otherwise than in conformity with the rules contained in Section 3 of the Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867; (ii) any publication which is a book or paper printed or published otherwise than in conformity with the rules contained in Section 5 of the said Act. Explanation - For the purposes of this section, a judicial proceedings; (a) is said to be pending (A) in case of a civil proceeding, when it is instituted by the filing of a plaint or otherwise; (B) in the case of a criminal proceeding under the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1898, or any other law

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(i) where it relates to the commission of an offence, when the chargesheet or Challan is filed, or when the Court issues summons or warrant, as the case may be, against the accused, and (ii) in any other case, when the Court takes cognizance of the matter to which the proceeding relates, and in the case of a civil or criminal proceedings, shall be deemed to continue to be pending until it is heard and finally decided, that is to say, in a case where an appeal or revision is competent, until the appeal or revision is heard and finally decided or, where no appeal or revision is preferred, until the period of limitation prescribed for such appeal or revision has expired; (b) which has been heard and finally decided shall not be deemed to be pending- merely by reason of the fact that proceedings for the execution of the decree, order or sentence passed therein are pending. Sections 4 and 5 of the Act protect fair and accurate reporting and fair criticism of judicial proceedings. Section 6 also protects for bona fide complaint against judge of a subordinate Court. Section 7 states when publication of information relating to proceedings in chambers or in camera is not contempt, except in certain cases, which are enumerated in that section. So anything that prejudices the court against any party before the cause is heard is contempt. The Law Commission of India16 categorizes ten type of publications in the media as prejudicial to a suspect or accused: (1) Publications concerning the character of accused or previous conclusions; (2) Publication of Confessions; (3) Publications which comment or reflect upon the merits of the case; (4) Photographs; (5) Police activities; (6) Imputation of innocence; (7) Creating an atmosphere of prejudice; (8) Criticism of witnesses; (9) Premature publication of evidence; (10) Publication of interviews with witnesses. The publication expressing opinions as to the sentence to be passed on any specific convicted offender.17 There are certain laws that specifically preclude access to courts/ government-held information: (i) Disclosure of identity of the victim of an offence of rape or sexual assault under sections 376, 376A, 376B, 376C and 376D of the Indian Penal Code, 1860 is prohibited and punishable under section 228A except with the permission of the court. (ii) Report of inquiry held under the Children Act, 1960, with particulars leading to the identification of the child; (s 36).

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(iii)Proceedings under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, (s 22); The Family Courts Act, 1984 (s 11); The Special Marriage Act, 1954 (s 33); The Indian Divorce Act, 1869 (s 53) held in camera. (iv) Details relating to identity of minors involved in the proceedings under the Juvenile Justice Act 1986; (s 36). The Law Commission of India in its 198th report on `Witness Identity Protection and Witness protection Programmes' (August 2006) has recommended not disclosing witness identity during investigation, inquiry and trial. Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948 declares the freedom of press and so do Article 19 of the International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights, 1966 and Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights. In the light of the human rights concepts and the provisions of our Constitution and the Contempt of Courts Act, 1971, the question arises whether any publication of matters regarding suspect or accused can amount to contempt of Court not only when it is made during the pendency of a criminal case (i.e. after the charge sheet is filed) but before that event, e.g. once a person is arrested and criminal proceedings are "imminent". The Law Commission of India has examined this issue in its 200th report (supra) and recommendations have been made. Thus, Contempt of Court law protects the person who is arrested and is likely to face a criminal trial. The media has right to freedom of speech and expression under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution but subject to law of contempt. Is prejudicial publicity about a criminal case jeopardizes the rights of the suspect/accused person to enjoy a fair trial? There is a presumption of innocence against the commission of any crime. The Constitution of India provides certain fundamental rights to a suspect/ accused. No person shall be convicted of any offence except for violation of the law in force at the time of the commission of the act charged as an offence and not be subjected to a penalty greater than that which might have been inflicted under the law in force at the time of the commission of the offence.18 No person shall be prosecuted and punished for the same offence more than once. 19 No person accused of any offence shall be compelled to be a witness against himself.20 Above all, Article 21 is the crucial article that guarantees the right to life and liberty. It reads: "No person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty except according to procedure established by law." The Supreme Court in Maneka Gandhi's

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case has interpreted the words `according to procedure established by law' - in Article 21 as requiring a procedure, which is fair, just and equitable and not arbitrary.21 The Apex Court again reiterated in Kartar Singh v State of Punjab that the law must ensure `reasonable, just and fair' procedure.22 A person who is arrested has to be produced before a Magistrate within 24 hours of the arrest. (Article 22(2) and the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973, Section 151 (2). An accused alleging false implication is entitled to seek judicial remand and ask for holding of identification parade.23 Orissa High Court has held that publication of photographs of accused in newspaper before identification parade cannot be prevented by police in a society where freedom of press is guaranteed.24 The new Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 including right to bail and anticipatory bail has been enacted with regard to the new dimensions which the Supreme Court has given to the expression `deprived', `personal liberty' and `procedure' established by law in the Article 21 of the Constitution. In Anukul Chandra Pradhan v UOI the Supreme Court of India observed that no occasion should arise for an impression that the publicity attaching to these matters has tended to dilute the emphasis or the essentials of a fair trial and the basic principles of jurisprudence including the presumption of innocence of the accused unless found guilty at the end of the trial. This requirement, undoubtedly has to be kept in view during the entire trial.25 The Supreme Court while granting anticipatory bail to an accused in a dowry death case observed that these type of articles appearing in the media would certainly interfere with the course of administration of justice.... indulging in such trial by media when the issue is sub-judice deprecated.26 On 18th March 2008 many Newspapers (Delhi editions) published-kidney kingpin Dr. Amit Kumar has confessed that about 70 Turkish nationals were operated for illegal kidney transplants. His photo was also published. He is in police custody and hearing of bail application will take place in future. Further, on 19th April 2008 Newspapers reported `Life in prison or Death for R.K. Sharma' convict in Shivani Bhatnagar case, the day of hearing of sentence. On 26th April 2008 Newspapers reported Killer's confession Vijay Bhardwaj saying "I did it with the revolver Rajbir bhai sahab gave me last Friday for my safety". The above crime news were also highlighted in various TV channels. A film on D-5 Noida Nithari killings is awaited censor board clearance certificate. Two hour long movie meant only for adult audience would reveal the modus operandi of the serial killers, showing how Surinder Koli used to lure children into the house before they were killed. (Surender Koli and Moninder Singh Pandher are accused facing criminal trial and are in jail).

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Once an arrest is made and a person is liable to be produced in Court within 24 hours, if, at that stage (when court takes cognizance of the matter), a publication/broadcast is made about accused's character, past record of conviction or alleged confessions, it may subconsciously affect the Magistrate who may have to decide whether to grant or refuse to grant bail, or as to what conditions have to be imposed or whether the person should be remanded to police custody or it should be a judicial remand. Further, if after such publication/broadcast, a bail order goes against the arrested person, public may perceive that the media publication must have subconsciously affected the Magistrate's mind. Is there any impact of pretrial or during trial prejudicial publicity on judges in a criminal case? The question regarding the impact of pretrial or during trial prejudicial publicity on judges in criminal cases has been one of the highly debated issues in our country. It was traditionally presumed that intensive prejudicial media publicity influences judges and resulting in unfair trial. However, no study in this regard ever seems to have been conducted by any institution/law researchers/social scientists in India. In Mangi Lal v State of Maharastra, the Supreme Court of India referred (in para 15) the William Thomas Shipping co. case - "But our courts, are which administer both law and equity. Assuming that a judge holding a trial is not likely to be influenced by comment in newspapers, or by other media of mass communication may be ruled out - though it would be difficult to be dogmatic on that matter also- the court is entitled and is indeed bound to consider, especially in our country where personal conduct is largely influenced by opinion of the members of the cast, community, occupation or profession to which he belongs, ..... that is a real danger which must be guarded against: the court is not in initiating proceedings for contempt of abusing a party to a litigation, merely concerned with the impression on the judge's mind or even on the minds of witnesses for a litigant, it is also concerned with the probable effect on the conduct of the litigants and persons having similar claims.27 Mr. Justice Jackson wrote a concurring opinion in which Justice Frankfurter joined: "But prejudicial influence outside the courtroom, becoming all too typical of a highly publicized trial, were brought to bear on this jury with such force that the conclusion is inescapable that these defendants were prejudices as guilty and the trial was but a legal gesture to register a verdict already dictated by the press and the public opinion which it generated."28 As the Sheppard case, the Hauptmann case, and others indicate, many American newspapers handle crime news so unfairly and sensationally that they deprive the accused of an impartial jury ....29 There is much

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dissatisfaction in the United States with existing efforts to resolve the conflict between a free Press and an impartial trial prejudicial publicity constitutes a serious threat to an accused's right to an impartial jury trial. He is without adequate means to combat it....30 The Orissa High Court observed in a case that the press should not attempt to influence the judges before they have made up their minds on pending controversies....31 In the past, it has been suggested that judicial officers may be susceptible to influence by media publicity in the same way as jurors and witnesses. However, the general view of the courts now appears to be that any such influence on judicial officers will not be sufficient to amount to a "real and definite tendency" so as to constitute contempt, because judicial officers have training and experience in disregarding information that is not obtained by way of evidence admitted in court. This view encompasses coroners, and magistrates hearing summary proceedings.32 ....the majority of Commissioners supports the general assumption that judicial officers are not susceptible to any significant degree to influence by media publicity.33 The Commission, while maintaining the view that judges are generally immune to media influence even in sentencing, is concerned that media comment about the sentencing of particular proceeding may "embarrass" the sentencing judge.34 Most law reform bodies have tended to take the view that judicial officers should generally be assumed capable of resisting any significant influence by media publicity.35 The above brief survey of the cases and Law Commissions' study on the impact of prejudicial publicity on judges in different jurisdictions gives a mixed picture of law. The courts tend to favour prejudicial publication's influence on trial judges. But Law Commissions have different view. Thus, there is evidence both and against the hypothesis that prejudicial publicity may lead to influence the trial judges (at least subconsciously). The challenges posed by media, especially electronic media require serious consideration by the media and courts.

Conclusion

The position today, however, has radically changed. Both the media and criminal justice system are on the cusp of a change. All the three questions have been debated and further it is bound to generate a debate. Right to know is a basic right that citizens of a free country aspire in the broader horizon of the right to live in this age in our land under Article 21 of our Constitution. That right has reached new dimensions and urgency. That right puts greater responsibility upon those who take upon themselves the responsibility to inform. No one can deny that due to media many victims of crime and accused persons got justice.

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It is asserted that no judge will be influenced in his judgment by any thing said by the media. Every judicial officer does his utmost not to let his mind be affected by what he has seen or heard or read outside the court and he will not knowingly let himself be influenced in any way by the media. Nevertheless it should be recognized that a man may not be able to put that what he has seen, heard or read entirely out of his mind and that he may be subconsciously affected by it. If so, such prejudicial publicity by media has threatened accused's right to fair trial, may it be at the time of bail hearing, or evidence hearing or sentence hearing. And of course, it needs to be prevented. Though a few cases have come before the Apex Court having bearing upon prejudicial media publicity in criminal trial and its effect on fair trial, it has guided trial judges to guard themselves against media's pressure and the media to restrain itself regarding prejudicial publicity. However, in a democratic country like India, we need both a free media and fair trial. Media should be free to publish material to the fullest without jeopardizing the administration of justice but a proper balance needs to be found between the two.

References

1. 2. 3. 1997 (8) SCC 386. Hindustan Times, New Delhi, March 31, 2008 at 11. The Law Commission of India, 101st report on `Freedom of Speech and Expression under Article 19 of the Constitution: recommendation to extend it to Indian Corporation' (1984) para 2.2. Constituent Assembly Debates Vol. VII, 780. I R Coelho vs State of Tamilnadu, (2007) 2 SCC 737 at para 106. Life Insurance Corporation of India v. Manubhai D Shah (1992) 3 SCC 637. Secretary, Ministry of Information & Broadcasting v. Cricket Association of West Bengal: 1995(2) SCC 161. AIR 2002 Bom 97(101). AIR 1959 SC 395 (402). Supra note 3 paras 1.7 and 7.5. AIR 1970 SC 1015. 1985 Cri. LJ 1963 (1967) (DB). AIR 2002 SC 1375 (1380). Schering Chemicals Ltd v Falkman Ltd and others (Lord Denning MR) (1981) 2 ALL ER 321 at 330. New South Wales Law Reform Commission, Discussion Paper 43, July 2000, para 1.9. Most of the countries like UK, Canada, Australia, and Ireland etc. have law of contempt of court.

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

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16. The Law Commission of India, 200th report on `Trial by Media: Free Speech and Fair Trial, Under Criminal Procedure Code, 1973' (August 2006). 17. See New South Wales Law Reform Commission, Discussion Paper 43, on "Contempt by Publication" July 2000, Paras 7.62 and 7.75. 18. The Constitution of India, Article 20(1). 19. Ibid, Art 20 (2). 20. Ibid Article 20 (3). 21. AIR 1978 SC 597. 22. 1994(3) SCC 569. 23. Natilal v State of Rajasthan 1989(1) Crimes 640 Raj. 24. 1994 Cri. LJ 1316 (1318). 25. (1996) 6 SCCC 354. 26. M.P. Lohia v State of West Bengal; 2005 (2) SCC 686. 32. New South Wales Law Reform Commission, Discussion Paper 43, on "Contempt by Publication" July 2000, Para 4.49. 33. Ibid, para 4.51. 34. Ibid, para 7.75. 35. Ibid, para 4. 50.

Shri A.K Upadhyay is Assistant. Government Counsel, Law Commission of India.

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TRIAL BY MEDIA (STING OPERATION)

R.P. TYAGI

The media consist of traditional, print and electronic mass communicators. The nature and character of the media of a nation reveals, the nature and character of its civil and political society. In India, the media is acknowledged as the Fourth Organ of the State. At present, media command a more powerful place in our society and its respectability and credibility depends upon the manner in which it is used. In this article, an attempt has been made to discuss the constitutional provisions and legal position of sting operations by media in India. Our constitution guarantees the freedom of speech and expression under article 19(1) (a) and the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India time and again held that Freedom of press is a part of Freedom of speech and expression. While taking part in constituent assembly debate Dr. B.R. Ambedkar remarked: "The Press has no special rights, which are not being given to be or which are not to be excercised by the citizen in his individual capacity. The Editor of press or its manager are merely excercising the right of expression and therefore no special mention is necessary of the freedom of press" Because of privatization policy of the Government many industrial houses are opening new television channels which compete for their existence. News reporting is now on commercial basis. Every channel wants to high up its TRP rating to prove its supremacy over collecting and telecasting the news programme to the public as early as possible. Many news channels present crime related news in the sensational manner to increase their TRP and have also started exclusive crime news channels. They telecast the criminal cases involving high profile personality to attract more public attention. These crime news channels play the role of investigators and adjudicators especially regarding sensational/ high profile crimes about the guilt of the accused. Many accused are now using these channels to surrender themselves in a heroic way after giving long interviews to gain public sympathy and these channels live telecast these surrenders again and again

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for a day or two. Sometimes witnesses of such cases are traced by their news reporters to get their live version about the facts of the case without caring their impact on the trial of the cases. This media trial has its pros and cons qua the fair trial to the accused. This right of fair trial of an accused is a legal right, which comes from Article, 21 of the Constitution of India and also from the various provisions of Code of Criminal Procedure. Sometimes "Media Trial" also invade the protection conferred upon the accused under Article 20(3) of the constitution, against self incrimination. So the question now is whether the freedom of press/ media should be absolute or their should be some rider on this freedom. The Apex Court in Re. Hari Jai Singh in Re.- Vijay Kumar (1996) 6 SCC. Page 446 expressed serious concern about freedom of press being misused, while holding that the freedom of press is indispensable for the functioning of democracy. The Apex Court observed: "The protection cover of freedom of press must not be thrown open for wrong doings. Public order, decency, morality and such other things must be safeguarded. If a newspaper publishes what is improper, mischievously false or illegal and abuses its liberty, it must be punished by the Court of law. It is the duty of a true and responsible journalist to strive to inform the people with accurate and impartial presentation of news and their views after dispassionate evaluation of the facts and information received by them and to be published as a news item. The presentation of a news should be truthful, objective and comprehensive without any false and distorted expression". Thus freedom of press is not an unfettered freedom, it is under a duty to exercise it with a sense of responsibility by taking into consideration the provision of Article 19(2) of the Constitution of India. In State of Maharashtra vs. Jalgaon Municipal Council (AIR 2003, S.C. 1659) the Apex Court observed that an accused cannot be convicted merely because anybody including press so desire. The press has right to publish court proceedings but this right is not absolute one and is subject to two limitations. Firstly, it should not be contempt of court and secondly, it should not prejudice the accused. In State vs. Mohd. Afzal & others 2003(3) JCC 1669 the Ld. Defence Counsel took the plea that the Police allowed the Media to take interview of Mohd. Afzal and the same was prominently telecasted for about 100 days by various channels which caused prejudice to the accused. He further submitted that Media trial is anti thesis of the rule of law and results in miscarriage of justice. He further contended that pretrial publicity is sufficient to cause prejudice and hatred against the accused and the presumption of innocence of every person till found guilty by a court of

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law is eroded. But the Hon'ble judges of Delhi High Court rejected this argument by observing that judges are trained, skilled and have sufficient experience to shut their minds receiving hearsay evidence or being influenced by the Media. But the Hon'ble judge lodged a caveat on this aspect of the matter by observing : "It has indeed become a disturbing feature as is being noticed by us repeatedly that the accused persons, after their remand by the Magistrate, are brazenly paraded before the press and interviews are being allowed. Accused persons are exposed to public glare through T.V. and in case where test identification parade or the accused person being identified by witnesses (as in the present case) arise, the case of the prosecution is vulnerable to be attacked on the ground of exposure of the accused persons to public glare, weakening the impact of the identification. Further, what is more fundamentally disturbing to our mind is the fact that the police custody is given by the court to the investigation authorities on the premise that the accused is required for the purpose of investigation. This custody is not to be misused by allowing the media to interview the accused persons. The practice of allowing the media to interview the accused persons when they are in police custody under the order of the court, has therefore, to be deprecated." Similarly in State vs. Sushil Sharma reported in 2007 (1) J.C.C. Page 765, while rejecting the plea of unfair trial due to Media Trial, the Hon'ble Court observed, "As far as the grievances of the appellant's counsel against the media publicity of the case is concerned we do not think that anything would turn around this plea. We find that this is now becoming a main ground of challenge whenever some conviction takes place. We, however, feel that despite the fact that in this case the learned trial judge has also noticed in his judgment that this case had attracted lot of media attention but his decision is based on a fair, unbiased and unprejudiced analysis and assessment of the evidence before him. As far as parallel media trial of criminal cases is concerned , that takes place since these days media people are briefed on day to day basis by the police, representatives of the accused and even accused persons themselves also quite often speak before the cameras of various TV channels. In these circumstances media cannot be blamed for highlighting the facts, which are spoken to before the cameras by the representatives of the prosecution as well as the accused. We have also experienced that these days whenever media people highlight some crime the investigation agencies perform their functions with much more diligence and perfection. We, therefore, reject the argument that the appellant did not get a fair trial".

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The Hon'ble Supreme Court also in case R Bala Krishna Pillai vs. State of Kerala reported is 2000(7) SCC page 129 and also in case Zee News vs. Navjot Sandhu reported in 2003(1) SCALE 113 held that media interviews do not prejudice judges. But in Kali Ram vs. State of H.P. reported in AIR 1973, S.C. 2773, the apex court held that if a reasonable doubt arises regarding the guilt of accused, the benefit of that can not be withheld from the accused. The courts would not be justified in withholding that benefit because the acquittal right have an impact on the law and order situation or create a diverse reaction in society or among those members of the society who believe the accused to be guilty. Guilt should have been established by the evidence on record. In M.P. Lohia vs. State of West Bengal 2005 "Crl. J 1416 the Apex Court observed "having gone through the record we find very disturbing fact, which we feel necessary to comment upon in the interest of justice. The death of Chandni took place on 23.10.2003 and the complaint in this regard was registered and the investigation was in progress. The application for grant of anticipatory bail was disposed of by the High Court of Calcutta on 13.12.2004 and the special leave petition was pending before this court. Even then, an article, appeared in a magazine called Saga titled `Doomed by Dowry' written by one Kokila Pooddar based on her interview of the family of the deceased giving version of the tragedy and extensively quoting the father of the deceased as to his version of the case. The facts narrated therein are all materials that may be used in the forthcoming trial in this case and we have no hesitation that these type of articles appearing in the media would certainly interfere with the administration of the justice. We deprecate this practice and caution the publisher, editor and the journalist, who were responsible for the said article, against indulging in such trial by media where the issue is subjudice. However, to prevent any further issue being raised in this regard, we treat this matter as closed and hope that the order concerned in journalism would take note of this displeasure expressed by us for interfering with the administration of justice". This judgment also clarifies that no comments can be made on the merits of the case or on any material, which is the subject matter of a case pending before a court of law. In October 2005 a news item was published in Times of India, New Delhi with the heading "Media Trial ends in Suicide". It was stated in that news that one person Naresh Pal working as a driver with Pusa Agriculture Institute committed suicide with his wife after leaving a suicide note which

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stated that a T.V. Channel was called by his niece who made allegation of rape against him although he was impotent. He could not face humiliation and ended his life along with his wife. Without going on truth the fact is that the allegation of niece were telecast on T.V. Channel, which gave publicity to her claim of being raped by her uncle.The channel in such cases must have asked the complainant to lodge a report with the police for proper investigation instead of defaming a person without ascertaining his views just to sensationalize the news. Recently, Sting operation of General Secretary of Indian Hockey Federation for accepting bribe which stirred the sport arena including Hockey Federation even this operation rocked the Parliament when many members of Parliament raised this issue because of poor performance of Indian Hockey Team. The Sports Minister of India also demanded resignation of Chairman of Indian Hockey Federation due to corruption shown in the sting operation. In many acts, apart from Constitution of India as stated above, there are restrictions imposed on the media by the legislation (1) Sec.499, of Indian Penal Code, which provide as under: "DEFAMATION : Whoever, by words either spoken or intended to be read or by signs or by visible representations, makes or published any imputation concerning any person intending any harm, or knowing, or having reason to believe that such imputation, will harm, the reputation of such person, is said except in case hereinafter excepted, to defame that person. There are, however, ten exceptions to this section. (1) Sec. 327 of Code of Criminal Procedure 1973, which provides as under: `Court to be open (1) the place in which any criminal court is held for the purpose of inquiring into or trying any offence shall be deemed to be an open court, to which the public generally may have access, so far as the same can conveniently contain them; Provided that the presiding judge or magistrate may, if he thinks fit, order at any stage or any inquiry into, or trial of, any particular case, that the public generally, or any particular person, shall not have access to, or be or remain in the room or building used by the court. (2) Notwithstanding, anything contained in sub-section (1), the inquiry into and trial of rape or an offence under Section 376, Section 376A, Section 376B, Section 376C or Section 376D of the Indian Penal Code shall be conducted in-camera;

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Provided that the presiding judge may, if he thinks fit, or on an application made by either of the parties, allow any particular person to access to, or be or remain in, the room or building used by court. (3) Where any proceedings are held under sub-section (2) it shall not be lawful for any person to print or publish any matter in relation to any such proceedings, except with the previous permission of the court. Section 22 of Hindu Marriage Act, Proceedings to be in camera and may not be printed or published (1) Every proceeding under this Act shall be conducted in Camera and it shall not be lawful for any person to print or publish any matter in relation to any such proceedings except a judgment of the High Court or of Supreme Court printed or published with the previous permission of the court. (2) If any person prints or publishes any matter in contravention of the provisions contained in subsection (1), it shall be punishable with fine, which may extend to one thousand rupees. Section 14 Official Secrets Act: Exclusion of public from proceedings: In addition and without prejudice to any powers, which a court may possess to order the exclusion of the public from any proceedings, if the course of proceedings before a court against any person for an offence under this Act or the proceeding on appeal or in the course of trial of a person under this Act, application is made by the prosecution on the ground that the publication of any evidence to be given or of any statement to be made in the course of the proceedings would be prejudicial to the safety of the State, that all or any portion of the public shall be excluded during any part of hearing, the court may make an order to that effect, but the passing of the sentence shall in every case take place in public . Another aspect of media trials which denies fair trial to the accused is the interview of the accused during police custody to the electronic media persons and the same were telecast for many days which focus public opinion against the accused. These interviews are self incrimatory and offend protection against the self incrimination which is provided to him under article 20(3) of the Constitution. Article 20(3) provided that no person accused of an offence shall be compelled to be a witness against himself. The Hon'ble Supreme Court (in Nandini Satyhy vs. D.L. Dhani repoted in AIR 1978 S.C.C. page 1025) held that the concept of compelled testimony goes back to the stage of interrogation as per provisions of Article 20(3) of the Constitution . The Court denied the compelled testimony as evidence procured not merely by physical threat, physic torture, at spherical pressure, environmental coercion, over bearing and intimidatory methods and the like not legal penalty for violation.

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It is true that largely the media, especially Electronic Media is doing deplorable job of public awareness by exposing corruption prevailing at every step, in the public life and exposing commission of crimes, etc., but at the same time it should not cross its limitations and should not get involved in trial by media persons. For the last many years, a new concept of `sting operation' is on increase on almost every channel of Electronic Media to show something different for exposing corruption and social evils prevailing in the society. These telecast of sting operations have also increased the TRP rating of the news channels. Tehlka.com was the first to telecast sting operation for exposing corruption in defence deals. Another sting operation was telecast which shows accepting of money by the then BJP President. After getting good public response and success of these sting operations which also increased the TRP rating of those news channels, every channel appointed special investigator equipped with sophisticated special equipments and hidden cameras to expose quack Doctors, showing corruption in Sales Tax Department, Corruption in Police and also corruption among political personalities including Members of Parliament who misused MPLAD Fund and accepted money for asking questions in the Parliament. Due to these sting operations, these Members of Parliament were adjudged disqualified and their memberships were cancelled. Many public servants were removed from service and criminal cases as well departmental enquires were also initiated. Some sting operations were telecast to expose the poor service and maintenance in Medical Colleges and Govt. hospitals, such exposures through Electronic Media play a major role in stirring public opinions and consciousness and forcing the Govt. and its officials to act diligently and in a transparent manner. This role of public awareness also thrust a heavy responsibility on Media to act without crossing the limits as mentioned above, otherwise an individual has to pay its price against whom the sting operation was telecast. One of such case is of Ms. Uma Khurana a teacher in Delhi Govt. School against whom a sting operation was telecast on `Live India' a television News Channel on 30.08.2007 in which she was dubbed as racketeer of prostitution who was purportedly forcing a girl student into prostitution. After this telecast she was beaten by the public at the gate of her school who also tore her clothes. Police sprung into action and saved her from public outrage and arrested her. Due to public outcry after seeing her sting operation, the Education Department of Delhi Administration hurriedly, first suspended her and later dismissed her from service. Later on, it was revealed that the girl who had been shown as a student and was allegedly being forced into prostitution by Ms. Uma Khurana was not a school girl but a budding journalist. The news of the sting operation was

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widely published in almost every newspaper for months together. The Hon'ble Delhi High Court suo moto took cognizance of this fake sting operation and issued notice to Delhi Administration and Delhi Police. Pursuant to the notice, the police told the court that it was a stage managed episode prepared by one Virendra Kumar in conspiracy with Mr. Prakash Singh and Ms. Rashmi Singh and was shown as sting operation, because Virendra Kumar had some monetary dispute with Ms. Khurana. Police also gave clear chit to Ms. Uma Khurana and charged above said three persons who prepared and telecast the alleged sting operation. The Hon'ble court observed in its order, "Such incident should not happen and false and fabricated sting operation directly infringing upon a person's right to privacy should not recur because of desire to earn more and to have higher TRP rating." "There is no doubt and there is no second opinion that `truth' is required to be shown to the public in public interest and the same can be shown whether in nature of sting operation or otherwise but what we feel is that entrapment of any person should not be resorted to and should not be permitted." "Sting operations showing acts and facts as they are truly and actually happening may be necessary in public interest and as a toll for justice, but a hidden camera cannot be allowed to depict something which is not true, correct and is not happening but has happened because of inducement by entrapping a person." "No doubt the media is well within its rightful domain when it seeks to use tools of investigative journalism to bring us face to face with the ugly underbelly of the society. However, it is not permissible to the media to entice and try to actively induce an individual into committing an offence, which otherwise he is not known and likely to commit. In such cases there is no predisposition. If one were to look into our mythology even a sage like Vishwamitra succumbed to the enchantment of "Maneka". It would be stating the obvious that the media is not to test individuals by putting them through what one might call the "inducement test" and portray it as a scoop that has uncovered a hidden or concealed truth. In such case the individual may as well claim that the person offering inducement is equally guilty and a party to the crime, that he/she is being accused of. This would infringe upon the individual's right to privacy. While disposing this writ petition (Crl. No. 1175/2007), the Hon'ble Court asked the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting to consider certain proposed guidelines mentioned in the order while examining whether a

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statute/or a code of conduct should be enacted for telecast of sting operation. Thus, the electronic media is playing an important role for the good health of our democracy by exposing corrupt officials and other evils prevailing in the society by way of sting operations, but while doing so it must adhere to the limitations mentioned above.

R.P. Tyagi, Advocate, Chamber No. 48, Western Wing, Tis Hazari Courts, Delhi-110054 Ph. 011-27015277

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MEDIA LAWS: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

K. M. Shrivastava

When Europeans write on the history of the media, they refer to the Acta diurna of the Roman Empire as closely akin to the newspaper of today. In India the Rock Edicts of Emperor Ashok (c.273-236 BC) engraved on the rocks contain in abundance measures adopted and regulations issued by him. This is not very different from the news content of modern media. In that era when Ashok, the Great, used this technology for communicating his message throughout his vast empire, we do not find any reference to restrictions on communication imposed by law. However, the Arthashastra, written originally in the reign of Chandragupta Maurya (c. 324-300 BC), by Kautilya mentions punishment for spreading false rumours. The Arthashastra and the Rock Edicts also speak of spies and reporters. Uzbek scholar Al-Biruni (973-1049 AD) in his book Kitabu'1 Hind (1030 AD) wrote: The Hindus are not in the habit of writing on hides, like the Greeks in ancient times. Socrates, on being asked why he did not compose books, gave this reply, "I do not transfer knowledge from the living hearts of men to the dead hides of sheep. The Hindus have in the south of their country a slender tree like the date and coconut palm, bearing edible fruits and leaves of the length of one yard, and as broad as three fingers one put beside the other. They call these leaves tar and write on them. They bind a book of these leaves together by a cord on which they are arranged, the cord going through all the leaves by a hole in the middle of each. In Central and Northern India people use the bark of the tuz tree one kind of which is used as a cover for bows. It is called bhurja. They take a piece one yard long and as broad as outstretched fingers of the hand, or somewhat less, and prepare it in various ways. They oil and polish it so as to make it hard and smooth, and then they write on it. The proper order of the single leaves is marked by numbers. The whole book is wrapped up in a piece of cloth and fastened between two tablets of the same size.i And, to write Kitabu'l Hind Abu Raihan Muhammad ibn Ahmad Al-Biruni did not spare either trouble or money in collecting Sanskrit books.

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In his memoirsii the first Mughul Emperor Zahirud-din Muhammad Babur Padshah Gazi writes about announcement of vows before his all-important battle with Rana Sanga, "I sent for scribes (munshilar) and ordered them to write for their newsletters (akhbar) the farman concerning two important acts that I have done. Sheikh Zain wrote the farman with his own elegance (inshahi bila) and fine letter (insha) was sent to all my dominions." This farman is dated 20 of Jumada I, 933 AH (26 February 1527). Akhbar is the word used for newspapers today in Hindi and Urdu languages and Babur mentions it in such a way as if it is something routine. It was meant to communicate an official announcement by Babur that a tax would be waived on all Muslims if he won the battle and he himself had given up drinking and banned liquor in his dominions. However, there is no reference to any regulation on akhbar. The earliest mention of pre-typographic newspapers is to be found in a contemporary historical work (Muntakhals-ul-Lubab by Khafi Khan)iii of the later Mughul times. Colonel James Tod (1782-1835) sent hundreds of original manuscript newspapers of the court of Aurangzeb, sixth of the Great Mughuls to the Royal Asiatic Society in London. The size of these seventeenth-century papers, written in different hands, was 8 inches by 4½ inches.'iv These were considerably free and could report even personal affairs of the emperor. We have no record of any law governing these newspapers. Perhaps, there was neither pre-censorship nor licensing, both being Western institutions.v It was sheer accident, however, that brought printing press to India on 6 September 1556. Granting a request from Emperor of Abyssinia the King of Portugal dispatched in 1556 a printing press and technicians via the Cape route. But the patriarch accompanying the press halted en route at Goa from where his onward journey to Abyssinia was first delayed and later abandoned. He died on 22 December 1562. The press, intended for missionary work in Abyssinia never left Goa, instead, it printed literature for Abyssinia from Goa.vi However, there was no press regulation until the British East India Company started ruling a part of India after the Battle of Plassey in 1757. William Bolts, an ex-employee of the British East India Company attempted to start the first newspaper in India in 1766 but was deported. Later a collection of papers on the affairs of India "particularly respecting the state of Bengal and its dependencies" was published in 1773 by J. Almon, London as "Considerations on Indian Affairs" in two volumes with maps and survey reports. In this publication he has been identified as former Judge of the Mayor's Court of Calcutta.vii

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The typographic media began in India with James Augustus Hicky's Bengal Gazette or Calcutta General Advertiser, the first issue of which came out of the press on 29 January 1780. When Hickey started to unmask Warren Hasting (the Great Moghul') and East India Company's ruling clique (the `Nabobs') there was no law, which could restrict him. Hicky's Gazette put on record "the strictly private arrangement by which Mrs. Imhoff became the wife of the first governor-general in India". Hicky's courage gave birth to the first government order against freedom of the press. "Fort William, November 14, 1780. Public notice is given that a weekly newspaper called the Bengal Gazette or Calcutta General Adviser, printed by J. A. Hicky, has lately been found to contain several improper paragraphs tending to vilify private characters and to disturb the peace of the settlement. It is no longer permitted to be circulated through the channel of the General Post Office". Libel suits resulting in heavy fines and imprisonments ultimately crushed Hicky. He had to sell his press and pass rest of his life in poverty. When newspapers in India were published by only Europeans expulsion of the editor (printer) was ultimate penalty. The Supreme Court of Judicature upheld this power. Every foreigner was required to obtain a licence for his residence in the territories of the Company and if any one incurred the displeasure of the officials by writing or publishing some thing which was not palatable to them, the licence was cancelled. William Duane (1760-1835), American journalist, born near Lake Champlain, N.Y., of Irish parentage. He learned the printer's trade in Ireland and in 1787 went to Calcutta, where he edited the Indian World. On December 27, 1794 Duane was invited by Acting Governor-General Sir John Shore (1746-1794) for breakfast and when he reached there he was handcuffed and after detention for three days deported to England on an armed ship `Indiaman'. On his arrival in England he was set free without a word of apology or explanation. His Calcutta property worth 50,000 dollars was confiscated and his paper banned forever.viii These were stories from Calcutta. Madras was no different. The first newspaper in Madras, The Madras Courier (October 1785) also had trouble with the authorities. Pre-censorship was first introduced in Madras (now Chennai) as in 1795. Madras Gazette agreed to submit all general orders of the Government for scrutiny by the Military Secretary before their publication. In May 1799 Marquis of Wellesleyix legalised this system by issuing the regulation for the control of newspapers. According to these the censor was instructed to prevent publication of matter relating to the following subjects: "Public credit and revenues or the finances of East India Company, military operations and intelligence, conduct of government officers, private

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scandal or libel of individuals, probability of war and peace between the East India Company and any of the Indian powers, information useful to the enemy and the observations likely to excite alarm or commotion." The penalty for infringement of the law was deportation, as till then the mischief of running a newspaper was confined to Europeans. This punishment was in fact legalised what was done arbitrarily to William Duane. It appears that growing importance of the Fourth Estate in England and the desire of missionaries to start newspapers in India ultimately led to abolition of pre-censorship in 1818 by Lord Hastingsx as missionaries of Serampore started the first Indian language journal Samachar Darpan on 23 May 1818. It became bilingual carrying news in Bengali and English in parallel columns in 1829. Like censorship, licensing was also a European institution to control the press. It was introduced in Bengal in 1823 through Adam's regulations. The East India Company also issued instruction that no servant of the company should have any connection with a newspaper. This decision was the result of an incident in Bombay (now Mumbai) where a member of the Council of the Governor owned a newspaper. Licensing regulations were replaced by Metcalfe' Actxi which was applicable to entire territory of the East India Company and required that the printer and publisher of every newspaper declare the location of the premises of its publication. Licensing was, however, reintroduced in 1857 by Lord Canning and was applied to all kinds of publications. This was the year when Indians fought their war of independence against the East India Company after which the British Crown took over the territories of the Company. In 1860 Indian Penal Code was passed as a general law but laid down offences which any writer, editor or publisher must avoid - the offences of defamation and obscenity. The next important event in the field of media laws was the enactment of the Press and Registration of Books Act (25 of 1867). This Act is still in force, of course with amendments from time to time. The object of this Act was to provide for the regulation of the printing presses and of periodical containing news, for the preservation of copies of books and for the registration of books. It contains rules for the registration of books. It contains rules for the making of declaration by the keepers of presses and publishers of newspapers (part II); rules regulations for the delivery of books (Part III); penalties (Part IV); registration of book (Part V). Part VI of this Act gave powers to the government to make rules and to exempt books or newspapers from the provisions of this Act. The Act 55 of 1955 added Part VA to provide for appointment of Registrar of Newspapers.

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The role of the press during the Wahabi Conspiracy of 1869-70 led to the amendment of the Indian Penal Code (27 of 1870) to incorporate a section on sedition (124-A). This dealt with a person who "excites or attempts to excite feeling of disaffection to the government established by law in British India." It came handy to send many freedom fighters to jail for their writings in newspapers. Some of them were deported to Burma or Andamans and kept in prison there. Some of them were deported to Andamansxii between 1908 to 1910 for contributing to or editing Swarajya, Inquilab and Yugantar. They were Govind Ram- Hotilal Verma (age 20 years) and Hari Ram (age 22) in 1908- Ram Charan Lal (age 24) in 1909 and Ladha Ram (age 21) and Nandgopal (age25) in 1910. There were more celebrated cases of sedition for writing in newspapers against political heavyweights like Lokmanya Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Mahatma Gandhi. Shortly afterwards, the restrictions imposed by the East India Company prior to 1841 returned to the government officers, though in a milder tone. In 1875, the government passed orders that no officer in the service of the government should be permitted without previous sanction to become the proprietor of any periodical or to edit or manage a periodical. Officers were advised to remain within the limits of `temperate and reasonable' discussion. No document or information should be revealed to the press, which they might come to posses in their official capacity. In cases where doubts, may arise as to whether any engagements of officers with the press were consistent with the discharge of their duties to the government, the decision to that effect would lie with the government. For the purpose of ascertaining the character of any intended public dramatic performance the Dramatic Performances Act (19 of 1876) was passed as it was suspected that such performances may provoke people against the Government. When the Indian language press became very bold the Vernacular Press Act 1878 was introduced. It was comprehensive and rigorous, aimed at "better control" of the language press. It empowered any magistrate of a district or a commissioner of police in a presidency town to call upon the printer and publisher of a newspaper to enter into a bond undertaking not to publish certain kind of material, to demand security, and to forfeit, if it was thought fit, such presses and confiscate any printed matter as it deemed objectionable. No printer or publisher against whom such action had been taken could have recourse to a court of law. It was particularly meant to crush Amrit Bazar Patrika, which was bilingual before this Act. But the smart owner foiled this attempt by turning it into an English language paper overnight.

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The main role in persuading Lord Lyttonxiii for the Vernacular Press Act was played by Sir Ashley Eden (1831-1887), the then Lieutenant Governor of Bengal. He was in a fit to crush the Amrita Bazar Patrika. Sir Ashley called the editor of the Amrita Bazar Patrika, Babu Shishir Kumar, and offered: "Let us three, I, you and Kristo Das, govern the province. Kriso Das has agreed to conduct his paper according to my direction... You will have to do the same thing. I shall contribute to your paper as I do to the Hindoo Patriot. And when you write an article criticizing the government you will have to submit the manuscript to me before publication. In return the government will subscribe to a considerable number of your paper and I shall consult you as I consult Kristo Das in carrying on the administration of province." Babu Shishir Kumar thanked him and quietly remarked, "Your Honor, there ought to be at least one honest journalist in the land". Sir Ashley himself remarked, "If there had been only one week's delay on the part of the proprietors to convert the Patrika into English we would have dealt a deadly blow at it by demanding a heavy bail-bond from them." When Gladstonexiv, who had criticized the Vernacular Press Act, became the prime minister and Lord Riponxv the governor-general, and even before the retirement of Sir Ashley Eden the repeal of Vernacular Press Act had become a foregone conclusion. The repealing bill was passed without discussion, on December 7, 1881. In India telegraph was introduced in 1851 and was very useful to East India Company during 1857. However, the Indian Telegraph Act was passed in 1885. The Government had exclusive privilege under this Act in respect of telegraph and power to grant licenses. The definition of telegraph in this Act is very wide as it later covered all other means of communication depending on electromagnetic waves, thus including teleprinter, telephone, fax, radio and television. It provides for interception of messages and takeover of licensed establishments by the Government in any public emergency or in the interest of public safety. Lord Dufferinxvi succeeded Lord Ripon in 1884, The Amrita Bazar Patrika published certain facts about the administration of Bhopal and commented adversely on the conduct of Sir Lepel Griffin(1838-1908), the agent to the governor general for Central India. Sir Lepel appealed to the government for action. The proposal was turned down on the ground that legal proceedings would draw greater publicity to the matter under dispute. In 1889, during Lord Lansdowne'sxvii regime, The Amrita Bazar Patrika published what was purported to be a confidential Foreign Office document. It said that the Maharaja of Kashmir was deposed not because he resigned or oppressed his people, but because Gilgit was wanted for strategic purposes by the British government. No action was taken against The

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Amrita Bazar Patrika, but the Indian Official Secrets Act modeled on a similar Act of the British Parliament, was passed on October 17, 1889. It provided a penalty of imprisonment for one to two years and/or a fine according to the nature of the offence. Section 19 of the Sea Customs Act 1878 gave power to the central government of prohibit or restrict the importation or exportation of goods into or out of India. Section 5 of the Telegraph Act 1885 gave power to the central government or provincial governments of an official specially authorized by the government to take possession of licensed telegraphs and to order interception of telegraphic messages which include as per section 3 (1) of the Act telephone messages also. Section 25 of the Indian Post Office Act 1898 confers power on an officer of the post office to intercept during transmission by post goods which have been notified under section 19 of the Sea Customs Act or the import or export of which is otherwise prohibited. Section 26 of the Post Office Act provides power of interception of postal articles on the same lines as section 5 of the Telegraph Act. Thus by the turn of the century the government had wide ranging powers to intercept anything anywhere along all the possible channels. With Swadeshi Movement and partition of Bengal the opposition of the Government reached its zenith, both in the press and the public. In June 1908 the government passed the Newspaper (Incitement to Offences) Act, which gave power to local authorities to take judicial action against the editor of any newspaper, which indulges in writings calculated to incite rebellion. Nine prosecutions were instituted under this Act and as a result seven presses were confiscated. Then came the Press Act of 1910, which empowered the government to demand security from any newspaper, a provision similar to what existed in the Vernacular Press Act. British Parliament passed the Copyright Act in 1911. Similar provisions came to India by Indian Copyright Act, 1914 (3 of 1914). It was replaced by a comprehensive legislation only in 1957 by the new Copyright Act (14 of 1957). In 1918 Government passed the Cinematograph Act (2 of 1918), which was replaced by the Cinematograph Act, 1952 (37 of 1952).xviii In 1921, the government appointed a committee, with Sir Tej Bahadur Sapru (1875-1949) as chairman, to look into the then existing press laws. The committee unanimously recommended the repeal of the Newspaper (Incitement of Offences) Act 1908 and the India Press Act 1910.xix In regard to the Press and Registration of Books Act, the committee recommended that the name of the editor should be inscribed on every issue of the newspaper and the editor should be subjected to the same liabilities as the

Media Laws: A Historical Perspective

29

printer and publisher as regards criminal and civic responsibility, that a person registering under this Act should be a major, that the term of imprisonment in part IV of the Act should be reduced from two years to six months, and that provision should be made for delivery to government of copies of newspapers printed in British India. The committee advocated the retention of powers to seize and confiscated seditious leaflets and literature. It recommended that the ancillary powers of preventing importation and postal transmission of such literature should be retained. The requisite amendments were carried out by the Press Law (Repeal and Amendment) Act of 1922 (14 of 1922). In 1922, on the request of the Chamber of Princes, the Princes Protection Bill was introduced in the Legislative Assembly. The Assembly rejected the bill. But the Governor-General, invoking treaty obligations and exercising his special powers under section 67B of the Government of India Act 1919, certified the Bill which became the Indian States (Protection against Disaffection) Act 1922. This Act provided punishment of imprisonment up to 5 years for any person editing, printing or publishing any document which brings into hatred or contempt or excites disaffection towards any prince or chief of a state in India, or the government or administration established in any such state. For material of this nature, the powers of forfeiture under sections 99-A to 99-C of the Criminal Procedure Code and of postal interception under sections 27-B to 27-D of the Indian Post Offices Act were made applicable. In 1923 the Official Secrets Act was passed in order to update and consolidate the existing provisions of Indian Official Secrets Act of 1889, along the lines of the British Acts of 1911 and 1920. The earlier Act was repealed. Section 5 of this Act, which affects the Press, deals with "official secrets" and relates to "wrongful communication of information." To meet the situation posed by the civil disobedience movement of 1930, the government promulgated the Indian Press Ordinance to provide for "better control of the press". This revived the stringent provisions of the repealed Press Act of 1910. Some 130 newspapers had to deposit securities, nine refused to do so and suspended publications. In 1931, the Indian Press (Emergency Powers) Act was passed. The operative clause of section 4(1) of this Act reads as follows: "Words, signs or visible representations which (a) incite to or encourage or tend to incite to or to encourage, the commission of any offence of murder or any cognizable offence involving violence or (b) directly or indirectly express approval or admiration of any such offence of any person, real or fictitious, who has committed or is alleged or represented to have committed such offence." Under the, original sub-section (3) of section 1 the Act was to remain in force for one year

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Mass Media in India

only and ;the government were given the power to extend this period by another year. The operation of the Act was extended from time to time and ultimately sub-section (3) of section was repealed by the Criminal Law (amendment) Act 1935 making this a part of permanent law of the land. In 1932 the Foreign Relations Act was passed with the object of providing against the publication of statements likely to prejudice the maintenance of friendly relations between the British government and the governments of certain foreign states. The powers of forfeiture under sections 99A-99G of the Criminal Procedure Code and the postal interception under sections 27B-27D of the Indian Post Offices Act were extended by section 3 of this Act to documents containing matter defamatory of such ruler or his consort of son or principal minister of a state outside but adjoining India. Indian States (Protection) Act was passed in 1934 to protect the administrations of states in India, which were under the suzerainty of the British crown from activities, which tended to subvert or excite disaffection towards or to obstruct such administration. Section 3 of this Act extended to Press Emergency Act Powers 1931 to protect these states. The Government of India Act was passed in 1935. In 1937 autonomous popular governments came to power in eight of the eleven provinces. They could do without using any special legislation against the press until they resigned in October 1939. In April 1946 popular governments returned to power in the states and a popular Interim Government came to power at the Centre in September 1939. On 30 September 1946 the wide powers for the control of the press, which were available under the Defence of India Rules, came to an end. To meet the grave communal situation the central and provincial governments promulgated ordinances during 194647 to be replaced in due course by emergency legislations. The provisions affecting the press related to imposition of censorship, control of publications, import, possession or conveyance of documents of objectionable nature. Before Independence, the Interim Government appointed the Press Laws Enquiry Committee in March 1947 to examine the press laws. The Committee gave its report on 22 May 1948 after Independence and partition of India. Ganga Nath, Mohan Lal Saxena, Tushar Kanti Ghosh, Diwan Chaman Lall, Mohd. Ismail Khan, Sri Narayan Mehta, S.A. Brelvi, Kasturi Srinivasan and G. V.Bedekar signed the report. It recommended some minor amendments in the Press and Registration of Books Act; repeal of the Indian States (Protection Against Disaffection) Act 1922, and the Indian Press (Emergency Powers) Act 1931; modifications of Section 124-A of the Indian Penal Code and exclusion

Media Laws: A Historical Perspective

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by explanation of the application of Section 153-A of the Advocacy of Peaceful Change of the Socio-economic order; and exclusion of Section 144 of the Criminal Procedure Code from application to the press. The Committee also recommended the repeal of the Foreign Relations Act and recommended another more comprehensive legislation to take its place in the changing circumstances. It suggested amendment of the Telegraph Act and the Post Office Act to provide for review by responsible ministers of the government of the actions and orders of subordinate officers. It suggested that all action taken against the press in the exercise of the emergency powers should be preceded by consultation between the provincial governments and the Press Advisory Committee or similar body. After the report of this committee the Act of 1931 was replaced by Press (Objectionable Matter) Act 1951. However, the mood was so much for freedom of press that it was allowed to lapse in February 1956 and was repealed in 1957. The Indian Constitution gives every citizen fundamental right to freedom of speech and expression and the courts have interpreted that it includes freedom of the press. On 23 September 1952 the Government of India appointed a Press Commission to enquire into the state of the press and to indicate the lines of its development in the future. Its recommendations resulted in establishment of the Press Councilxx and a law to regulate working conditions of journalists,xxi which provides for appointment of a Wage Boardxxii, periodically. Major setback to the freedom of press in India was when Emergency was imposed in June 1975 and censorship was introduced.xxiii However, after the defeat of the then ruling party in 1977 General Elections it has not been possible for anybody to follow the example.xxiv Press Council advised the Government not to put curbs on the press even in disturbed areas like Jammu and Kashmir. This policy appears to be better than the curbs on the press by Government. Liberal ethos reinforced after 1977 has affected broadcasting as well. While demand for autonomous corporation to control All India Radio and Doordarshan was accepted and finally Prasar Bharti, an autonomous corporation came into existence from 15 September 1997 after the notification of the Prasar Bharti Act. It has not been possible to come up with a regulator for broadcasting content despite several bills that came to Parliament over the years and private satellite and cable channels are having a field day enjoying more freedom than in any other part of the world. Though the Government has not allowed news on private radio outfits yet,

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freedom of print and television channels make India one of the most liberal countries in the world as far as the freedom of media goes. Right to Information Act 2005xxv has been implemented and this has further extended freedom of media in India.

References

i ii India by Al-Biruni, an abridged edition of translation by Dr Edward C. Sackau, edited for National Book Trust New Delhi by Q. Ahmad (1988:58). Babur Nama, translated from the original Turki text of Zahirud-din Muhammad Babur Padshah Gazi by Annette Suannah Beveridge. Published by translator in 1922, reprinted by Orient Book Reprint Corporation, New Delhi, 1979. Author himself styles Muntakhabu-l hubab Muhammad Shahi, is frequently called Tarikh-i Khkfi Khan. It is a highly esteemed history, commencing with the Invasion of Babar, A.D. 1519, and concluding with the fourteenth year of the reign of Muhammad Shah. Desai, M. V.(1977) Communication Policies in India Unesco, Paris. Shrivastava, K.M. (1977) Press Laws in India: Warren Hastings to Metcalfe Indian Press (Journal of Indian and Eastern Newspaper Society), Vol. IV No.8 August 1977. Early Printing In India, Printing Times, Vol 17 No 1, WAPC Special, February 1993, p. 28. In a recent article "The Austrians in the Nicobars" written in German by Astrid Kuffner and published in the July/August 2005 issue of Universum, there is mention of William Bolts: The Austrian Habspurg rulers chose the Dutchman William Bolts as advisor. He had been active in the British East India Company but had been convicted for trading with opium and dismissed. In 1774 he travelled to Vienna to convince the inexperienced Austria of the feasibility of trade between Trieste and the Far East..

iii

iv v

vi vii

viii Shankdhar, B.M. (1977) William Duane: a restless crusader Indian Press (Journal of Indian and Eastern Newspaper Society), Vol. IV No. 10 October 1977. ix x Wellesley, Richard Colley, Marquess of (1760-1842), the East India Company's governor general of India, 1797-1805. Francis Rawdon-Hastings, lst Marquess of Hastings, (9 December 1754 - 28 November 1826) was a British politician and military officer who served as Governor-General of India from 1813 to 1823. In 1830, Sir Charles Metcalfe, as a member of governor-general's council, said: "I think on the present occasion that it will be infinitely better to allow anything to be said that can be said, than to furnish a new source of discontent, by crushing the expression of public opinion. I have, for my own part, always advocated the liberty of the press, believing its benefits to

xi

Media Laws: A Historical Perspective

33

outweigh its mischief: and I continue to have the same opinion." Charles Theophilus Metcalfe, 1st Baron Metcalfe (1785 - 1846), was the second son of Thomas Theophilus Metcalfe, then a major in the Bengal army, who afterwards became a director of the British East India Company, and was created a baronet in 1802. xii Unsung Heroes of Freedom Struggle in Andamans, Who's Who, Compiled and edited by Rashida Iqbal for Directorate of Education and Culture, Andaman & Nicobar adminstration, Port Blair (1998) p.88,109.

xiii Edward Robert Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, lst Earl of Lytton (1831-1891) was an English statesman, who served as Viceroy of India; was a poet, under the pen name of Owen Meredith. xiv William Ewart Gladstone (1809-1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman. xv George Frederick Samuel Robinson, 1 st Marquess of Ripon( 1827 - 1909). xvi Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, Ist Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, (1826-1902). xvii Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne (18451927). xviii In K.A. Abbas v. Union of India (1970) 2SCC 780, Supreme Court held that censorship in India has full justification in the field of the exhibition of cinema films. It is in the interest of society. The censorship of films including prior restraint is justified under the Constitution. It is has been almost universally recognized that the treatment of motion pictures must be different from that of art and other forms of art and expression. xix Most of the witnesses examined by the committee expressed the view that Press Act had not been applied with equal severity to English-owned and Indian-owned newspapers. xx The Press Council Act 1965 established Press Council to safeguard freedom of press and standards of journalism. It was abolished by the Press Council (Repeal) Act 1976 during Emergency imposed by Mrs Indira Gandhi in June 1975. After the 1977 General Elections in which Mrs. Gandhi lost and the Janata Government that came to power revived the Press Council by Act 37 of 1978. xxi It led to similar demand by cine-workers that ultimately led to the CineWorkers and Cinema Theatre Workers (Regulation of Employment) Act 1981, and Cine-Workers Welfare Cess Act, 1981. xxii The Working Journalists Act, 1955 gives job security to working journalists, provides for statutory Wage Boards, entitles them to payment of a gratuity and provident fund. It also regulates hours of work, holidays and notice period for termination of service. xxiii During 1976-77 seven foreign correspondents were expelled or their visas were not renewed for not complying with the guidelines issued by the Chief

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Censor. The entry of 19 foreign correspondents into India was also banned. (Annual Report 1976-77, Ministry of Information And Broadcasting, p.3) xxivIn fact one of her decision during Emergency was to merge four news agencies Press Trust of India (PTI), United News Of India (UNI), both cooperatives of newspapers, and Hindustan Samachar, cooperative of employees and Samchar Bharati, in which some state governments had shares without their representatives on the Board into one news agency Samachar. Samachar was the Indian partner in the NonAligned News Agencies Pool. The Government that came to power dismantled Samachar into old agencies out of which only PTI and UNI survived. xxv On 15 June 2005, President APJ Abdul Kalam gave his assent to the national Right to Information Act 2005. With presidential assent, the Central Government and State Governments had 120 days to implement the provisions of the Act in its entirety. The Act formally came into force on 12 October 2005.

K. M. Shrivastava, Professor, Indian Institute of Mass Communication New Delhi-110067

35

TRIAL BY MEDIA AND TRIAL OF MEDIA

Prof. (Dr.) Ranbir Singh*

The demi-world of journalism is like the fun house of mirrors that one finds in carnivals. In one reflection you are too fat; in another you are absurdly thin; in another reflection you appear to have an elongated neck; in another, a flat head,- in still another you have next to nobody. Yet there you are, standing in front of these bizarre reflections, fully formed and hearing little resemblance to any of the images before you. The difference is, however, that unlike the fun house of mirrors, the distortions of the media are rarely a joke. From -Two or Three Things I Know About Journalism Understanding the origin Media has been hailed as the Fourth Estate that checks the three estates of the Legislature, Executive and Judiciary. It earned this status after a prolonged history of bitter struggle and oppression. Such oppression continues till date in many societies and Nations. The dynamics of the structure and processes of print, broadcast and internet forms of media vary and attempts of audit and prescriptive suggestions have to be done separately. Media today includes Internet which is called as the `New Media'. Media is an angel or a devil depending on which side of the reporting one finds oneself. `Indian Media' especially the `Television' has come of age and is in the midst of the controversy among the legal fraternity of its role in Justice delivery process. The label `Trial by Media' is a 20th century phenomenon attributed to the media coverage of events which has possibility to distort the proceedings in the court and also which raises the public opinion and pressure on a trial. The moot point here is what should be covered by media and to what extent which will not jeopardize the due process of law? There are no clear cut answers. There are also varied views in different spaces of democracies. Yet to analyse the issue one needs to understand the complex process of `Media and its role'.

*Prof. Ranbir Singh is the Vice-Chancellor of National Law University, Delhi. He can be contacted at singhranbirnyahoo.com - ( I would like to acknowledge Prof. Vivekanandan for his research inputs in preparing this paper.)

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To understand the complexity and importance of media, one needs to understand its origins. Media finds its origins in the late 15th century in newsletters that were circulated among tradesmen. From these emerged a regular paper essentially to spread financial information among the business community. Nieuwe T'y'dinge from Antwerp published in 1605 is considered the oldest. The trend caught on in Europe and later publications began covering foreign news for local audiences. Courrantor `Current News' was one such attempt at newspapers by the Dutch. As the popularity of newspapers grew, governments clamped duties, imposed censorship rules and engaged them with libel prosecutions. The Stamp Duty of 1712 in the UK imposed a duty of one penny for each copy of the Spectator which had a cover price of one penny! It was not just stamp duty but also `a tax on knowledge'. William Corbett, a radical political essayist, was imprisoned in 1810 in the UK for his articles. Since Corbett, hundreds of journalists, publishers and photojournalists have met with harassment, imprisonment, torture and death in the last two centuries of media history. In a sense, the Human Rights index of a society reflects the status of the media and of its journalists. Media began as a private initiative and has commercial origins. It soon emerged as an information interface between public authorities and the society. Media entrenched its right as a`watchdog' of the three estates and added various segments of human activity like entertainment, sports and lifestyle to its repertoire. Contemporary Understanding It is not only media that is capable of distorting reality as the fun mirrors of the carnival. Our understanding of the media is also distorted by our own mirrors. In a poor and underdeveloped country like India, with its glaring development issues, it is natural that the expectations of the mass media are very high and any perceived shortfalls erupt quite emotionally. Emotions are fine but at the end of the day the understanding of the paradigm in which the media operates will only make it easier to effect the desired intervention through the media. Media in its concept connects two or more structures and processes. A map of the dynamics of the media shows it to be: 1. Between the public power holders -the authorities and power addressees -the people 2. Between the private power holders - the individual/trade/industry/ voluntary organisation, etc., and power addressees - the people

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3. Between public and private power holders This broad spectrum covers all the players on the basis of private and public power. Mediating between the power holders and power addressees is a two-way process where media is expected to inform the society of the state of public affairs and also serve as a feedback mechanism relaying the pulse of the people to the power holder. In its quest to inform, it must unmask people, institutions and transactions. This is investigative journalism. From a functional perspective, its common minimum mandate is three-fold: 1. To report objectively and accurately, happenings in the public sphere. 2. To investigate and expose misuse of any power processes in the public and private spheres. 3. To reflect the varied views of the people and provide feedback to power regulators and the public. Media vs Fair Trial `Trial by Media' as a term refers to the role of Media acting as a Judge overriding the official "justice delivery system" thereby distorting, prejudicing, sensationalizing, instigating the public and there by derailing the `justice delivery processes'. The expansive nature of media connecting homes makes it a serious issue compared to the `print media' which once had a small audience. The competition among the media also makes it vulnerable to Instinct gratification and to break news first has the potential to such derailment of due process and fair trial. The current debate not only in Indian Context but also in the International arena is that of 1. What is the parameters of Free Press ? 2. How Freedom of Expression impacts Judicial Processes ? 3. Does it hinder or aid the Justice delivery processes ? 4. If it hinders how it could be regulated -by law or by self regulation ? 5. Will legislation on this lead to the gagging of the Press ? In the International context, the UN Basic Principles on the Independence of the Judiciary, at Article 6, which states the judiciary is entitled and required "to ensure that judicial proceedings are conducted fairly and that the rights of the parties are respected."1 The principles enunciated in this Article are also stated in similar language in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)2, which provides that "everyone shall

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be entitled to a fair and public hearing by a competent, independent and impartial tribunal" in the determination of any criminal charge or in a suit at law.3 The ICCPR acknowledges that the right to a public trial is not absolute and that certain limitations on public access are necessary. Article 19 of ICCPR confirms that freedom of expression is also a fundamental part of a democratic society. It elaborates that freedom of expression includes the freedom of the press and states that "everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice."4 Under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, to which the UK and its other signatories are morally committed, the freedom of the press is paramount. Exceptions to that freedom may be made only such as are "necessary in a democratic society", permissible only to the extent that they correspond to "a pressing social need", and are proportionate to the end to be achieved.5 The constitutional position on the role of media in the Freedom of Speech and Information in Indian Constitution is clear. Article 19 1(a) to 19 (2) and Article 38 of the Indian Constitution clearly advocates the `right to impart and receive communication'. Subsequent court judgements including those on airwaves are clear indications of the role expectations of State and media. Indian courts have held the people as more important than the publishers or the editors to honour the right of the people to know and be informed. In this backdrop one needs to appreciate the relevance of a constitutional wing like judiciary and the informal estate like media to synergize for effective realization of `truth'. Interfacing Media and Human Development When dealing with media, it is essential to understand the concept of human development as expected to be promoted by the media. Human development in its bare minimal discourse can be taken as health, housing, education, meaningful employment and clean environment. More importantly it will also include `Justice' to the victims. It will also include the right of the public to know that the Institutions created by them, for them and of them. The State is mandated by the Constitution to provide the above to each citizen as bare minimum needs and then to promote the same to higher standards. The Government of the day operates to fulfill such promises.

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What is the role of media in such human development viz-a-viz the primary responsibility of the Government? What is the quantum or quality of such a role? As discussed earlier, in the construct of the `media' between various stakeholders of the power processes, it is the responsibility of the media to reflect different viewpoints and provide information on human development aspects. Some responsibilities include: 1. Monitoring the public power holder's action and inaction on the promotion of human development 2. Investigating concealed misdeeds to be exposed to the political community of opposition parties and the society 3. Educating the power addressees to equip themselves to be receptive to efforts and measures on human development 4. Covering and encouraging non governmental players who are involved in human development efforts The question of the quantum and quality of such a role has come into sharp focus of concern for media watchers in the last decade. The Justice Administration System in open societies stand on the principle of open trial and proceedings on the dictum that `Justice' should not only be done but should be seen to be done. In this context `media' in a way carries this to the public at large. But what happens if media instead of being a`medium' becomes `meddlesome' ? It certainly blocks, distorts and frustrates the fair trial. It can create `chasm' among the `courts' and `public at large'.

Issues at Stake

The confrontation between Justice Administration and the media revolves around three factors: 1. The limits of freedom of press as perceived by the Courts 2. The limits of freedom of press as perceived by the media itself 3. The difficulty of a legislation which mind end up gagging up of the press On the first issue, media commentator point that the a limit prescribed as freedom of press or often portrayed as `trial by media' does disservice to the public. It is often pointed that the legal representation of the powerful is no match to many victims access to justice and without a trial by media many aspects will never the reach the portals of the Court and thereby would have shutdown the process of Justice. There is no denial of this fact in a country like India that access to lawyering by the poor is a distant

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dream even today. It is also argued that there can be no fixed or rigid parameters to label free reporting vs trial by media. Hence it is an issue to be self regulated and evolved through norms and mechanisms. The misuse or malafide use of freedom of press can only be pointed at specific instances and cannot be dictated generally for the media. On the second issue, it is a fact in the era of electronics coupled with commercial compulsions to survive, media becomes a self victim in its reportage. The rush to break news or to be different or to catch instant eye balls, information is doled out without factual verification, information flashed without understanding larger consequences. The code of conduct and other self regulation cannot cope with the onslaught of the mad rush to report. It does not take a survey to tell that most of the media personnel lack basic knowledge on legal issues which will impact the fair proceedings. Media is often portrayed as a watch dog. The moot point is whether watch dogs need a leash or can simply be free? On the third issue, often raised is that of a strict legislation on the recent spate of media vs court frictions. The 17th Law Commission in its "Trial by Media: Free Speech vs. Fair Trial Under Criminal Procedure (Amendments to the Contempt of Court Act, 1971)" said, "Today there is a feeling that in view of the extensive use of the television and cable services, the whole pattern of publication of news has changed and several such publications are likely to have a prejudicial impact on the suspects, accused, witnesses and even judges and in general on the administration of justice." The report said, "according to our law, a suspect/accused is entitled to a fair procedure and is presumed to be innocent till proved guilty in a court of law. None can be allowed to prejudge or prejudice his case by the time it goes to trial." It said that publications, which interfered or tend to interfere with the administration of justice would amount to criminal contempt under the Contempt of Courts Act, 1971 and "if in order to preclude such interference, the provisions of that Act impose reasonable restrictions on freedom of speech, such restrictions would be valid." The report noted that at present, under Section 3 (2) of the CC Act, such publications would be contempt only if a charge sheet had been filed in a criminal case. The Commission has suggested that the starting point of a criminal case should be from the time of arrest of an accused and not from the time of filing of the charge sheet. In the perception of the Commission such an amendment would prevent the media from prejudging or

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prejudicing the case. The report also recommended to empower the High Court to direct a print or an electronic media to postpone publication or telecast pertaining to a criminal case and to restrain the media from resorting to such publication or telecast. The report also said that publications with reference to character of the accused, previous convictions, confessions, judging the guilt or innocence of the accused or discrediting witnesses could be a criminal contempt. It is pertinent to note that Section 10 of the Madrid Principle l2, developed in 1994 by a group of distinguished international legal experts and media representatives, outlines permissible limits on the freedom of expression: Laws may restrict the Basic Principle 13 [of a free press] in relation to criminal proceedings in the interest of the administration of justice to the extent necessary in a democratic society (a) for the prevention of serious prejudice to a defendant; (b) for the prevention of serious harm to or improper pressure being placed upon a witness, a member of a jury, or a victim. This restrictive authority is exercised in a discretionary way by the courts, with some few exceptions. In recent years, there has been a tendency by the appellate courts in major common law countries to require that this discretion be exercised in a more reasoned way, requiring that a strong case be made for suppression of publication in the interests of the administration of justice with less emphasis on protecting individual interests. More and more, the judiciary in the major common law jurisdictions appear to be strongly endorsing the principles of open courts and press freedom. In Canada and the UK, senior appeal courts have been critical of sweeping use of gag orders and have emphasized they should be used only where there is a substantial risk of serious prejudice which cannot be adequately reduced by the tools available to the trial judge.... that the courts are now less likely than before to use the other enforcement tools available to them for breach of publication bans; contempt proceedings and an appeal court's reversal of a conviction because of prejudicial media publicity.6

Balancing the Estates

Open societies flourish on critical analysis and transparency. Judiciary and its administration among the three estates have been held high in such expectations. They certainly need an atmosphere to deliver their mandate. Any interference or distraction not just effects the courts but the public who look upon them for Justice. At the same time, one needs to acknowledge that a free press in theory and objective is a mirror to reflect

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the reality to the public. It also helps one to tidy themselves. In this context to have a healthy mirror which does not distort the real one can think of the following suggested by Justice F. B. William Kelly,'Supreme Court of Nova Scotia7. 1. Press Liaison Officers or Media Spokespersons. Many courts have designated a person to be the official contact person for the media. This person's duties can range from advising the press on court related information to being designated the official. 2. Court/Media Liaison Committees. These have been established in a number of jurisdictions, usually on an informal basis and sometimes including bar representation. Many of these committees make no formal decisions but merely discuss mutual problems in depth and attempt to reach resolution that can be translated into a court policy. These groups have frequently contributed to the development of written court/media guidelines. 3. Court/Media Guidelines. Many jurisdictions have established clear, comprehensive and practical guidelines relating to media access and reporting. Such guidelines minimize disputes and establish consistency at all court venues. Guidelines can deal with the logistics of media coverage and other areas of court/media irritations. They may cover only minor matters or deal with the full range of potential problems, and further may be reviewed and improved on a regular basis. Everyone works more comfortably in an arena where the ground rules are clear and in writing. 4. Joint Conferences and Seminars. These can occur at a regional, state/ provincial, or national level. Mutual discussion of problems leads to mutual understanding and often to mutual solutions. These gatherings can also serve to educate the parties: judges can be trained in effective communication with reporters, and reporters trained in effective coverage of court news. 5. Court Outreach. The courts can make planned and effective efforts to speak to the public, directly and through the media. Courts have used this technique by using trained personnel or judges to communicate matters of public interest in an informal but structured way. This can be done in many fora, from talk shows to personal talks to a community group or a classroom. In some jurisdictions courts will hold an "Open Court Day" or a "Meet Your Judges" event, usually in the courtrooms and in co-operation with the bar and court staff. An important aspect of any outreach program would be to involve the judiciary in the education of journalists.

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6. In-house Projects. These would. include projects that educated the judiciary in effective community and media relations. The judiciary could also develop methods of mutual assistance, communications and support. This could consist of ongoing communications between individual judges on the subject of press relations by informal meetings, a newsletter, or internet lists. The subject matter could not only be court/media issues, but also public education matters generally.

References

1. 2. UN Basic Principles on the Independence of the Judiciary, G.A. Res.146, U.N. GAOR, 40thSess.(1985) art.6. Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly Resolution 2200 A (XXI) of 16 December 1966. Entered into force on 23 March 1976 in accordance with article 49. Art. 14(1), ICCPR, (1966) 999 UNTS 171, 1976 Can. T.S. No. 47, in force, including Canada, 1976. Article 14(1) of the ICCPR provides that "[t]he Press and the public may be excluded from all or part of a trial for reasons of morals, public order (ordre public) or national security in a democratic society, or when the interests of the private lives of the Parties so requires, or to the extent necessary in the opinion of the court in special circumstances where publicity would prejudice the interests of justice." As well as Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). http://www.icclr.law.ubc.ca/Publications/Reports/Fair VSFree.pdf. Ibid.

3. 4.

5. 6. 7.

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MEDIA ORGANIZATIONS

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT

The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, is the nodal Ministry for the information, broadcasting and film sectors.Various media units, attached/subordinate offices, autonomous organizations and PSUs under its control are as follows:

Information

Media Units Press Information Bureau Directorate of Advertising and Visual Publicity Registrar of Newspapers for India Directorate of Field Publicity Publications Division Research, Reference and Training Division Song and Drama Division Photo Division Autonomous Organizations Press Council of India Indian Institute of Mass Communication

Broadcasting

Attached/Subordinate offices Electronic Media Monitoring Centre Autonomous Organizations Prasar Bharti a. All India Radio b. Doordarshan

Media Organizations - Central Government

45

Public Sector Organization BECIL

Films

Attached/Subordinate Offices Films Division Central Broad of Film Certification National Film Archive of India Directorate of Film Festivals Autonomous Organizations Film and Television Institute of India, Pune Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute, Kolkata Children's Film Society of India Public Sector Undertaking National Film Development Corporation

PRESS INFORMATION BUREAU

The Press Information Bureau (PIB) is the nodal agency of the Government of India to disseminate information to the print and electronic media on government policies, programme initiatives and achievements. Functioning as an interface between the Government and the media, the PIB also provides feedback to the Government with people's reaction as reflected in the media. With its 8 Regional Offices and 34 Branch Offices and Information Centres, the PIB disseminates information through different modes of communication, such as Press Releases, Press Notes, Feature Articles, Backgrounders, Press Briefings, Photographs, Press Conferences, Interviews, Database available on Bureau's website, Press tours, A.V. Clippings, etc. The information material released in English, Hindi, Urdu and other regional languages reaches about 8,400 newspapers and media organisations. At its headquarters, the Bureau has Departmental Publicity Officers who are attached to various ministries and departments for the purpose of assisting them in disseminating information to the media through press

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Mass Media in India

releases and press conferences, etc., and advise on all matters pertaining to publicity activities. They also provide feedback to their respective ministries and departments. As part of the Special Services, the Feedback Cell in the PIB prepares a daily digest and special digests based on news stories editorials from national as well as regional dailies and periodicals. The Feature Unit of the Bureau provides backgrounders, updates, features and graphics which are circulated on the National Network, Internet and also sent to the Regional/Branch offices for translation and circulation to the local press. The unit releases special features for highlighting policies and programmes of the Government. Special mention may be made of features and success stories on National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, Women Empowerment, Child Labour, Drinking Water, Education, Health (AIDS), Small Scale Industries and other topical issues. This unit has been producing on an average over 200 features annually including photo features and backgrounders. PIB arranges photo coverage of various Government functions throughout the year and photographs are supplied to dailies and periodicals. The Bureau gave excellent publicity to the recently held IFFI-2007, at Goa. Special photo features were released on the eve of Independence Day. PIB provides accreditation to Media representatives including foreign media at the Headquarters. This facilitates them to access information from the Government sources. About 1425 correspondents and 430 cameramen/ photographers are accredited. Besides 150 technicians and about 76 Editors and Media critics have also been granted accreditation. The Feedback cell of the Bureau prepares a Daily Digest of News and Views based on news items, as well as editorial comments, as reflected in the print media. This digest is prepared on each working day and is sent regularly to the President & Vice President's Office, Prime Minister's Office, Cabinet Secretariat, all Cabinet Ministers and all Secretaries and important functionaries in the Government. Besides, the Cell also prepares a weekly `Media Report on Economic Issues.' In addition, Special Digests and Special Reports on emerging issues which draw adequate attention and focus from national as well as regional press, is also prepared from time to time. During the period January-March, 2008 apart from Daily Digest and Media Report on Economic Issues, the Cell would be producing Special Digests on Conference on Social Sector Issues, Economic Survey, Railway Budget and General Budget. The website of PIB(http://pib.nic.in) which is an important source of information to small and medium newspapers of India, was reviewed

Media Organizations - Central Government

47

to make it more attractive and incorporate new features. PIB also has 6 sister websites in 6 different languages viz. Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu, Bengali and in Mizo. A Media Accreditation (http://dff.nic.in/pibmedia.asp) application is developed in Press Information Bureau for International Film Festivals of India 2007. This application is fully online including the submission of forms, the approval, rejection, preparation of media cards, etc. Altogether 313 journalists got accredited through this application and were given media cards to attend the event. A Content Management System was also developed to maintain IFFI pages for PIB which consists of videos schedules, still photos, brochure, etc. IntraPIB, an Intranet web portal for PIB has been upgraded with the new features like PIB Clipping Service, providing links to in-house applications viz. Hardware Complaints, Monthly Progress Report, Payslips, Notices, download forms. Under the agenda of e-governance, · · The CPS (Composite Payroll System) has been upgraded to CompDDO (Comprehensive DDO), A demo of web based DMIS (Document Management Information System - File Tracking System) was done for higher officers of PIB for its implementation. Implemented CPGRAMS (Centralized Public Grievance Redress And Monitoring System) for PIB to make users enable to enter & monitor grievances.

·

Publicity by Departmental Publicity Officers attached to various Ministries /Departments at Hdqrs. Major decisions of the UPA Government were compiled on the occasion of completion of three years in Office. State-wise booklets under the title `Major programmes of UPA Government' with regard to Uttar Pradesh, Uttaranchal, Manipur, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh and Gujarat were printed and thereafter disseminated widely amongst media persons and others. The Prime Minister released a`Report to the People - 2004-07" highlighting the major achievements of UPA Government. Multi media publicity was secured for the letter written by the Prime Minister to all the Chief Ministers urging them to take steps to curb inflation. In addition, wide coverage was secured for the meeting of Economic Advisory Council. A Press Conference by Shri C. Rangarajan, Chairman, Economic Advisory Council to PM, on the `Economic Outlook

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Mass Media in India

for 2007-08' was organized. Publicity arrangements were made. A backgrounder and a booklet were distributed to the media. PM's statement in Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha on Civil Nuclear Energy Cooperation with the United States was distributed to the media. Important addresses of PM at various functions were released to the media. A few among them were: PM's opening remarks at the Full Planning Commission meeting; PM's opening and closing remarks at the National Development Council meeting; PM's opening and closing remarks at the Third Round Table Conference on Jammu & Kashmir; PM's address at the Conference of Chief Ministers and Chief Justices of High Court; PM's address on the occasion of dedication of Tala Transmission system to the Nation was released to the media. `Live' telecast of the event by Doordarshan was arranged. The President's address to the Joint Session of Parliament was covered. `Live' webcast was done. The Address was sent to all Regional and Branch Offices of PIB. Bureau made special arrangements for the coverage of PM's foreign visits to Philippines for the 5th India-ASEAN Summit and 2nd East Asia Summit; Visit to Germany for the G8 & Outreach Countries Summit Meeting; Visit to Nigeria and South Africa for the 2nd India-Brazil-South Africa (IBSA) Summit; Visit to Russia for the annual bilateral summit; Visit to Singapore for 6th India-ASEAN Summit and the 3rd East Asia Summit and Visit to Uganda to attend CHOGM 2007. Prime Minister's address at the Summit and various meetings on the above tours were uploaded on the website and disseminated to the media. Prime Minister's visits, among others, to Assam, Jammu and Kashmir, Mumbai were also covered. An interaction between media and recipients of the Kabir Puraskar and National Communal Harmony Award, 2006 was organized in May, 2007. Another media interaction was organized in November, 2007 for child victims of violence. Media strategies were prepared for tackling terrorism and Naxalism. An interaction between the Naxal Division of MHA and media units of the I&B Ministry was organized in November, 2007 to strengthen and improve the media effort in the Naxal-affected areas. Other major issues highlighted during the period include (1) Government's efforts to deal with the situation arising out of bomb blasts in Srinagar, Hyderabad, Gorakhpur, Guwahati, Ajmer Dargah, Uttar Pradesh, etc., and violent incidents in the North-East and Naxal-affected areas (2) Efforts made by MHA to tackle terrorism and Naxalism (3) Assistance given to

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49

Rajasthan in the wake of the Gujjar agitation and to Punjab in the wake of the Succha Sauda issue (4) Central Government's assistance to flood affected areas in various parts of the county (5) Independence Day Awards (6) Home Secretary level talks between Indian and Pakistan, India and Bangladesh and India and Nepal (7) Madhan Menon Committee report on the criminal justice policy (8) Governments position on issues relating to Tasleema Nasreen and Nandigram and violence in Assam (9) release of central assistance for riot victims of Gujarat. Publicity was organized for the Unorganized Workers Bill, 2007 which was introduced in Parliament in September this year and for the new scheme the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana which was launched on 1st October this year. Publicity was organized for various important conferences like the Annual Vishwakarma Rashtriya Purskar and National Safety Award, the 10th Conference on Safety in Mines and also for the 42nd Standing Labour Committee Meeting which was attended by the Labour Ministers from all the States and the representatives from major trade unions. Transport Ministers from SAARC nations met recently in New Delhi. Publicity for this meeting was organised in coordination with the SAARC Secretariat. Extensive coverage was arranged for UNESCO Regional Conference on Global Literacy, organised by the Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of School Education & Literacy with UNESCO on 29-30th November, 2007 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi where Smt. Sonia Gandhi was the Chief Guest of the inaugural session. Shri Arjun Singh, Minister of Human Resource Development led an Indian delegation to the 34th Session of the General Conference of United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organsation (UNESCO) that was held at Paris from October 16 to November 3, 2007. Wide publicity was arranged for it. Efforts were made to cover a two-day National Conference on Development of Higher Education on 10th and 11th October, 2007 at New Delhi organised by University Grants Commission. The National Conference was a culmination of four Regional Conferences that the UGC had organised at Mumbai, Kolkata, Hyderabad and New Delhi. Wide coverage was arranged for inauguration of Conference for E9 Countries on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) (4-6 October, 2007) at Bengaluru by Shri Arjun Singh, Minister for HRD. To commemorate 150th Anniversary of first War of Independence & 60th Anniversary of India's Independence and birth centenary of Shaheed Bhagat

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Mass Media in India

Singh, Shri Arjun Singh, Minister for Human Resource Development flagged off "Azadi Express" (Special Mobile Train Exhibition ). The Exhibition would pass through 70 stations around the country. Starting its journey on 28 August 2007, it would be on till May 2008. Due publicity was arranged for the event. Union Minister for Human Resource Development (HRD), Shri Arjun Singh launched Online Admission 2007 - Project (Ni-On) of National Institute of Open Learning on July 04, 2007. To brief media on the launch, Press was invited to attend an interactive session regarding National Institute of Open Schooling's `Online Project for Admissions'. The NFSM and RKVY schemes launched by the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperation to invigorate the agriculture sector were given publicity by way of handouts, backgrounders and press briefs/conferences. Other major items highlighted in the media included the campaign for rabi production, crop area estimates issued by the Weather Watch Group and the announcement of minimum support prices for agricultural produce. Handling of the situation created by the outbreak of Avian Influenza in Manipur early this year was highlighted in the media by daily press conferences by senior officials of the Department of Animal Husbandry. The need for large-scale wheat imports were explained by way of handouts, informal briefs and interview to the electronic media. Other areas of thrust were procurement operations and the efforts to check price rise. Publicity was arranged for 99 th Meeting of the Permanent Indus Commission held from 30 May to 4 June 2007 in which the Commissioners of Indus waters of both India and Pakistan participated. Central Ground Water Board organized the National Ground Water Congress on 11th September 2007, which was inaugurated by Hon'ble Prime Minister of India. On this occasion, welcome address was given by Prof. Saifuddin Soz, Hon'ble Minister of Water Resources. Key note address was delivered by Dr. M.S. Swaminathan, Hon'ble Member of Parliament. Around 1000 Eminent Scientists, farmers, school children, representatives of Panchayati Raj Institutions and NGOs participated in the Congress. Publicity was secured for the Congress both in print and electronic media. As per Cabinet decision on 2nd November 2007 Ministry of Water Resources got approval to the scheme "Flood Management Programme" under state sector within estimated cost of Rs.8000 crore during 11th Plan Period (200712). As per the Cabinet decision on 15th Nov. 2007, the Ministry got the

Media Organizations - Central Government

51

approval to the scheme of "Artificial Recharge of Ground Water" through Dug wells in Hard Rock Areas" in six states. Wide publicity had been arranged for both the schemes. Wide multi-media publicity was organised for the Meeting of G-4 (India, Brazil, US and EU) G-6 (G-4 plus Japan and Australia) Trade Ministers held in New Delhi on 12th April, 2007 to review the progress of the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations since the resumption of the negotiations. A joint press conference arranged got huge coverage in the Indian and International media. Announcement of the Annual Supplement to the Foreign Trade Policy (2004-09) which gave major initiatives to give further momentum to export growth. A press conference was arranged for the same on 19th April, 2007 and the same was covered extensively by both print and electronic media. On this occasion, number of briefs, backgrounders, were issued for the purpose of press coverage. One-to-one interviews - both print and electronic media - were arranged for the Commerce and Industry Minister. The Second Ministerial Council of Asia-Pacific Trade Agreement (APTA) was held in Goa on 26th October 2007. Over 30 delegates headed by the respective Ministers or Vice Ministers from the six APTA participating states (Bangladesh, China, India, the Republic of Korea, Lao PDR and Sri Lanka) attended the meeting. A joint press conference was arranged at Goa on the outcome of the concluding session. Extensive coverage arranged from both print and electronic media. Wide publicity was given to major policy initiatives taken by the government for setting up of Special Economic Zones (SEZs) as well as the approval of SEZs throughout the country, from time to time. Wide multi-media publicity arranged for the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) project which is expected to transform the industrial landscape across half-a-dozen Indian states leading to the rapid development of industrial as well as physical infrastructure along the route of the corridor. The coverage has been extensive both print and electronic media. Extensive coverage was arranged for the measures taken by Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion like computerisation of trademark offices and the various studies undertaken to enhance the competitiveness of the Indian industry. A pro-active, investor-friendly and forward-looking North East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy (NEIIP) was notified on Ist April, 2007. The policy encompasses a liberal capital investment subsidy along with

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Mass Media in India

fiscal incentives like income tax and excise duty exemptions, interest subsidy and comprehensive insurance. Wide multi-media coverage arranged for the scheme. All publicity arrangements were made to give wide publicity to the Union Budget 2007-08, Economic Survey-2006-07, Public Private Partnership Programme, etc. Other major events, which were covered for media publicity included (1) State Information Ministers' Conference (SIMCON) (2) Ban on various satellite channels for carrying objectionable content. (3) New Advertisement Policy of the DAVP (4) Films Division's Swatantrata Filmotsav on 150th year of 1857 freedom struggle (5) Audio Visual coproduction agreement between India and Brazil (6) Allocation of 97 FM channels in the phase II of private FM radio (7) 38th International Film Festival of India-2007, pre event as well as event publicity (8) 53rd National Film Awards-from setting up of juries to the presentation of awards (9) Russian Film Festival, 3-day Egyptian Film Festival (10) Children's Film Festival. Parliament passed the aircraft (Amendment) Bill 2007 to ensure better safety and security control and enhance the power of DGCA to include safety oversight functions. An IMG has been constituted to streamline and operate cargo operations. It is contemplated to promote cargo operations through Public Private Partnership as non-metro airports now. The Airport Economic Regulatory India Bill 2007 was introduced in the Lok Sabha on 5th September 2007 and has been referred to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Transport, Tourism and Culture for examination and report. The Government on 1st march 2007 approved the merger of Indian Airlines and Air India into a new company called the National Aviation Company of India, (NACIL). NACIL was incorporated on 30th March with its Headquarter at Mumbai. All the above were given wide publicity by the Bureau. A new coal distribution policy has been circulated with effect from 18.10.2007 which, inter-alia, envisages meeting the demand of coal from consumers of different sectors of the economy, both on short term and long term basis, in an assured, sustained, transparent and efficient manner with built-in commercial discipline. During 2007, twenty seven projects of thermal power plants and Independent Power Producers (IPPs) involving coal commitment to the tune

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53

of about 75 million tones have been recommended for issue of Letter of Assurance (LOA). The companies engaged in production of syn-gas through coal gasification and coal liquefaction were made eligible for captive mining in addition to existing ones vide notification dated 12.07.2007. Ministry of Coal has finalized the guideline for undertaking detailed exploration by the allocates of unexplored coal blocks in the public and private sectors as well as State Governments. This will speed up the process of exploration as allocates will be able to get the exploration from any agency of their choice. An expert Committee set up under the Chairmanship of Shri T.L. Shankar to suggest a road map for the Coal Sector Reforms has since submitted its final report in October, 2007. The report is under consideration in the Ministry of Coal which will help in coal sector reforms in a big way after it is accepted and implemented. Joint Bipartite Committee of Coal India (JBCCI) constituted for wage revision of CIL workers. Wide publicity was arranged for all the above activities. 14th SAARC Summit Publicity was secured for the 14th SAARC Summit which was held in New Delhi. Prime Minister's Opening and Closing Remarks at the SAARC Summit were distributed to the media. Prime Minister's meeting with Heads of SAARC countries was given wide publicity. First SAARC Car Rally The first SAARC Car Rally was held from March 15 to April 14, 2007. Wide publicity was provided during the SAARC Car Rally. The Rally started from Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, on March 15, 2007 and reached Delhi on April 1, 2007 after travelling through Bangladesh, Bhutan, Nepal and Pakistan. At Delhi, SAARC leaders flagged the Rally on April 3, 2007 for onward journey to Mumbai. The Rally later went to Sri Lanka and ended in Maldives on April 14, 2007. The media coverage of the Rally was coordinated by the PIB. 16 Press releases and photographs of the Rally were released and put up on PIB website. Commemoration of 150th Anniversary of 1857 - India's lst war of Independence Elaborate arrangements were made by the bureau for providing wide publicity to the National Celebration to commemorate 150th Anniversary

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Mass Media in India

of the lst War of Independence, 1857 in coordination with the M/o Youth Affairs & Sports & other media units of the Ministry of I&B viz. DG:AIR, DG:Doordarshan, Song & Drama Division, etc. PIB has set up one main Padao (camp) at Meerut and 5 Padaos along the route from Meerut to Delhi. From 6-10 May, 2007, PIB personnel were on duty at Meerut and at all 5 Padaos at 5.30 a.m. daily to facilitate the media coverage. At every Padao a PIB officer was in position from 9.30 a.m. - 5.30 p.m. with internet enabled computer and mobile phone for use of media persons. The same was used by media persons to file stories. Extensive coverage in newspaper and news channels on the rally/march was achieved. Hindi channels especially gave a wide coverage. Hindi Newspapers like Amar Ujala, Rashtriya Sahara & others dedicated couple of pages daily to 1857 for at least 7 days. On 11 May, 2007, the media arrangements for the Inaugural function of the National Celebration at Red Fort were chalked out in co-ordination with the Ministry of Youth Affairs & Sports. A media stand for electronic media was made and an exclusive media enclosure was also provided. At the time of event the presence of visual media was impressive. The coverage of the inaugural function on May 11, 2007 was good. A number of special features as under were also issued to commemorate this historic event: 1. India celebrates 150th Year of its lst War of Independence. 2. Lesser known Heroes of India's 1st War of Independence (1857)-Part I. 3. Lesser known Heroes of India's 1st War of Independence (1857)-PartII. Release of Report to people on the occasion of third Anniversary of the UPA Government. PIB organized visual and print media coverage for release of Report to the People 2004-2007 by the Prime Minister on 22 May 2007. The speeches on the occasion have been disseminated amongst the media persons along with copies of the Report. The bureau also translated the Report to People 2004-2007 in Urdu and 12 regional languages, which were released by the Minister for Information and Broadcasting and Parliamentary Affairs, at a Press Conference organized by PIB on 23.5.07. They have also been placed on PIB Website after their release and hard copies were distributed by PIB's network of Regional & Branch offices across the country to local media persons. One set of language copies was sent to Prasar Bharti Corporation

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55

to enable regional units of DD to mount programmes based on the publication. National Awards for Nurses Media coverage for the National Awards for Nurses, which was given by the Hon'ble President of India was arranged. These awards revived after a gap of 17 years are now called `Florence Nightingale Awards'. Adequate media coverage was also given for the Conference of State Health Ministers from North Eastern States organized in Delhi. Cultural Exchange Programme for the years 2007- 2009 between India and China In June, 2007 PIB organized the print and electronic media publicity for the signing ceremony of Cultural Exchange Programme for the Years 20072009 in New Delhi during the three day visit of Chinese Minister of Culture, Mr. Sun Jiazheng. Election to the office of the President of India The nation's most prestigious Elections to the office of the President was held in July, 2007 for which the Bureau issued necessary Press Notes/Press Releases. Further more, authority slips to 125 Media Persons for polling/ counting were issued. Independence Day Celebrations High-profile publicity was secured for the Independence Day related addresses of PM & President. Elaborate arrangements were made to disseminate PM's address to the Nation on the occasion of the Independence Day. PM's address was web cast on the Bureau's website. The full text of the PM's address and highlights of the address were translated in Hindi & Urdu and issued to facilitate media persons. Regional and branch offices were instructed well in advance as a result of which PM's address was translated and released to the Language Press on time. Similar arrangements were made for dissemination of President's address on the eve of Independence Day which was also web cast and was sent to Regional and Branch offices. First International Tax Conference, 2-3 July, 2007 at New Delhi India hosted first International Tax Conference, a unique opportunity of understanding Indian tax reforms as well as to contribute to the process by the international participants. All arrangements were made to give it wide publicity in the print & electronic media.

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Mass Media in India

Two Day "TEX Summit 2007" Two Day "TEX Summit 2007" concluded on 1 st September 2007. The Hon'ble Prime Minister addressed the concluding session of the Summit. The proceedings of the summit was published widely in National and Regional Print media. Electronic media also telecast special stories based on the address of the Hon'ble Prime Minister. Incredible India@ 60 event A media party led by PIB officer attached to the Ministry of Tourism went to New York to cover Incredible India@60 event. The event was organized by the Ministry of Tourism and Culture and CII to showcase the progress and vibrancy of the country. Editors Conference on Social issues in Srinagar (J&K) from 17-18th October 2007 PIB organised an Editors Conference on Social issues in Srinagar (J&K) on the 17-18th October 2007. The Conference was jointly inaugurated by Dr Raghuvansh Prasad Singh,Union Rural Development Minister and Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad, Hon'ble Chief Minister of J & K. The media delegates were addressed by Shri M.A.A.Fatmi, Hon'ble MOS for HRD, Shri R.VeIu,MOS for Railways, Shri Mangat Ram Sharma and Shri Mohd. Dilawer Mir, Ministers in the J & K Government. The Conference provided an excellent platform for journalists to interact with Union Ministers and familiarise themselves with the development initiative of the Central Govt. with special focus on J&K. The two day Conference was attended by more than 150 journalists. 45 editors from all over the country representing regional media and about 120 journalists from J & K State attended the Conference. The Conference was widely covered and reported in the media. In all, PIB received about 700 press clippings reporting the event. Military World Games, Hyderabad Press Tour was conducted to Hyderabad to facilitate the coverage of Military World Games there in October, 2007. A main media centre along with 13 mini media centres were set up in various parts of the city. Besides this, 3 media centres were established in Mumbai to cover sailing and triathlon events, which were held in Mumbai as part of Military World Games. A total of about 100 handouts and 150 photographs were released

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57

for the media during the games. About 470 journalists including 150 from foreign countries were facilitated to cover the event. The Photo Section of DPR Defence was fully digitalized on the eve of the games, photographs were disseminated within half-an-hour of the event. Three issue of Games Newsletter were also brought out along with special articles on Military World Games in issues of Sainik Samachar. International Day of Non-violence Publicity was organized both on the electronic and print media for the "International Day of Non-violence". On 2nd October 2007, the main function was addressed by the Hon'ble Prime Minister of India Dr. Manmohan Singh at the Vigayan Bhawan in New Delhi. 24th Indian Handicrafts & Gifts Fair (Autumn) 2007 24th Indian Handicrafts & Gifts Fair (Autumn) 2007 was inaugurated by Shri Shankersinh Vaghela, Minister of Textiles on 16th October, 2007 it was widely covered by print & electronic media. Economic Editors' Conference Economic Editors' Conference was organized from 12-14 November, 2007 at New Delhi in which around 350 journalists including 63 economic editors from all parts of the country participated. The Ministries participated are: Finance, Agriculture, Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, Petroleum and Natural Gas, Civil Aviation, Steel, Chemical and Fertilizers and Labour. It gave a good platform for interaction on the Government policies, programmes and achievements with the editors and also got the feed back on these policies. This created a clear understanding among the media of the various economic and infrastructure issues. Inaugurating the Conference, Shri P. Chidambaram said that a marked change in the way the Indian economy is viewed both in the country and in other countries of the World. Based on this, a very large number of clippings and editorials appeared on different issues. PIB had made all arrangements to give it wide publicity both in the print & electronic media. The Conference provided a platform for economic editors to interact with Ministers of economic portfolios. Apart from coverage, the Conference sensitises editors on various economic aspects of the country. India-International Trade Fair 2007 India-International Trade Fair 2007 was inaugurated by the President of India on 14th November, 2007; with the theme of "Processed Food and Agro Industries". Extensive publicity was given during the entire duration

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of 14 days (14-27 November) in both print and electronic media. Activities in the Health Pavilion set up by the Ministry of H&FW at the India International Trade Fair were covered by the media on a day-to-day basis. 4th International Conference on Federalism held from 5-7 November, 2007 and 2nd Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction 4th International Conference on Federalism held from 5-7 November, 2007 and 2nd Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction held from 7-8 November, 2007 in New Delhi. Curtain raiser briefings were organized for the Secretary (Inter-State Council) and Secretary (Border Management) ahead of the Conferences. Both the inaugural and valedictory sessions for the 4th International Conference on Federalism were arranged telecast live through Doordarshan. The inaugural session of the 2nd Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction was also arranged telecast live through Doordarshan. Photo opportunity was also organized for bilateral meetings of some visiting Ministers with the Union Home Minister. Special feedback reports on both the conferences, primarily from Delhi based newspapers and websites were prepared. India Telecom 2007- a four-day International Exhibition-cumConference For the second time, telecom majors from across the world came together on a single platform at India Telecom 2007, a four day International Exhibition -cum-Conference organised under the aegis of the Department of Telecommunications in association with FICCI. The Conference and Exhibition was inaugurated by the Prime Minister of India. Shri A.Raja, Minister of Communications and Information Technology delivered the keynote address. All the four day deliberations were given wide publicity.

SOME STATISTICS

(April, 2007 To March, 2008)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. No. of assignments covered by Headquarters No. of photos releases by PIB Total Press Releases Total Features Total Press Conf./Press Briefings 1863 3969 61166 3101 5837

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DIRECTORATE OF ADVERTISING AND VISUAL PUBLICITY (DAVP)

The Directorate of Advertising and Visual Publicity (DAVP) is the Primary multimedia advertising agency of the Central Government for about six decades now. It caters to the communication needs of almost all Central Ministries/Departments and Autonomous Bodies and provides them single window cost effective service. It informs and educates the people, both rural and urban, about the Government's policies and programmes and motivates them to participate in development activities, through its unique modes of communication viz. advertising in press, electronic media, printed booklets/ folders, exhibitions and outdoor publicity tools. Organizational Set up The DAVP is headed by Director General who is assisted by 2 Additional Director Generals and other officials. At its headquarter it consists of a Campaign Wing. Advertising Wing, Printed Publicity Wing, Exhibition Wing, Electronic Data Processing Center, Mass Mailing Unit, Audio-Visual Cell, a Design Studio and Administration and Accounts Wings. It has two Regional Offices at Bangaluru and Guwahati headed by Regional Directors. It has two Regional Distribution Centers at Kolkata and Chennai. It has a network of 32 Field Exhibition Units spread all over the country. e-Governance To facilitate its users, DAVP has modernized its operations in various areas such as payments through Electronic Clearance System (ECS) for press advertisements, release orders for display advertisements through the website to facilitate remotely located newspapers/publications. Advertisement artworks are already being released to newspapers through the DAVP website. Release orders for audio and video advertisements are also being released electronically. Steps have been initiated to set up digital systems for distribution of media content to electronic channels through the web.

ACHIEVEMENTS

(April 2008 To March 2009)

· · · Advertisements released to newspapers Display advertisements released Copies of printed jobs brought out 13018 851 7756442

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Mass Media in India

· ·

Outdoor Publicity jobs done Exhibitions undertaken

66,00,13,394 599

Major Activities

Policy Initiative A New Advertisement Policy for print media formulated with a view to extending more facilities to small, medium and language newspapers, came into effect from 2 nd October 2007. The New Advertisement Policy is available on DAVP's website www.davp.nic.in. The amendment envisages a special focus on small and medium newspapers in regional and other languages. The share of advertisements has been increased in the case of small and medium newspapers from 40% to 50% and for regional and other languages from 30% to 35%. The special package amongst other measures has brought down the eligibility criteria for empanelment of newspapers for the purpose of DAVP advertisements in languages such as Bodo, Dogri, Garhwali, Kashmiri, Khasi, Konkani, Maithili, Manipuri, Mizo, Nepali, Rajasthani, Santhali, Sindhi, Urdu, in addition to Sanskrit and Tribal language newspapers from 12 months to 6 months. Release of Advertisements A total number of 13018 advertisements were released to various newspapers throughout the country during the financial year 2008-09. Out of these 851 were display advertisements and the rest were classified advertisements. Some of these advertisements on World Population Day, World AIDS Day, World Health Day, Malaria Day, Iodine Deficiency Day, Environment Day, World Sight Day, National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGA), Indira Gandhi Old Age Pension Scheme, Babu Jagjivan Ram's Remembrance, International Day of Disabled Person, Baba Sahab Amedkar Hastshilp Vikas Yojana, Sadbhavna Diwas, Bharat Nirman, Azadi Express, Independence Day, Republic day. Outdoor Publicity Outdoor Publicity Wing uses the medium of hoardings, bus-panels, kiosks, wall paintings, banners, animation display, decorative railings, cinema slides, metro display boards metro train inside panels, etc. to spread messages. This wing has put up a total number of 66,00,13,394 displays during the period. OP Division has displayed hoardings on Bharat Nirman with schemes of

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UPA Government in the states of Bihar, UP, Uttarakhand, Haryana, Punjab and HP. This Division tried to publicize National Convention for panchayat Adyhaiksh in Delhi through various Outdoor Publicity media all over India. Audio Visual Publicity The AV Cell of DAVP undertakes publicity campaigns through radio and video sponsored programmes, jingles and audio- video spots on AIR, Doordarshan, private satellite TV, radio channels, digital theaters, mobiles through SMS and DFP units on various issues of social relevance and national importance. A special campaign on Bharat Nirman has been initiated for Ministry of Information and Broadcasting under which audio and video spots have been produced on various issues like NREGA, Health, Water, National Rural Health Mission which are being broadcast/telecast on AIR/Doordarshan/ private TV Channels/digital theatres. Also, a mega campaign was initiated on the National Rural Health Mission for Ministry of Health and Family Welfare under which audio and video spots have been produced on various health related issues which are being broadcast/telecast on AIR/ Doordarshan/private. TV Channels/digital theaters. Major campaigns on Consumer Awareness for Ministry of Finance, Anti- Ragging for Ministry of Human Resource Development and Earthquake awareness for the Ministry of Home Affairs was also launched and audio-video spots were telecast on private channels by DAVP. A number of weekly sponsored radio programmes on various developmental issues are produced by DAVP and are being broadcast from various All India Radio stations. These include `Sanwarti Jayen Jeeven ki Rahein' on welfare scheme of Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, "Break the Silence" on youth affairs for Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, `Akash Hamara Hai' and "Poshan Aur Swasthya" on women and child development issue for Ministry of Women and Child Development, "Fantastic Four" and "Koshih Sunhere Kal ki" for the Ministry of Environment and Forest and "Nai Aashayen Nai Dishayen" for Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. These programmes are of 15-30 minutes duration and produced in Hindi and regional languages in interesting drama format. These are broadcast all over the country through Primary Channels and Commercial Broadcasting Service (CBS) stations of AIR. Programme `Let's talk' is being broadcast from FM, AIR Delhi. Besides these campaigns, audio/video spot/films were produced on consumer awareness for Department of Consumer Affairs, Empowerment of Disabled for Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, Anti Ragging

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for Ministry of Human Resource Development, Pre-natal diagnostic technique (PNDT), Deafness, Mental Health & Anti Tobacco for Ministry of Food Processing Industries, Resurgent India, Gandhi Jayanthi for Ministry of I&B. Printed Publicity Activities This Wing looks after the aspect of the DAVP's advertising function through printed publicity. The Wing looks into the planning, production and supervision of print jobs viz. multi colour posters, folders, brochures, calendars and other miscellaneous items of printed publicity. Preparation of plans/estimates for various Ministries as per the requirements and budget allocations are also done. DAVP produces printed publicity material in all major Indian languages i.e. Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, Bengali, Assamese, Oriya, Punjabi, Urdu and Hindi. This Wing maintains a panel of Printers, Typesetters and Dairy Makers to get the work completed in the minimum possible time and controlling cost over runs. Exhibitions Some of the highlights of exhibition programmes are as under: Azadi Express mobile exhibition train The Azadi Express mobile exhibition train, which was flagged off at Safderjung station, New Delhi on 28th September 2007 by Human Resources Development Minister, Shri Arjun Singh, continued its all-India tour during 2008-09 as part of the celebration of the 150th year of First War of India's Independence and the 60th year of Independence India. It completed its journey on 14th May, 2008. The sixteen-coach exhibition train, through photographs, murals, dioramas and audio-visuals, depicted the saga of popular upsurge leading to the 1857 uprising, the role nationalist leaders and thinkers played during the long freedom struggle leading to progress India has made in various fields since then. After visiting northern, western, central, eastern and north-eastern parts of the country, Azadi Express entered Bihar on 15t April 2008 and halted at Katihar. Shri Nikhil Kumar Chaudhary, MP, and several other dignitaries were the first to see the exhibition on the opening day. After halting at three stations in Bihar, including Patna, the mobile exhibition train had its first stoppage in UP at Varanasi. At Kanpur station, the minister of State for Home, Shri. Sriparkash Jaiswal viewed the

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exhibition and was highly appreciative of the theme and presentation of events altogether the train halted at 9 station in UP, including Lucknow. Towords the end of its journey, Azadi Express halted at the historic city of Meerut. Supplementing the exhibition train , DAVP organized an exhibition of some rare photographs connected with the freedom struggle and the 1857 events at Bhaisali ground in Meerut in coordination with the Heritage society and the Government freedom Struggle Museum Commemorating the great `Delhi Chalo' March of 10th May 1857. Azadi Express rolled out of Meerut for Delhi on 10th May evening. Azadi Express returned to Delhi on the 11th May 2008 after seven and a half month long journey, during which over 80 lakh people witnessed the exhibits when the exhibition train halted at 74 major stations. At every station, mini exhibition highlighting local heroes of the freedom struggle was put up on the platform alongside Azadi Express. At all the stations, there has been tremendous response from the people. Due to heavy rush of visitors the exhibition time had to be extended on most of the days. Both prints and electronic media gave extensive coverage to the Azadi Express exhibition train at every station it halted. The response from the media was such that some newspapers even came out with colourful special reports. All India Radio, Doordarshan and private channels and local cable TV Channels made extensive coverage of the exhibition.

Special Campaigns

Bharat Nirman Campaign Bharat Nirman campaign Phase II and III continued during the year with multimedia publicity being launched through Press Advertisement, Radio and Video Spot Production and Broadcast/Telecast and putting up of Hoardings. Bharat Nirman Phase III started on November, 15th with Press advertisements, Radio and Video spots being released on NREGS, MDM, Farmers Welfare in Non-election states. Radio and Video spots on overarching theme incorporating NREGS, MDM, Farmers Welfare, Minorities Welfare and NRHM were released on National channels. Apart from the Bharat Nirman Campaign, various advertisements on Empowerment on International Day of disabled, advertisement of Income Tax on Advance Tax, advertisement on Dr. Ambedkar Mahaparinirwan Diwas, Nirmal Gram Puraskar, Drinking Water Supply on International year of sanitation achievement were released. In addition to these, advertisements on Atomic Energy in various languages including Booklets and Folders have also been issued.

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Special Campaign on 2nd October On the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti, multi-media publicity was organized by DAVP. The details included: · · Press advertisement released on Gandhi Jayanti. As part of the Gandhi Jayanti celebrations, 3 to 5 days exhibitions in Chennai, Mumbai and Hyderabad were organized on the life and teachings of Gandhiji. Radio and video spots were produced and broadcast/telecast on Doordarshan/All India Radio and Private Electronic Media Channels. Video spots were also shown in cinema houses through M/s. UFO on an experimental basis. Message text was given to telecommunication department (MTNL) and Private Mobile Operators such as Airtel, etc. who sent SMS to their customers on the occasion.

· · ·

Special Campaign on Chandrayaan-I Audio Visual publicity campaign on the occasion of successful mission of Chandrayaan-I was done. Audio and Video spots were produced and broadcast/telecast when Chandrayaan-I successfully crossed the last 200 kms. to moon. These were telecast on Doordarshan and Private TV channels and broadcast on AIR.

REGISTRAR OF NEWSPAPERS FOR INDIA

The office of the Registrar of Newspapers for India, more popularly known as RNI, came into being on lst July, 1956, on the recommendations of the First Press Commission in 1953 and by amending the Press and Registration of Books Act 1867. The Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867 contain the duties and functions of the RNI. On account of some more responsibilities entrusted with RNI during all these years, the office is performing both statutory as well as some non-statutory functions. Under Statutory Functions, the following jobs are covered: (i) Compilation and maintenance of a Register of Newspapers containing particulars about all the newspapers published in the country; (ii) Issue of Certificate of Registration to the newspapers published under valid declaration;

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(iii) Scrutiny and analysis of annual statements sent by the publishers of newspapers every year under Section 19-D of the Press and Registration of Books Act containing information, circulation, ownership, etc.; (iv) Informing the District Magistrates about availability of titles for intending publishers for filing declaration; (v) Ensures that newspapers are published in accordance with the provisions of the Press and Registration of Books Act; (vi) Verification under Section 19-F of the PRB Act, of circulation claims furnished by the publishers in their Annual Statements; and (vii) Preparation and submission to the Government on or before 31 st December each year, a report containing all available information and statistics about the Press in India, with particular reference to the emerging trends in circulation and in the direction of common ownership units, etc. The following items fall under the Non-statutory functions: (i) Implementation of Newsprint Allocation Policy, Guidelines and issue of Eligibility Certificates to the newspapers to enable them to import newsprint and also Entitlement Certificates to procure indigenous newsprint. (ii) Assessing and certifying the essential need and requirement of newspaper establishments to import printing and composing machinery and allied materials. (iii)RNI also checks the circulation claims of newspapers or request through the empanelled CA. As per the provision of the Press and Registration of Books (PRB) Act 1867 and rules under it, the Registrar of newspapers for India (RNI), commonly known as Press registrar, is required interalia to submit an Annual report to the Government on the status of newspapers, on or before 31st December every year. According to the data available for the year 200708, the total number of newspapers and periodicals being published in India was 69323 as compared to 64998 during 2006-07, registering an increase of 6.65 percent. There were 7710 dailies, 371 Bi-Tri-Weeklies, 622 Annuals, 23414 Weeklies, 9053 Fortnightlies, 20948 Monthlies, 4687 Quarterlies and 2510 others, etc. Newspaper were published in as many as 151 languages & dialects during 2007-08. The largest number of newspapers. (27527) were published in Hindi followed by English (10000) & Bilingual (4560). Daily newspapers were brought out in all the principal languages except Kashmiri. Newspapers were published from all states & union territories.

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Uttar Pradesh with 10799 newspapers retained the prestigious position of publishing the largest number of newspapers in any state. In the case of dailies also Uttar Pradesh held the top position with 1230 newspapers. Bombay Samachar, a Gujrati, daily published from Mumbai since 1822, is the oldest existing newspapers. Data shows that the total claimed circulation of the Indian newspapers during 2007-08 was 207108115 copies. The Hindu, English daily published from Chennai was the largest circulated single edition daily with 1275553 copies followed by Ananda Bazar Patrika a Bengali daily from Kolkata with 12255850 copies. The Eenadu a Telugu daily published from Hyderabad came third with circulation of 11 81844 copies. The Times of India, in English having five editions claiming combined circulation of 2335991 copies came first among multiedition dailies. Eenadu with 23 editions and a combined circulation of 2227025 copies stood second and Dainik Bhaskar having 15 editions in Hindi with a combined circulation of 2032922 copies occupied the third position. Among periodicals The Hindu, an English weekly from Chennai topped with a circulation of 1128596 copies, while The Sunday Times of India, an English weekly, published from Delhi came second with a circulation of 1089710 copies. During the 11th five year plan (2007/11), a scheme "Strengthening of RNI" has been included with a total outlay of Rs. 88.06 lakhs. This scheme envisages of setting up of two new Regional Offices of RNI one in Guwahati in the North Eastern Region and other one in Bhopal in the Central Region. Setting up of Regional offices at Guwahati in North Eastern Region and Bhopal in Central Region respectively will give an effective presence to RNI in these areas. RNI already has its regional offices at Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata.

TOTAL NUMBER OF NEWSPAPERS IN 2007-08

(Language and Periodicity wise)

Language Assamese Bengali Bilingual Bodo Dogri Daily 37 125 132 2 0 Bi/Tri- Weekly Fort Month Quarter Others Annual Total Weelkly Nightly -ly -ly 4 15 22 1 0 91 707 970 4 2 45 690 562 1 0 81 861 2040 5 1 15 574 517 2 3 11 243 254 1 i0 1 29 63 0 285 3244 4560 16 6

Media Organizations - Central Government English 594 Gujarati 220 Hindi 3418 Kannada 493 Kashmiri 0 Konkani 1 Malayalam 265 Manipuri 18 Marathi 553 Maithili 2 Multilingual 21 Nepali 10 Oriya 107 Others 61 Punjabi 116 Sanskrit 5 Sainthali 0 Sindhi 13 Tamil 409 Telugu 405 Urdu 703 Total 7710 42 17 130 6 0 0 9 0 24 0 5 2 3 15 15 0 0 0 43 5 21 379 1358 1410 12793 573 2 4 211 7 1991 1 164 64 247 83 413 9 0 41 454 372 1443 23414 965 307 4042 419 0 2 186 5 343 3 89 7 140 32 117 6 0 11 335 340 406 9053 4015 881 5687 1015 1 6 1060 11 842 8 368 18 383 148 345 21 3 40 1511 971 626 20948 1612 88 1023 68 0 2 79 7 160 4 88 18 114 56 43 19 2 11 50 41 91 4687 1163 67 376 32 0 0 55 5 67 4 54 8 33 13 20 6 1 3 41 32 21 2510 251 15 58 4 0 0 18 0 142 0 18 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 10 2 4 622

67

10000 3005 27527 2610 3 15 1883 53 4122 22 807 127 1032 409 1070 66 6 119 2853 2168 3315 69323

DIRECTORATE OF FIELD PUBLICITY

Directorate of Field Publicity with its headquarters in New Delhi is the largest rural oriented interpersonal communication medium in the country. It operates as a two-way channel for dissemination of information among masses and gathering feed back for the Government. It acts as a bridge between the people and the Government. Established in 1953 as `Five Year Plan Publicity Organization' with the sole objective of publicity of Five Year Plans, the Directorate assumed its present format and role in 1959 with its publicity scope widened and made all inclusive. Over the years, its areas of operation as also its aims and objectives have been diversified. Briefly they are:- (a) to inform, educate, motivate and involve the people, especially at the grass root level, in the process of development so that the vision of the framers of the Constitution as outlined in its preamble is realized. (b) to generate public opinion for the implementation of developmental programmes and mobilize popular participation in the process of nation building. (c) to keep the public, especially the weaker, the marginalized and the remotely placed people informed about the policies and the programme of the Government and generate awareness on

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several national and social issues of relevance. (d) to keep the Government informed of the people's reactions to its programmes and policies and their implementation at the field level thereby facilitating corrective measures as and when required. DFP communicates with the people through various modes of communication. Inter-Personal Communication is the basic essence of all its programme activities. DFP resorts largely to interactive medium like Group Discussions, Seminars/Symposia, Public Meetings, Elocution Contest, Question Answer Sessions, and Rallies, etc. to convey its message to the masses. It also supplements its publicity activities through visual and live entertainment programmes like Film Shows, Photo Exhibitions, Song & Drama shows, etc. to communicate with the people. The Directorate also conducts competitions like quiz, essay, drawing and painting, slogan writing, and rural sports, etc., to disseminate message on the chosen themes. Collecting feed back of public perceptions to the authorities is one of the main components of DFP's functioning. During the year the Directorate conducted massive awareness campaign on National Rural Health Mission, AIDS Awareness, Iodine Deficiency Disorders, Control Non-Conventional Energy Sources, Legal Literacy and Free Legal Aid Programmes for the poor, Common Minimum Programme of UPA Govt., etc. Conducted Tour During the current financial year 11 conducted tours are proposed to be organized at a total cost of Rs 49 lacs. Out of these 7 tours have already been undertaken. Regions which have organised the conducted tours are Jharkhand, Bihar, Orissa, Tarnil Nadu, Maharashtra, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan. Four more tours are in the advance stage of finalisation. Public Information Campaign Public Information Campaign is a new and important feature of the publicity activities of the Directorate. DFP participated in PIB led PICs on Bharat Nirman in different parts of the country. In every PIC four Field Publicity Units were deployed for five days of pre PIC phase, five days of main PIC and two days post PIC. These campaigns have been organised in 1. Sitarganj (Punjab) 2. Jogindernagar (Himachal Pradesh) 3. West Khasi Hills (Meghalaya) 4. Kunihar (Himachal Pradesh) 5. Mulbagal (Karnataka) 6. Adeshpur (Orissa) 7. Dibrugarh (Assam) 8. Kovvali (Andhra Pradesh) 9. Podukottai (Tamilnadu) 10. Amthala (Rajasthan) 11. Kottayam (Trivandrum). In all the PICs, DFP put up a stall where information on a

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variety of topics of public interest was disseminated. DFP ensured that people in large numbers participated in the PICs across the country. Publicity Programmes on RRE The Field Publicity units rendered publicity support to Red Ribbon Express. The units mobilized people who flocked in large numbers to see the train. The units organized programmes at the railway stations and in the surrounding villages. Avian Flu The Field Publicity Units rendered valuable publicity support in creating awareness about the deadly Avian Flu virus. The FPUs made good use of publicity material provided by UNICEF and other agencies. The people were explained about the preventive steps to check the transmission of virus. The Units also exhorted the poultry farmers to cooperate with the culling team. Unlike last year, the awareness activities this year are concentrated in Tripura, West Bengal and Sikkim where the virus made its appearance. Border Area Development Programme (BADP) Border Area Development Programme publicity programme has been launched in selected blocks/villages of some identified districts of the Border States. The programme aims at promoting National Integration, bringing the people into the vortex of national life and improving morale of the border population. With this end in view the FPUs have been organizing programmes on a variety of themes especially those under the flagship programmes-NREGA, Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, RTI, Mid Day Meal, etc. People in large number have participated in these programmes. The programme is continuing in Border States of Nagaland & Manipur, Uttarakhand. Jammu & Kashmir, West Bengal(S), North West (Chandigarh), UP(CE), Bihar, Rajasthan, Arunachal Pradesh, Assam, Gujarat, West Bengal (N). Special Programmes Special Publicity programmes funded by Ministry of Rural Development (on Bharat Nirman) and by Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (on Iodine Deficiency Disorder Control) have been launched in November 2008 by DFP across the nation in a comprehensive and intensive manner to generate awareness among the people about the latest developments and issues pertaining to these programmes.

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Observance of Days and Weeks of National Importance is yet another way whereby DFP help generate public participation in nation building process by instilling nationalism and communal harmony among the people. During the year DFP observed all the important Days and Weeks of national importance in a befitting manner. Covering of Fairs, Festivals and Crowd Points is DFP's yet another important way of interacting with the people. During the year DFP covered important State and National level Fairs and Festivals and disseminated messages. During the year 2008-09, DFP organized 15757 Films shows, 2179 Song and Drama Programmes, 3945 Special Programmes, 2511 Oral Communications, 13730 Photo Exhibitions, 20507 Group Discussions, besides gathering 3054 Public reaction reports on various policies and programmes of the Government through its network of 22 Regional offices and 207 Field Publicity Units spread all over the country.

PUBLICATIONS DIVISION

Set up in 1941 as a branch of Bureau of Public Information, the Publications Division of the Government of India aims at providing authentic information on different aspects of Indian panorama at affordable prices to its readers. With headquarters at Soochna Bhawan, CGO Complex, New Delhi, the Division functions through its various field units-Sales Emporia at New Delhi, Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai. Kolkata, Patna, Lucknow, Hyderabad and Thiruvananthapuram and Yojana offices at New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Ahmedabad, Guwahati. Hyderabad, Thiruvananthapuram and Bengaluru. The offices of Employment News and Journals Unit are located at R.K. Puram, New Delhi. Books Books of Publications Division cover the whole gamut of subjects from art, culture, history, land and people, flora and fauna, children's literature, science and technology, Gandhian literature, biographies of eminent persons to reference works like India-A Reference Annual, Press in India and Mass Media in India. The Division also publishes selected speeches of the Presidents and Prime Ministers of India. The Division, brings out around 100 titles every year and has published more than 7800 titles so far. During the period April 2007 - March 2008, the Division has published 103 titles in English, Hindi and other regional

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languages. To commemorate 150 years of the First War of Indian Independence and birth centenary of martyr Bhagat Singh, the Division brought out some important books of lasting shelf value. These are: Bhagat Singh: The Eternal Rebel, 1857 -The Uprising, Delhi in 1857 (in English) Veer Kunwar Singh, Tatya Tope, Bahadur Shah Zafar, Nana Dhondu Pant Peshwa, Yeh Karvan Hamara and 1857 - Sachitra Jhanki (in Hindi). Translation of the well known title on 1857 by eminent historian S.N. Sen in Telugu was published this year. Other important titles brought out during April 2007- March 2008 are: My Book of Human Rights, Sunita Williams and Maulana Jalaluddin Rumi. Journals The Division also brings out 18 monthly journals including `Bal Bharati'a children's magazine, `Aajkal in Hindi and Urdu, `Kurukshetra' in Hindi and English and `Yojana' in Hindi, English, Urdu, Punjabi, Oriya, Bengali, Assamese, Gujarati, Marathi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Kannada. Bal Bharati Bal Bharati, the popular children's monthly in Hindi is being published regularly since 1948. Its main objective is to provide healthy entertainment to children while inculcating in them human values and scientific temper through short stories, poems, pictorial stories and informative articles. It has brought out a special science issue in June 2007. November, 2007 was another Special Number. Bal Bharati organized an Essay Competition for Children in the month of November, 2007 to tap creative writing ability of young children and to develop a competitive spirit among them. With a circulation of more than one lakh per month, it is among the largest selling children magazines in India. Aajkal Aajkal is a prestigious literary monthly magazine in Hindi and Urdu. It has brought out a number of special issues that covered varied aspects of Indian culture and literature. Aajkal (Hindi) as well as Aajkal (Urdu) brought out Special Numbers in May 2007 to commemorate 150 years of the First War of Indian Independence. August 2007 and November 2007 issues of Aajkal(Hindi) were devoted to 60 years of India's Independence and Children's Literature respectively. Aajkal (Urdu) provided special focus to various contemporary literary issues in their different numbers, covering subjects like Sufi philosophy, Urdu Press and feminism. Aajkal(Urdu) also brought out special issues on eminent writer Qurrutail Ain Haider in November. 2007.

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Yojana Yojana, the flagship journal of the Publications Division, devotes itself to socio-economic issues. The monthly magazine published in 13 languages simultaneously, is meant to promote awareness about development schemes and topical economic issues among all sections of the people especially those in semi-urban areas/small towns. Yojana through its various issues during the year covered important topics like Approach to Eleventh Five Year Plan, 50 Years of Indian IT, Handlooms, 150 Years of India's First War of Independence, Inflation Vs. Growth, Water, Microfinance, Immoral Traffic and Budget 2008-09. In collaboration with Jammu and Kashmir Government, a Column, "J&K Window" has been launched to focus attention on creating awareness about business opportunities and possibilities of economic activities in the States. Another column called `Best Practices' contains success stories/initiatives taken by NGOs, individuals and other groups. The series `Shodh Yatra' is again being restarted with National Innovation Foundation, Ahmedabad. The objective of the column is to highlight the technologies developed by rural population for their welfare. Yojana has started devoting December issues every year to North-East. December 2007 issue was on North-East with Sikkim as the theme State. A new series called `Do You Know' was launched in which basic facts on topical issues are analysed in simple language. Kurukshetra Kurukshetra, the only dedicated journal on rural development is serving as a forum for exchange of ideas on programmes, policies and implementation status of development efforts in the rural sector. The monthly journal is published in English and Hindi on behalf of the Ministry of Rural Development. This year, the focus of the annual issue (October 2007) was on `Changing Face of Rural India'. Employment News The Division also brings out the weekly, Employment News/Rozgar Samachar in English, Hindi and Urdu, which focuses on employment opportunities in government and semi-government organizations/ departments. public sector undertakings, autonomous bodies, banks and universities. The journal has a weekly circulation of about 4 lakhs copies. It has a network of 297 sales distributors and 4051 direct subscribers across the country. During the year 2007-08, revenue generated stood at Rs. 51.44 crore which

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is a significant increase over the last year. The total revenue increased from Rs 44.54 crore in 2006-07 to Rs 51.44 crore in 2007-08. Average number of pages per issue has also seen a distinct improvement from 52.98 in 200607 to 58.46 in 2007-08. In spite of escalation in the various cost factors the net revenue generated by Employment News increased from Rs.20.26 crore in 2006-07 to Rs 27.90 crore in 2007-08. The website of Employment News launched under the domain name www.employmentnews.gov.in has become very popular amongst the job seekers throughout the country. The website is now equipped with state of the art Search Engine which enables viewers to quickly retrieve material from the website. The website is providing counseling service on an interactive basis to youngsters throughout the country where questions are answered by specialist career counselors. Over 65,000 youngsters are now getting free services provided on a routine basis by the website which is in addition to the hits on daily basis made by the viewers. The website has archived write-ups on various career options available and carries over 1000 answers to variety of career questions. The website has also entered into an arrangement with STEP, IIT Kharagpur for marketing space on the website and has been technically upgraded. The website is very popular among the youth and is attracting a page hit of more than 2 lakhs per day which is one of the highest for a government website. Encouraged by the response of its readers and also in keeping with the official language policy of Government of India, EN launched an exclusive website under the domain name www.rojgarsamachar.gov.in for Rozgar Samachar, its Hindi version, in the first week of July 2008 to cater to the needs of Hindi speaking areas. Bharatendu Harishchandra Awards The Bharatendu Harishchandra Awards, originally instituted to encourage creative writing in Hindi on mass communication, are also given annually to children's literature and writings on women's problems and national integration. The awards for 2004 and 2005 in different categories were presented on 23rd May 2007. Business and Marketing Publications Division sells its books, journals and CDs, through its emporia in New Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad, Thiruvananthapuram, Patna, Lucknow and has about 400 agents. Yojana offices located at Ahmedabad, Bengaluru, Guwahati also function as the

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sales outlets. Apart from this, the Division participates in major book fairs like International Book Fair, Mumbai International Book Fair, etc. The revenue earned by the sale of books and journals in the year 2007-08 is Rs. 5.25 crore which is Rs. 1.12 crore higher than the previous year. This upward trend is being maintained in the current year also. Modernisation and Computerisation Under the l lth Five Year Plan, an amount of Rs. 218.75 lakhs has been allocated by the Ministry for this Division for the Scheme Modernization of Publications Division. The details are as under:

(Rs. in Lakhs) S.No. 1 1 A 2 Modernisation of Publications Division Digitalisation of part issues of Yojana and Kurukshetra Creating a Website of Yojana Computerisation and Modernisation of Yojana Offices Modernisation of business offices and Sales Emporia TOTAL 45.60 10.50 8.55 13.05 13.05 90.75 Name of Scheme 2007-08 3 2008-09 4 2009-10 5 2010-11 6 2011-12 Total 7 8

B C

1.60 14.00

0.40 12.00

-

-

-

2.00 26.00

D

20.00

20.00

20.00

`120.00

20.00

100.00

81.20

43.90

28.55

33.05

33.05

218.75

During the annual Plan 2007-08, an amount of Rs. 67.21 lakhs was spent to implement the Scheme. During the year, Book Gallery at Headquarters and Sales Emporium, Hyderabad were modernized and seven Yojana offices were computerised. Website was designed and dedicated leased line with IP address was started. Website has been launched. Work relating to the digitisation of past issues of Yojana (English and Hindi) and Kurukshetra (English and Hindi) was completed. The official website of the Division is www.publicationsdivision.nic.in. The details of the books/journals/magazines, etc. brought out by the Division, the events of book industry and forthcoming book exhibitions/book fairs are available on this website.

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The Division has two e-mail addresses, [email protected] and [email protected] which can be used for placing orders and seeking relevant information

RESEARCH, REFERENCE AND TRAINING DIVISION

Set up in the year 1945 the Division functions as information serving unit for the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting and various media units under it. The role of Research, Reference and Training Division (RR & TD) is to assist the Media Units of the Ministry in collection, compilation and preparation of material involving research into published works, etc.; building up a data base on important subjects and to prepare background notes on current and other topics for the use of the Media Units. The Division studies trends in mass communication media and maintains reference and documentation service on mass communication. It provides background, reference and research material for use of the Ministry, its media units and others engaged in mass communication. The Division also looks after the training aspect of the Indian Information Service (IIS) officers in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC) It has for the time being deffered. Organization set up RRTD has its headquarters at Soochna Bhawan, New Delhi and is headed by ADG (I/C) and assisted by two Directors one Deputy Director, one Chief Documentation Officer, one Assistant Director, one Research Officer, one Documentation Officer and supporting staff. e-Governance As part of ongoing ICT activities, the library is being upgraded and computerized. It is to be converted into a virtual library by the end of XI Plan. To smoothen the working of the office the LAN network is being further strengthened and expanded.

MAJOR ACTIVITIES

Annual Reference Manual The Division compiles annual reference books, `India - A Reference Annual', a compilation on development and progress made by Central Ministries/Departments, State/Union Territory Administration and PSUs/ Autonomous bodies. It is simultaneously published in Hindi titled-'Bharat'. Hon'ble Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting, Shri Anand

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Sharma released the 53rd edition of Reference Annual India/Bharat 2009 on 6th January 2009. Mass Media in India The Division brings out `Mass Media in India', a comprehensive publication on Mass Media in the country. It contains articles on various aspects of the mass media, information on the status of media organization in Central government, States and Union Territories. It also includes the general information on print and electronic media. The 2008 issue was brought out with a specific focus on `Application of IT in Mass Communication'. Diary of Events The Division maintains a fortnightly Diary of Events. It focuses on important national and international events for record and reference purposes. Speciality Magazines Monthly Report The Division prepares a monthly report on specialized magazines and after screening sends it to the Ministry. These magazines are monitored to ensure that the publishers adhere strictly to the stipulations laid down by the government. Reference Library The Division has a well-stocked library with a large collection of documents on various subjects, bound volumes of selected periodicals and various reports of the Ministries, Committees and Commissions. Its collection includes specialized books on subject pertaining to journalism, public relations, advertising and audio-visual media, prominent encyclopedia series, yearbooks and contemporary articles. Besides the senior officers of I&B, the library facilities are also available to accredited Indian and foreign correspondents. 630 new titles were added to the library during the year 2008-2009(up to March,2009) including 299 books in Hindi. National Documentation Centre on Mass Communication The National Documentation Centre on Mass Communication (NDCMC) was created in 1976 as a part of the Division on the recommendation of an Expert Committee set up by the Ministry for collection, interpreting and disseminating information about the events and trends in mass media through its periodical services. The NDCMC documents major news items,

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articles and other information material available on mass media/ communication. The current activities of the centre include collecting, documenting and dissemination of information. The information collected is maintained and disseminated through services like Current Awareness Service - annotated index of select articles; Bibliography Service - annotated subject index of articles; Bulletin on Film - abstract of various developments in the film industry; Reference Information Service - background papers on subject of topical interests in the field of mass media Who's Who in Mass Media-biography of eminent media personalities; Honours Conferred on Mass Communicators-details of awards conferred on Mass Communications and Media Update-diary of national and international media events. The Centre brought out 55 such services during the year 2008-09. PLAN SCHEMES The Division has a Plan Scheme titled "Research Reference and Media Awards". This scheme approved under 11t" Five Year Plan of the Division has three components namely `Research in Mass Media', `Upgradation of Library' and `National Media Awards'. Research in Mass Media A study "Coverage of Gender Issues in Print Media" has been undertaken and has been entrusted to the University of Kashmir. The preliminary report has been received and is being finalized. Upgradation of Library Computerization of Library is underway. More books and magazines with specific focus on Media and Mass Communication are being added to the Library National Media Awards A committee headed by Principal Director General (M&C), constituted to formulate regulations for operationlising of National Media Awards, a component of the plan scheme has submitted its report which is under consideration.

SONG AND DRAMA DIVISION

The Song and Drama Division was set up in 1954 as a unit of All India Radio and was given the status of an independent media unit in 1956

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with the mandate of development communication. This is the largest organization in the country using performing arts as a medium of communication. The Division uses a wide range of art forms such as drama, ballets, operas, dance-dramas, folk and traditional recitals, puppetry. In addition, the Division organizes theatrical shows on national themes such as communal, harmony, national integration, secularism, promotion of cultlural heritage, health, environment, education, etc., through Sound and Light Programmes. Organizational set up Functioning from Headquartrs at Delhi the Division has the following field Offices: (a) ten Regional Centres at Bengaluru, Bhopal, Chandigarh, Chennai, Delhi, Guwahati, Kolkata, Lucknow, Pune, and Ranchi; (b) Seven Border Centres at Imphal, Jammu, Shimla, Nainital, Darbhanga, Jodhpur and Guwahati; (c) Six Drama troupes at Bhubaneshwar, Delhi, Hyderabad, Patna, Pune and Srinagar; (d) Nine troupes of Armed Forces Entertainment Wing at Delhi and Chennai: (e) Two Sound and Light Units at Bengaluru and Delhi and (f) A Tribal Pilot Project at Ranchi. Division has also reopened its project in Dehradun in Uttarakhand w.e.f. 1.8.2008. With the help of about 380 departmental staff artistes, approxirnately 8,10 registered troupes and about 1200 empanelled artistes, the Division organized 21,539 programmes during 2007-08. The programme activities of the Division are carried out through : Armed Forces Entertainment Wing The Division caters to the entertainment requirements of the Armed Forces in most inhospitable, remote, border and forward areas. The Armed Forces Entertainment Wing troupes are very popular for presenting folk dances from all the states in original and attractive form, colour and costume, thereby highlighting the cultural integration of the country. The areas visited by these troupes include Leh, Ladakh, Chumathang, Thoyas, Partapur, Mokok Chung, Lung Talai, Alon Samdhu, Pang, Port Blair, Indo-China and Myanmar, Pak, Bangla, interior parts of J&K and North East Region. Tribal Publicity Ranchi Tribal Centre was established in 1980 to enhance awareness activities by involving more tribal artistes in the developmental process. 419 Programmes were presented by the troupes in the tribal areas of Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh & Orissa to educate the people about various developmental schemes designed for them during 2007-2008.

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Border Publicity Troupes The Border Publicity Troupes are Departmental troupes functioning at Imphal, Guwahati, Dharbhanga, Nainital, Shimla, Jammu and Jodhpur. These troupes have undertaken publicity in the remote border areas to educate the people about various developmental schemes of Government of India and also to counter the propaganda across the border. These Programmes were organized in close coordination with SSB, BSF and other Government agencies. The troupes present programme on National importance in local dialects and Hindi touching Indo China, Pak, Myanmar and Bangla borders. Departmental Drama Troupes During the year, the Departmental Drama Troupes situated at Delhi, Pune, Patna, Hyderabad, Bhubaneshwar, Jammu/Srinagar and Delhi presented plays on various themes like Family Welfare, AIDS, Drug Abuse, National Integration, Communal Harmony, Environmental Issues, etc. These troupes presented shows especially in local fairs and festivals and during the India International Trade Fair 2007 where large number of people congregate. Various issues on Health and family Welfare were presented in plays. Plan Scheme Under the Plan schemes, the Division covers up ICT activities in Hilly/ Tribal/Desert/Sensitive and Border Areas and Impact Assessment and Modernization of Song and Drama Division. During 2007-08 under the scheme about 6048 programmes were presented. During 2007-08 the following are the special components of the approved plan `Scheme' of the Division. (a) Information, Communication, Technology activities in hilly/tribal/ desert/ sensitive and border areas. (b) Activities in 76 identified districts. (c) Publicity on Common Minimum programmes in 10 Regional Centres. (d) Special Activities in J&K and North East. (e) Presentation of Theatrical shows on National/social themes. (f) Modernisation of Song and Drama Division. ICT activities in hilly/tribal/desert/sensitive and border areas The Division also presents Programmes in Tribal, Hilly and Desert areas with the view to creating awareness among the isolated tribes living in the hill and desert areas regarding the developmental activities initiated for their

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welfare. These Programmes aim at promoting amongst them a sense of belonging to the country and to encourage them for their participation in the on going developmental activities around them by devising progrogrames which are intelligible to them. Performing troupes are created from amongst the local people in their respective dialects and idioms. Activities in 76 Identified Districts Under plan scheme Activities in 76 identified districts during the year 20072008, the Division presented Programmes in the specially identified districts all over India. National Integration, Communal Harmony, Anti Terriorism and Patriotism are the themes being highlighted through these Programmes. 875 Programmes were presented during 2007-08 in all the 76 identified districts. Publicity on Common Minimnm Programme Under the plan scheme for Publicity on Common Minimum Progrmmes, this Division presented 620 Programmes highlighting the salient features of CMP during 2007-08. Special Activities in J&K and North East Region During the year 2007-08, this Division presented 541 Programmes providing special coverage for North-East, Jammu & Kashmir and other identified districts. Presentation of Theatrical shows on National Themes With the objective of educating the people in general and youth in particular about the rich cultural and historical heritage of the country, the Sound & Light Units of the Division made Sound and Light Programmes in various parts of the Country. The Bengaluru unit presented "Karnataka Vaibhav" at Mysore and Bengaluru, Vijayanagara Vaibhava at Hampi in Karnataka and Neneyo Aa Danruva in Bengaluru during the year 2007-08. Shatroopa, a special sound and light show on women through ages was presented at Jammu and Madhubani in Bihar. HEALTH AND FAMILY WELFARE The Division presented about 230 Programmes for the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare on different themes on health awareness. During India International Trade Fair-2007 the Division presented colourful programmes in the pavilion of Health & Family Welfare. 276 programmes were presented on various themes of Health & Family Welfare in the form of drama, composite programmes, magic, puppetry and traditional folk

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recitals, etc. The Division presented programmes on the occasion of health mela at Lalganj in Raibareily district UP in October 2007. In New Delhi also a weeklong Health Mela of the MTNL was presented before huge gathering in which variety of cultural programme was staged. SPECIAL CAMPAIGN ON PREVENTION OF AIDS All the field units presented programmes on prevention of AIDS. Prior to presentation of Programmes in the field, the participating troupes were given orientation on the theme of HIV and AIDS. The Bengaluru Centre presented 120 Programmes on AIDS in coordination with Karnataka State Aids Prevention Society. A total 1254 Programmes were presented on prevention of AIDS in the high prevalence districts all over the country during 2007-08. RED RIBBON EXPRESS -- PUBLICITY ON AIDS In order to provide vide and effective publicity NACO has flagged off a special train "Red Ribbon Express" from 1st December 2007. In all its 71 halting places up to 31st March 2008 the Division presented 253 programmes covering Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Chhattisgarh, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Bihar, Jharkhand, West Bengal and Assam. BHARAT NIRMAN- PUBLIC INFORMATION CAMPAIGN During 2007-08, the Division participated in all the Public Information Campaigns organized by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in which all the media units played remarkable role in giving publicity on themes like National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, National Rural Health Mission, Sarvshiksha Abhiyan, Universal Mid-day Meal Programme, Jawaharlal Nehru Urban Renewal Mission, Right to Information Act, Prime Minister's 15 point programme on minorities, etc. In addition to presenting colorful programmes at the place of the campaign, the Division presented pre and post publicity programmes for five days before and after the campaign in the surrounding villages thereby creating awareness on the developmental schemes under the Common Minimum Programmes. During the year 2007-08, the Division provided full publicity coverage for the Public Information Campaigns at Thiruvananthapuram in Kerala, Vikrabad, Gudur and Vijayanagaram in Andhra Pradesh, Coimbatore, Erode and Vellore in Tamilnadu, Bellari in Karnataka, Lohit in Arunachal Pradesh, Washim in Maharashtra, Chamoli in Uttrakhand, Chindawada, Narsingpur and Dhaar in Madhya Pradesh, Chittore in Rajasthan, Namchi in Sikkim, Dhamanayar, Joypur, Darjeeling and Nadia in West Bengal, Srinagar and Jammu in Jammu and Kashmir,

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Jalandar and Malarkotla in Punjab, Naraingarh in Haryana, etc, under Guwahati Regional centre all PIC programmes were presented with PIB reaching the identified areas in North-East Region. The Division will continue to provide full coverage for all the PICs during the remaining period of the year up to March 2008. COMMEMORATION OF 150th YEAR OF FIRST WAR OF INDEPENDENCE HELD IN 1857 The Division is actively presenting programmes on commemoration of 150th year of Independence from May 2007. Programmes were presented during the rally from Meerut to New Delhi. The rally was started with the historic song, presented by artistes of this Division. All the field units presented programmes in their respective Regions to mark the occasion. The Division provided full coverage during the year. In this connection the Division is presenting programmes in each halting places of Azadi Express of DAVP flagged off on 2nd October 2007 coinciding with Gandhi Jayanti A five day festival commemorating the contributions of the unsung heroes of North-East was observed at Imphal from 13th to 17th June 2007. Programmes like dramas and dance dramas were presented on the occasion. 142 dramas such as Rani Gaidinliu, war of freedom, Bhagat Singh, the first flame of women's war 1904, against the white riders, when Britisher's Mouth was shut, Swaraj, etc., were presented in Manipur and Assam during June to July 2007 in coordination with Nehru Yuva Kendras.

PHOTO DIVISION

Photo Division, a media unit meant for visual support for the activities of the government of India, is a subordinate office under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. The Division is responsible for photo documentation and archiving of photographs both in black and white and colour for internal and external publicity on behalf of the Government of India. The major function of the Photo Division is to document photographically, the growth, development and the political, economic and social changes in the country and to store such images for posterity. Photo Division provides visuals (still) to media units of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, for day to day publicity and also to use the photographs in exhibitions or publications. Other major users are central and state government agencies, Ministries/Departments including the President's

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Secretariat, Vice- President's Secretariat, Minister's Office, Lok Sabha & Rajya Sabha Secretariats and Indian Missions abroad through XP Division of the Ministry of Externals Affairs. The Division also supplies photographs on payment basis to non-publicity organizations, private publishers and general public. Organizational Set up The Photo Division is headed by a Director and assisted by one Deputy Director, one Senior Photo Officer and 6 Photo Officers. e-Governance As part of continuing ICT activities the Photo Division has upgraded its website www.photodivision.gov.in. The website has an archival section which includes rare photographs of historical importance. The Division has also undertaken the process of Digitalization, Cataloguing and Indexing of its images. This would help better preservation and maintenance of rare photographs.

Major Activities

Collection of Old Images During the period the Division has initiated the collection of old images with Cellular Jail authorities who had some unique collection of old photographic records from 1885 onwards till the Independence and about 50 photographs were collected from the British Museum. After a meeting with the Additional Secretary in the Ministry and Director, Photo Division with the Secretary (Culture) of the Andaman and Nicobar Administration, it was decided to have the images digitalized and Photo Division would be able to use these images for the cross-referencing purpose and other necessary needs. Accordingly 50 such images and 119 portraits of unknown freedom fighters who were detained in the Cellular Jail have been digitalized by the Division. Outsourcing of Images In order to enrich its Photo Archives and to have a cross-referencing of the existing images, Photo Division through National Centre of Photography has decided to acquire old photographs of archival value of at least 50 years old from the photographers, collectors and individuals having old records. A committee in this respect was formed with two outside experts, an eminent historian Dr. Narayani Gupta and an eminent photographer Shri Raghu Rai in addition to two Directors from the Ministry

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and Director, Photo Division as the Chairman of the committee. Division has given countrywide announcement for the collection from the collectors. The Committee met twice before finalizing the images which have been received from 28 respondents out of which eight were short-listed and 323 images were finalized. There were some unique images of the period 1880 onwards. The Division has acquired some of these images. Synergy between other Media Units To keep a synergy between the other Media Units, Division has taken up various measures. To avoid the delay in sending photographs to newspaper through network, Division is now equipped to send pictures to the PIB desk without much delay. To produce excellent publicity materials, Photo Division took various steps to take up updated documentation be it for the printing of calendar or for thematic exhibitions, etc. To disseminate its expertise it also took measures to organize Workshop, etc. in collaboration with Media Units and state governments. Moreover, with the shifting of DAVP, Publications Division and many other media units to Soochna Bhawan it has become easy to work in unison and as a matter of fact the Division is able to give more of its services to other media units which was earlier concentrated to the PIB's releases. Through the requirement of hard copies for the PIB has been reduced to almost nil (excepting the few copies meant for the official and the Prime Ministers office), the production of the exhibition work has been substantially increased. With the introduction of the large size printing the Division has supplied ready exhibition sets to DAVP in the life size from 3 feet by 4 feet and above. 21st NATIONAL PHOTO CONTEST: LIFE AND ENVIRONMENT Photo Division conducted its 21st National Photo Contest on the theme "Life and Environment". A country-wide invitation was sent to the photographers through National and Regional Newspapers to participate in the competition by sending maximum number of four entries in such section i.e. Monochrome (Black & White) and colour on the specific subject. A total number of 2206 photographs were received from 506 photographers from 25 states. A high level Jury comprising of Smt. Stuti Kacker, Additional Secretary, Ministry of I&B, Shri T.S. Nagarajan, noted Photo Journalist from Bangaluru and the former Director, Photo Division, O.P. Sharma, noted Photo Artist from New Delhi and the Head of India International Photographic Council, Anil Risal Singh, a noted Pictorialist, Photo Conservationist and the President of the Lucknow Camera Club and Debatosh Sengupta, Director, Photo Division screened the entries and

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decided the award winning as well as the selected photographs for the Exhibition. In addition to this, the jury also considered 75 colour and 23 black and white photographs for exhibition. The aim of the Photo Contest was to encourage photographers of the country so that talent available in the field could be projected and be given due recognition. The theme was rather wide in its scope and this gave the contestants a large arena from which to select their subjects. Secretary, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Smt. Sushma Singh inaugurated the exhibition and distributed the awards to the winner on 29th December 2008 at Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi and inaugurated the exhibition. The prize winning and selected photographs of the 20th National Photo Contest entitled "the Spirit of Independent India" has also been exhibited at Bangaluru, Bhopal, Lucknow, Ahmedabad, Kolkata, Guwahati and Indore. On the occasion of the Communal Harmony Week, the Division displayed an exhibition on the theme "Secular India" in Soochna Bhawan, New Delhi.

Production

With the introduction of printing of murals initiated during the last plan scheme Division produced a number of important sets of panel of exhibition. An outline of the same is given below: 1. 20 sets of exhibition materials of Kranti Yatra, the exhibition on 1857, the first war of Independence; 2. 20 sets for NACO kit; 3. 8 sets of Swasth Gram & Swasth Bharat; 4. 3 complete sets of the Civil Service Exhibition on Best Practices supplied to different administrative institutes in Shimla, Hyderabad, and ISTM, New Delhi; and 5. One set from the selection of Bharat Nirman (flagship programme).

Plan Activities

Photo Division initiated two new Plan Schemes under the Xlth Five Year Plan: National Centre of Photography The National Centre of Photography envisages wider dissemination of the photographic heritage with a view to creating awareness among the masses about the freedom movement and development of the country.

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National Centre of Photography scheme will upgrade the digital storage system of photographs and allow researchers, academicians and others to access the photographs. This would result in a specific accessing system on conventional as well as digital platform for authentic photographic information. All the images would be made available through net for the benefit of general public. Special Drive for the North East and J & K The scheme has been introduced with a clear need to implement a sustained awareness campaign in the far flung areas of our country so that the people of these areas can be made aware of the heritage of our country and the progress being made. The scheme proposes a wider dissemination of the photographic heritage of this country specially to Jammu and Kashmir, North East, Andaman and Nicobar Island and Lakshadweep with a view to creating awareness among the masses about the development of the country.

PRESS COUNCIL OF INDIA

Press Council is a statutory quasi-judicial authority mandated by the Parliament to preserve the freedom of the press and maintain and improve the standards of newspapers and the news agencies in India. It is an autonomous body with equal quasi judicial authority over the authorities and the press persons. For the discharge of the above objects, the Council comprises of a Chairman and 28 members. While the Chairman has by convention been a sitting or retired judge of the Supreme Court of India, of the 28 members, 20 represents various segments of the Press and eight overseeing the readers' interest, are representatives of the two Houses of Parliament and premier literary and legal bodies of the country i.e. University Grants Commission, Bar Council of India and Sahitya Academy. The Council has its own funds for performance of its functions under Act that comprises of the fee collected by it from the Newspapers and other receipts and grants from the Central Government. The Press Council of India has been reconstituted in its Xth term w.e.f. January 7, 2008. The Council is presently chaired by Hon'ble Mr. Justice G.N.Ray. The Council discharges its functions primarily through adjudications on complaint cases received by it, either against the Press for violation of journalistic ethics or by the Press for interference with its freedom. Where the Council is satisfied, after inquiry, that a newspaper or a news agency has offended against the standards of journalistic ethics or public taste or that an editor or working journalist has committed any professional

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misconduct, the Council may warn, admonish or censure them or disapprove of their conduct. The Council is also empowered to make such observations as it may think in respect of the conduct of any authority, including Government, for interfering with the freedom of the press. The decisions of the Council are final and cannot be questioned in any court of law. During the year under review, a total of 678 complaints were instituted in the Council. Of these 120 complaints were by the Press against authorities of the Government for violation of press freedom and 558 complaints were directed against the press for breach of journalistic ethics. With 665 matters pending from the last year, there were a total of 1343 matters for disposal by the Council. Of these 584 matters were disposed of during the year, either by way of adjudication or through summary disposal by the Chairman on account of settlement by the mediation of the Chairman or due to lack of sufficient grounds for holding inquiries or non-prosecution, withdrawal or on account of matters having become sub-judice. In all 759 matters were being processed at the close of the year. In its advisory capacity the Council provided the Government and other authorities its views on: 1. Publication of report or photograph of juveniles in newspapers; 2. Obscenity in Print & Electronic media; 3. Campaign of Products by the liquor companies in newspapers; 4. Implementation of the recommendations contained in the Fourth Report of the Second Administrative Reforms Commission (ARC) titled `Ethics in Governance'; 5. Petition regarding misuse of Right to Freedom of Speech and Expression by the print and electronic media and the need to restrict under Article 19 (2) of the Constitution; 6. Committee on Empowerment of Women- Selection of subject for examination during the year 2007-2008-Status of Women in Print Media; 7. O.M. of the Ministry of Home Affairs seeking suggestion on "Communal Violence (Prevention, Control and Rehabilitation of Victims) Bill, 2005"; 8 Private Member's Bill 2007 on the Consumer's goods (Publication of price with advertisements) introduced in Rajya Sabha; and

9. Draft National Policy on Criminal Justice.

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The Council noted and discussed Contempt proceedings against Mid-Day before High Court of Delhi and the conviction of its journalists. The Council observed that even though the entire facts considered by the Hon'ble High Court were not before the Council and specific issue of Mid Day was also pending before the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India and thus sub-judice, without entering into the merits of the case, it felt that the Courts were expected to be more sensitive to the duties and functions of the press and before taking any view the courts were expected to consider whether the criticism per se had undermined the functioniring of the Court in the estimation of the public by demeaning the judges presiding in the law courts. It also observed that in a democratic set up all institutions were open to bonafide critical evaluation of their functioning and such bonafide criticism in public interest would only strengthen the quality of functioning. Eminent judges and jurists had indicated that dignity of the court would be maintained more by restraint and magnanimity. The Council recalled that it had only recently supported before the Parliamentary Committee the proposal to accept truth as a defence in any contempt proceedings against the Media and truth forming the basis of the media information had now been protected under the amended provisions of the Contempt of Courts Act. Therefore, media information based on truth and published in the public interest would constitute defense in a contempt proceedings. It however, felt that such publication should not be accompanied by publicity, which was excessive. While the Council extolled the four pillars of the Indian Democracy to welcome critical evaluation of its functioning to strengthen the confidence of the public in the system, it observed that at the same time, the press must agree to subject itself to an effective system of self regulation and public accountability to ensure fairness of conduct. The Council expressed confidence that the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India which was now seized of the matter would give due consideration to all such aspects and its decision would give added impetus to the guarantee enshrined in Article 19 (1) of the Indian Constitution.. The Council had been continuously facing the question as to why it was not taking steps to restrain the electronic media from its aberrations from the guidelines laid down by the Council. Many felt that the competition posed by the electronic media was one of the main reasons for growing trivialization in the print media. The Council discussed the matter at length. It felt that the print media of the country was by and large more responsible than a large number of channels of electronic media. There was no doubt that the electronic media needed a regulator. The Press Council of India functioning under the mandate of its statute, has successfully guided the print media of the country in promoting ethical conduct, even though a lot

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of ground was yet to be covered. The Council reiterated that the flexible code built up by it under Section 13(2) of the Press Council Act, 1978, was as much applicable to the electronic media as to the print media, and that the principles of ethics and morality could not be different for the print and electronic media. It, therefore, resolved that its proposal for entrusting the regulation of print and electronic media to a common body, by conversion of the Press Council of India into Media Monitoring Commission of India, was the mechanism most effective and acceptable to the media. The Council decided that its proposal be pursued with the Government of India. The Council considered the matter of empowerment of the Council in its meeting held on July 27, 2007 against the backdrop of the amendments already proposed by it to the Central Government and pending its consideration. Reiterating them, the Council resolved that empowerment of the Council as an internal regulatory mechanism was essential to carry out the will of the Parliament in creating this Authority. While the Council was not in favour of being converted into a penal forum, it needed to be given sufficient authority to ensure compliance with its directives. For this, the following steps were necessary: (1) Mandatory publication of the adjudication of the Council by the respondent newspaper at the place and in the manner directed and within the period specified; (2) State advertisements may not be released to the paper after the expiry of the period till the adjudication is published; (3) Non-compliance may lead to suspension of advertisements of newspaper, or withdrawal of accreditation of journalist, as the case may be, for the period specified; (4) Any persistent non-compliance may lead to directions for suspension/ cancellation of license; (5) Recommendations of the Council should be binding on the authorities. The Council also initiated a process of consultation and dialogue with press/ media Councils and similar bodies in different parts of the world for active encouragement to preservation of the press freedom and promotion of its standards and ethics worldwide. As a part of these efforts, the Chairman of the Council participated in the debate organized by the Kenyan TV of Kenya on May 4-5, 2007 on `Can the Media Regulate itself' along with Mr. Chris Conybeare, Secretary General, WAPC, Mr. Mitch Odero, Ethics and Complaints Committee, M.C.K.. Mr. Carl Erkgrimstad, Sr. Advisor, Norwayon Institute of Journalism and Mr. Alonso Azar, Regional Advisor,

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UNESCO. The Programme had concluded with support for the Indian Model of the Press Council. The Council came out with the studies and the reports on important matters which have nexus with the preservation of the freedom of the Press and maintenance of its standards. · · · Study Report on Working Journalist Act vis-a-vis Appointment of Journalists on Contract (27.7.2007). Report on the Problems of Small and Medium Newspapers (October 4-5, 2007). Report of the Assessment Committee on Violation of the Freedom of Press in North-East (October 4-5, 2007).

During the period under review the Press Council of india encouraged debates on media matters through various seminars/conferences/meets. The National Press Day was observed on November 16 with discussion on "Media as People's Voice - Pre and Post Independence". Hon'ble Speaker, Lok Sabha Shri Somnath Chatterjee inaugurated the celebrations in Delhi in the presence of Hon'ble Minister of Information and Broadcasting and Parliamentary Affairs, Mr. Priya Ranjan Dasmunsi. A souvenir was also released on the occasion carrying valuable articles from eminent personalities on the subject. The states also commemorated the day on various levels with discussions on the subject. The Council also organised two workshops during the period under review. Workshop on March 3, 2008 was organised in collaboration with Makhanlal Chaturvedi University of Journalism and Communication, Bhopal on " Standardization of Media Education in Consultation with the Concerned" in New Delhi. Two days Workshop on "Reporting of Court Proceedings by the Media and Administration of Justice" was also organised by the Council in collaboration with the Supreme Court Legal Services Committee, National Legal Services Authority. Indian Law Institute and Editors' Guild of India on March 29-30 in the Capital. The Council successfully published its quarterly house journals in Hindi and English that chronicle the activities/important developments of the press world. The website of the Council was enriched with the latest adjudications of the Council and other developments and in an effort to garner greater revenue from fee levied on newspapers, the list of defaulting newspapers has been put on the website for general access and information. The Council also benefited from the augmentation of its hardware capacity.

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The Press Council of India has been entrusted by the Parliament with the additional responsibility of functioning as an Appellate Authority under Section 8 (c) under the PRB Act 1867 and the Appellate Board comprising of the Chairman of the Council and another member met regularly to hear the Appeals before it.

INDIAN INSTITUTE OF MASS COMMUNICATION

The Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC), registered as a society under the Societies Registration Act, 1860 (XXI) of 1860) came into existence on August 17, 1965. The Institute, inaugurated by the then Prime Minister of India and the then Minister of Information and Broadcasting, was established with the basic objective of undertaking teaching, training and research in the area of mass communication. Beginning with a modest staff' strength including two Consultants from UNESCO and organizing training courses mainly for Central Information Service Officers and undertaking research studies on a small scale, the Institute, over the last about 42 years, has graduated into conducting a number of specialized courses for meeting diverse and demanding requirements of the rapidly expanding and changing media industry in modern times. As of today, the Institute conducts a number of Post-graduate Diploma Courses in Print Journalism, Radio &TV Journalism and Advertising and Public Relations. Beginning in 1969, the Institute organizes a Post-graduate Diploma Course in Development Journalism for middle level working journalists from Afro-Asian countries under the auspices of the Ministry of External Affairs. A number of specialized short-term courses ranging frorn one week to twelve weeks are also organized to meet the ever-growing training needs of communication professionals working in various media/ publicity outfits of Central/State Governments and Public Sector Organizations. Besides, the Institute also collaborates with difterent national and international agencies in conducting training, seminars, workshops, etc., and undertaking joint research projects. In recent times, mass communication has undergone a paradigm shift and has emerged as a major area of activity greatly impacting the process of decision making. Though comparatively at a nascent stage of its development, it has rapidly acquired importance and prominence and has become a major attraction for students; pursuing different academic disciplines. The Information Technology revolution has significantly

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contributed to the expansion of mass media. It has also posed major challenges for students, teachers and practitioners of the discipline. The rapidly changing technology is transforming the very complexion of the discipline in a manner unknown to any other area of academic activity. The need of the hour undoubtedly is to effectively respond to the emerging challenges for maintaining and enhancing the effectiveness of the media. Accordingly, the Institute continuously evaluates and revises the course curriculum under the guidance of its Academic Council, so as to effectively meet the contemporary challenges thrown upon by the fast changing environment. This enables the effectiveness of the courses being run by the Institute, to be maintained even in the changed scenario. The Institute equips the young men and women who aspire to be ultimately associated with variety of media institutions with the basic skills/techniques and provides insights into diffierent dimensions of the field. An attempt is made by the Institute to develop its students into useful members of the society through dissemination of information, the communication being aptly considered to be a crucial ingredient of the development process. This is what gives the Institute and its alumni a distinct identity and character. The Institute endeavours to contribute towards the creation and strengthening of an infomation structure suitable not only for Indian requirements but also those of other developing countries. It provides its expertise and consultancy services to other institutions/bodies, both within India and outside. The Institute also provides - training, research and consultancy; services as per the requests received from departments/organs of the Central/State Government, Public Sector Organizations, Universities and other Academic Institutions. With the growing popularity of the Institute's training activities and with a view to meeting the regional aspirations, the Institute opened in 1993 a branch at Dhenkanal, Orissa for catering to the demands of the eastern region. At present, the Branch conducts two Post Graduate Diplomas Journalism (English) and Journalism (Oriya). The Government of India through the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting makes the financial support to the Institute available. The activities of the Institute are guided by its Executive Council whose Chairman is the Secretary in the Ministry who also is the President of the Institute (Society). The other members of the Council inter-alia include representatives of the Institute's Faculty and eminent personalities from the world of media. Through its continuous hard work over the last more than four decades of

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its existence and excellent delivery mechanism, the Institute has achieved the envious position of a "Centre of Excellence: in the arena of communication teaching, training and research. Teaching and Training Programmes The academic and training activities of the Institute can be divided into four programmes: Post-graduate Diploma programmes for freshers. This comprises three programmes in Journalism and one in Advertising and Public Relations: Medium of Examination/Instruction 1. Post-graduate Diploma Course in Journalism - English 2. Post-graduate Diploma Course in Journalism - Hindi 3. Post-graduate Diploma Course in Journalism - Oriya 4. Post-graduate Diploma Course in Radio and TV Journalism -- English and Hindi 5. Post-graduate Diploma Course in Advertising and Public Relations (English and Hindi) Programmes for officers of Indian Information Service 1. Foundation Course in communication for officers of the Indian Information Service Group `A' 2. Orientation Course for officers of the Indian Information Services Group `B' Programme for candidates from developing countries Diploma Course in Development Journalism This Diploma Course is highly sought after by middle level working journalists in Africa, Asia and Latin America and other developing countries. The average intake of participants is 20-25. The Institute organizes two such courses each year. So far nearly 1164 journalists from 106 countries have been benefited from this training programme. The programme is sponsored by the MEA. Short-term Courses, Workshop, Seminars and Conferences With a view to contributing towards better understanding of different issues pertaining to mass communication in the context of India and other

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developing countries and in order to make the personnel aware about the emerging techniques and sharpening their basic skills, the Institute has been organizing a variety of short-term courses, workshops, seminars and conferences on various themes of communication. The Institute runs regular short-term academic programmes for personnel of different media units of the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. A number of specialized short-term courses, ranging from one week to 12 weeks' duration, are also conducted for meeting the professional training needs of the Defence Officials and those of working in various media/ publicity organizations of the Central/State Governments and Public Sector Enterprises. Since its inception, the Institute has organized a total of 544 such Courses, etc. with participation of 11692 persons, both from India and abroad. Apna Radio AR-1 Community Radio: The community Radio broadcasts on 96.9 MHz five days a week for two hours each day from 1.00p.m. 2.00p.m. and repeat broadcast from 3.00p.m. ­ 4.00p.m. Apna Radio has a range of 10-12 km around the Institute. The FM radio station has a Broadcast studio and two recording studios and several sound editing workstations. A communication research study conducted by the students on `The Community Radio in the second year' indicates that 65% of the people in the surrounding areas listen to Apna Radio. The Community Radio is particularly popular among the semi-urban & slum clusters in the vicinity, as the students with WLL, & mobile phones and our newly acquired OB van often broadcast live programmes on issues concerning the local people.

ELECTRONIC MEDIA MONITORING CENTRE

Consequently upon the directions from Cabinet Secretariat, major functions of the Central Monitoring Services (Excluding content monitoring) along with land, building/assets has been transferred to National Technical Research Organization (NTRO) with effect from 01 April 2005. The portion of work related to private TV Channels with regard to adherence to Programme Code and Advertisement Code enshrined in the Cable Television Networks (Regulation) Act 1995 and Rules framed thereunder has been retained by this Ministry. Accordingly, it was decided by the Ministry to establish the Electronic Media Monitoring Centre (EMMC) for information of:

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(i) All TV Channels downlinked in India with reference to violations of Programme and Television Networks (Regulation) Act, 1995 and rules framed thereunder, (ii) Private FM Radio channels with reference to license conditions, and (iii)Any other such work relating to monitoring of content of Broadcasting Sector as assigned by the Government from time to time. BECIL, a PSU under the administrative control of this Ministry has been entrusted the task of executing the EMMC project and augmentation of its monitoring capacity. EMMC has come into existence with effect from 9 June 2008 at R&D Building, IP Estate, Ring Road, New Delhi as an state-of-the-art facility and has since commenced its monitoring activity. The Centre has been equipped with RF Downlink systems, Digital Channels Router System and logger system, etc. It had started monitoring about 100 TV Channels (24x7). Facility for monitoring another 50 TV Channels is ready. At the same time, the process of augmentation of its capacity to 300 TV Channels is also underway and is expected to be complete during 2009-10. Main features of the facility are as follows: 1. Live Monitoring of TV Channels. 2. Review of the stored content as and when required. 3. Creation of Meta Data to assist in report formation. 4. On line/Web based retrieval of the logged footage and content. 5. Archiving of the logged content for future reference. The revised uplinking guidelines and downlinking guidelines for channels beamed at Indian viewers also require monitoring of violation and remedial measures. Constitution of Monitoring Committee for Pvt. TV channels at State/ District Level It has been noticed that enforcement of some of the sections, specially section 5 and 6 of the Cable TV Networks (Regulation) Act, 1995, i.e. programme and advertisement codes prescribed under Rule 6 and Rule 7 of the Cable TV Networks Rule 1994 respectively, in many parts of the country is not satisfactory either due to lack of clear knowledge or mechanism to enforce the same. To keep a close watch in the matter detailed guidelines have been issued for constitution of Monitoring Committee for Pvt. TV channels at

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State and District level vide order dated 19 February 2008. The status of constitution of these committees, so far, is as under: (A) State level Monitoring Committees i) ii) iii) iv) Dadra Nagar Haveli Mizoram Tripura J&K (Already constituted the State Level Monitoring Committee in pursuance of Order dt. 19.5.2006)

(B) District Level Monitoring Committees Arunachal Pradesh Andhra Pradesh Assam Bihar Chandigarh Chhattisgarh Dadra Nagar Haveli Haryana Himachal Jammu Kashmir Jharkhand Karnataka Kerala Madhya Pradesh Lower Subansiri Warangal Diphu Hajipur, Patna, Shekhpura (3) Chandigarh Raigarh Dadra and Nagar Panipat, Ambala (2) Bilaspur Kathua Ranchi, Deoghar, Koderma, Saheebganj (4) Gulburga Mahalappuram, Palakkad (4) Kasaragod, Kozhikode,

Khargon, Nimach, Dhindori, Shahdol, Mandsor, Narsinghpur, Harda, Anup Pur, Sagar, Balaghat, Chhindwada, Muraina, Tikamgarh, Rajgarh, Badhbani, Guna, Rewa, Burhanpur, Bhind, Shivpuri, Dhar, Sihor, Ashok Nagar, Jabalpur, Datiya, (25) Ukhrul Aizwal, Kolasib (2) Kohima Jagatsinghpur, Nayagarh (2) Patiala, Moga, Ludhiana (3)

Manipur Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab

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Rajasthan Tamilnadu U.P.

Bhiwadi, Jodhpur, Ajmer, Rajsamand (4) Perambalur Ramanathapuram (2) Aligarh

The Constitution of Committees continues to be vigorously pursued with the State Governments.

PRASAR BHARATI ­ THE CORPORATION

Introduction Prasar Bharati (Broadcasting Corporation of India) is the Public Service Broadcaster in the country, with Akashvani (All India Radio) and Doordarshan as its two constituents. It came into existence on 23rd November 1997, with a mandate to organize and conduct public broadcasting services to inform, educate and entertain the public and to ensure a balanced development of broadcasting on radio and television. Objectives The major objectives of the Prasar Bharati Corporation as laid out in the Prasar Bharati Act 1990 are as follows: i) To uphold the unity and integrity of the Country and the values enshrined in the Constitution.

ii) To promote national integration. iii) To safeguard citizen's rights to be informed on all matters of public interest and presenting a fair and balanced flow of information. iv) To pay special attention to the fields of education and spread of literacy, agriculture, rural development, environment, health and family welfare and science and technology. v) To create awareness about women's issues and taking special steps to protect the interests of children, aged and other vulnerable sections of the society. vi) To provide adequate coverage to the diverse cultures, sports and games and youth affairs. vii) To promote social justice, safeguarding the rights of working classes, minorities and tribal communities. vii) To promote research and expand broadcasting facilities and development in broadcast technology.

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ALL INDIA RADIO

The Origin Radio broadcasting began in India in the early 1920's. The Radio Club of Bombay broadcast the first programme in 1923. This was followed by the setting up of a Broadcasting Service that began broadcasting on 23rd July 1927 on an experimental basis in Bombay and Calcutta, under an agreement between the then Government of India and a private company called the Indian Broadcasting Company Ltd. When this company went into liquidation in 1930, Indian State Broadcasting Service under the Department of "Controller of Broadcasts" was constituted. The Indian State Broadcasting Service was renamed as All India Radio in June, 1936. All India Radio also came to be known as Akashvani in 1956. When India attained independence in 1947, AIR had a network of six stations and 18 transmitters. The coverage was 2.5% of the area and just 11%, of the population. AIR today has 231 radio stations and 373 transmitters and its coverage extends to 91.79% by area and 99.14% by population. Operating in a multi-cultural, multi-linguistic country like India, AIR broadcasts in 24 languages and 146 dialects, in its home service. In External Services, it covers 27 languages including 16 foreign and 11 Indian languages. AIR operates its broadcasting services on Medium Wave, Short Wave and FM. The FM Service uses a larger bandwidth to provide a programme service of high fidelity and lower noise distortion. Programme Objectives In its programming and other activities AIR is guided by its motto "Bahujana Hitaya; Bahujana Sukhaya" i.e to promote the happiness and welfare of the masses through information, education and entertainment. To realize its objectives, AIR has evolved a three-tier system of broadcasting national, regional and local. It caters to the mass communication needs of the people through its various stations spread across the country. They provide music, spoken word, news and other programmes. Local stations meet the area specific needs of the listener. AIR Channels All India Radio operates its services through: Primary Channels Commercial Broadcasting Service (Vividh Bharati) FM Channels (Rainbow and Gold)

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Local Radio Station (LRS) National Channel DTH External Services Broadcast Other niche channels: Amrutha Varshini

Primary Channels

The public service broadcasting arm of AIR, the Primary Channels put out infotainment programmes with the objective of enriching the lives of their listeners. The Primary Channels, broadcast largely on the Medium Wave frequency, follow a composite programming mix. They also promote art and culture with a major emphasis on Indian classical music. Around 40 percent of total broadcast on primary channels comprises music, which includes Classical music, light, folk, film and music of various other languages. News and Current Affairs programmes constitute 20 to 30 percent of the broadcast time. Radio plays and drama, health & family welfare programmes, programmes for women and children, farm and home programmes aimed at empowering rural masses are the other important segments of Primary Channels. These Channels being the most accessible of all the AIR channels, strive to reach their audience in the language most understood by all.

Vividh Bharati

The entertainment channel of AIR, Vividh Bharati service was started in October 1957, with popular film music as its main ingredient. It started accepting commercials from November 1967. Vividh Bharati Service provides entertainment for 15 hours a day. Nearly 85 percent of programming is based on music with film music topping the chart. Classical, folk, light and devotional music are also broadcast. Bulk of the Vividh Bharati programming originate from Mumbai which are also relayed by other Vividh Bharati centres. Regional Vividh Bharati stations also produce and broadcast a few programmes at specified timings in their respective languages. Several programmes of Vividh Bharati are quite popular among the audience. The top ten programmes are "Chitralok"(Morning), "Bhule Bisre Geet", "Chaya Geet", "Hawa Mahal", "Chitralok"(Evening), "Jaimala" , "Aap Ki Farmaish" , "Triveni" , "Sangeet Sarita" and "Manchahe Gcet".

FM Rainbow

All India Radio operates 14 FM Stereo channels in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata,

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Chennai, Bengaluru, Panaji, Lucknow, Cuttack, Jalandhar, Tiruchirapally, Kodaikanal, Vishakhapatnam, Hyderabad and Coimbatore. Beside these stations Rainbow Programmes are relayed for certain duration from Kasauli, Shillong, Mussorie, Aligarh, Dharamshala, Bhatinda, Kurseong, Kochi, Pondichery, Vijayavada, Kanpur, Bhadarva, Poonch, Rajouri, Naushera, Radio Kashmir Srinagar, Jammu, and Leh. These channels, called AIR FM Rainbow, are targeted at the urban audience with a refreshingly new style of presentation. Besides music - Hindi, English and regional, the FM Channels also broadcast chat shows, helpline programmes, interactive phone- in programmes, etc. The traffic beat and the city weather updates are of particular interests to metro dwellers.

FM Gold

A composite news and entertainment channel called AIR FM II was launched on 1st September 2001. The channel is on air for l8 hours a day. Operational in Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata and Chennai, AIR FM-II is now called AIR FM Gold. The programming is a blend of information and entertainment, with one third of its content devoted to news and current affairs. While the hourly news bulletins in Hindi and English originate from Delhi, the FM Gold Channels at the other three centres also broadcast news in respective regional languages. AIR FM Gold is positioned as a Classic Channel with golden oldies, ghazals and light classical music forming part of the entertainment segment.

Local Radio Station (LRS)

Local Radio is comparatively a new concept of broadcasting in India. Each of the station serving a small area provides utility services and reaches right into the heart of the community, which uses the microphone to reflect and enrich its life. What distinguishes Local Radio from the regional network is its down to earth, intimate and uninhibited approach. The programmes of the local radio are area specific. They are flexible and spontaneous enough to enable the station to function as the mouthpiece of the local community.

National Channel

All India Radio offers a 3 tier system of broadcasting, namely National, Regional and Local. National Channel forms the first stage of it. Started on 18th May 1988, the National Channel of All India Radio works as a night service from 6.50 p.m. to 6.10 a.m. the next morning. It covers 64% area and about 76% population of the country, through its 3MW Transmitters at Nagpur (191.6 M-1566 KHz), Delhi (246.9 M-1215 KHz) and Kolkata

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(264.5M-1 134 KHz from 2300hrs) with shortwave support in 31 Meter Band (9425 KHz & 9470 KTTz) which cover the entire country. Considering the whole of India as its zone, the programme complexion of the Channel has been designed to make it representative of the varied cultural mosaic and ethos of the Nation as a whole. National Channel serves in three languages - Hindi, Urdu and English with vast variety of programmes on Science, Health, Sports, Literature, Humour, Current Social Issues, and Cultural Heritage so as to enrich the vast knowledge of its listeners. VIVIDHA both in Hindi and English are also taken up with lot of advance planning. Magazine programmes on economics, science, sports, music, literature and health are also broadcast on regular basis. Career guidance, current affairs and social issues are taken tip in the fortnightly programme FOCUS. Eminent personalities from different fields are featured in the programme of senior citizens and AAJ KE MEHMAN. The programme HANSTE HANSAATE is broadcast twice a week. A number of magazine programmes are broadcast daily with proper emphasis on minority welfare. education, culture and socio-economic development are focal points of daily Urdu Magazine programme MANZAR. An issue based phone-in programme - HELLO ZINDAGI is broadcast on first Thursday of every month. In order to involve listeners and ensure their active partcipation in the programme activities, programmes of their messages/requests are broadcast five days a week including the programme JAI JAWAN for soldiers. Hourly news-bulletins; alternatively in Hindi and English are broadcast only from the National Channel throughout the night. Whenever the Parliament is in session, National Channel broadcasts recording of the "Question Hour" for the benefit of the listeners. During the Holy Month of `Ramzaan' a special 50 mts. programme Sahargaahi is broadcast daily (4.10 a.m. to 5.00 a.m.) in which emphasis is given to human values and Indo-Islamic culture.National Channel has imparted training to IGNOU students for Diploma Course in Radio programmes.

External Services

All India Radio entered the realm of external broadcasting shortly after the out break of the IInd world war on 1st of October, 1939, when it started a service in Pushto for listeners' across-what was then the North West Frontier. Since then the External Services Division of AIR has been a vital link between India and rest of the World, especially with those countries where the interest of India are intertwined because of Indian population, staying in those countries. Indians, who left their home decades ago in search of better life today live on every part of the globe and are still interested to know what "The Country of their Birth" holds for them.

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Naturally, External Services Broadcast has been projecting the Indian Point of view on matters of National and International importance through its various programmes. External Services Division of All India Radio ranks high among the External Radio networks of the world both in reach and range covering about 100 countries in 27 languages. External service of AIR aims to keep the overseas listeners in touch with the ethos of India. The langauges in which AIR reaches its foreign audience are English, French, Russian, Swahili, Arabic, Persian, Pushtu, Dar, Baluchi, Sinhalese, Nepali, Tibetan, Chinese, Thai, Burmese and Bhasha Indonesia. The services in Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and Gujarati are directed at overseas Indians, while those in Urdu, Punjabi, Sindhi, Sairaki, Kannada and Bengali are meant for listeners in the Indian Sub-continent. The three major services of External Services Division are (a) The General Overseas Services (GOS) in English, (b) AIR External Service in Hindi and (c) AIR External Service in Urdu. The External Services broadcasts follow a composite pattern and generally comprise News and Current Affairs, Review of the Indian Press, Newsreel; Magazine programmes - sports and literature documentaries and features, talks and discussions on social, cultural, economic, political and historic subjects. Music is also braodcast in good measure. The ESD also supplies recordings of music, spoken word and other programmes to about 25 foreign broadcastings organizations under the cultural exchange programme. During the financial year 2007-08 extensive coverage was given to all major National and International Conferences, Seminars, Symposia etc. in the form of commentaries, radio reports and interviews. Wide coverage was also given to the visits of various Heads of States, Governments and other Foreign Dignitaries to India.

DTH

On 16th December, 2004 the Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh launched the Direct-to-Home Service of Prasar Bharati - DD Direct Plus. With this, All India Radio entered a new era of satellite broadcasting providing 24 hours service. In the first phase twelve channels of AIR have been made available to the listeners in India and abroad and in second phase eight more channels have been added. The programmes include information and entertainment in equal measure.

Amrutha Varshini

Amrutha Varshini is a dedicated music channel operational in Bengaluru. It aims to promote classical music - both Carnatic as well as Hindustani.

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THE YEAR AT A GLANCE

Prasar Bharati remained focused on its objectives and functions as laid down in section 12 of the Prasar Bharati Act, 1990. During the year 200708 All India Radio and Doordarshan accomplished major tasks in programming and technological areas in time with their mandate. The highlights of the activities and initiatives during the year with particular reference to the objectives and functions of the Corporation are briefly described.

All India Radio Activities

Programme activities: Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan concerts were organized at 21 Stations of AIR acrosss the country on 27th, and 28th October 2007 featuring artists of both Hindustani and Carnatic music. AIR introduced regional Folk & Light Music Festival at par with Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan. The purpose of this regional Folk & Light Music Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan is to project, promote & propagate the rich folk cultural heritage of our country. The year commenced with the broadcast of National Spring Festival of Folk & Light Music featuring Telugu Light songs by Shri KBK Mohan Raju, Smt. Anjana Sudhakar, Kathakali Padam by Kalamandalam C.V. Sukumaran from Kerala, Malayalam Light songs by Smt.T.A.Sobha, Tamil Folk by Jyotivel & Party and Kannada Light Songs by Sangeetha Katti Kulkarni. Another remarkable festival that closely followed in the early year of the broadcast was the TRINITY MUSIC FESTIVAL. In this festival both young and prominent artists have featured. Tyagaraja Compositions were rendered by Smt.B.Arundhati (Vocal) and Shri Shreyas Narayanan (Vocal), Muthuswamy Dikshitar Compostitions by Dr.R.Ganesh (Vocal) and Smt.R. Vedavalli (Vocal), Shyama Sastry compositions by Neyvelli R.Santhanagopalan (Vocal) and Smt.Pantula Rama (Vocal). Another Major event was the Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan concerts. This year Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan Concerts were held at 23 Stations all over the country on 27th & 28th October, 2007 featuring artist of both Hindustani & Karnatic music. Total number of participants excluding accompanying artists was 51.

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A Direct relay from Thiruvayaru on the Saint Tyagaraja Aradhana Festival was broadcast on the 26 th January 2008 in our National Programme of Music followed by a live relay of Pancharatna Kirtanas rendered by eminent artists of Karnatic Music in the morning on the 27th January 2008. Akashvani Annual Awards in different categories of Programme Broadcast by stations of AIR are awarded every year. The Award Presentation Ceremony for Akashvani Annual Award-2006 was held at Radio Kashmir, Jammu on 8th April, 2007. Public Service Broadcasting and Gandhian Philosophy Awards are also given to commemorate the first visit of Mahatma Gandhi to the studio of AIR, Broadcasting House, and New Delhi on 12th November, 1947. AIR has stepped up its activity of Agriculture Broadcast with launch of exclusive Project Mass Media Support to Agriculture Extension with the title Kisan Vani for AIR from 15th February, 2004 in collabration with Ministry of Agriculture to inform local farmers the daily market rates, weather reports and day to day activites in their area at micro level. Presently `Kisanvani' is being broadcast and relayed from 96 FM Stations of AIR. All India Radio observed 15th February as "KISAN DIVAS" from its 96 Kisanvani broadcasting stations. Special programmes were broadcast on the occasion by these stations. Special programmes on National Food Security Mission were broadcast by `Kisanvani' Broadcasting AIR stations. Two Trainings and one Review workshop were organized by MANAGE, Hyderabad. Almost 40 Farm and Home Programme Producers were trained in these Workshops. Programmes directed towards women listeners cover subjects related to socio-economic development of women, health and family welfare, food and nutrition, scientific home management, women entrepreneurship, education, including adult education and gender issues. Fixed chunks were given for educational broadcast for the students as well as for the teachers in collaboration with the National Council of Educational Research & Training (NCERT) and Central Institute of Educational Technology (CIET). Besides, educational programmes of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) were broadcast from AIR stations.

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Radio adaptations of outstanding novels, short stories and stage plays were also broadcast. Serials projecting current socio-economic issues like unemployment, illiteracy, environment pollution, problems of the girl child, etc., were broadcast on regular basis. The National Programme of play is broadcast on fourth Thursday of every month at 9.30 p.m. Regular publicity was and is being given to National Common Minimum Programme on each of the following thrust areas viz., 1. Employment Opportunities, 2.Agriculture Growth, 3. Education, 4. Health, 5. Women and Children, 6. Food and Nutrition, 7. Panchayti Raj, 8. SCs and STs, 9. Social Harmony and Welfare of Minorities, 10. Industry, 11. Infrastructure Development, 12. Development of J&K, North East and Border States. Special mention can be made of the publicity given to schemes such as Employment Guarantee Scheme, Jan Kerosene Pariyojana, etc., formulated by the various central Ministries/Departments. Consequent upon the coming into force of the Right to Information Act, 2005, vigorous publicity to this Act was and is being provided. Programme Heads of all AIR Stations were asked to highlight the salient features of this Act in their programmes. Publicity was given to the Hon'ble Supreme Court Judgement on Anti Dowry Literacy among people. Sardar Patel Memorial Lecture in English was organised in New Delhi on 11th October 2007. Shri Bipan Chandra, Eminent Historian, delivered the lecture on the subject "Pre Gandhian Roots of Gandhian Era Politics". Its recording was broadcast on national hook-up on 31st October, 2007 on the occasion of the birth anniversary of Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel. Dr. Rajendra Prasad Memorial Lecture in Hindi was organized at Chandigarh on 16th November, 2007. Shri Ashok Bajpai, eminent Poet delivered the lecture on the subject "Hindi ka Sanskritik Ashay." Its recording was broadcast on the national hook-up on 3rd December, 2007 on the occasion of the birth anniversary of Dr. Rajendra Prasad. The news headlines can now be obtained through SMS also. Listeners can get the latest updates by simply typing NEWS on mobile and sending an SMS to 5676744. The SMS service has also been extended to Market Mantra programme. The listeners of the programme can now give their feedback through SMS. News is also available on phone. Callers can get the latest news by simply making a phone call on the designated numbers and listen to

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national/international news or regional news in English, Hindi and local language as the case may be. This service was extended to three more cities-Imphal, Lucknow and Raipur in 2007 and two more cities Guwahati and Shimla in 2008. With this, the service is now operational in 14 cities across the country including Delhi, Chennai, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Patna, Jaipur, Ahmedabad, Banglore and Thiruvanathpuram. News lovers can also get the latest news and listen to bulletins from NSD's official website www.newsonair.com. The website was relaunched with a new look and additional features in October, 2006. At the beginning of each session, a discussion with Members of Parliament (MP) of different political parties is organized and broadcast regarding "Issues before the Parliament" in English and Hindi. During the Parliament Session, `Sansad Sameeksha' in Hindi and `Today in Parliament' in English, reviewing the proceedings of the day of both the Houses of Parliament are broadcast. Similarly, reviews of the proceedings of the State Legislatures, whenever they are in Session, are broadcast by the respective Regional News Units of NSD: AIR. This year NSD has taken initiative to automate the newsrooms of its different RNUs. News automation system has been installed at six RNUs namely Guwahati, Shillong, Tirichy, Shimla, Jaipur and Imphal. This is an endeavour towards fully digitised, paperless office. In order to further smoothen the work of news room, all the RNUs are in the process of shifting from teleprinter line based news wires to World space/V-Sat based news wires for receiving news from agencies. The focus of the NSD's coverage this year was the common man. The Division did a vast coverage on the issues affecting the common man and how the various schemes of the Central government including the ones for the welfare of SC/ST, OBCs, minorities, farmers, unorganized workers, women and youth have fared. Flagship programmes of the government such as National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, Bharat Nirman and Sarva Siksha Abhiyan, etc., were given special coverage. Efforts were made for giving wide coverage to all flagship theme programmes of the central government as well as to the steps taken by the government to check the prices of essential commodities and wheat procurement by central and state agencies. During the year 2007-08, NSD mounted special programmes on all major events including election of President of India, Vice President of India, 60-years of India's Independence, elections to the State Assemblies of Manipur, Uttar Pradesh, Uttrakhand, Goa, Punjab,

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Gujarat, and Himachal Pradesh, 150th anniversary of First Indian War of Independence (1857), centenary celebration of Shaheed Bhagat Singh and the resumption of border trade between India and China after 44 years from Nathula.The journey of three trains- Azadi Express, Science Express and Red Ribbon Express was also widely covered in all regional and national bulletins. The Right to Information Act was given high priority in its news bulletins and programmes. Special featurised programmes were mounted on economic issues such as WTO talks, government's efforts to contain price rise and relief packages to farmers and National Employment Guarantee Scheme & its implementation. News based programmes on Indo-Pak relations were broadcast especially in the context of containing cross-border terrorism. Radio report on Indo - Pak Volleyball Men Test Match at Chennai on 10 th August 2007 and Volvo Master of Asia Golf Tournament at Bangkok from 5 th to 9 th December 2007. AIR also covered 2 nd Commonweath Volleyball Championship for Men held in Kolkata on 3rd and 4th August 2007. Reports on Senior National Boxing Championship-Delhi on 31st August 2007 and 2nd Asian Carrom Championship-Raipur on 9th September 2007 were broadcast. Live coverages of the 15 th Senior National Women's Football Championship-2007 on 12th May 2007 at Rourkela, ONGC Nehru Cup Football International Tournament on 29 th August 2007 in Delhi, Fedreation Cup Football Tournament on 15 th September 2007 at Ludhiana, and 120th Durand Cup Football Tournament on 7th November 2007 in Delhi were given. AIR has broadcast reports on Wimbledon Tennis Championship 2007 played from 25th June to 9th July 2007 in London and live coverage to the Sunfeast Tennis Championship Kolkata on 22nd and 23rd September 2007 for Semi Finals and Finals respectively. AIR has also provided extensive coverage to the 4th World Military Games held in Hyderabad and Mumbai in October 2007. Coverage of the National Sports Events held in India, e.g., 112th All India Beighton Cup Hockey Tournament 2007 in Kolkata, 45th All India Bombay Gold Cup Tournament 2007 on 25th April 2007 at Mumbai, Asia Cup Hockey Tournament on 8th September 2007 in Chennai, 24th Surjeet Hockey Tournament on 2nd November 2007 were some other highlights of AIR Sports coverage.

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AIR broadcast Voice cast on Dortmund International Chess meet from 23rd June to 1st July 2007 from Germany, Advanced Rapid Chess at Leon in Spain from 6 th to 9th September 2007, International Chess Championship in Luxumberg from 9th to 15th July 2007, Genka Leasing World Chess Championship, Germany from 15th to 20th August 2007, World Chess Championship ­ Mexico from 12 th September to 1 st October 2007, World Blitz Chess Championship - 2007 held in Mexico from 12th September to 1st October 2007 wherein G.M. Vishwanathan Anand of India won the World Title and also on Asian Grand Prix atheletics meet on 24 th and 28 th June 2007 at Guwahati and Pune respectively. AIR provided live coverage to India vs Australia Cricket Series in Australia from 26th December 2007 to 28th January 2008 alongwith T20 International Cricket in Melbourne on February 2008 and also Commonwealth Bank Series (ODI) in Australia from 3rd February to 4th March 2008. Adding another feather to its cap, the External Services Division has started digital transmission from its new set up installed in the New Broadcasting House. All modern gadgets and equipments are being used to attract as many listeners as possible. Introduction of Internet broadcasting by All India Radio has enabled its listeners in parts of the world like USA, Canada, West and South Africa to avail of AIR's Services on Internet 24 hrs. Urdu Service of External Services Division is also available on air through DTH w.e.f. 30.06.2006. As a "Voice of the Nation", External Services Division of All India Radio has been India's "Authentic Windows to the World",. With growing prestige of India in the world, an increasingly important role is envisaged for External Broadcast for times to come. International Relation Unit of All India Radio maintained good relations with other broadcasting organisations across the world. AIR, Lucknow participated in a joint radio production with Deutsche Welle on `Challenges of Equality' in respect of gender equality in India and another joint production with DW on the subject `Living With Forces of Nature' has concluded in November 2007 at AIR Cuttack, in which one Deutsche Welle producer and one AIR producer participated. One producer from Radio Canada visited AIR on study tours to study the various aspects- of radio broadcasting in AIR. The bursary was granted to them - by the Commonwealth Broadcasting Organisation. Under the Cultural Exchange Programme Agreements (CEP) signed between Government of India and different countries, the IR Unit

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coordinates exchange of radio programmes with broadcasting organizations of different countries. There are 21 countries at present with which Government of India has live `Cultural Exchange Programmes Agreements' concerning Radio/broadcasting. High-level delegations from Maldives, China, Germany, Deutsche Welle, Tanzania and Malaysia visited AIR during the period with the aim to explore avenues for better coordination and cooperation between the two National Radio Organizations. Mr. David Astley, Secretary General, ABU visited Prasar Bharati, AIR, DD and the Ministry in February 2007 to explore the possibilities of hosting 3r d Word Electronic Media Forum in India. Many organisations in other countries have also shown interest in AIR's broadcast contents to use the same at their networks. Guidelines for allowing foreign broadcasters using AIR programming contents have been sought from the Ministry and the response on the same is still awaited. Facilities for recordings of programmes were made available to BBC in AIR studios at Calcutta, Pune and Chennai. As in previous years AIR also participated in several International Awards competitions and brought laurels to its credit. Entries were sent for the AIBD Awards, CBA Awards, ABU Prizes, and International Grand Prix radio competitions. AIR's entry `Shabash Banty' co-shared the first prize with a Korean entry in the `Children Category' of the AIBD Awards 2006 and won a trophy and a cash prize of US $500. AIR continued to join hands with UNICEF in disseminating the important social messages on Health, Nutrition, Sanitation, Water, Girls Education, Child Rights, Registration of Birth, and Eradication of Polio, Breast-feeding, HIV/AIDS and consumption of Iodized Salt. UNICEF conducted two workshops at Latur and in which Programme Executives from identified districts participated. The objective of the workshops was to focus radio programming which could lead to behaviour change in the people for their betterment. All India Radio also participated in the Thomson Foundation's EUIndia Media Initiative on HIV/AIDS Project. Programme Executives from different AIR stations attended the training workshop in this respect at Delhi and Hyderabad. Four of the AIR producers who had sent their entries for the `Reporting HIV/AIDS Awards' to Thomson Foundation were awarded a fully funded trip to UK as a prize. All India Radio is also helping Afghan Radio and Television (ART) in their reconstruction process by providing music records and has offered

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training opportunities for their personnel. A team of four female programme personnel of `Educational Radio and TV Service of Afghanistan' (ERTV) came to India in September 2006 for an eightdays training course in the field of radio broadcasting at STI (P), New Delhi. UNESCO sponsored the training. International Relations International Relations Unit of DG; AIR remained quite active during 2007-08 in carrying out and coordinating international activities and commitments concerning All India Radio. Besides, All India Radio participates actively in all the SAARC related activities in broadcasting. Every month a SAARC Audio Visual Exchange programme of a member country is broadcast -over AIR. A special SAARC News bulletin is also broadcast on every Sunday. High-level delegations from Malaysia, Tanzania, Sri Lanka and Mauritius visited AIR during the period with the aim to explore avenues for better coordination and cooperation between the respective National Radio Organizations. Many organisations in other countries have also shown interest in AIR's broadcast contents to use the same in their networks. NHK World, Radio Japan has been taking Hindi broadcast experts for its Hindi service from All India Radio for over two decades. In 2007, Sh. Akhil Mittal, NRT (Hindi), News Services Division, All India Radio, New Delhi was selected by NHK for the next two-year segment. AIR's IR Unit coordinated the process of selection of the candidate with NHK World, Japan. As in the previous years, AIR participated in several International Awards competitions and brought laurels to the organisation. Entries were sent for the AIBD Awards, CBA Awards, ABU Prizes, and International Grand Prix radio competitions and IRIB Radio festival. AIR's entry titled "Bujhi Parile Hela (Be Aware, Take Care) produced by Sh. Padmalochan Das, Programme Executive, All India Radio, Sambalpur, won the First Prize in the 8 th International IRIB Radio Festival in Mashhad, held in May 2007 hosted and organized by the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting. The award included a cash prize of USD 2000, a Certificate and a Trophy besides free participation in the festival for the winner. The entry of AIR Pune, `Female Infanticide' produced by Ms. Neelima Patwardhan got the first prize in AIBD Awards 2007, in the category

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"Best In-house Radio Public Service Spot". The award includes a cash prize of USD 1000 and a trophy. Commonwealth Broadcasting Association (CBA) also shortlisted one of the AIR's entries sent for the CBA 2008 Award.

STAFF TRAINING INSTITUTE (PROGRAMME)

History Staff Training Institute (Programme) was established in 1948 at Delhi as an attached office of DG, AIR, New Delhi. It was declared as a subordinate office with effect from 01.01.1990. Staff Training Institute (Programme) at Delhi and Bhubaneshwar alongwith five other Regional Training Institutes (Programme) at Ahmedabad, Hyderabad, Lucknow, Shillong and Thiruvananthapuram imparts training to all the programme and Administrative cadres of AIR and Doordarshan. Achievements from April 2007 to March 2008 Thrust areas for in-house training this year are Sports Programmes, Managing the Change, Marketing Management, Corporate Work Culture, Digital Broadcast, Modern presentation techniques, Voice Culture, Broadcast Management, Innovative Programmes, Programme packaging & promotion, Interactive and Participatory programmes, Development programmes and Radio jockeying & TV Anchoring. By now STI (P) has established itself as a professional trainer for outside agencies. Our Institute provides Programme Production and Voice Culture training to IGNOU and Indian Airlines respectively. Besides, professional attachments are also open to recognised Institutes and Universities teaching Broadcast Journalism. Specific courses on programme format were designed for Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabad. Inhouse Courses During the year 2007-2008, STI(P) Delhi and STI(P) Bhubaneshwar along with five Regional Training Institutes at Ahmedabad, Hyderabad, Lucknow, Shillong and Thiruvananthapuram conducted 108 courses 83 Programme courses and 25 Administrative courses and trained 2310 Personnel - 1555 Programmers of AIR and 755 Administrative officials of AIR & Doordarshan.

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In order to gear up and to give coverage to the 2010 Commonwealth Games professionally, STI (P), Delhi conducted the Workshop on Sports on Radio for Sports Programme Personnel of AIR & DD from all over India. Courses were conducted for the students of MCJ of Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabad on `Radio Production' at RTI(P), Hyderabad in which 50 were trained in two batches. Likewise 15 students of journalism and Mass Communication were trained by RTI(P) Thiruvananthapuram. Training programmes on a campaign mode are being conducted to familiarise AIR & DD programme managers and administrative personnel about the RTI Act. Coordinated Courses During the year 20007-08, STI (P), Delhi conducted 8 courses in coordination with Staff Training Institute (Technical), AIR & Doordarshan, Delhi on Hard Disc Based Recording System, Programme Production Techniques and Digital Program Library for the programme officers of AIR and trained 120 programme staff of AIR in these specialised fields. Vani Certificate Courses VANI (Voice Articulation and Nurturing Initiative) Certificate courses for newly selected comperes, announcers and presenters are being conducted on payment basis at various stations of AIR. During the year 2007-08, about 3500 newly selected comperes, announcers and presenters have been trained in 150 batches at various AIR Station and awarded VANI Certificates. From this year Vani Certificate Course has been extended to Refresher Course for existing Casual Announcers and News Readers / News Reader cum Translators and for Editors and Reporters also. The News Services Division from this year has also introduced training for Part Time Correspondent. STI (P)s and RTI(P)s are taking specific interest in training F.M.presenters through designed workshops on Radio Jockeying. The handbook `VANP is proving to be helpful to the participants of Vani Certificate Course as a supplementary material and have been sold to participants for earning revenue for Prasar Bharati. Outside Courses During the year 2007-08 STI (P), Delhi organized 5 workshops for Indian Airlines and trained 142 Air-hostesses and cabin crew in Voice Culture at RTI (P), Hyderabad and many more such workshops are in pipeline.

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Prasar Bharati has been giving practical training to the students of Post Graduate Diploma in Radio Prasaran (PGDRP) and Post Graduate Diploma in Audio Programme Production (PGDAPP) as per MoU signed with IGNOU. This year 186 students have been given practical training in 13 batches at 8 AIR Stations. In addition many AIR stations have taken students of Radio Journalism from Universities for practical training on payment of Rs. 500/- per week. Revenue earned STI (P) during the April, 07 to March, 08 earned net Revenue of Rs 10,542,448 /-(One Crore Five Lakh Forty Two Thousands Four Hundred & Forty Eight only) from all sources. Staff Training Institute (Technical) Staff Training Institute (Tech.) at Delhi caters to the training needs of engineering personnel. Regional training institutes have also been set up at Bhubaneshwar, Shillong & Mumbai to augment the training facilities. The institute at Delhi was established in 1948 and has since grown into a center of excellence for technical training in electronic media. A well organised Library and a Computer center with advanced multi-media equipment are available as part of the institute. The institute conducts training courses for departmental candidates as well as for candidates of similar foreign organizations. Workshops at different field offices are also held. The institute conducts recruitment examination for direct recruit engineering assistants and also holds departmental competitive examinations for promotions in the subordinate engineering cadres. The regional institutes conduct training courses like use of Computerized Hard Disc Based Recording, Editing & Playback system. Activities undertaken from April, 2007 to March, 2008 (a) During the period April, 07 to March, 08, 33 number of courses were conducted at STT(T) Delhi and 1201 number of trainees attended the course. At RSTI (T) Bhubaneshwar 21 courses were conducted and 606 trainees attended the courses. (b) Special Course During this period, following courses other than scheduled during 200708 were also conducted.

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1. Refresher course for SC/ST Senior Engineering Assistants was conducted from 21st May, to 8th June, 2007 and 12 persons attended the course. 2. A training course on 20 KW FM Broadcast Transmitter (Nautel make) was conducted which was attended by 22 persons. 3. Basic course for Sr. Technician & Technicians was arranged at AIR Leh which was attended by 15 technicians. 4. Helpers Course was conducted at DTI-Lucknow. (c) Special Programs A special DRM Show Case Project in association with ABU and DRM Consortium was organised. This included workshop on DRM System Implementation Aspects with field trials. 48 persons attended the course. International participants from various countries attended the " Workshop on DRM Systems & Implementation Aspects" as detailed below: No. of Participants l. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Papua New Guinea Japan Singapore Kuwait Brunei Hongkong Iran 2. 7 2 2 1 1 3

A Total of 18 international participants attended the showcase project/ workshop. Two participants from MBC Mauritius attended the course on "Modern Trends in Broadcasting" alongwith AIR & DD staff arranged by STI(T) Delhi. Summer Training for Diploma/Degree Engg. Students for four/six weeks was conducted by STT(T), Delhi and this was attended by a total 83 Students of engineering.

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DOORDARSHAN

Doordarshan, a Public Service Broadcaster, is one of the largest Television Networks in the world. It started its service on 15th September, 1959 at Delhi with the transmission of Educational and Development programmes on experimental basis. Second Television center was started at Bombay in 1972 and later Doordarshan's Television service was expanded to other places. The rapid expansion of DD started in 1984 with almost every day a transmitter was installed in the Country. Doordarshan is presently operating 31 TV channels besides free-to-air DTH service and has terrestrial network of 66 Studios and 1414 transmitters installed throughout length & breadth of the country. In terrestrial mode, Doordarshan coverage is available to about 92.2% population of the country. Present Network and Service Doordarshan presently telecasts programmes on 31 distinct channels, as under: DD I DD News DD Bharati DD Sports DD Rajya Sabha DD Urdu Regional Channels Malayalam (Kerala) Telugu (Saptagiri) Marathi (Sahyadri) North East State Networks Rajasthan Bihar Chhatisgarh Tripura DD India Gyan Darshan Tamil (Podhigai) Bengali (Bangla) Gujarati Punjabi Madhya Pradesh Himachal Pradesh Haryana Mizoram 12 Nos. Uttar Pradesh Jharkhand Uttarakhand Meghalaya International Channel Educational Channel National Channel News Channel Enrichment Channel Sports Channel Parliament Channel Urdu Language Channel 11 Nos. Oriya Kannada (Chandana) Kashmiri (Kashir)

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Extent of terrestrial coverage of DD 1 and DD News channels is as under: S. No. 1. 2. Channel DD 1 DD News Population wise 92.2% 49.1% Area wise 91.2% 25.6%

Multi channel TV coverage through free to air DTH service of Doordarshan is available in the entire country (except A&N Islands).

DD: National

DD: National is not a purely entertainment channel but it is a hybrid channel. Being the Public Service Broadcaster with tremendous terrestrial reach throughout India, there is tremendous pressure on the channel, therefore, does live telecast of Parliament proceedings, programmes of various Ministries and Departments, Independence Day/ Republic Day & Beating the Retreat Celebrations, Festivals & Anniversaries, International conferences/ summits, Cricket matches and other Sports events of International level, Film Festivals, etc. Apart from live telecast other programmes telecast on the channel include Educational programmes of UGC and NCERT, Agriculture programmes, Rural Development programmes, Health programmes based on Women, Children and Senior Citizens, Music & Dance, Welfare Programmes on Scheduled castes and Scheduled Tribes and other weaker sections including minorities, etc. Keeping in view the professional competition in a multi-channel scenario, the channel has taken several steps to induce fresh thinking in programming. It has refurbished its programme content and embarked upon special programmes targeting all sections of society. The programme `AAP KI BAITHAK' is one in this category, which seeks to bring the subject matter to the viewers in partnership with Socialistic, Journalists, Politicians and Political parties. In fact DD: National channel caters to the needs and aspirations of people of each and every section of the society. In order to revitalize the channel the Self Finance Commissioning was introduced in the year, 2005. This scheme was meant for the Mid-PrimeTime slots and Prime-Time slots in the National channel. Introduction of programmes under SFC has resulted in enhancing the quality and content of the programme. Thus leading to remarkable increase in viewership and also substantial increase in revenue for Doordarshan. The revenue from Sponsored Programme in Prime-Time slots from 08.30 pm to 11.00 pm was about 17.5 lacs per day [3.5x5]. Whereas from SFC serials the average revenue from these slots are more than Rs. 65.00 lacs per

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day. Similarly, in case of Mid Prime-Time slots the average revenue from six slots under Sponsored programmes was about 6 lakhs [6x1.00 lakh]. Whereas from SFC the average revenue from these slots are more than 16 lacs. The other advantage of SFC serials are that the property rights is vested with Doordarshan and this software can be exploited further by Doordarshan in future also. In the SFC scheme Doordarshan is able to rope in some of the best production houses and talents in the country like Shri Parikshit Sahni, Shri Rakesh Chaudhary, Ms. Rani Mukherjee, Shri Raja Mukherjee, Shri Joy Mukherjee, Mrs. Saira Banu, Shri Lekh Tandon, Percept Picture Company, B.R. Films, Endemol, Shri Arun Govil, Shri Aswin Dheer, Shri Rupesh Gohil, Shri Gyan Sahai, Shri Gajender Singh, Shri N. Chandra, Hindustan Lever Limited and Aditya Birla Group, etc., and others. The other scheme on Indian Classics on the National channel helped in attracting the established and well-known artists and directors in India. The weekly slot of KATHA SARITA under Commissioned category features programmes produced by the best talent in the country like Muzaffar Ali, Gulzar, Amol Palekar and Basu Chatterjee etc. A. R. Rehman [Asian Band Search band] Reality show "THE BIG BAND" is also on the pipe line to rock the viewers. Due to various innovative schemes and programme the TRP and viewership of the channel has shown sustained increase in the recent past. Even the Saturday and Sunday slots which was not that popular earlier has also started attracting viewership these days. Doordarshan introduced new film guidelines to procure films centrally for telecast on its all channels under Royalty category. The feature films telecast on the National channel on Fridays and Saturdays at 09.30 p.m., Sunday 12.00 noon and 04.00 p.m. [HBN) have tremendous viewership. Similarly the Bioscope Serialized Feature Film in Hindi on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at 11.00 p.m. have also helped the channel to increase viewership.

DD: News

DD News is the only terrestrial-cum-satellite News Channel in the country and it has the largest reach over all other news channels. The channel has taken many initiatives during the year to meet the interest of the people. The major achievements of the channel during the years are as under:

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The channel logo, graphics, sets, chroma backdrop and colour has been given a new slick and bold look with a view to undertaking a revamp to the look and feel of the channel. A five minutes daily bulletin in Mizo was started from Aizawl and another five minutes bulletin was added in RNU, Ahmedabad. Duration of current affairs programmes like `Prime Meridian', `Jayeza' and `Cinema Is Hafte' has been increased. Hot topics of the day, social issues and major government policy announcements figured in discussion with eminent guests in the programmes like `Charcha Mein' and `Amne Samne'. Special programmes and live coverage are carried out on the Union General and Rail Budgets. The channel continued to telecast a one hour live interactive show with viewers in `Total Health' on Sundays, the current affairs programmes on communal harmony, defence and security related issues, rural development, RTI, etc., and the interactive phone -in-programme `Vyaapar Is Hafte' which offer tips on the stock market. News gathering and up linking of the news footage from different locations across the country has been greatly enhanced by the deployment of DSNGs. Engineering facilities were extended to various global Broadcasting agencies for their important coverages in India. From October 2005 till date more than 100 feeds and studio facilities were made available to the foreign broadcasters there by earning around 50 thousand USD. Doordarshan News has also a news website ddinews.gov.in wherein the browsers can access to the latest news updates. The Website also offers live Doordarshan News bulletins on the net and has a registered good response from within and outside the country. In this ever-changing vibrant medium it has always been the endeavour of Doordarshan News channel to constantly keep pace with the change and provide the best to the viewers. A dedicated digital satellite news gathering system including high tech gadgets like satellite phones and video phones have been made available for DD News, which has greatly increased its capacity in giving live inputs from the spots.

Sports Channel

A dedicated Indian Sports Channel of Doordarshan was launched on 18th March 1999. The transmission of the channel was increased from 10 hours

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to 12 hours a day from April 25, 1999 and considering the popularity of the channel the transmission hours has been extended to round the clock from June, 2000. The channel is presently being managed through limited staff. The channel has brought to its audience commendable programmes/ coverage of sports events like wise during the year: Beijing Olympic Games Commonwealth Youth Games, Pune Pune Marathon Delhi Half Marathon Mumbai Standard Chartered Marathon Torch Relay for commonwealth Youth Games Davis Cup For the coverage of above International mega Sports events Prasar Bharati had deputed ever-large contingent of production staff and given extensive coverage to the events. A decision has been taken to introduce the system of cash outflow for covering non-Olympic and traditional sports. The cash outflow amount is charged mainly to meet expenses on moving DSNG and OB VAN for the live coverage along with amount paid to commentators. It was also decided to continue covering sporting events organized by the different sports federations and associations with whom we are in agreement for which Doordarshan pays them rights fee. Keeping in view the Public Services mandate of Prasar Bharati (PB) to promote sports, PB from time to time amended the "Cash outflow" principle in respect of the following: Armed and Para Military Forces Games for Disabled Education and Cultural Institutions Sports in rural areas - National or Regional level Promotion of Women Sports/ events irrespective of discipline Events held in remote area like J&K, North East States, Himachal Pradesh, Anadaman, Nicobar and Lakshdeep During the financial year 2008-09 a Budget grant of Rs. 17.00 Crores (Rupees Seventeen Crores only) was earmarked for running DD Sports

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Channel which includes payments to TV rights fees to various sport federations/ sports agencies to acquire the required software.

DD Bharati

DD Bharati Channel was launched by Prasar Bharati on 26 January 2002. Now the channel has completed six years on 26 January 2008. It telecast programmes on Health, Children, Art and Culture, Music, Dance, Women, Education, Travelogue and preserving the country's great heritage and values.

DD India

Telecast of 24X7 hrs. transmission. CPC: DD is also doing in-house production of weekly programme "Yours Truly" of 30 minutes duration for telecast on DD India. TV reports are produced from time to time of various cultural activities, events, seminars, stage shows, festivals, exhibitions held in the region, Pravasi Bharatiya Divas, International Trade Fair, Visits of Youth Diaspora, etc

DD Urdu

DD: Urdu was launched on 15th August 2006 by the Hon'ble Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh initially for a shorter transmission which was extended to make the channel 24X7 w.e.f. 14th November, 2008. During the year under review, telecast of Urdu version of President's Message to the nation on the eve of Independence Day and Republic Day was introduced on DD: Urdu. Arrangements to acquire more software for DD: Urdu were also initiated and is in the final stage of acquisition. DD: Urdu has entered into an MOU with the Maulana Azad National Urdu University (MANUU), Hyderabad, whereby MANNU is providing daily one hour software which will be doubled during the next five years. The programme done by them will encapsulate education, heritage and infotainment. In the days ahead, it is proposed to link major and authentic Urdu Centers at the national level like Aligarh Muslim University, Jamia Millia Islamic, Osmania University, Maulana Azad National Urdu University, Hyderabd, Khuda Baksh Library and all Urdu Academies in India. At the international level selected places in South Asia, Middle East and Urdu research centers in Europe and America will also be linked through the satellite exchange if views on Urdu related developments will bring transformation of the target audience. The channel has an inherent potential of roping in artists

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& scholars not only from within India but from Pakistan & places in Europe, America & Middle East, etc. Audience Research The Audience Research unit of Doordarshan with its 19 field units located with Doordarshan kendras all over the country, is involved in Research studies on various aspects of broadcasting since 1976. The field units are located at Ranchi, Jaipur, Delhi, Ahmedabad, Nagpur, Chennai, Bengaluru, Lucknow, Hyderabad, Bhubaneswar, Bhopal, Kolkata, Guwahati, Mumbai, Gorakhpur, Rajkot, Jalandhar, Thiruvananthapuram and Srinagar. The units are working under Audience Research Officer at Kendra level and is controlled by Director, Audience Research at the Directorate General: Doordarshan level. During the year 2008-09 the audience research unit continued to conduct: DART rating through panel diaries. Regular feedback on agriculture programme under the mass media support to agriculture extension funded by the Ministry of Agriculture. Analysis and reporting of TAM TVR on weekly basis. Besides the above the unit's other contributions are: Preparation of draft material for annual report of Prasar Bharati and Ministry of I&B for the year 2008-09 respectively. Annual report of Doordarshan 2008-09 under preparation. Impact study on flagship programme of Doordarshan completed. Pilot project for the monitoring of Doordarshan channels viewership as per cable. TV network (Regulation) Act 1995 under process Study on "Impact of DD, Pvt. Cable & Satellite channel on `women and family" is under process. Planning is being made to revamp the DART study by increasing and restructuring its sample and use of latest software and Internet for quick reporting of programmes rating as per recommendation of the 67'" Parliamentary Standing Committee on IT Technology. Feature Films on Doordarshan Feature Films are high revenue generating entertaining property of Prasar Bharati. The Gross revenue earned from the telecast of five Hindi feature

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films on Doordarshan's National Network is more than two crore per week. To make the telecast more attractive and better in terms of packaging and marketing, Doordarshan has branded the feature films slot as "Friday Houseful" to show latest blockbusters. "Saturday Jubilee" to show super hit popular films, "Retrospective" to show films of eminent film makers/ artists on Sundays, "Bioscope" to show old popular films in serialized manner from Monday to Wednesday. Recently "Guru", "Babul", "Naya Daur-Col", "Khoya Khoya Chand", "Cash", "Don(New)", "Krish", "Eklavaya-The Royal Guard", "Joney Gaddar", "Provoked", "Cheeni Kum" were among the popular films which are shown on Doordarshan in different categories mentioned above. Films featuring "Akshay Kumar", "Kajol", "Rekha", "Mumtaz" were shown on Retrospective slot on National Network. Seeing the popularity of Retrospective slot, some more innovations were devised for the slot. For the festival season, films based on the theme- "Melody Masala Mix" were telecast and in the pipeline are themes based on "Immortal Love Stories-Yeh Ishq Nahi Aasaan", etc. National Awarded Regional Films Adhering to its commitment as a Public Broadcaster for promoting quality cinema, Doordarshan telecasts two national award winning films every month. The Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus) and Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus) awards winning films are telecast on 2nd and 4th Sunday at 11:30 pm. "BaaghiPunjabi", "Thayi-Tamil" are the recent national awards winning films. Seeing the good response of films received under New Film Guidelines, Doordarshan may plan to invite offers for the latest blockbusters in order to fetch good revenue and increase viewership. Doordarshan is also in the process of formulating new films for guidelines for award wining regional language films as well as commercial regional films for telecast on NNW and Regional Kendras. Central Commissioning Unit CCU is acquiring and producing software on a variety of subjects of telecast on Doordarshan. CCU has continued the project for production of literary programmes of archival value titled Indian Classics. The Indian Classics Programmes under the title "Katha Sarita" are being telecast at 21:30 hours every Monday on DD-I. The programmes have received wide appreciation, commercial support and are meeting the software requirement of DD-I, DD Bharati, DD India, DD Urdu and Regional Channels. During the year 2000, half-an-hour episodes in 11 languages have been completed and nearly 80 episodes in Kashmiri, Dogri and Tamil language have been commissioned under this scheme.

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DTH Services Doordarshan has launched a free to air DTH Channel on DD Direct+ in December 2004 with a bouquet of 33 channels. Capacity of DTH earth station has been augmented for telecast of 50 TV Channels and is further being increased to 59 TV Channels by improving spectrum efficiency. Presently there are 47 TV Channels and 21 Radio Channels on DTH Platform. Very soon we are going to complete all the 50 Channels on DTH Platform. For Demonstration purpose Doordarshan had earlier provided ten thousand DTH receiving units in villagers of selected states. During the year 2007-08 twenty thousand DTH receiving units have been provided to Government of Himachal Pradesh for installation in Kinnaur, Lahaul Spiti and Chamba districts.

New Initiatives

DTH Service "DD Direct Plus" Doordarshan had launched Ku band transmission (free-to-air DTH "DD Direct Plus") in December, 2004 with a bouquet of 33 TV channels. The main objective of this service was to provide TV coverage to the areas hitherto uncovered by terrestrial transmission. With the launch of this service, multi-channel TV coverage has become available in the entire country (except A&N Islands). Capacity of DTH platform was later increased for transmission of 50 TV channels and is being further increased for transmission of 59 channels by improving spectrum efficiency during 2008-09. Mobile TV (DVB-H Transmission) Doordarshan started Mobile TV service (DVB-H transmission) in Delhi in May, 2007, as a pilot project, with a bouquet of 8 TV channels. The transmitter deployed is of 5KW power operating on ch#26 in UHF band, which is installed in Akashwani Bhawan, Parliament Street, New Delhi. The signal can be received on DVB-H enabled mobile phones within a range of about 10-12 Kms from the transmitter location. Number of TV channels in DVB-H bouquet has been increased from 8 to 16 using statistical multiplexing, wef Ist August, 2008. Sixteen DD channels included in the DVB-H bouquet are as under: DD National DD Bangla DD Oriya DD News DD Urdu DD Sahyadri DD Sports DD Punjabi DD Saptagiri DD Bharati DD India DD North East

DD Chandana DD Gujarati

DD Malayalam DD Podhigai

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Narrowcasting With a view to providing area specific information on agriculture, a pilot project was started by Doordarshan in 2002 and was implemented to 11 transmitters across the country in 18 States. Following the successful implementation of this concept of narrowcasting, demand was created for further spreading of this concept in other parts of the country and accordingly a proposal was sent to the Planning Commission through the Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India. The Centrally sponsored project mass media support to Agriculture Extension was approved and introduced in January 2004 was inaugurated by the then Prime Minister of India. The project is now being implemented with a total budget of Rs. 225 crores for the 10th Five Year Plan in a three tier mode and under 11th Five Year Plan the total budget is Rs. 562.36 crores. The programmes are formulated by experts of Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary sciences, Fisheries, etc., and all aspects of these areas are covered on day to day basis, highlighting different technologies of each crop, various schemes, success stories of farmers, weather report, kisan credit card, Agriculture News Bulletin and Mandi Bhav Bulletin. Publicity of minimum support price, mounting of campaign on seed treatment during kharif and other information provided by the DAC, Minister of Agriculture, etc. DD Commercial DD Commercial service is responsible for booking advertisement of goods and services on Doordarshan. Booking of advertisement are normally accepted through accredited and registered agencies and also directly on advance payment without agency commission. During the year 2008-09, it earned Rs. 818.19 crore as revenue. DD Archives DD Archives is a fast expanding unit of Doordarshan. Its main objective is to digitize all the analogue content reserved in the library of the kendras. From the year 2004, this unit has been working on the project acquiring all the legacy taps from other kendras and converting it into digital media. The year 2008 has been a very eventful year for the archive. It acquired high and restoration equipment, physical cleaners and electronic cleaners; noise reduction equipments and software based non-leaner auditing system which can also refurbish audio. This set of equipments can render good quality output by cleaning and removing all the blemishes of the analog tapes. The cataloging and categorization sub unit of DD archive has identified more than 50,000 hours of achievable content in various categories. Metadata is

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being created for each type by subject media experts and media professionals. The state of art acquisition 2008 is media asset management. DD archive is pioneer in this area as this system archiving which gives world class preservation and retrieval result is only with DD archive. Though the staff is out sourced through the agencies, the young archive assistant has been trained in all equipments for archiving procedures. By moving into the Digital domain with media asset management, the archive content is now ready for any multi-platform application like video on demand, web casting, etc. This has opened the opportunity for encasing the long tail and providing rich resources for repurposing of programmes for broadcasting. DD-Archives is also becoming a resource center for advance research in the areas of sociology, communication media studies, children and women studies and ecology. DD archives has also taken of a major project of programmes and serials have been dubbed in 8 languages. The prestigious DVD project celebrates its 80th title this year by releasing two DVDs based on the recording of great playback singer Manna Dey. In 2008, it has also released the prestigious serial Bharat Ek Khoj in 18 DVDs for sale. Other DVDs releases are Tehreer Directed by Gulzar based on short stories on Premchand Parsai kehte hain & Katha Sarita are other library releases. DD archive has worked on the most prestigious project that is creation of website based on the video & Audio recording of 4 leaders on India-Mahatama Gandhi, Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru, Shrimati Indira Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi. The website offers simple and advanced search with complete data of hundred hours of video and hundred hours of audio. The unique feature of this website is that we can see and hear the leaders directly. This is one of its kinds in the world. This is ready for launch in January 2009. Central Production Centre (CPC) Situated in Delhi, the Central Production Centre (CPC) is currently responsible for managing the transmission of DD News, DD Sports, DD India & DD channels like DD National, DD news and DD Bharati. It also specializes in production of documentaries and other DD programmes. In recent years, CPC has become an active player in preparation of programme promos of Doordarshan. The programme schedule of DD Sports, DD India, DD Urdu, are prepared by DG: DD. In addition to above, CPC, DD is providing/supplying regularly high quality programme of Music, etc., to different Doordarshan Kendras across the country on their Demand received from time to time. CPC: DD also telecast Sponsored/ Commissioned programme on "DD Urdu" & "Krishi Darshan" as per the schedule sent by commercial wing of DG: DD.

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Development Communication Division (DCD) DCD, since 2001 is engaged in various activities. The concept was born of a need to generate revenue by securing funds from government partners including ministers, departments and public sector undertakings. From 5 partners and 9 campaigns in the year 2001-02 to 23 partners and 133 campaigns in 2008-09, the Development Communication Division has come a long way with large number of campaigns in the past few years. Major campaign includes National Rural Health Mission, Rural Employment Guarantee Act. Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, Total Sanitation Programme, Drinking Water Supply, Registration of Birth & Death, Incredible India, Ministry of Railways, Food & Nutrition Board, Department of School education, National Pharmaceutical Pricing. Authority, Ministry of overseas India Affairs, Ministry of Labour & Employment, Ministry of Development for North-Eastern region, National Food Security Mission, Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Consumer Affairs. Doordarshan undertook flagship campaigns under NRHM, Girl Child, Women Empowerment, Sarva Shiksha Abhiyaan and telecast this campaign under Bharat Nirman highlighting the progress & development in various fields of India. New Campaigns like Mental Retardation, National Communicable Disease, Indian Army, Indian Navy & Campaign on Autism for the important features in 2008-09, new clients like Agriculture Insurance Company of India Ltd., Ministry of Minority Affairs & Guru-Nanak Eye Care Centre were also our associates. Doordarshan also completed the campaign of RedRibbon Express (initiated by NACO) which had been going-on throughout the year 2008 all across the country and was successful in creating awareness on HIV/AIDS. Another important programme "Kyunki Jeena Isi ka Naam Hai" in collaboration with UNICEF being telecast thrice in a week on DD National got further extension beyond February 2009 for 130 episodes. This serial is based on Entertainment and covering the issues related to NRHM, Adult Education, Women Empowerment & Disaster Management. Doordarshan generated revenue 436 crores gross & 236 crores net with Bonus AirTime in the year 2008-09. This year till April 2009, 5991 new programmes were produced centrally, and in Regional Kendra under direct supervision of Development Communication Division. These programmes under the flagship campaign, Kalyani has received:

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Best Communication Strategy on HIV/AIDS in India Asian Media Information communication Centre (AMIC), Singapore & Commonwealth Section, London 2008. The Malaria Foundation International (MFI), Malaria Awards 2007 News Show of the Year; Kalyani UNFPA-LAADLI MEDIA Award (Eastern Region) 2007 - Best Issuebased Infotainment Programme (Oriya) UNFPA-LAADLI MEDIA Award (Western Region) 2006-07 - Best Issuebased Infotainment Programme (Hindi) These awards were given for Kalyanis pioneering effort in successfully adopting the genre for infotainment TV programming an important social cause, i.e., sex selection. In the year 2008-09, a total number of 133 campaigns and 884 numbers of programmes have been produced. DD Annual Awards In the year 2008, the cell received approx. 600 programmes from all over India to compete for Doordarshan Annual Award 2008. During 2008 DD Award Section included one more Award (Best KalyaniII) and the total Awards were given in 49 categories. The final presentation of Doordarshan Annual Award 2008 staged in Jalandhar on 4th March 2009. The ratio of distributing the Award Money is 60% 40% (i.e.60% for producer and 40% for crew members). In the year 2008 Doordarshan earned a revenue of Rs. 1,10,00,000/-(One Crore Ten Lakh Only) from the Annual Awards Event. Doordarshan Annual Award cell also organizes sending programmes for National & International Competitions. Doordarshan got International Awards UNFPA-LAADLI MEDIA Awards (Suniti Devi) for the Quality Productions in the year 2008. Marketing Initiatives Prasar Bharati has eight Marketing Division(s) in Mumbai, New Delhi, Kolkata, Hyderabad, Bengaluru, Chennai, Thiruvananthapuram, Guwahati, Kochi and Jalandhar with a view to bolster the in-house marketing of programmes on DD-National Network, DD-Regional Kendras, DD-News and various other satellite channels beamed across the country. The flagship channel of Doordarshan i.e. DD-1 (National) which

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contributes nearly 55% of the total gross revenues on Doordarshan through Commissioned, etc. The bookings of the division for the period AprilOctober, 2007 on DD-National Network stands at Rs. 222.31 crores and depending on the market conditions, the division expects to generate a gross business of around Rs. 380 crores from this channel. Today, over 95% of the inventory on DD-National Network has been mounted under SFC whereby the channel retains the perpetual rights of the software and has to exploit it to generate maximum revenues. The Marketing Division has successfully shouldered the responsibility of booking Rs. 110.804 crores from the inventory mounted under SFC during the period April-October, 2008. The Marketing Division has been able to market programmes of various genres mounted on the channel including reality shows/ game shows such as `Airtel Desh Ki Awaz', `Wheel Smart Shrimati', `Taaza Khelo Gao Jeeto', etc. Wherein a host of national brands such as Bharti, Airtel, HLL, Dabur, Emami, Colgate, Palmolive, etc., have made substantial investments in the channel. In addition to the entertainment, the programmes also included various elements of women's empowerment, social enlistment, etc. The marketing Division has taken the challenge of the marketing of the `Katha Sarita' which was series of episodes featured on classic works of great writers/novelists of India and reproduced on television by several well known producers. The division has booked record revenues of Rs. 2.25 crores on this diverse `Katha Sarita' series during the period April to October 2008. The Marketing Division has also been able to market effectively and book revenues on several serials & software mounted on prime time which focused on women's issues and aspiration of women including programmes such as `Airhostess', `Astitva Ek Kahani', etc., as well as children's fantasy programme `Chandramukhi' with gross revenues of Rs. 6.45 crores; Rs. 7.15 crores and R. 12.09 crores respectively from each of these programmes. The Marketing Division has been successful in marketing international sporting events such as the cricket telecast of Asia Cup in which it has been able to achieve benchmark gross revenues of Rs. 16.109 crores which was in excess of the amount committed in the bid process. In addition, the division has also taken to the market unique events such as Beijing Olympics, 2008; Olympic Torch, Robocon International Championships, Sunfeast Marathon, 2008 and Commonwealth Youth Games, 2008 and generated investments on these properties from the media market with participation and support from major national & international brands.

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The Marketing Division(s) function(s) as nerve centres for generation of business on the properties mounted on the channel from various clients across the country. They are key flashpoints between the entire media market and the programming link to ensure that best market practices are also taken forward on Doordarshan in a progressive manner. The Marketing Division(s) also have the responsibility of managing and marketing the channel inventory as well as generating revenues from various public service initiatives undertaken by the channel from time to time. PSBT Public Service Broadcasting Trust (PSBT) represents a unique and successful partnership between the National Broadcaster and a private initiative to source quality documentaries on various issues of concern on wide ranging subjects. These documentaries produced by eminent as well as first time and young film makers are telecast on DD National on Saturdays. Each year, in partnership with UNESCO the Open Frame International Festival and Forum showcases some of the best films and programmes from around the world. This year PSBT films have received several international and two national awards. Coverage of Flagship Programmes on Doordarshan As a part of its public service mandate, Prasar Bharati has been providing coverage to flagship programmes of the Central government through Doordarshan. Flagship programmes covered are as under: Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan Mid-day Meal Scheme Rajiv Gandhi Drinking Water Mission Total Sanitation Programme National Rural health Mission Integrated child development services National Rural employment services Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission All DD Kendras are covering Flagship Programmes once a week in a magazine format. Some Kendras are also telecasting spots and jingles daily. News Division of Doordarshan is also telecasting programmes and related success stories in its national and regional news bulletins. Current Affair programmes of DD News are also incorporating the flagship theme on regular basis. The dissemination of information on flagship programmes

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is helping the masses to get awareness and utilize for their benefit. In addition to the above Doordarshan has successfully covered different matters pertaining to General Election 2009 for Parliament.

BECIL- A BRIEF HISTORY

With the opening of broadcasting sector after the gulf war, Indian companies also felt the need to broadcasting via satellite. These companies needed an expert agency to advise them in the field of broadcasting. Such expertise till then was available only with AIR and Doordarshan. The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting therefore decided to incorporate one such agency for this purpose. Thus BECIL was formed on 24th March 1995. It is now a well established consultancy agency, system integrator and turnkey solution provider in all the spheres of Broadcast Engineering. It also undertakes operation and maintenance of various types of broadcast systems. Its client list includes government, semi government, overseas and private organizations. BECIL is a profit making PSE. Mission To play a pivotal role in growth of radio and television broadcasting through terrestrial, cable and satellite transmission in India and abroad and achieve excellence. Objectives To enhance the present share in the market by providing specialized and customized solution to a wider range of clients. Providing technical consultancy to Ministry of Information and Broadcasting for their objectives. To explore new avenues in other allied areas. Explore the opportunities in overseas market on a continual basis. Conduct market research and product development. Establishment of satellite uplink & downlink systems for TV channels also for distance education. Establishing and maintenance of operation of broadcasting centers. Constantly endeavour to enhance customer satisfaction through services. To enhance the present share in the market by providing specialized and customized solution to a wider range of clients.

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HighIights BECIL has been granted the coveted "Mini Ratna Status" by the Government. During the year the company has achieved highest turn-over ever since its incorporation. During the year the profile of the company has touched new heights and is highest since incorporation of BECIL. The company has declared a dividend of 205.60% on the paid up equity. During the year the company has commissioned CTI for 148 Private FM channels in the country under FM Phase-II Scheme launched for Private FM Broadcasting by Government of India. Updation & replacement of Robotic Camera Setup in the Lok Sabha Chamber for establishment of HDTV Set up and 24 hour Lok Sabha TV Channel Studios. Setting up of state-of-the-art Electronic Media Monitoring Centre for checking contents violation. The company has recently received biggest single value order worth over Rs 58.03 Crore from All India Radio for supply, testing, and commissioning & training for 2 nos. of 1000 KW MW super power medium wave transmitter for All India Radio Rajkot & Chinsurah. BECIL­ Management and Organization The Board of Directors comprises of full-time Chairman and Managing Director, whole time Director Operations and Marketing and four to seven part time Directors nominated by the Government of India. At present, there are two Government nominee Directors and an Independent Director in the Board. Below Board level there are two posts of Joint General Managers, One Deputy General Manager Marketing, One Deputy Manager (Finance) and One Junior Manager (Finance). The Technical Work is further assigned to consultants and Project Manager hired on contract basis. At present the Board consists of following members: Chairman and Managing Director : Full-Time Director : Government Nominee Director : Ministry of Information and Broodcasting Independent Director : : Shri Harkesh Gupta Shri I.S. Mehla Smt. Zohra Chatterji, Jt. Secretary, Min. I&B Smt. Kavita Pandey, Director (Finance) Shri. D.M.Tangri

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Areas and Modes of Operation Areas of Operation Broadcasting Information Technology Providing Technical inputs to Ministry of Information and Broadcasting Modes of Operations Consultancy Turnkey Solutions System Integration Deposit Work Sales and SITC Development of Sub-Systems Placement of Broadcast Professionals Operation and Maintenance

Financial Highlights

Share capital The BECIL was incorporated with authorized Capital of Rs. 250 Lakhs. The paid up equity has increased from Rs. 25 Lakhs for the year 1995-96 to 136.5 Lakhs. At present Central Government of India is holding 100% equity share capital. BECIL does not get any budgetary support from Government. Business Turnover, Divided and Net worth During the financial year 2007-08 the profit before Tax of the company has increased by 171.28% as compared to the previous year from Rs.792.95 Lakhs to Rs 1,358.20 Lakhs (excluding adjustments).The turnover of the company, including deposit work has increased by 121.49% to Rs 11,988.81 Lakhs for the corresponding period. During the period under consideration the consultancy income of the company has increased by 136.49% from Rs 798.54 Lakhs to 1,089.92 Lakhs. Company has paid Dividend of 205.60% on the Paid up share capital of the company amounting to Rs.2, 80, 65,000/- (excluding tax on Dividend).

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The Networth of company has increased to Rs 2,008.85 Lakhs against the Paid up Equity Capital of Rs 136.50 Lakhs. Summarized Financial Performance

Detail Paid up Equity Turnover (including Deposit work) Gross Profit Net Profit Dividend Reserves & surplus Capital Employed Net worth 2003-04 136.50 1,683.64 173.20 108.62 27.30 364.81 501.31 500.41 2004-05 136.50 3,773.32 201.25 130.14 27.30 464.03 600.53 599.97 2005-06 136.50 3,152.40 227.95 139.13 27.30 572.03 708.52 698.21 2006-07 136.50 9,867.84 792.95 361.73 104.23 811.81 948.31 939.41 2007-08 136.50 11,988.81 1,358.20 1,403.25 280.65 1,888.54 2,025.03 2,008.85

Business Activity i Areas of specialization FM Broadcasting Establishment of TV Channels Installation of Teleports Design of Digital Newsroom Systems Direct to Home (DTH) Systems Cable Head-End Systems Distance Education Systems through satellite Community Radio Stations Acoustics, Stage lighting, Sound reinforcement system i. Radio Business FM Radio Broadcasting In continuation of the last year, work of establishment of common transmitter infrastructure for private FM broadcasters under Government of India FM Phase II scheme, during the current year the company has established CTI for 148 FM Channels in 63 cities. Although a number of difficulties were faced by the company while establishing CTI, the company has accomplished an unprecedented task which has revolutionized the radio business in the country.

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FM Towers BECIL received an order from Ministry of Information and Broadcasting for establishing five FM Towers for Private FM Broadcasters, where the Prasar Bharati Tower was not available. Out of the 5 towers BECIL has commissioned tower at Jaipur, Delhi, Chennai and Hyderabad. Construction of a new tower at Kolkata is held up due to non availability of clear land. Supply of Equipments During the year the company has supplied equipment to All India Radio for radio broadcasting. BECIL is regularly participating in open tenders by Government agencies for supply of equipments. ii. Television Business During this year BECIL successfully established a 24 hour TV channel for Lok Sabha under a highly challenging time schedule, given limited working hours and security concerns, between the monsoon and winter session of the parliament. The most important activity was replacement of high definition robotic control TV cameras in the Lok Sabha chamber. A new high definition studio was also established for the Lok Sabha Channel. With the establishment of the facilities, the Indian Parliament acquired a unique status of having its own 24 hour TV Channel. During this year a multi media studio in Rashtrapati Bhawan was commissioned by the company. The operation and maintenance of the setup is also being carried out by BECIL. BECIL has set up a TV studio for EDUSET networking programme at Delhi College of Engineering (DCE). This project involved supply of equipment, renovation of studios and integration of equipment. iii. Electronic Media Monitoring Centre (EMMC) BECIL has established Electronic Media Monitoring Centre (EMMC) for Ministry of Information and Broadcasting with the aim to have effective monitoring of content from various Satellite TV Channel beaming over Indian territory for any violation of the programme and advertisement code. The set is equipped with the facilities for accessing, monitoring and recording of the satellite TV Channel. Initially the facility provides for monitoring of 100 TV channels with capacity augmentation provision up to 300 channels in phased manner. Presently BECIL is working on increasing the monitoring cap.

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iv. Monitoring Activity After the commissioning of various Private FM Stations in the country under Government of India's FM Phase-II Scheme, BECIL has been entrusted with responsibility of content monitoring of Private FM Channels. Presently it is being carried out by listening to the contents stored in loggers at broadcasters premises. A scheme is being worked out to do it from a central location. v. Supply of Communication and Security Equipment During the year BECIL has participated in the various tenders floated by paramilitary forces for supply of communication and security equipments and supplied equipments worth Rs 1,278.97 Lakhs. The management considers that there is a large business potential in this area. vi. Operation and Maintenance BECIL is carrying out operation and maintenance activities of studios and earth stations. The company is also providing manpower to Prasar Bharati (AIR as well as DD) in news and various production fields. The business of providing manpower to Prasar Bharati, even though comparatively small in value, provides a source of regular income for the company. vii. Overseas Business The company has executed the various projects in Afghanistan entrusted by Ministry of External affairs under Government of India Aid Programme. viii. Community Radio The company has established community radio stations, designed to provide a limited coverage in a city by a small power FM transmitter for the benefit of a community, for a number of institutions.

Future Business activities

i. Radio Business The FM Phase-II scheme is nearing completion. The Government of India is in the process of launching FM Phase-III Scheme and also auction of the vacant channels of the FM Phase-II Scheme. The management expects increase in business after the launch of this scheme. The FM Phase-III Scheme will cover 237 cities and will provide approximately 700 channels in B, C & D category cities. BECIL has received an order from Ministry of Information and Broadcasting for construction of a new FM Tower in Dehradun which is under execution.

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ii. Television Business The television business over the year has been increasing. BECIL has received orders of approx. Rs 300 Lakhs for establishment of various studio class rooms, for EDUSET Programme and supply of equipment and integration. With the launch of DTH, Mobile TV and IPTV the management expects to get increased business opportunities in the TV business. iii. Commonwealth Youth Games 2008 & Commonwealth Games 2010 The Commonwealth Youth Games were organized in Pune in October 2008 and Commonwealth Games would be organized in 2010. BECIL is making special efforts to associate it with these mega events which offer good business opportunity. The company received order worth Rs 118 Lakhs for establishment of press centers for PIB for the Commonwealth Youth Games Pune 2008. iv. Training of Technical Manpower With the phenomenal growth of broadcasting sector, there has been considerable increase in the demand of trained technical manpower. The management of the company took special initiatives in this regard by organizing a training course for Private FM Broadcasters. The management considers that this field has tremendous future and therefore it is working on strategic alliances with various broadcasting bodies/ institution. v. Monitoring Business The company has received an order worth Rs 550 Lakhs for expansion of electronic Media Monitoring Centre for Monitoring of satellite TV channels from its present capacity of 100 channels to 300 channels from the Ministry of Information & Broadcasting. BECIL is also working on a scheme to monitor Private FM Channels from a central location at EMMC. vi. Supply of the equipment The company will continue to participate in various tenders floated by Government Agencies/ Companies. The supply of equipment would continue to be a major source of income for the company in the coming years. The company has diversified its activities for supply of communication equipment and security equipment along with the broadcasting equipment. A high value tender of WSSR for BSF is under consideration during the current year.

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FILMS DIVISION

The story of the Films Division is synchronous with the eventful years of the country since Independence and over the last 60 years. The Division has been motivating the broadest spectrum of the Indian Public with a view to enlisting their active participation in nation building activities. The aims and objectives of the Division, focused on national perspectives, are to educate and motivate people in the implementation of national programmes and to project the image of the land and the heritage of the country to Indian and foreign audiences. The Division also aims at fostering the growth of the documentary film movement, which is of immense significance to India in the field of national information, communication and integration. The Division produces documentaries, short films, animation films and news magazines from its headquarters at Mumbai, films on Defence and family welfare from its Delhi unit and short fiction films for rural audience from the regional production centers at Kolkata and Bengaluru. The Division caters to nearly 8500 cinema theatres all over the country and to the non-theatrical circuits like units of the Directorate of Field Publicity, mobile units of the State Governments, Doordarshan, field units of the Department of Family Welfare, Educational institutions, film societies and voluntary organisations. The documentaries and newsreels of State Governments are also catered in the Division's release on the theatrical circuit. This Division also sell prints, stock shots, video cassettes and distribution rights of documentaries and feature films in India and abroad. Apart from production of films, Films Division also gives on hire, its Studio, Recording Theatre Editing Rooms and other Cine Equipments to private film makers. Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India has entrusted the task, of organizing the Mumbai International Films Festival (MIFF) for Documentary, Short and Animation Films to Films Division. The aim of MIFF contest is the dissemination of images contributing to wider knowledge and close knit fraternity among the nations of the world. This event provides a unique opportunity and platform to filmmakers, film producers, distributors, exhibitors and film critics from different countries to meet and interact during festival. Over the years, MIFF has become a preferred and much awaited event for the filmmakers to showcase their work, interact and exchange ideas. MIFF began its historic journey way back in 1990 and since then it has grown in size and stature as one of the premier international events of the documentary film movement. The biennial MIFF is attended by a large number of prominent documentary

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and short filmmakers and intellectuals, students from India and other parts of the world. Nearly, 35-40 countries with more than 500 entries participate in every edition of the festival. The 10th edition of Mumbai International Film Festival (MIFF) for Documentary, Short and Animation was held from 3-9 February, 2008 at National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA), Mumbai in co-operation with the Government of Maharashtra. The organisation of the Division is broadly divided into four wings viz. (1) Production, (2) Distribution, (3) International Documentary, Short and Animation Film Festival and (4) Administration

Production Wing

The production wing is responsible for production of films such as (1) Documentary Films (2) Short Feature Films specially designed for rural audience (3) Animation Films and (4) Video Films. In addition to the headquarters at Mumbai, three production centres of the Division are located at Bengaluru, Kolkata and New Delhi. The documentaries range in theme and topic from agriculture to art and architecture, from industry to the international scenes, from food to festivals, from health care to housing, from science and technology to sports, from trade and commerce to transport, from tribal welfare to community development, etc. Normally, the Division reserves about 40 percent of its production schedule for allotment to independent film makers from all over the country with a view to encouraging individual talent and thus promoting the documentary movement in the country. In addition to its normal production programme, the Division provides assistance to all the Ministries and Departments of Government including public sector organisations in producing documentary films. Newsreel Wing of Films Division encompasses a network spread over main cities and towns including State and Union Territory capital engaged in covering of major Events, VVIP visits, etc., to the different parts of the country and abroad and other events like Natural calamities, etc. These coverages are used for making the fortnightly news magazines and also in compilation of archival material. Famed Cartoon Film Unit of Films Division has also become high-tech with computer animation replacing cell or classical animation. Equipped with the state-of-the art technology both in hardware and software, the Unit now can churn out productions in U.S. animation, 2-D and 3-D animation with advanced software including Opus. Concerto, High-End and Maya. The Commentary Section looks after the dubbing of films and news

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magazines into 14 Indian Languages and foreign languages from the basic version ( English/Hindi ). The Delhi based Unit of the Division has the responsibility of production of instructional and motivational films for the Ministry of Defense and the Department of Family walfare and other Ministries/Deptts. With a view to adapting to the changing scenario, the unit has lately been equipped with video film making facilities. The regional centres of the Division at Kolkata and Bengaluru also produce social and educational documentaries to spread the message of social and national issues such as family welfare, communal harmony, dowry, bonded labour, untouchability, etc.

Distribution Wing

The Distribution Wing (DHO) is headed by the Officer-in-charge of Distribution and control 10 Distribution Branch Offices situated in Kolkata, Lucknow, Nagpur, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Vijayawada, Bengaluru, Chennai, Madurai and Thiruvananthapuram. These branches are headed by either Sr. Branch Manager or Branch Manager who function as Head of Office as well as DDO of the Branches concerned and are responsible for the supply of Approved films to all the cinema theatres (required under the Central Cinematograph Act, 1952), execution of Agreement, issue of Films Division Certificate as well as collection of 1% rent from the exhibitors. Films Division has released 263 prints of 52 Approved films (total: 13676) in with 8 films of NFDC (total: 2024 prints) every week to 8410 cinema houses through out the country and has earned Rs.6,01,42,481/- as rent revenue up to March, 2008. The Distribution Wing has redefined itself and has made Film Festivals a regular activity at state and district levels, independently as well as in collaboration with NGOs, film societies, educational institutions, etc., to reach out to the masses and to promote and encourage documentary movement. The Distribution Branch Offices have conducted 50 film festivals till March, 2008 reaching out to even the remotest places in India. These festivals were appreciated by the audiences from all walks of life. The Publicity section of Distribution Wing arranges the participation of FD film in National and International film festivals. During the year 200708 we have entered our films to 5 different National Film Festivals. Similarly, we have also entered our films in to 11 International Film Festivals. We have also arranged 24 special screenings of our films on different subjects/topics including four films that have been screened during

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the IFF1. 2007 in the `India @ 60' segment. Apart from these, during the year 2007-08, the Distribution Wing has got seven documentary films of Films Division. telecast on DD, Kolkata. Two press shows with four films were organized during the period under report. The Wing also distributes prints of selected films of Films Division to the Indian Mission abroad through the External Publicity Division of Ministry of External Affairs. It also commercially exploits the films on royalty basis as well as through sale of Stock Shots, Film Strips, Video Clippings, etc. During the year 2007-08, the Wing has earned Rs.6,85,449/- by sale of Stock Shots upto March, 2008. Film Library Section The Film Library of the Division is treasure of valuable archival material of India's contemporary history and its rich heritage and artistic traditions. It is in great demand by the Film makers throughout the world. It contributes vital footage for the production of films by rendering services besides bringing out revenue through the stock footage sale. The total collection of Film Library is about 1.9 lakhs items of 8200 titles which include original picture negatives, dupe/inter negatives, sound negatives, master/inter positives, saturated prints, pre dub sound negatives, 16mm prints, library prints and answer prints, etc. The films are categorized based on the archival value as Most Precious, Precious and Normal films. 1102 films of Most Precious category have been restored digitally in high definition format, and 4213 titles have been transferred on Standard Definition Format. This library has user friendly computerized information system. The details of Film Library are also available in the web site. Citizens Charter Citizen's Charter of Films Division is placed on the official website of films Division www.filmsdivision.org. Public Grievances Redressal Mechanism In accordance with the instructions/guidelines issued by the Government on the issue mechanism for redressing public grievances has been established. The Chief Producer has been nominated as Public Grievance for Films Division. Implementation of Right to Information Act, 2005 In accordance with the provisions of the Right to Information Act, 2005

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and instructions/guidelines issued by the Government time to time, Films Division has nominated/appointed Chief Producer as Appellate Authority and one Director as Public Information Officer. The Public Information Officer at Head Office is assisted by 14 Assistant Public Information Officers out of which 13 are at the field Offices i.e. 10 Distribution Branch Offices and 3 Regional Production Centres of Films Division. One Assistant Public Information Officer is posted at Head Office to assist Public Information Officer. The Assistant Public Information Officers coordinate with the Public Information Officer in dealing with the cases/ applications received under the provisions of the Right to Information Act, 2005.

Mumbai International Film Festival-2008 Documentary, Short And Animation

Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India has entrusted the onerous responsibility of organising the Mumbai International Film Festival for Documentary, Short and Animation Films (M.I.F.F.) to Films Division. M.I.F.F., which began way back in 1990, in Mumbai has grown in size and stature making its presence felt in almost all the film making countries of the world and is recognized as the one of the best documentary film festivals. M.I.F.F. documentary film festivals, offer an amount of Rs. 26 lakhs approximately as total prize money along with real Golden / Silver Conches in addition to the "Dr. V. Shantaram Lifetime Achievement Award" which carries a Trophy and Cash Award of Rs. 2.501akhs. The aim of M.I.F.F. is to provide a unique opportunity for filmmakers, film producers, distributors, exhibitors and film critics to meet. Over the years, M.I.F.F. has become a preferred and much awaited event for the filmmakers to showcase their work, interact and exchange ideas. M.I.F.F. began its historic journey way back in 1990 and since then it has grown in size and stature as one of the premier international events of the documentary film movement. The biennial M.I.F.F. is attended by a large number of prominent documentary and short filmmakers from India and other parts of the world. Nearly, 35 countries with more than 700 entries participated in every edition of the festival. The 10th edition of M.I.F.F. was held between 3rd - 9th February, 2008 at National Centre for the Performing Arts, Mumbai. This festival was organized by Films Division with the co-operation of Government of Maharashtra.

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Retrospective and Special Packages IN MIFF - 2008. 1. South Africa - From The Margins to The Centre: A Special Package of films from South Africa reflecting the socio-cultural and political development of the country since the dismantling of apartheid. 2. SAARC Films: Documentary and short fiction films from Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Nepal featured in this special package. 3. Films From Brazil: A Package of Documentary, Short and Animation films from Brazil made by prominent filmmakers were featured in this package presented with the help of the Ministry of Culture, Brazil. 4. Tijry's Retrospective: This section comprised films made by the Members of the Jury i.e. Mr. Ali Kazimi of Canada, Mr. Wu Wenguang of China, and Mr. Frank Scheffer of Netherlands. 5. Classics: Films of Great Master of Documentary Films: This section comprised films made by Great Masters like Bert Haanstra, Robert J. Flaherty, Francois Truffaut, Istvan Szabo, Kristof Zanussi and Ritwik Ghatak. This package was organized with the support of National Film Archive of India, Pune. 6. Film Memoirs: This section had biographical films made on great filmmakers like Andrei Tarkovsky, Ingmar Bergman, Satyajit Ray, Bimal Roy, and Naushad Ali. 7. Films on Second World War: This package comprised rarest film records of the Indian troops in action at various part of the world during Second World War. This also featured the battle of Britain, Russia and other major incidents of that period. This package was organized with the help of the Armed Forces Film and Photo Division, Delhi. 8. Films From Northeast India: 33 films from all the eight states of the entire NorthEast of India including Sikkim, reflecting the lives and sociocultural and political milieu of the people were screened. 9. Films From Jammu & Kashmir: This special package of films depicted various aspects of the state through the eyes of the filmmakers from Jammu & Kashmir. 10. Glimpses of Films Division: This section showcased films on the entire spectrum of development of India made by directors of the Films Division since its inception in 1948. 11. Homage: Films Division paid tribute to the filmmakers who passed away in the recent past; Films made by Shri K. K. Mahajan, Shri K. Vishwanath and Shri Girish Vaidya.

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Seminar and Open Forum The objective of Open Forum and Seminar was to give opportunity for dialogue among eminent documentarians, cineartistes, delegates and film lovers to exchange their ideas and share the experience during the festival. The Open Forum was inaugurated on 4th February, 2008. One Seminar and four Open Fora were organised as part of the festival. The responsibility of conducting Open Fora and Seminar was entrusted to the Indian Documentary Producers Association (IDPA). The venue for the Open Fora was Sunken Garden at NCPA and the Seminar was held at Little Theatre in NCPA. The open fora and seminar were wellattended. Functions The opening function of M.I.F.F.-2008 was held at Tata Theatre, NCPA on 3rd February, 2008 at 5.00 p.m. The festival was inaugurated by the Hon' ble Chief Minister of Maharashtra, Shri Vilasrao Deshmukh. The festival was also graced by Shri Ashok Chavan, Hon' ble Minister of Culture, Industry, Mining and Protocol, Government of Maharashtra as the guest of honour. The Hon' ble Union Minister of Information and Broadcasting and Parliamentary Affairs, Shri P.R. Dasmunsi presided over the function. The most cherished moment of the inaugural function was the announcement of "Dr. V. Shantaram Lifetime Achievement Award", by the Hon' ble Chief Minister of Maharashtra. The "Dr. V.Shantaram Lifetime Achievement Award" was conferred upon Shri Aribam Syam Sharma, eminent film maker from North-East. The award includes citation, angavastra, trophy and cash component of Rs. 2.50 lakh. Mr. Rajit Kapoor, the accomplished actor-narrator, conducted the function. The Director (M.I.F.F.) and Chief Producer, Films Division, gave the inaugural address at the opening ceremony of M.I.F.F.-2008. The Oscar nominated film "Our Time is Up" from USA, "Infinity" from Canada and "The Mother's House" from South Africa were shown as the inaugural films. The live telecast of Opening and Closing functions was done by Doordarshan Kendra, Mumbai on Sahyadri Terrestrial Network. The closing function of M.I.F.F.-2008 was also held at Tata Theatre, NCPA, Mumbai on 9th February, 2008 at 5.00 p.m. The awards consisting of Golden / Silver Conches and cash awards were given away to the winners.

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Details regarding other film festivals

Goa International Film Festival, Panaji, Goa (28th April to 2nd May, 2007) Films Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India in collaboration with Kala Academy, Goa and Department of Information and Publicity, Government of Goa, has organised 1st time noncompetitive Goa International Film Festival for Documentary, Short and Animation Films from 28th April to 2nd May, 2007 in Panaji successfully. The Inaugural Function was held on 28 April, 2007 at 6.00 p.m. at Dinanath Kala Mandir, Kala Academy Complex. The festival was inaugurated by Shri J.P. Singh, Chief Secretary, Government of Goa alongwith the actress Ms. Isha Koppikar and film maker Shri Pankaj Parashar. On the Inaugural Day, two Goan film personalities, Shri V.K. Naik, Sr. Film Editor and Shri Les Menezes were felicitated by the Kala Academy, Goa, for their contribution to the film culture in Goa. The Opening Ceremony was followed by screening of 2 Award Winning films of M.I.F.F. i.e. "Little Terrorist" (15 mins.) directed by Shri Ashvin Kumar from India and Bulgarian film "Whose is This Song?" (70 mins.) directed by Ms. Adela Peeva. During the festival, 19 Award Winning Films of Mumbai International Film Festival for Documentary, Short & Animation Films and a package of 9 Award Winning Animation films of Films Division and 22 best of Films Division films including films on Goa were screened in the festival. To encourage film makers from Goa, a package of 25 films made by Goan film makers were also screened during the festival. First Documentary, Short and Animation International Film Festival, J & K (Jammu on 13th & 14th June and Srinagar on 27th & 28th June, 2007) Films Division in co-operation with J& K Academy of Art, Culture and Languages, Srinagar, has organized 1st Documentary, Short and Animation International Film Festival on 13th & 14th June, 2007 at Jammu. The festival was inaugurated by His Excellency Lt. Gen. (Retd) S. K. Sinha, PVSM, Governor, Jammu & Kashmir on 13th June, 2007 at 10.00 a.m. at Abhinav Theatre, Jammu. Similarly, Films Division in co-operation with J & K Academy of Art, Culture and Languages, Srinagar, has organized Documentary, Short and Animation International Film Festival on 27th and 28th June, 2007 at SKICC, Srinagar. The festival was inaugurated on 27th June, 2007 by Shri Ghulam Nabi Azad, Hon' ble Chief Minister of Jammu and Kashmir.

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During the above film festivals, the package of Award Winning Films of Mumbai International Film Festival for Documentary, Short & Animation Films, Films Division best documentary films including films on Jammu and Kashmir, Package of Animation films and 10 films made by Kashmiri filmmakers depicting the life and culture of valley was screened. Swatantrata Filmotsav, Delhi (11th to 14th August, 2007) The "Swatantrata Filmotsav" organised by the Films Division to commemorate the 150th Anniversary of the First War of Independence got off to a colorful start at the Siri Fort Auditorium, New Delhi, at 7.00 p.m. on August 11, 2007. The film festival, a unique and first of its kind in the national capital, was inaugurated by Smt. Sheila Dixit, the Chief Minister of Delhi while Shri Priyaranjan Dasmunsi, Union Minister for Information and Broadcasting and Parliamentary Affairs presided over the function. Shri Shashi Bhushan, veteran freedom fighter and President, All India Freedom Fighters Association graced the occasion, as a Guest of Honour and Dr. Jabbar Patel renowned filmmaker too was present as a special guest. The Secretary, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Smt. Asha Swaroop graced, the Opening Function and Shri Pyarelal, Joint Secretary, Information and Broadcasting Ministry proposed the vote of thanks. Apart from a number of distinguished guests, young people from different colleges and schools were present in large numbers. The Inauguration was followed by a six minute film, Shat Shat Pranam, specially made by the Films Division for the occasion. The film as well the song and dance presentation by the Song and Drama Division drew overwhelming applauses by the audience, 1857 - The Beginning, a documentary film of Films Division and a feature film, Jhansi Ki Rani directed by Sohrab Modi were screened on the inaugural day. The film festival drew huge crowd as can be seen by the long queue of people at the Auditorium, especially school and college students from different institutions from all over the Delhi. The Auditorium, having a capacity of more than 1800 seats were going almost houseful as the enthusiastic youngsters were lapping up the films on offer. Apart from the Auditorium I, a number of selected documentary films made by the Films Division were screened in the Auditorium II. ADMINISTRATION WING The Administration Wing provides the necessary facilities like Finance, Personnel, Stores, Accounts, Factory Management and General Administration. This Wing is directly under the control of Senior Administrative Officer who is assisted by the following officers:-

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1. Assistant Administrative Officers in the matters relating to Personnel Management, Purchase, General Administration, Vigilance and Security. 2. Accounts Officer in consultation with Internal Financial Adviser in the matters of Finance and Accounts. Performance During 1st April, 2007 to 31st March, 2008 this Division produced 57 documentary/short fiction/ video films. Out of these 49 films were produced departmentally and 8 films through Independent Producers. During this period Films Division has also purchased 4 documentary films from Independent Producers. Apart from this Films Division has produced and released 11 News Magazines on VVIP's visit abroad. The details is at Annexure-I. The details of officials deputed to foreign countries alongwith the VVIPs may be seen at Annexure-II. The list of film produced in basic version as Hindi is at Annexure-III and News magazines at Annexure-IV. Films Division provided sustained publicity and communication support through its documentaries, news magazines, and video programmes on important national campaigns like Women Empowerment, Communal Harmony, National Integration, Eradication of Untouchability, Family Welfare Programme, etc. Documentary Films The Noteworthy documentary films produced during the period are: Pradakshina ­ The film shows temples, festivals in Kerala Annamalai University Art of Living Healers-Film is on traditional herbal healers of North East Hindi Aaj Tak Indian Football ­ A credible Legacy Suchana Ka Adhikar, Adhiniyam-06 A Trip Down Memory ­ The film is on flash back the major event that transformed Mohandas, the young Barrister into Mahatma National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) Pareshan Bachpan

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Moksh ­ Ek Bhram 1857-A Salute Khadigram Udyog Tamanna Films Division produced Biographical films on the life and career of the following personalities K. R. Narayanan Naushad Ali, Mubarak Begum Rajarshi Bhagyachandra of Manipur, Ustad Bismillah Khan Satguru Ram Singh Ji & Kuka Movement Dada Muni (SV) Gopal Swaroop Pathak Antardhwani-Pandit Shiv Kumar Sharma The following biographical films are under production Husna Lal Bhagat Ram Mahanayak A Superstars Journey- Uttam Kumar Mahashweta Devi Mohammed Rafi Dr. V. Shantaram A Portrait Mrinal Sen Maharani Lakshmi Bai of Jhansi Maqbool Sherwani - A legend figure of 1947 who sacrificed his life to save Kashmir from Pakistani raiders Late Sachin Dev Burman Martyr Khudi Ram (Midnapur) Centenary celebrations Trial of Maharshi Aurobindo a freedom fighter turned spiritual leader Ashfaqulla Khan Acharya Narendra Deo Chandra Singh Garhwali K. Kelappan Kunwar Singh

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Madanlal Dhingra Ram Prasad Bismil Udham Singh Shahmal Jat Jhalkari Bai Begum Hazrat Mahal Jatin Das Bagha Jatin of Bengal Mrs. Matangini Hazra Bishnu Ram Medhi Vijay Singh Pathik Bhima Bhoi Pandit Hariprasad Chaurasia Films Division continues to produce films on the following important subjects/themes during the year 2007-2008 Communal Harmony National Integration Prohibition Family Welfare Programme Environment Agriculture Science and Technology Current History Rural Development Social Welfare Industry Women and Child Welfare Women Empowerment Defence Biographical Films

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During this period Films Division has produced the following documentary films on to commemorate with 150th Anniversary of India's Struggles for independence Freedom and Progress Freedom Fighters and Satyagraha Movement Gandhiji in South Africa A Trip down Memory Gandhiji's letter to Hitlar 1857-A Salute This Division is also producing 19 (Nineteen) documentary films on Freedom Fighters. Films Division is producing following subjects on North Eastern Region Traditional Herbal Healers of North East Tourism in North East IT Revolution in North East Fusion Music of Nagas and Deities of Manipur Mothers Peacemakers- Resolving conflict Victims of Maps- Chakma refugees in India Films Division has produced the following video films Indian Football -A Credible Legacy Hindi Aaj Tak Ek Naya Sankalp Mahatma Gandhi in South Africa Shat Shat Pranam Dreaming Movies 8th World Hindi conference-2007 My life is my message A new dawn in Andaman & Nicobar Logo for MIFF 2008

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Curtain raiser for MIFF Promo for MIFF 08 (I) Promo for MIFF 08 (II) Promo for MIFF 08 (III) Promo for MIFF 08 (IV) Travellogue MIFF Roving Eyes Bharatiya Police Sahas Yeh Bhi Advantage North East Films Division has participated in 11 International Film Festivals, (including MIFF08) 6 National Film Festivals and 50 State level film festivals. Lifetime Achievement Award given to Shri Kuldeep Sinha, Chief Producer, Films Division by International Centre for Cultural Relations, Mumbai on 30th April, 2007. 1. National Award's 2007 : One National Award to the Film "Hans Akela" Directed by Shri Jabbar Patel.

2. Films Division's Films Selected for Screening in the Indian Panorama Section (iffi) 2007 held at Goa : 2004 PANDIT RAMNARAYAN RAJASHRI BHAGYACANDRA OF MANIPUR MUBARAK BEGUM NAUSHAD ALI 3. Special Screening/Shows 1. Films Division's 6 documentary films were screened at Nehru Yuva Kendra Sangathan, New Delhi at the 150th Anniversary of the First War of Independence, 1857. 2. An International Dance Festival' 2007 organized by Films Division in collaboration with International Centre for Cultural Relations, Mumbai on 30th April, 2007.

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3. Films Division's 14 films screened at Payyannur, Kerala, organized various programmes in connection with Satyagraha. 4. A film "Art of Living" directed by Shri Shivraj Suvarna was screened at RR III, Films Division, for the staff of the Films Division on 11th May, 2007 followed by an Introduction Programme / Demonstration on "Art of Living" by prominent teachers. 5. Twenty films were screened in Film Festival organized by M/s. Vyas Creation, Thane (W) on freedom Struggle in collaboration with Films Division. 6. Fourteen DVDs of the film "CHIKEN GUNIYA" were sent to Thiruvananthapuram Branch Office for screening in all districts of Kerala with the help of State Health Department. The same had been arranged by the Mission Director, Arogaya Keralam, Health Directorate, Thiruvananthapuram in coordination with the Branch Office, Films Division, Thiruvananthapuram. 7. One Feature Film "Aleman" on the theme of Water sent to Bengaluru Branch Office for screening at Bengaluru Film Society 8. Tate Modern had arranged a major exhibition in the Turbine Hall, London this summer entitled "GLOBAL CITIES". They organized a series of film screenings, among the screening Shai Heredia (Festival director of Experimenta) selected FD film, Trip' by Pramod Pati for screening in the Staff Auditorium at Tate Modern, London in the month of July, 2007. 9. A film titled "NAYE PATTE" - (New Buds) sent for screening at Consulate General of Russian Federation in Kolkata in the month of July, 2007. 10. Two films namely "They call me Chamar" & "Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar" were screened at Prakriti Foundation, Chennai at Indian Documentary Film Festival called on Billion Eyes Indian Documentary Film Festival. The festival was held from 15th to 19th August, 2007. 11. Sixteen Films were screened during 17th 18th November, 2007 at St. Mary's College, Trichur - 680 020 in the "TEEN REELS - 2007" Film Festival for Children and Youth. 12. Two Films viz. (1) Prime Minister Indira Gandhi (2) Indian News Review - 1336 (having 2 minutes coverage on Pokharan Explosion) screened on 19 th November, 2007 at Priyadarshani Indira Gandhi Memorial Foundation, Kolkata on the occasion of the birth day of Smt. Indira Gandhi.

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13. Four Films (35 mm prints) viz. (1) Call For Swaraj And Swadeshi (2) Then Came Gandhi (3) India Wins Freedom (4) Gandhi An Emerging Reality on Freedom Struggle were selected in India @ 60 Section of IFFI - 2007, Goa. 14. One documentary on Sonal Man Singh was screened on 13th December, 2007 in the Book Fair; Patna. 15. Seven Films viz. (1) Painter of Eloqunce Silence - Ganesh Pyne (2) Rabindranath Tagore (3) The Inner Eye (4) Kalamandalam Gopi (5) Ek Akaar (6) Chhay Dances of Mayurbhanj (7) Through the Eyes of a Painter were screened on 18 th and 19 th December, 2007 at Delhi International Arts Festival (DIAF). 16. Three documentaries viz. (1) Pandit Ramnarayan - Sarangi Ke Sang Dir. Packirisamy (2) Hans Akela - Dir. Jabbar Patel (3) Flash Black Dir. SNS Sastry were screened in the Bengaluru International Film Festival held between 3rd to 10th January, 2008 at Bengaluru. 17. One Film viz. "Searching Smita" by Meera Dewan on the late actress Smita Patil was screened at the 2nd Short and Documentary Film Festival organized on Art and Artist held on 28th, 29th & 30th January, 2008 in Bhubaneshwar, Orissa. 18. Following 8 films (35 mm) on DANCE THEME viz. (1) "Parampara" (2) "Damyanti Joshi" (3) "Yamini Krishnamurthi" (4)"Sitara Devi" (5) "Raja -Radha Reddy" (6) "A Luminous Jewel" (7) "Padma" (8) "Kanak Rele" and following 4 films (35 mm) on PERSONALITIES (1) "Naushad - The Melody Continues" (2) "Mubarak Begum" (3) "Pandit Ramnarayan" (4) "Dagar" were screened in "PULOSTAV" Film Festival between 30th January to 11th February, 2008 at Pune organized by "Aashay Sanskrutik Va Paranjape Schemes, Pune. 19. Following 15 DVDs viz. (1) "Gandhi - An Emerging Reality" (2) "Glimpses of Gandhiji" (3) "Nayak - Ni Pol Porbander" (4) "Memory We Cherish" (5) "Dawn of Gandhian Era" (6) "Then Came Gandhi" (7) "Non Co-operation Movement" (8) "Poorna Swaraj" (9) "The Great Salt March" (10) "Parleys and Broken Pacts" (11) "Constitutional Expirement" (12) "Quit India" (13) "Do Or Die" (14) "India Wins Freedom" (15) Martyrdom of Mahatma" were screened at the International Rights Exhibition of Works on Mahatma Gandhi titled In Words and in Deeds being organized by National Book Trust, India at the 18th New Delhi World Book Fair from 2nd to l0th February, 2008 at Pragati Maidan. 20. Following 4 films (35 mm) on FORMER PRIME MINISTER INDIRA

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GANDHI viz. (1) "The Prime Minister (Indira Gandhi)" (2) "Indira Gandhi 1917-1984" (3) "Indira Priyadarshini" (4) "The Voice Of India" were sent to the Regional Director, Indian Council of Cultural Relations, Kolkata, for onward transmission to "THE NEHRU CENTRE, LONDON, the Cultural Wing of High Commission of India, LONDON for screening on 12th March, 2008 during "International Women Week" from 3rd to 14th March, 2008. 21. Following 16 films (DVDs) sent to the High Commissioner of India, Port Louis, Mauritius for screening in the month of MARCH, 2008 on the occasion of 40th Independence day Anniversary Celebrations of Mauritius. i) Saga of Indian Immigration to Mauritius-150 Anniversary, Col-Eng-1984, 57 Mins., Dir. T.S. Narasimhan

ii) Prime Minister of Mauritius Visits India, B&W-Eng-1965, 20 Mins.,

iii) Prime Minister of Mauritius Dr. Ramgoolam Visits India, B&W-Eng-1970, 21 Mins.,

iv) Chacha Sir Seewoosagar Ramgoolam - PM of Mauritius, Col-Eng-1976, 38 Mins., Dir. Chandrashekhar Nair

v) In The Relam of Hindi (Ekata Ka Parva), Col-Eng-1977, 12 Mins., vi) Prime Minster of Mauritius Dr. S. Ramgoolam meets the President. Dr. Radhakrishnan. Dinner hosted by the Prime Minster. vii) Freedom Comes To Mauritius: After 400 years of foreign domination, the former Mauritius Governor Sir John Shaw Renne is sworn in as the first Governor-General Dr. Seewoosagar Ramgoolam as the Premier. viii) Mauritius Welcomes Indira Gandhi: Reception at Port Louis, the Mauritian capital by Prime Minister Sir Seewoosagar Ramgoolam. Mrs. Gandhi addresses the National Assembly. ix) News Flashes: a) Prime Minister of Mauritius in India. Dr. Ramgoolam arrives in India on a goodwill visit. Dir. Chandrashekhar Nair

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x) A Distinguished Visitor: Palam airport, New Delhi. A warm welcome to Dr. S. Ramgoolam, Prime Minister of Mauritius. Talks with Mrs. Indira Gandhi. xi) P.M. of Mauritius: Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam has parleys with Indian PM Indira Gandhi. xii) PM in Mauritius: Port Louis. Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is warmly welcomed by Sir Seewoosagar Ramgoolam, the Mauritius PM. Mr. Sanjay Gandhi and his wife accompany Mrs. Gandhi. xiii) Mauritius PM Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam exchanges views with Mr. Morarji Desai and Mr. Atal Behari Vajpayee. xiv) PM of Mauritius: Dr. Ramgoolam's visit to strengthen ties between the two countries. xv) Mauritius Prime MInister Visit India : New Delhi. Sir Seewoosagar Ramgoolam calls on President Neelam Sanjiva Reddy. xvi) Udyanjali: Synopsis - The film covering the Vishva Hindi Sammelan organized by the Rashtra Bhasha Prachar Samiti, Vardha. This conference was held in Nagpur on January 10, 1975. 22. Following 5 DVDs viz. (1) "Aids" (2) "Parable in Stones" (3) "Take A Little Care - Avoids Aids" (4) "Highways Of The Sky" (5) "Aawaran" were sent to Bengaluru Branch for festival purpose. 23. Following three films had been sent for screening in Metro International Films Festival of Kochi during 4th to 10th April, 2008. (1) Pandit Ramnarayan - Sarangi Ke Sang (2) Journey of An Indian Farmer (3) Naushad Ali - The Melody Continues 24. FD film "Mubarak Begum" was screened at Chavan Centre on 4th March, 2008 at 6.30 p.m. by Prabhat Chitra Mandal, Dadar, Mumbai.

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4. Press Shows

Sr. No. 1 Date of the Press Show 4th JULY, 2007 Name of the films 1. Art of Living 2. Mubarak Begum 3. K.R. Narayanan 2 12 OCTOBER, 2007

th

1. Right To Information Act, 2005

5. General Shows

Sr. No. Name of the Institution The Bombay International School Association. Name of the films screened Visit Date Scree ning date 2nd July, 2007

Consultants

1. Mata Ganga 27th June, 2. Melody of the 2007 Monsoon 3. Natures Symphony 4. Himalayan Expedition 5. Nature and Man 1. Beauty in Blossom 12th July, 2. Green is the Hue of 2007 3. My Tree 4. Green Glory 5. Service of Trees 6. A Tree for Every Child 7. Tree is a friend ------

The Bombay International School Association.

17th July, 2007

Pratima Film Society, 1. Khilonewala Dombivali (East)

23rd Dec., 2007

Staff Show of the following films was arranged on 15th June, 2007 at RR III 1. Mission Olympics, 2. K.R. Naryanan and on 20th August, 2007 on the occasion of observance of Sadbhavana Diwas on 20th August, 2007 at RR III. 1. Communal Harmony, 2. National Integration Staff Show of 3 films was arranged on 1st October, 2007 on the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti & International Elderly Day. 5 DVDs sent on 26th November, 2007 to Films Division, New Delhi for screening on "Tribal Dominating Area".

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6. Loaning of Films

Sl. Name of the Institutions No. 1. 2. 3. Khayal Trust SPE Films India Pvt. Ltd. Bhavan Cultural Centre, Andheri San Jose (N. America) Prabhat Chitra Mandal, Dadar, Mumbai Sophia College for Women, Mumbai BARC, Music Circle, Mumbai National Film Archive of India, Pune Shamiana Film Festival Name of the films loaned 1. Hans Akela 1.Creative Artists of India by Satyajit Ray 1.Satyajit Ray Part - I 2.Satyajit Ray Part - II 3.Late Shri K.M. Munshi 1. Hans Akela 1. Hans Akela 2. Pandit Ramnarayan 1.Martyrdom of Mahatma 2. Writing off the Raj 7. 8. 1. Salil Chowdhury 1. Parampara 2. Pravahi 3. Hans Akela 1. Salil Chowdhury 1. Salil Chowdhury 2. Naushad Ali 3. Mubarak Begum 1. The Seer Who Walks Alone 19/11/2007 6 to 8/12/2007 Date of the Show 05/05/2007 15/05/2007 01/06/2007

4. 5. 6.

02/07/2007 02/08/2007 16 &17/08/2007

9.

16/01/2008 29/01/2008

10. Khayal Trust, Mahim, Mumbai 11. Krishnamurthy Foundation of India, Malabar Hill, Mumbai.

23 to 26/02/ 2008

7. Visitors to FD 1. Two Students from MES College of Engineering, Kuttippuram, Kerala. 2. Students from Arena Multimedia, Andheri (W) visited Films Division on 17.05.2007. 8. Festivals Organized Bengaluru Branch 1. Festival of Films Division films was arranged at Regional Museum, Natural History, Mysore, Bengaluru on 20th July, 2007 in which 14 documentary films were shown.

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2. Film Festival held at MES College Auditorium, 15 th Cross, Malleswaram, Bengaluru on 6.8.2007. 3. Film Festival held at MES College Auditorium, 15 th Cross, Malleswaram, Bengaluru on 7.8.2007. 4. Film Festival held at MES Prof. B. R. Subha Rao, P U College Auditorium, Bengaluru on 8.8.2007. 5. Film Festival held at MES Prof. M. P. L., Shastry, P U College Auditorium, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru on 9.8.2007. 6. Film Festival held at MES College Auditorium, 15 th Cross Malleswaram, Bengaluru on 6/8/2007. 7. Film Festival held at MES College Auditorium, 15 th Cross Malleswaram, Bengaluru on 7/8/2007. 8. Film Festival held at MES Prof. B.R. Subha Rao, P.U. College Auditorium, Bengaluru on 8/8/2007. 9. Film Festival held at MES Prof. M.P.L. Shastry, P.U. College Auditorium, Rajajinagar, Bengaluru on 9/8/2007. 10. Film Festival organized by Bengaluru Branch Office in connection with the Festival of Gandhiji on lst October, 2007 11. Film Festival organized by Bengaluru Branch Office on Madhubani Paintings on 2nd October, 2007. 12. Bengaluru Branch had conducted Film Festival on the occasion of Vignan Utsav - 2007 held on 22nd & 23rd November, 2007 organized by M/s. Vagdevi Vilas Institutions, Munnekolau, Bengaluru. 13. Regional Museum of Natural History had conducted Film Festival on Wildlife during 5-6 November, 2007 in Suttur, Mysore in collaboration with Films Division, Bengaluru Branch. 14. Bengaluru Branch had screened 14 films viz (1) Life and Message of Swami Vivekananda (2) Rabindranath Tagore (3) Against the Current (4) Conquest of Kanchanajunga (5) Last Puff (Smoking) (6) Heaven that is hell (7) Abuse of Narcotic Drugs (8) Circle of Red (9) Nature symphony (10) Alchohol (11) Quit India (12) Jalianwalabagh (13) India Wins Freedom (14) Then Came Gandhi, in Film Festival conducted by them on 3rd December, 2007 at Kendriya Vidyalaya, ASC Centre (s), Bengaluru - 560047. 15. Bengaluru Branch had conducted Film Festival on 7th December, 2007 at Kendriya Vidyalaya, ASC Centre (s), Bengaluru - 560 047.

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16. Bengaluru Branch had screened 8 documentaries on Historical and other themes at BES Evening College of Arts & Commerce, Bengaluru on 22nd February, 2008 at 6.00 p.m. Merger of Princely States Jallian Walla Bagh Quit India (1939 - 1942) India Wins Freedom Call for Swaraj & Swadeshi (1905 - 1914) 1857 - The Beginning Feathered life of Rajasthan Wild Life of India Chennai Branch Festival of Documentary Films on the 150th year of 1857 Revolution of Indian Freedom Struggle Movement held at Nagapattinam District on 25.5.2007 to 27.5.2007. Film Festival organized by Chennai Branch Office in connection with the 150th years of 1857 Indian freedom struggle movement at Vellore, on 21.9.2007 to 23.9.2007. Kolkata Branch Screening of Films Division's films held at Nandan Cinema, Kolkata on 8 th August, 2007 on the occasion of 67 th death anniversary of Rabindranath Tagore in Collaboration of West Bengal Film Centre. On the occasion of Onam, Kolkata Branch organized a screening of Documentary & feature films on Kerala in collaboration with Nandan on 7.9.2007. On the occasion of 22nd anniversary , Nandan West Bengal Film Centre held screening of the Film, Inner Eye on 2.9.2007. Kolkata Branch had screened 3 films viz (1) Girija Devi (2) Out of Clay (3) Tagore's Ode To Nature, in the Film Festival from 2-8 December, 2007 organised by them at Kolkata. Kolkata Branch had screened 5 films Viz (1) Ustad Amjad Ali Khan (2) Baba (3) Ustad Allah Rakha (4) Ravi Shankar (5) Sruti & Graces in Indian Music, at Nandan, Kolkata on 24th December, 2007.

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Kolkata Branch has screened 6 films viz (1) Gaganendranath Tagore (2) Ramkinkar Baij (3) Amrita Sher Gil (4) M.F. Hussein (5) Raja Ravi Varma (6) Hanesh Pyne, in the Film Festival at "NANDAN" on 18th January, 2008. Kolkata Branch had screened 4 film & viz. (1) "The Flame Burns Bright" (2) "Netaji" (3) "Do Or Die" (4)"Shah Nawaz Khan" in a Ten - day programme on the eminent leaders between 20 - 29 January, 2008 organized by "West Bengal State Central Library" and "The Young Explorers Institute for Social Service". E.R.P.C. Kolkata had screened films in the "Netaji Krishi Mela Utsab" on 23rd and 24th January, 2008 in association with Radhanagar Netaji Young Association, Radhanagar, 24 Paraganas. Kolkata Branch had screened following 6 films (35 mm) on Classical Indian Dancers viz (1) "Guru Kunju Kurup" (2) "Kanak Rele" (3) "Raja - Radha Reddy" (4) "Sonal" (5) "Birju Maharaj" & (6) "Yamini Krishnamurti" AND (1) DVD of the film "Guru Amubi Singh" on Classical Indian Dancer, on 22nd February, 2008 at NANDAN - II, Kolkata. Kolkata Branch had screened following 4 films (35 mm) on Indian Music Composers viz (1) "Anil Biswas" (2) "Pankaj Mullik" (3) "Naushad Ali - The Melody Continues" (4) "Salil Chowdhury" on 13th March, 2008 at NANDAN - II, Kolkata. Lucknow Branch Film Festival was conducted by Lucknow Branch Office during 8-13 April, 2007 in various Cinema Halls of Lucknow. Show of Documentary films was arranged in orphanage/children from weaker section "Shrimad Dayanand Bal Sadan, Motinagar, Lucknow4 on 18th July, 2007. Lucknow Branch had screened documentaries in Mela Area, in Allahabad on 6th February, 2008. Madurai Branch A Special Screening of the film "Chinna Pillaiyamma" was organised at Samooga Pani Mandram (Social Work Association) building, Madurai on 19.6.2007. Film Festival on Music and Dance held at Isayalaya Music School,Villapuram, Madurai, in the month of August, 2007.

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Mumbai Branch A Film Festival was conducted by Mumbai Branch Office on 15.4.2007 at Siwari, Mumbai. A Film Festival was conducted by Mumbai Branch Office on 2-6 April, 2007 at Dhule, Maharashtra. Mumbai Branch office had put up a stall at first Public Information campaign of 2007-08 which was organized at Buldhana from 21-25 July, 2007. The campaign was inaugurated by Hon'ble Member of Parliament of Buldhana, Shri Anandrao Adsul on 22nd July, 2007. Special Film Show arranged of the film Pandit Ravishankar at `Madhuban Chitrapatgrah' at Dombivali, Mumbai in the month of August, 2007. Nagpur Branch Film Festival conducted at Veer Savarkar Hall, Nagpur on 27th May, 2007. Film Festival held at Indore and Lakhni, Nagpur, on the occasion of 150th Anniversary of the First War of Independence on 11th August, 2007. Thiruvananthapuram Branch Film Festival on Indian Freedom Movement Series in connection with Satyagraha Shathabthi was organised at Payyanur, Kannur on 29th and 30th April, 2007. On the 60 th Independence Day celebrations by Mahatma Gandhi University, Kerala on 15th August, 2007 Films Division had arranged screening of our films at University Campus, Kottayam. Thiruvananthapuram Branch had screened Films on Mahatmaji & Nehru on 26 th December, 2007 at Karavarnam Vocational Higher Secondary School, Kallambalam. Thiruvananthapuram Branch had screened our Films on Mahatmaji & Nehru on 29th December, 2007 (at 10.00 a.m.) at St. Goretti, Higher Secondary School, Punalur, Kallambalam. Thiruvananthapuram Branch had screened our Films on Mahatmaji & Nehru on 29th December, 2007 (at 3.00 p.m.) at Govt. High School, Kottarakara, Quilon.

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Following 15 films (DVDs) on freedom movement sent to Thiruvananthapuram Branch Office for screening in Schools in Kerala. 1857 - The Beginning Then Came Gandhi Dawn of Gandhian Era Victory at Bardoli Non Cooperation Movement Poorna Swaraj Parleys and Broken Pacts Quit India The Great Salt March Do or Die Constitutional Experiment Towards Freedom 1945-1947 India Wins Freedom Call for Swaraj and Swadeshi (1905-1914) Contribution of Kerala to India's Freedom Movement Following 2 films (DVDs) on freedom movement sent to Thiruvananthapuram Branch Office for screening in Schools in Kerala. (1) Spirit of Nationalism (2) Ordinances Arrests & Elections

June, 2007 - Festival of Films Division's Films arranged in Jammu on 21st and 22nd June, 2007 and in Srinagar on 24th and 25th June, 2007. Public Information Campaign Organized by PIB :Branch Offices participated in PIC organized by PIB.

NEW INITIATIVES

Films Division has started publishing a quarterly magazine titled "DOCUMENTARY TODAY" exclusively to promote short film maker genre. This magazine provides an opportunity to the documentary film fraternity to interact, express their views and also to showcase their works alongwith offering thought provoking articles. The first issue which was

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bilingual was released on 12th August, 2007 during the opening ceremony of "SWATANTRATA FILMOSTAV" by Hon'ble Minister of Information and Broadcasting Shri P.R. Dasmunsi, at Siri Fort Auditorium, New Delhi. The second issue has been brought out during the 38th International Film Festival of India, 2007 and the 3rd one was MIFF special. The magazine, the first of its kind in India, has been appreciated by short film makers, critics and documentary lovers.

INTERNATIONAL DIGITAL ARCHIVE AND RESEARCH AND REFERENCE CENTRE INAUGURATED

Films Division has been making documentaries and newsreels for the last sixty years and faces similar problems of preservation, archiving and dissemination. It is however acutely aware of the fact that it is a custodian of a nation's history which should be taken back to the people of India. With this main objective, Films Division came up with the idea of establishing two units: International Digital Archive for Documentary, Short and Animation Films and the Research and Reference Centre. Both were inaugurated by Ms. Sushma Singh, Secretary Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, on her visit to the Films Division in August, 2008. A beginning has been made with as many as 8,000 films which are readily available in the DVD format. Individual video kiosks have also been created so that researchers can watch any film of their choice. Books and magazines dealing with documentary films will also be available.

DIAMOND JUBILEE CELEBRATION

(1) As part of the Diamond Jubilee Celebration of Films Division, an exclusive film festival and exhibition have been organized at Films Division Auditorium, Mahadev Road, New Delhi. Our 64 documentaries have been screened from 12th to 16th June, 2008 (4 days) in this festival. The festival was inaugurated by the Hon'ble Minister of Information and Broadcasting. (2) As a part of the Diamond Jubilee Celebration of Films Division, an exclusive film festival and exhibition has been organized at Mangala Mantpa Auditorium, NMKRV Women's College, 3rd Block, Jayanagar, Bengaluru - 560 011 from 27th to 30th August, 2008 (4 days) by FILMS DIVISION, SRPC, Bengaluru. The festival is being inaugurated by Shri

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M.S. Sathyu, renowed Film Maker. (3) As a part of the Diamond Jubilee Celebration of Films Division, an exclusive film festival from 23rd to 26th September, 2008 (4 days) has been organized in Kolkata at following three different places on the dates mentioned against each by Branch Office Kolkata & E.R.P.C., Kolkata. The festival has been inaugurated by Shri Gautam Ghosh, noted Film Maker, Kolkata.

HIGHLIGHTS

Films Division has organized a Cine Expo, "Behind The Frame":- A first of its kind in Asia-in the 38th International Film Festival in Panaji, Goa, from 24th November to 2nd December, 2007. The Expo was inaugurated by the Hon'ble Minister of Information and Broadcasting Shri P.R. Dasmunsi. Hundreds of Cine Equipments including old and new Cameras, Editing Light and Sound Equipments along with photographs and posters of old films were displayed in the Cine Expo, expounding the history of film making in a nostalgic manner. Films Division produced a special video film, "Dreaming Cinema" to celebrate 60 years of post Independence Indian Cinema. The DVD of the film was released by Hon'ble Minister of Information and Broadcasting Shri P.R. Dasmunsi on November 24, 2007 at Panaji during the International Film Festival of India. On public demand, BEHIND THE FRAMES was again put up at Gulshan Mahal, Films Division Complex during 3-11 February, 2008 coinciding with MIFF'08. The expo was inaugurated by Shri Govind Nihalani, eminent film maker. Films Division's film "Hans Akela" directed by Shri Jabbar Patel has won the National Award. This year Films Division's following films had been selected for screening in the Indian Panorama Section (IFFI) 2007 held at Goa. Pandit Ramnarayan Mubarak Begum Rajashri Bhagyacandra Naushad Ali Films Division's following films (35 mm prints) on Freedom Struggle had been screened in India @ 60 Section during IFFI - 07 at Goa.

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Call For Swaraj and Swadeshi Then Came Gandhi India Wins Freedom Gandhi an Emerging Reality

CENTRAL BOARD OF FILM CERTIFICATION (CBFC)

The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC), set up under the Cinematograph Act, 1952, certifies films for public exhibition in India. It consists of a Chairperson and twenty- five other non-official members. The Board has its headquarters at Mumbai and nine regional offices located at Bengaluru, Kolkata, Chennai, Cuttack, Guwahati, Hyderabad, Mumbai, New Delhi and Thiruvananthapuram. The regional offices are assisted in the examination of films by advisory panels consisting of persons from different walks of life. Smt. Sharmila Tagore, a well-known film personality, took over as Chairman CBFC on 14.10.2004 During the period January to December, 2007, the Board issued a total of 20,498 certificates, as against 10,583 during 2006; 3700 certificates were issued for celluloid films and 16798 certificates for video films. During the same period, 1146 Indian Feature Films (Celluloid), and 361 Foreign Feature Films (Celluloid) were certified. Out of 1146 Indian Feature Films certified in 2007, 629 were granted "U" certificates, 310 "UA" certificates, and 207 "A" certificates. Similarly, of the 361 Foreign Feature Films certified in the year, 75 were granted "U" certificates, 101 "UA" certificates, and 185 "A" certificates. The Board certified a total of 1873 Indian Short Films during the period 2007, of which 1712 were granted "U" certificates, 128 "UA" certificates, and 33 "A" certificates. In respect of the 313 Foreign Short Films certified in the year, 152 were granted "U" certificates, 124 "UA" certificates and 37 "A" certificates. A total of 16798 certificates were issued to Video films during the same period. Out of these, there were 1131 Indian Feature Films, 2874 Foreign Feature Films, 11667 Indian Short Films, 581 Foreign Short Films, 545 films belonging to the "Others" category (Indian long films other than feature). During the same period a total of 11 Indian Feature Films and 2 Foreign Feature Film were refused certificates as they were found to violate

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one or more of the statutory guidelines issued by the Central Government under section 513(2) of the Cinematograph Act 1952. Some of them were subsequently certified in their revised versions. During the period January to December 2007, 19 cases of interpolation in films were detected at various places and the verification reports were sent to the concerned Judicial Magistrates for necessary action. The workload of CBFC has increased considerably due to the certification of film various channels as per the Mumbai High Court Judgement. The increase in certification of video films has increased from 7129 in 2006 to 16798 in 2007. In order to speed up the certification work meet the target and time limit CBFC has distributed the work of different satellite channels to different regions of CBFC. Additional Examining Officers have been taken on deputation from other Central Government offices to dispose off the films.

NATIONAL FILM ARCHIVE OF INDIA

The importance of preserving film is an art and historical document has been recognized all over the world. The task of preserving cinema in all its varied expressions and forms is best entrusted to a national organization having adequate resources, a permanent setup and the confidence of the film industry. Thus, the National Film Archive of India was established as an independent media unit under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in February, 1964 with the following aims and objectives: 1. To trace, acquire and preserve for posterity the heritage of national cinema and build up a representative collection of World Cinema; 2. To classify and document data related to film, undertake and encourage research on cinema and publish and distribute them; 3. To act as a centre for dissemination of film culture in the country and to ensure the cultural presence of Indian cinema abroad. During the 44 years of its existence NFAI has been making rapid strides in achieving its goals. During the period 1st April, 2008 to 31st March, 2009, NFAI has added to its collection 66 fresh titles, 52 duplicate prints, 365 titles as free deposits, 6 video cassettes, 316 DVDs, 343 books, 770 scripts, 1498 stills, 200 press clippings, 15 disc records, 64 slides, 303 song booklets 1151 publicity posters, 10 film folders/pamphlets. 18 images were

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converted on CD and 1,42,352 ancillary film material like posters, stills, etc., were digitalized. Dissemination of Film Culture NFAI's activities to disseminate film culture in India are manifold. Its Distribution Library has about 40 active members throughout the country. The Archive also organizes joint screening programmes on weekly, fortnight and monthly basis in seven important centers. Another important programme is the film-teaching scheme comprising long and short term appreciation courses conducted in collaboration with FTII and other educational and cultural institutions. 33rd annual course in Film Appeciation held in Pune this year had 64 participants from different disciplines and professions including two from Sri Lanka and one from Bangladesh. This activity was extended to other centers by organizing one-week shortterm film appreciation course. The first course was conducted in Bengaluru at Suchitra Film Society from 23-29 August, 2008 for 32 participants. Another course was organized at Guwahati from 22-28 September, 2008 at Jyoti Chitraban Film Society. 72 students from six North Eastern States participated in the course. As a part of dissemination of Film Culture, a programme called `Chitra Jagat' was organized in Kolhapur on 10th May, 2008 which included screenings, interactive panel discussions and poster exhibition. This programme was open to all. Similar programme was held at Nasik on 24th May, 2008 as part of first international Film Festial organized by Kala Vaibhav Sanstha, Nasik. Sixth Pune International Film Festival was held from 10-17 January 2008 and NFAI gave programme support to the event by leading the auditorium and Archival films on usual terms and auditions. The first ever "Pune Film Treasures Festival" was organized from 1720 March, 2008 by the Thomson Foundation for Film and Television Heritage, Paris, in association with NFAI and FTII at Pune. Some heritage classics were also screened for students and public. "Shiraz" a silent film was screened with live music accompaniment. Eighteen students from USA visited NFAI, Pune as a part of their study tour and conducted the workshop for them from 4-5 January, 2008. Sixth Asian film festival organized in Pune at the initiative of Ashay Film Club was also given programme support by NFAI.

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Short film festival "Global Warming" was organized at NFAI main Theatre. A Festival of Russian films was organized by NFAI in association with Cultural Centre of Russia, Mumbai and Ashay Film Club, Pune from 13-16 March, 2008 to celebrate the 60 th Anniversary of the Establishment of the Diplomatic relation between Russia and India. Vasundhra International Film Festival on Environment, Wildlife, Energy, Air and Water was organized at NFAI, Pune by the Ashay Film Club and Kirloskar Group from 22-29 March, 2008. Sixth European Film Festival was jointly organized by NFAI, Alliance Francaise de Pune, British Library and Max Mueller Bhavan, held from 5-11 May, 2008. First Goa Marathi Film Festival was organized in association with ESG, NFAI and Vinsan Graphics held from 7-8 June, 2008. Three Marathi films were showcased for the festival. Marathi film poster exhibition was also organized during the festival. Sri Lanka Film Festival was organized to celebtrate the 60 years of Indian-Sri lanka Diplomatic relationship relations in association with Sri Lanka Foundation, FFSII, NFAI and Ashay Film Club from 1-5 July, 2008. Third short film appreciation course in Marathi was organized by FFSI, Ashay film club, Lalit Kala Kendra of Pune University and NFAI at Pune from 3-8 August, 2008. Nearly 150 candidates participated in the course. A Retrospective of Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman was organized by Palador Pictures in association with Swedish Embassy and NFAI from 5-11 September, 2008 at Pune. A festival of contemporary Russian films was organized by NFAI, Cultural Centre of Russia, Mumbai and Ashay Film Club, Pune from 6-10 October, 2008. Film from Israel and Iran were showcased in Pune in collaboration with Ashay Film Club, Iranian Cultural Centre, Mumbai and the Embassy of Israel. The Archive also organized a series of festivals showcasing films from France, Germany, UK, Iran, Poland and other European countries in collaboration with Alliance Francaise, Max Mueller Bhawan, British Council and Cultural Centre of Russia, Mumbai.

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Fifty two films were screened for NFAI's Film Circle programme during the period under report. Students of various mass media and journalism institutions visited NFAI as part of the educational tour. NFAI organized an Exhibition of Wallposters and Stills at 39 th International Film Festival of India held at Panaji, Goa from 22 nd November to 2nd December 2008. The expo was appropriatly titled "Film as Etertainment in India". A silent film "Kaliya Mardan" was also screened with live music accompaniment. NFAI also presented screenings of five internationally acclaimed film under `Treasures from NFAI programme'. Important among the other programmes for which NFAI supplied special packages during the year under report were : NFAI gave programme support by supplying fifteen films for `Pulotsav' organized by Ashay Film Club, Pune in January, 2008. Twelve films were supplied for the 4 th International Film Festival Thrissur held from 18-24 January, 2008. International Film Festival of Tribal Art and Culture organized by "VANYA" an enterprise of Department of Tribal Affairs, Government of Madhya Pradesh, ten films were sent to Indore for this festival. Twenty films were sent to Roopkala Kandra Kolkatta for the International Social Communication Conference held from 15-21 February, 2008. Seven films were sent to Indo-Korean Cultural and Information Centre, Chennai for the 1 st International Film Festival of Women held 1-8 March, 2008. Supplied seven films from Patna Film Festival organized by Information and Public Relations Department, Government of Bihar held from 4-10 March, 2008. Ten films were sent to Metro Film Society, Kochi for the 1st Metro Film Society held from 4-10 March, 2008. Twelve films were supplied for the 10th International Film Festival Mumbai-2008 held from 6-13 March, 2008. Supplied eleven films to FILCA for festival held from 1-8 May, 2008 at Thiruvananthapuram. Two films were sent to Nasik International Film Festival organized in Association with NFAI during the festival.

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Two films were sent to Habitat Film Club, New Delhi for their special screening. Supplied four films to Osian's Cinefan-8 festival held at New Delhi from 20-29 July, 2008. Two films "Shaheed" and "Chhatrapati Shivaji" were sent to Entertainment Society of Goa for special screening on the school children. A package of 9 films were supplied for the 5 th International Film Festival of Thrissur held from 22-28 August, 2008. Seven films were supplied to Nandan, Government of West Bengal, for the 13 th Kolkata International Film Festival held from 10-17 November, 2008. Sixteen films were supplied to Directorate of Film Festival for 39th International Film Festival of India held at Panaji, Goa from 22.11.2008 to 02.12.2008. NFAI also organized an Exhibition of Publicity Posters of Cinema and Stills at Goa during the 39th International Film Festival of India. Ten films were supplied to 13th International Film Festival of Kerala, (December 12-19) at Thiruvananthapuram. Four films were sent to Suchitra Film Society Bengaluru for the 3rd Bengaluru International Film Festival held from 16-22 January, 2009. Festival of films from Bangladesh held at NFAI auditorium from 2022 February, 2009 in collaboration with NFAI and FTII. 14th European Union film festival was held a NFAI auditorium from 18-27 March, 2009. A number of films were also supplied for joint screening held by FFSI at Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bengaluru, Hyderabad and Cochin. Film sent for international Film Festivals and other Special events: Silent film "Kaliya Mardan" was sent to Mexico for International Film Festival "Expression E carto" held from 18-27th July, 2008. A retrospective of five Adoor Gopalkrishan films "Elipathyam" "Swayamvaram" "Mukhamukham" "Kathapurushan" and "Kodityettam" were sent to Ljubljana International Film Festival, Slovenia, held in October, 2008. A film "Light of Asia" in DVD format was sent to Rome, Italy, in November, 2008 for official screening.

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Theatre Facilities NFAI has three multi-purpose theatres ­ a preview theatre of 35 seats and main theatre of 330 seats in the main complex and state-of-the-art theatre of 200 seats at Kothrud. Apart from NFAI's own programmes and FTII's academic screening, the facilities were also availed of by other institutions for their screening programmes, lectures, seminars, etc. Max Muller Bhavan, Alliance Francaise and British Council in Pune also organized screening programmes for the benefit of their members on a regular basis. During the period under report the main auditorium and preview theatre were rented out for 759 programmes. Conservation, Preservation and Restoration work The moving image heritage of India can be safeguarded only if sustained efforts are made to preserve it. The films are stored in a controlled environment with temperature of about 15 degree Celsius and relative humidity of 50 per cent which is ideally suited to preserve black and white films. NFAI also has specialized vaults for color films maintaining conditions of 2 degree (plus or minus 1 degree Celsius) temperature and 24 per cent (plus or minus 5%) relative humidity. Facilities to Producers/Copyright Owners NFAI is rendering service to producers/copyright owners in respect of supply of films for repairing their original negatives, preparation of duplicate copies and video copying for telecast purposes. A number of celluloid classics being telecast on the national and satellite networks were collected from its collection.

Plan and Non-plan Programmes

Plan Outlay NFAI has a budget provision of Rs. 300 lakhs during 2008-09 for one Plan Scheme. During the period 1st April, 2008 to 31st March, 2009, NFAI acquired 343 books, 10 film folders/pamphlets, 770 film scripts, 1498 stills, 303 song booklets, 15 Disc records, 64 Slides, 200 press clippings, 1151 publicity posters, 18 Images were converted on CD and 1,42,352 ancillary film material like posters, stills, etc., were digitized. It also acquired 483 films, 6 video cassettes and 316 DVDs during the same period. At present two colour film vaults at Phase-II building of NFAI are functional. A statement showing Plan performance during 2008-09 is enclosed at Annexure-B.

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Budget provision for North East region and Jammu and Kashmir Considering the nature of activities of NFAI it was not considered feasible to provide any budget provision for North-East region and Jammu and Kashmir.

Administration

Organization set up With headquarters in Pune the NFAI has three Regional Offices at Bengaluru, Kolkata and Thiruvananthapuram. These regional offices are primarily engaged in the task of diffusing film culture in the respective areas through film societies, educational institutions and cultural organizations. The functioning of the regional officers is overseen by the Director with the help of Deputy Director-cum-curator who is heading the technical and administrative wings at the headquarters. At present the post of Deputy Director-cum-Curator is vacant. Director (M&C), PIB, Pune has been given the additional charge of Director, NFAI, Pune. The present staff strength of NFAI inclusive of the three Regional Offices is 48-24 in the administrative wing and 24 in the technical wing. Budget provisions with regard to Tribal Sub-Plan/Special Component Plan for SCs and STs. Considering the nature of activities of NFAI, it was not considered feasible to provide any budget provisions with regard to Tribal Sub-Plan/Special Component plan for SCs and STs.

NFAI

NFAI has been a member of the International Federation of Film Archives since May, 1969. FAIF membership enables NFAI in getting expert advice, know-how and material on preservation techniques, documentation, bibliographies, etc. It also facilitates exchange of rate films with other Archives under archival exchange programmes.

DIRECTORATE OF FILM FESTIVALS

The Directorate of Film Festivals was set up under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in 1973 with the prime objective of promotion of film art and cultural exchange. These objectives are served by organizing the following activities:

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The International Film Festival of India. The National Film Awards and the Dada Saheb Phalke Award. Cultural Exchange Programme and organizing screening of Indian films through the missions abroad. The selection of Indian Panorama. Participation in International Film Festivals abroad. Special film expositions on behalf of the Government in India. Print collection and documentation. These activities provide a unique platform for an exchange of ideas, culture and experiences between India and other countries in the field of cinema. It also provides a powerful platform for Indian cinema and opens commercial opportunities for Indian films. Within the country, the latest trends in global cinema are made accessible to the general public, film industry and students. The International Film Festival of India- IFFI- 2008 The International film festival of India is one of the prime film events in the country which brings together a large variety of cinemas from all over the world on one platform. The 39th edition of International Film festival2008 was organized in Goa from 22nd November, 2008 in collaboration with the Government of Goa. Programme The festival this year presented a total of 124 foreign films under this section from 44 countries. Cinema of the World Section : 53 films Competition Section :15 films Other foreign films Sections : 56 films The festival screened 124 foreign films in 189 shows across a chain of 7 festival theatres. The festival had the following Sections : Competitive Section of the Festival The focal point of the festival was the `Competition Section' for feature films from Asia, Asia Pacific, Africa and Latin American Countries. A total of 15 feature films from 15 countries competed for top honors under this section. The International Film Jury was headed by Mr. Peter Chan-

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Chairman (Hong Kong), Mr. Marco Muller (Italy), Ms. Tabassum Hashmi khan known as Tabu, Member (India) and Mr. Lav Diaz - Member (Philippines) Awards The golden peacock and a cash prize of Rs. 40,00,000/- for the Best film was awarded to the Kazak/Russian Film Director Mr. Sergey Dvortsevovy for the film Tulpan. The Silver Peacock and a cash prize of Rs. 15,00,000/- for most Promising Director awarded to the Kazak/Russian Film Director, Mr. Sergey Dvortsevovy for the from Tulpan. The special Jury Award of Silver Peacock and a cash prize of Rs. 15,00,000/ - was awarded to Sri Lankan lead actress Ms Malani Fonseka, for the film Akasa Kusum. Cinemas of the World This Section presented a wide range of cinemas being produced across the world. The Section sought to present varied cinematic styles, themes and approached through art of cinema from 44 countries. Most of the films screened had won awards in various prestigious International Film Festivals. Foreign Retrospectives, Country Focus The foreign retrospectives in IFFI-2008 included a major retrospective of the Aki Kaurismaki, Worng Kar Wai, John Landis, Country Focus-Russia, Country Focus- Switzerland, Country Focus-Iran, Film India World Wide and Film Heritage. All these packages provided an extremely rich and varied selection of films which attracted a positive response from both film professionals and the media. Indian Section A total of 83 films were screened as part of the Indian Sections. The section had the following sub sections: (i) Indian Panorama (ii) Retrospectives - Bimal Roy, L.V. Prasad, Devika Rani and 75 years of Kannada Cinema

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(iii)Special Section - Taj Mahal - a Celluloid Journey (iv) Life Time Classics - Dilip Kumar, Lata Mangeshkar, Tapan Sinha and B. Saroja Devi (v) Homage - B.R. Chopra, Nabendu Ghosh, Jayshree Gadkar, Raghuvaran, Vijay Tendlkar and Shridhar (vi) Treasures from National Film Archives of India (i) Indian Panorama The Indian Panorama selections were made by two juries (feature films seven members and non-feature films five members). Shri K.N.T. Sastry headed the Jury of feature films and Shri Anjan Bose headed the Jury of non-feature films. The Juries conducted their screening in October 2008 and selected 26 feature films and 21 non-feature films. The Indian Panorama package was screened at the 39th edition of the International Film Festival of India in Goa. The directors along with actors and producers of the Indian Panorama films attended their screening and addressed press conferences related to their films at the Media Centre of the Festival. To commemorate the occasion, the Directorate published a compact book having all the details of these films. This handbook was widely circulated during the festival among Indian and Foreign delegates. The Indian Panorama section opened with Yarwng (kokborok) - Feature by Joseph Pulinthanath and 16 MM : Memories, Movement and a Machine ( Malayalam) - Non-feature by K.R. Manoj on 23rd November 2008. A total of 26 feature films and 21 non-feature films were screened. (ii) Retrospective Retrospectives of Bimal Roy ( Udayer Pathe, Devdas, Bandini, Do Bigha Zamin, Gautama the Buddha and Remembering Bimal Roy), L.V. Prasad (Bidaai Daadi Maa), Devika Rani (Karma) and 75 years of Kannada Cinema (Nagamandala, Babaruvahana, Dweepa, Ondanondu Kaladalli, Bandhana), were organized. (iii) Special Section Special screenings of films based on Taj Mahal were organized. Shiraj (1928), Shah Jahan (1946), Taj Mahal (1963) and Taj Mahal (2005). (iv) Life Time Classics Films of Lifetime Achievement Award Winners were screened- Dilip Kumar (Mughl-e-Azam, Devdas), Lata Mangeshkar (Hum Apke Hain Kaun, Dil Ek Mandir), Tapan Sinha ( Kabuliwala) and B.Saroja Devi.

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(v) Homage Homage was paid to the departed souls of B.R. Chopra (Waqt), Nabendu Ghosh (Trishagni), Mahendra Kapoor (Gumrah), F.C. Mahra (Professor), G.P. Sippy (Sagar), Jayshree Gadkar (Saadhi manse), Raghuvaran (Anjali), Vijay Tendulkar (Umbartha), Shridhar (Dil Ek mandir) and Jeeva (Daam Dhum). (vi) Treasures from National Film Archive of India Six landmarks films were screened from the Archives of NFAI Neecha Nagar, The Song of Buddha, Karma, Sant Tukaram, Kalpana and Newspaper Boy. Other Activities during the festival National Film Archives conducted a poster exhibition during the festival. Inaugural Function The festival was inaugurated on the 22" d November 2008 at Dinanath Manageshkar Auditorium. Chief Guest, Ms Rekha, Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting and External Affairs Shri Anand Sharma, Shri Digamber Kamath, Chief Minister of Goa, Mayor of Panjim City Shri Toney Rodrigues and other distinguished guests were present. Mr. Peter Chan, Chairman and Ms Niki Karimi, Ms Tabassum Hashmi, Mr. Marco Muller and Mr. Lav Daiz members of the International Jury for the competition section of the festival were introduced to the guets. The festival screening opened with the film `Warlords' directed by Mr. Peter Chan. Closing Function The Closing Ceremony of the 39th International Film festival of India was held on 2"d December, 2008 at Dinanath Mangeshkar Auditorium (Kala Academy). The Chairperson Mr. Peter Chan addressed the audience and announced the awards. Chief guest Shri Kamal Hassan, Chief Minister of Goa, Shri Digamber Kamat and the city Mayor Shri Tonney Rodrigues presented the awards to the winners. The song of Sparrows directed by Majid Majid (Iran) was the closing film. 54th National Film Awards As part of the 54th edition of the National Film Awards the awards were presented to film personalities by the Hon'ble President. The function was held on 2"d September 2008 at Vigyan Bhawan.

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(i) Feature Film Section "Pulijanmam" (Malayalam) directed by Priyanadanan was the Best Feature Film while Madhur Bhandarkar was adjudged the Best Director for his "Traffic Signal" (Hindi). The award for the Best First film of a Director was won by Kabir Khan for "Kabul Express"(Hindi) and Madhu Kaithapuram for "Eakantha" ( Malayalam). "Lage Raho Munna Bhai"(Hindi) directed by Raj Kumar Hirani won the award for Best Popular Film providing wholesome entertainment. The Kannada film "Kallarli Huvagi"directed by T.S. Nagabharna won the Nargis Dutt Award for Best Feature Film on National Integration. The award for Best Film on Family Welfare was presented to "Karutha Pakshikal" (Malayalam) directed by Kamal and "Faltu" (Bengali) directed by Anjan Das K. Satyanarayana directed "Hope" (Telugu) won the Rajat kamal for Best Film on Other Social Issues. Master Krishan S.S. directed "Care of Foothpath" (Kannada) was adjudged the Best Children's Film, and presented a Swarn Kamal. The award for the Best Actor was presented to Soumitra Chatterjee for his performance in the Bengali language film "Podkkhep" while the one for Best Actress went to Priyamani for her powerful performance in Tamil language film "Paruthi Veeran". Dilip Prabhavalkar and Konkona Sensharma were adjudged Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress respectively for the films "Lage Raho Munnabhai" (Hindi), "Shevri" (Marathi) and "Omkara" (Hindi). Baby Divya Chaphadkar, Child Artist from Goa won the award for Best Child Artist for his performance in the Konkani film "Antarnad". Gurdas Mann was adjudged the Best Male Singer for the Film "Ishq Da Waris" (Punjabi) while Aarti Anklekar Tikekar won the award for Best Female Playback Singer for the film "Antarnad" (Konkani). The Special Jury Award was presented to Actors Thilakan for the film "Ekantham"(Malayalam) and Prosenjit Chatterjee for the film "Dosar" (Bengali). (ii) Non-Feature Film Section The film "Bishar Blues" directed by Amitabh Chakraborty was adjudged the Best Non-Feature Film and awarded coveted Swarn Kamal. The award for the Best Non-Feature Film of a Director was presented to Jacob Varghese for his film "Andhiyum". The Special Jury award in the nonfeature film category was awarded to the film "Lama Dances of Sikkim"directed by Manash Bhowmick. Ramesh Asher won the Swarn Kamal for the Best Director for his non feature film "Ek Aadesh Command for Chhoti".

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(iii) Best Book on Cinema Jerry Pinto won the Swarn Kamal for Best Book on cinema for his book "Helen : The Life and Times of an H-Bomb" while G.P. Ramachandra and Rafique A.R. Baghdadi were adjudged the Best Film Critic for the year 2005. (iv) Dada Saheb Phalke Award The prestigious Dada Saheb Phalke Award was presented to veteran film maker, Tapan Sinha for his commendable contribution to Indian Cinema. (v) Life Time Achievement Award Life Time Achievement Award was mark the 60 th anniversary on Independence was conferred upon Shri Tapan Sinha, Shri Dilip Kumar, Ms. Lata Mangeshkar and Smt. B. Saroja Devi. Festival of Indian Panorama Films in Delhi The Indian Panorama 2008 films were screened at Siri Fort Auditorium, New Delhi between 11 December to 21st December 2008, as part of the ongoing Delhi International Art Festival. The screenings were well received, 3 shows on weekdays and four shows on weekends. Participation in other Film Festivals DFF also participated in other International Film Festivals in India i.e., Chennai Film festival, 6th Pune International Film Festival, Bangaluru lnternational Film festival, Bengaluru, 2 nd Hyderabad Film Festival at Hyderabad, 4th International Film festival of Thrissur held at Thrissur, Sathyam Cinemas held at Madras, 10th International Film Festival in Mumbai, Metro International Film Festival at Kochi, North East Film Festival, Kalakshetra Foundation, Chennai, 5th National Film festival of Kerala, Tellicherry, Women Film Festival held in New Delhi, and Indian Panorama Film Festivals at Thiruvananthapuram, Kozhikode, Kannur, Kolkata, Tamilnadu and Shillong. Participation in Festivals abroad Indian Films participated in Film Festivals and special screening in 28 countries till December 2008. The countries and places were Netherlands, Sweden, France, Bangladesh, USA, Seoul, Switzerland, Abu Dhabi, Los Angeles, Spain, Israel, Madrid, Belgium, Mexico, Jerusalem, Zimbabwe, Australia, Montreal, Bangkok, Hong-Kong, Vienna, Washington, Slovenia, Brazil, DPR Korea, Rotterdum, Fribourg Belfast and Cannes.

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Cultural Exchange Programme In India Organized Hungarian Film Festival in Sirifort Auditorium-II from 21 to 25 January, 2008. Seven films have been screened in the festival. Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation (IOR-ARC) Film Festival was organized at Sirifort Auditorium-II from 22 February to 1 March, 2008. Ten Films have been screened in the festival. Australian Film Festival was organized at Sirfort Auditorium-II from 6 to 9 March, 2008. Nine films have been screened in the festival. Survival to Success- Festival of Films on Women and Child Development was organized at Sirifort Auditorium-II on 9 March, 2008. Two films namely, `Chamel'&'Dor'have been screened in the festival. Special Film Festival from Spain was organized at Sirifort Auditorium-II on 10th March, 2008. Film `FADOS'has been screened in the festival. Special Film Festival from Itlay was organized at Sirifort on 14 th March, 2008. Films `BILLO,LE GRAND DAKHAAR'& `TEXAS' have been screened in the festival. Chinese Film Festival - started from 28 th March, 2008 at Sirifort Auditotium-II and an Eight member delegation attended the opening function on 28th March, 2008. 9 films were screened in the festival. Colombian Film Festival was organized at Auditorium-II on 22,24 & 25 October, 2008. Three films were screened in the festival. Screening of German film `My Dream and Loneliness Never Walks alone' on 17 January, 2008 was held in Siri Fort Auditorium-III, New Delhi. Screening of Italian films was held from 30 January 2009 to 1 February, 2009 in Siri Fort Auditorium-II, New Delhi. Screenings of European Union Film Festival were held from 5 to 10 March 2009 in Siri Fort Auditorium-II, New Delhi. The screenings of the following films were held: (1) Czech Dreams-Czech Republic (2) Could this be love - France (3) Teah- Slovenia (4) Arabian Nights- Luxembourg (5) Hanin-Poland (6) Emma's Bliss- Germany (7) A Perfect Match- Belgium (8) The Black Pimpernel- Sweden (9) Do not think about it - Italy (10) Happy FamilyNetherlands (11) Beauty and the Bastard- Finland (12) Totally Married- Greece (13) Welcome Home -Austria (14) Relatives- Hungary (15) Return of the Storks- Slovenia (16) Seven Billiard Table- Spain (17) The Last the Front Line- Ireland.

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Abroad Indian Films were screened during the `India in Serbia Festival in Kragujevac in Serbia from 8-14 April, 2008. Ten films were screened in the festival. Indian Films have been screened in Bosnia and Herzegovina festivals during the month of April, 2008. Ten films were screened in the festival. Two films have been screened in SAARC Film Festival in Sri Lanka from 18-23 July, 2008. Five films have been screened in Cairo International Film Festival, Egypt from 11-16 November, 2008. Eleven films have been screened in `Days of India Cultural Festival' in Tehran (Iran) during the month of November, 2008. Seven films have been screened in Film Festival in Cyprus during the month of November, 2008. Ten films have been screened as a Retrospective of Indian Art Movies in Brazil during the month of November, 2008. The film Sardari Begum was shown in Abu Dhabi. Grant-in-Aid The total budget Grant of Rs. 19.00 lakh for Grant-in-Aid to film festivals has been fully utilized by distributing to the following festivals: International Women Film Festival Society of India. Kerala Cartoon Academy Animation Film Festival JDCA Film Festival, Orissa Pune International Film Festival North Bengal Film Festival- Jalpaiguri Grant-in-aid of Rs. 6.00 lakh was also released to Federation of Film Societies of India separately.

FILM AND TELEVISION INSTITUTE OF INDIA, PUNE

The Film Institute of India was setup by the Government of India in 1960 under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Following the addition of Television Wing in 1947, the Institute was redesigned as Film and

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Television Institute of India. The Institute become a Society in October 1974 under the Registration of Societies' Act, 1860. The Society consist of eminent personalities connected with Film, Television, Communication, Culture, Alumni of Institute and Ex-Officio Government Member. The Institute is governed by a Governing Council, headed by a Chairman, the current Chairman being the eminent writer Dr. U.R. Ananthamurthy. The academic policies and the plans of the Institute are formulated by the Academic Council. The matters involving finance and controlled by the Standing Finance Committee. The Institute consists of two Wings : the Film and TV Wing, and offers courses in both Film and Television. The Three Year Diploma Courses lead to a Post Graduate Diploma in Film Direction, Cinematography, Audiography and Film Editing. The Institute also offers Two Years Post Graduate Diploma Course in Acting and Two Years Post Graduate Course in Art Direction and Production Design, One Year Post Graduate Certificate Course in Feature Film Screenplay Writing, One and Half Year Certificate Course in Animation and Computer Graphics. The Television Course offered consist of One Year Post graduate `Certificate Course in Television' with specialization in TV Direction, Electronic Cinematography, Video Editing, Audiobiography & TV Engineering. A total of 1891 applications in the prescribed form were received for the year 2008. Out of these 1584 candidates were called for Entrance. Finally 143 candidates ( including foreign candidates) were selected for admission to various courses for the year 2008. The Film and Television Institute of India provides the latest education and technological experience in the art and technique of film making and television production. In-service training is provided to officers of all grades of the Doordarshan and others. It is equipped with the latest digital and broadcast grade production set-ups viz. Non Linear, Beta Cam and A/B Roll editing set-ups, Digital Camera viz. Sony BVP500 P; Soft Chroma Keyer, Digital Special Effect Generator, Silicon Graphics 02 workstations with Alias software, modern movie cameras re-recording equipments etc. which provides an excellent exposure to the faculty and Students of Film & Television.

Proposed Development of the Newly Acquired Land--Global Film School

The FTII has additional land measuring about 26 acres which is proposed to be developed with ultra modern facility for Film and TV production. At present there is a Doordarshan Studio, film vaults of the National Film Archive of India and FTII staff quarters in the same location.

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Film Appreciation Course

Thirty third Film Appreciation Course was held from 26.05.2008 to 21.06.2008 with joint auspices of Film and Television Institute of India and National Film Archive of India. 74 participants including journalists, filmmakers, artists, activists, teachers and media-persons attended the course. (i) Revival of the original acting classroom The Acting Class Studio No.1 where the talent of all the stalwarts of today were nurtured, was in shambles. It was renovated and revived on 5 October 2008. This was the actual place where all of them were groomed while the Institute earned all its glory and glamour. Shri Roshan Taneja, the Guru, inaugurated this grand ceremony. Veterans such as Shabana Azmi, Naseerudin Shah, Shailendra Singh, Benjamin Gilani, Rameshwari, Rakesh Bedi, Satish Shah, Mukesh Khanna, Asha Sachdeva, Rita Bhaduri and Kawaljit Paintal attentded the function. The Institute received massive press coverage of the event. (ii) Prabhat Museum FTII is located on the premises of Prabhat Film Company which had made a significant contribution to Marathi and Hindi Cinema in the 1930s and 1940s. A museum for preserving materials of archival value inherited from Prabhat Studio was setup in 1995. The Museum houses all the available artefacts, original contracts and partnership deed of Prabhat Film Company in addition to costumes, properties, equipments, posters and stills which are historically important. Till now, the Museum was accessible only to VIPs and dignitaries visiting the institute. However, the Museum has been renovated and made open daily for general public since 29th February 2008. (iii) Film Heritage Educational Programme The Thomson Foundation for Film and Television Heritage launched the first ever "Pune Film Treasures Festival" a four day cinema event at FTII from 17th to 20th March, 2008. Some timeless wonders based on the theme `Cinema of Modernity and Modernity of Cinema' were screened during this period. It was designed as a complement to the Film Heritage Educational Program within FTII, specifically designed for the future generation of filmmakers trained at this National Film School in Pune. The Thomson Foundation has planned another similar event in February 2009. (iv) Film Music Seminar at FTII The Film and Television Institute of India organized a Film Music Seminar on 29th and 30th April, 2008 at FTII, Pune. It was a rare kind of symposium

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conducted at the professionals as well as writers and critics from the field of music had come together and shared their demonstrations on various aspects of music. (v) Hindi Fortnight at FTII The Institute observed Hindi Fortnight between 14th September, 2008 and 30th September, 2008. The Institute also observed Anti-Terrorism Day, Sadbhawana Diwas and Quami Ekta Diwas. All the employees, students and trainees took a pledge on these days. (vi) Lensight Lensight, a quarterly publication was revived after a gap of eight years. The first issue was released by prominent filmmaker Shri Govind Nihalani on 28th July, 2008. (vii) Dhaara and Guftagoo Recognising the need and demand from the students, the prospective filmmakers need to be aware not only about cinema, but also various forms of art, literature, aesthetics, issues and problems of society, etc, the Institute has launched two new series: Dhaara, a series of culture programmes, and Guftagoo, a series of discussions and seminars. A number of celebrities such as Pandit Ronu Mujumdar, Shafqat Ali Khan, Rahim Fahimmuddin Khan Dagar, Asad Ali Khan, Biswajit Ray Choudhary, Prahlad Singh Tipania have presented their art whereas noted scholars like Dr. M.K. Dhavalikar, Vishnu Khare, Rajesh Joshi have taken various sessions on the respective topics.

New Initiatives

A number of research projects on various aspects of cinema such as the relationship of `Tamasha' with Marathi Films; Terrorism in Cinema; Urban Life In Hindi Cinema, and so on are in the pipeline. The new hostel for students is being constructed for more number of students to be admitted on implementations of reservation of OBC candidates. A multimedia resource centre is being developed to cater to the academic inputs of students and facualty. Participation in Film Festivals Films made by Diploma students are regularly entered in various National/

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International Film Festivals in order to give exposure to students' work in India and abroad. During the year, the Institute has so far participated in 34 festivals/events. Workshops/Seminars To strengthen the academic inputs for the students, Workshops/Seminars are regularly organized by eminent filmmakers from India and abroad. Alongside the above workshops and lectures several eminent guest lectures visited the FTII and interacted with the students and trainees of various disciplines. Other Short Courses The following short courses were conducted by the Institute: Short courses in "Basic Videography for AK Police Photographes" from 31.03.2008 to 11.04.2008. Short courses in Videography DV - Cam for DD staff conducted from 23.06.2008 to 05.07.2008. Non Linear Editing for DD staff conducted from 28.07.2008 to 08.08.2008. Workshop on TV Studio (single camera) for students of Mass Communication FLAME conducted on 13.10.2008. Workshop on TV News Production Technique for students of Guru Nanak Dev University conducted from 03.07.2008 to 07.11.2008. Film Library The Film Library of the Institute has a collection of over 3000 films including Indian and Foreign features and short films, study-extracts and FTII Films. The Film Library also houses audio visual material like disc records, video cassettes and DVDs/VCDs. Video Tape Library VSH and U-matic and Betacam Cassettes of Indian and foreign features and short films, documentary and student films, TV programmes, Video documentaries made by students and TV trainees are housed in the Video Library. These tapes are helping the students as resource material in making an in-

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depth study of content development and production techniques, supplementing the film viewing sessions on editing tables. Grievance Cell Grievance Redressal Mechanism and Information Facilitation Centre have been established. The Registrar is the Nodal Officer of the Public Grievances Redressal Mechanism (PGRAM) at FTII and Dean (Films) and Academic Coordinator has been nominated as Head of the Grievance and Facilitation Counter. Citizens' Charter The Citizens' Charter of the FTII is already uploaded on its website and it is updated periodically. Implementation of RTI Act The information regarding the FTII as required under Right to Information Act, 2005 is available on the website. The FTII is fully functioned towards the implementation of Right to Information Act, 2005 and the information asked for under this Act is provided within the prescribed time limit. During the period from 01.04.2008 to 31.12.2008, sixteen application seeking information under RTI were received and information was provided to them within the prescribed time limit. Registrar of the Institute has been nominated as CPIO and Administrative Officer as ACPIO. Financial Review The actual expenditure of the Institute for the financial year 2007-2008 is as follows

Revised Estimates NON PLAN PLAN TOTAL 825.00 (Net) 621.00 1446.00 Final Grant 825.00 (Net) 620.00 1445.00 Actual Expenditure 1037.31* 606.28** 1643.59

· ·

The excess expenditure incurred from the Revenue Receipt. Balance amount of Rs.13.72lakhs remained unutilized under Machinery and Equipments. The Institute has got unspent balance of Rs.101akhs refunded by D.G. Doordarshan, New Delhi in October, 2006 under `Captive TV' Plan scheme.

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The BE and actual expenditure during 2008-2009 is as follows:

Sanctioned Budget Estimates 2008-2009 (As per Final Grant)

PLAN NON-PLAN TOTAL

554

932.67

1486.67

Actual Expenditure 2008-2009

PLAN 544 NON-PLAN 932.67 TOTAL 1476.67

Plan and Non-plan Performance

(1) Annual Plan 2008-2009 The Grant-in-aid of Rs. 800 lakhs has been approved in the Annual Plan for the year 2008-2009 initially and it has been reduced to the extent of Rs. 5741akh. The Sanction of Revised Annual Plan for the year 2008-2009 is yet to be received from the Ministry. A new plan scheme namely'Global Film School' has been approved by the Ministry "in-principle" for the XI Plan. A taken provision of Rs. 30 lakhs has been sanctioned and included in Annual Plan 2008-2009. (2) Non-plan As far as the Non-Plan performance is concerned the expenditure has been incurred on account of salary, rent/rates and taxes etc. for the smooth running of the Institute. Brief Indication of Programme of Work from 1st January 2008­31st March 2009 The Revised Estimates proposed for the year 2008-09 is Rs. 1469.00 lakh (Net) and proposed Budget Estimates 2009-2010 is Rs. 1581.88 lakh (Net). UNDP : In order to ensure that the message of state HDRs reach the widest possible audience the series of documentary films on key messages of different States are produced by FTII under UNDP project since the year 2006-2007. During the financial year 2008-09 twelve films have been produced which pertained to six States for which expenditure of Rs. 13.921akh has been incurred upto December, 2008. Eminent Visitors i) Smt. Asha Swarup, Secretary, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting visited the FTII on 1st May, 2008 and on 24th July, 2008.

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ii) Parliament Standing Committee on Information Technology visited the FTII on 8th September, 2008. iii) Shri Anand Sharma, Minister of State for External Affairs and Information and Broadcasting visited the FTII on 8th December, 2008.

Sr. No. 1. 2. 3. Activity District Level Film Festival State Level Film Festival Individual Film Show Number of Shows 980 1036 57 Audience 1134697 536013 29021

SATYAJIT RAY FILM AND TELEVISION INSTITUTE

Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute, Kolkata, was established by the Government of India as an autonomous educational institution under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, and was registered under West Bengal Societies Registration Act, 1961. Located at Kolkata and named after the legendary film maestro Satyajit Ray. SRFTI is the second national level training institute to be established by the Government of India. The institute offers three-year post-graduate diploma course in Direction & Screenplay Writing, Motion Picture Photography, Editing and Sound Recording. Apart from the basic diploma course, the institute also has the provision to conduct short and medium term courses on areas related to film and television. Research and explorative studies in the sociology, culture and technology of film and television is another area of focus in SRFTI. Management and Organizational Framework SRFTI is a fully funded autononmous Institute under the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, run by a Society constituted by the Government of India. The Society, headed by a President runs the Institute through a Governing Council (GC) that is constituted with select members of Society. The Governing Council is the supreme body for all executive functions of the institute. It also constitutes different committees/bodies as deemed necessary viz. Academic Council, Standing Finance Committee, etc. The Government is represented in the Society, Governing Council and Standing Finance Committee through ex-officio members consisting of officials drawn from the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India and various media units. The new Society of the

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Institute has been formed by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Government of India with Shri Buddhadeb Dasgupta, the renowned filmmaker of the country as the President of the Society, by virtue of his post he is also the Chairman of the Governing Council and other committees. During the period between April 2007-March 2008, one Society Meeting and three Governing Council Meetings were held.

Infrastructure and Equipment Facilities

Major Infrastructure and Equipment Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute (SRFTI) has been constructed in a sprawling area of 39.36 acres of land located at the Eastern Metropolitan Bye-Pass Road in Kolkata. The infrastructure of the Institute consists of the following major buildings and facilities: Direction Block: The Film Direction block mainly houses the offices of the Direction and Purchase Department. It has two A.C. Class Rooms, PC rooms that are equipped with digital viewing facilities and one Basic DVD Editing Room. The main classroom is equipped with Home Theatre facility, projection facility. Reputed professionals are invited regularly to conduct workshops on various aspects of directorial skills and strategies. Same block also accommodates the Film Library. Sound Recording Department: The Sound Recording Block consists of three studios and a several Digital Audio Work stations(DA Ws) for sound recording, sound editing, and track laying at the post-production stage. Currently these studios have been equipped with Dolby Digital recoding system. The elegance of analogue recording, which is the traditional method of audio post production, is blended with the most advanced digital recording technologies for flexibility or freedom of an artist. The allied technologies like acoustics and electronics are also part of the syllabus to make a complete sound recordist in the true sense. The department also has an assortment of hard-disc-recorders, microphones/accessories of highest world standard. Editing Block : The Editing block consists of one film and one video section. The film section has 10 Steenbeck editing suits in separate chambers and a large hall with 10 editing tables, synchronizers, splicers six pic-syncs and a moviola etc. The video section is equipped with Analog Video editing suits, Avid Media Composers, facilitating editing work in SVHS, U-matic and Beta formats. The Digital Non-Linear Editing (DNLE) section consists of Avid Media Composers and Final Cut Pro with cine tool for film editing, Avid DV Xpress, FCPs and Adobe Premiere setup

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dedicated to non-linear editing. The department also includes five linear video editing suites; And a graphics section with three dedicated workstations; The department has a special class room. Agit-prop, for regular screening, discussions and analysis with viewing and digital edit demonstration facilities. Currently the department has been equipped with Digital Graphics Work-Station­SMOKE, the only of its kind in eastern India. Motion Picture Photography Department: Located next to the film studio and the television studio, the Motion Picture Photography Department is equipped with a wide range of cameras viz. Two ARRI 2C 35 mm cameras, one SR III and one SR II cameras (both I S min), one ARRI 435- a new generation, advances non-blimp 35 mm camera with video assist system, two DYC 637 video cameras (one with additional SVI IS attachment), two beta cam recorders, one High-band recorder, four Digital cameras. HMI lights and basic camera accessories, including light meters and other equipment. Currently the department has been equipped with two state of the art 35mm131impped cameras Evolution with accessories. The department is further equipped with a basic `Three Camera Set ­Up' in the Television Studio and a Still Photography section with 16 cameras and B&W as well as colour film processing, developing and printing facilities. A recent induction of Arri Sun-series HMI lights has lent a sophisticated touch to the dept's collection of' lights. The department has active interface with front-rank labs for regular student visits. Ancillary Facilities Film Studio and Television Studio: The Institute can be rightfully proud of its two studio floors. The Film Studio is one of the best in the eastern zone. The floor size (80'×50') is ideal even for big budget spectacular sets. It has got a fully air-conditioned make-up room, underground pit for specialised camera angles. Three tier platforms for lighting, big store room for stacking art material and a carpentry and painting section. The state of the art fully air-conditioned Television Studio floor of 50'×50' dimension has a 3- camera set-up with control room, dimmer panel, motorized telescopic lighting grid, and cyclorama facilities. This studio is used for on-line TV prograrnmes and multi-camera student projects. Both the studios have separate rooms for safe keeping of camera and light equipment. Auditorium and Screening facilities : The institute has multi faceted facilities for preview and screening of films both in celluloid and video

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format. Currently the Main Theatre has been equipped with Dolby digital sound reproduction system. The Main Theatre (370 seats), one Preview Theatre (72 seats) have multipurpose facilities of 35 mm and video projection arrangement. The Library : The fast growing library of the Institute is located in a twostoried building with a large reading hall, a well -equipped video viewing room with several viewing booths and a music room with several booths for listening and studying music. At present the library has an impressive collection of books, periodicals, VHS cassettes, LDs/DVDs/VCDs. Film Library : The Institute Film Library has a collection of 1451 films (feature : 501 and documentary : 950). The films are used mostly for academic purposes. Students' Hostel : The new hostel, started in 2001 has a capacity of 160 seats in addition to two dining halls and a kitchen, recreation room, medical room with a Gymnasium, intercom connections. Residential Complex : The Institute has 41 quarters for housing its employees. Guest House : The Institute has Guest House with two VIP suits and 16 Double bed room accommodations with facilities of dining hall, kitchen, a beautiful lounge, reception, storeroom and a courtyard. Other Facilities : One in campus post office operated by the Department of Post, Govt. of India. One Canteen operated by a private contractor.

Academic Affairs :

Admission process for the admission of the 7th batch of students was completed during the financial year and the students are undergoing regular classes. Post-Graduate Diploma Course on offer: Name of the Course Course Duration Minimum Qualification Three -Year Post Graduate Diploma in Cinema 3 ( Three) Years Graduate or equivalent (For Sound Recording: With Physics as one of the subjects at the 10+2 level)

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Present Strength:

SN COURSES ON OFFER NO. OF STRENGTH OF STUDENTS (PG Diploma Course) SEATS DURING 2007-2008 5th BATCH 6th BATCH 7th BATCH TOTAL 1. Film Direction & Screenplay Writing 2. Motion Picture Photography 3. Editing 4. Sound Recording Total N.B. 10 10 10 10 40 10 10 10 07 37 08 08 09 08 33 10 10 10 10 40 28 28 29 25 110

1. Two seats reserved in every course for foreign students. 2. Reservation as per the extant Govt. norms

Admission Method to PG Diploma Course Conducted by the Institute Admission is through a competitive entrance examination held on an all India basis held annually. The entrance examination consists of a written test followed by an interactive orientation session & viva-voce for shortlisted candidates. New admissions are done in July/August and the admission process starts in January/February every year. Admission advertisement appears in the employment News and selects major newspapers all over India. While the written test is held at multiple centers all over the country; the interactive orientation session & viva-voce is held at the Institute premises in Kolkata. The written examination consists of a common paper on General Knowledge & Mental Aptitude and another paper on Specific Area Aptitude in the discipline of choice. Study/Educational Tours During the period SRFTI Students went to Italy under Student Programme between ZeLIG-school for Documentary, Television and New Media. Bolrano, Italy followed by ZeLIG students workshop at SRFTI. Apart from that a High Defination Workshop was conducted by NHK, Japan Broadcasting Corporation and NHK Visit to India Students/ Filmmakers for India series programme. Some other festivals attended by the students International competition of Cinema du Reel at France­ Kanu Behl Documentary

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Lisbon International Indepedent Film Festival-2007 Cannes Film Festival ­2007

Raka Dutta "Chinese Whispers" Raka Dutta "Chinese Whispers"

Berlin Talent Campus International Film Festival -2007 Kerala Film Festival-2007 Asian Film Festival of 1st Film, Singapore Regular Faculty of the Institute The Institute has a core faculty of 8 teachers, which includes three Assistant Professors and five Lecturers. All members of the existing faculty are persons of standing in their respective fields and are either ex-film school graduates or professionals of repute. Guest Faculty of the Institute The Institute adopts the system of drawing from working professionals from the industry as Guest Faculty for taking classes and practical on special subjects. Moreover, keeping in view the miniscule size of the regular faculty, the Institute occasionally has to depend on the guest faculty even for routine classes. Apart from this, the Institute also invites eminent professionals/experts in cinema and television to conduct workshops. Following are some of the experts of the media who conducted the workshops: Pankaj Rishi Kumar, Avinash A Chandiramani, Debjit Biswas, Ranjeet Bahadur, Suresh Pai, Arjun Gourisaria, Abhijit Dasgupta, Santosh Sivan, Kundan Shah, Amos Gitai, Tsemberopouloas, Vinay Shukla, Girish Kasarravalli, Asim Sinha, Ranjit Bahadur, Argha Kamal Mitra, Anup Mukhopadhyay, Aswin Ranganathan, Amitabh Chakraborty, Suresh Rajamani, Anup Dev, Netailal Chakraborty, Soumendu Roy. Malay Bhattcharya, Anup Ganguly, Indranil Ghosh, K.K.Jaiswal, Mahendra Kumar, R.V.Ramani, Mahesh Aney, Rajan Kothari. Barun Mukherjee, Kumar Sahani, Subhalaxmi Mukherjee, Shama Zaidi, Sohag Sen. Screening Programme and Festivals and Retrospectives During 2007-2008, over 210 feature/short Films were screened as part of the academic activities. In addition to the regular screenings, the students attended the Kolkata Film Festival held in November, 2007 which was made a part of their curriculum. Sanjiv Kumar Behera "Kulai Chula" Bishnu Dev I-lalder Documentary "Bagher Bachha"

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Festivals attended by Students and faculty Kolkata International Film Festival. Kolkata- November, 2007 International Film restival of India. Goa, 2007 Kerala International Film Festival-2007 International Lecture/Seminar/Workshop organized by SRFTI Satyajit Ray Memorial Talk-2007 (Speech delivered by Shri Gautam Ghosh) Docedge-2007 (International Documentary Workshop) Fuji Cinemascope Workshop 2008 (Conducted by Shri Santosh Sivan) Kodak Workshop (Conducted by Mahesh Aney) Subrata Mitra Kodak Scholarship A Kodak Workshop was conducted to pay tribute to the maestro of Indian Cinema Subrata Mitra. Kodak has instituted a Scholarship titled Subrata Mitra Kodak Scholarship for the best cinematographer in the Diploma Film each year. Training in Visual Anthropology for ASI Specially designed workshop on Visual Anthropology for Scholars & Technicians of Anthropological Survey of India. ERP Major functional activities like academic activity management, project management and financial management, material management and financial management are being Computerized by implementing ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) package of order. Oracle E-Business suite with custom development. This computerization is expected to help Institute in future for better management of major activates through integration of major functional activities. Visit of Important Dignitaries During the period the institute was visited by several dignitaries and delegations from abroad, including the following: Audrius Stonys, Leena Pasanen, Stefano Tealdi, Rada Sesic, Paul Rainer Hartleb, Ryota Kotani, Cara Mertes, Hans Robert Eisenhauer. Axel Amo, Giles Trendle, Cynthia Kane, Amos Getai, Yorgos. John W. Hood, Ramprasad Devineni, Suranjan Ganguli, Margarita Garpe, Philppe

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Mertineaii. Naotoka Doi, Atsushi Murakani, Furniyuki Soto, Kazunari Tonaka, Koji Kateyama, Ryoma Nakazaki and Akio Taniguchi.

CHILDREN'S FILM SOCIETY, INDIA

Formed in 1955 under the Society Act of 1860, the Children's Film Society, India (CFSI) is an autonomous body, functioning under the aegis of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India. The formation of CFSI was based on the recommendation of Film and Enquiry Committee which was set up by the Government of India in 1949, with the aim of harnessing the medium of cinema to provide healthy entertainment for children in particular and the youth in general. CFSI conducts film festivals all over India, reaching 40 lakh children in remote areas annually. In the 11th' Five Year Plan, FSI's aim is to progressively expand its reach to most of the 36% of the countries young India who are under the age of 15. With these objectives in view, we regard the Children's Film Society, India and the film movement as an essential part of the overall programme of children's welfare and it should be envisaged by all concerned in this broader framework. The success of this movement will only be possible when it can secure the willing co-operation of the Central Ministry of Education, the State Ministries, other Departments of the Government, as well as public and non-official agencies associated with it. "Children's Film which have a tremendous influence on the minds of children, should be encouraged by all like thinking persons" - Pt. Jawahar Lal Nehru. The CFSI has 3 prime objectives viz., Production & acquisition of films, Distribution and Organisation of International Children's Film Festival. Production & Procurement : CFSI is engaged in the production of feature films, featurettes, animation, short films, puppet films and TV serials. The organisation also procures exhibition rights of award winning Indian and Foreign films. Such films acquired in various foreign languages are then dubbed into Indian languages and exhibited through theatres and T.V. medium. During 52 years of its existence CFSI has produced over 100 feature films and 150 short films, animation, documentary, puppet and serials. During the year 2007-08, 12 films including feature and short were in progress. However, 3 feature films were dubbed in South Indian languages.

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Distribution & Marketing of Films: The CFSI has a marketing section based in Mumbai with two branch offices at Delhi and Chennai and is engaged in the task of exhibiting films in theatres, schools, on TV and through sale of VHS CDs. The marketing activities of the CFSI can be broadly divided into following heads: Individual Screening at Theatres and Schools : This activity is mainly to cater to the requirements of any school or welfare organization. Any individual or school can produce a film of their choice on payment of fixed hire charges and exhibit to the children. District level & State level Festivals; In order to broad base the exhibition activities, CFSI carries children cinema to district and mofussil areas. A capsuled programme is provided to the district administration for a period of 5-7 days. The programmes are popularly known as `Children's Film Festivals'. Telecast : CFSI films apart from being telecast on Doordarshan, have also shown on various T.V, channels like Sahara, Star Gold, etc. Screening in Municipal Schools: In order to cater to the urban poor, rural and tribal children, CFSI has introduced a new scheme to organize community screenings in the remotest parts of the country. The services of various NGOs are taken to carry out this scheme. The CFSI expects to cover some 38 lakh children annually through these screenings spread all over the country. During the year 2007-08, the Marketing Division of CFSI has arranged 6589 shows covering 31,71,222 children audience. Participation in International Film Festival: CFSI's new films are sent to various competitive film festivals all over the world. Many films have won awards, acclaims and accolades through these festivals at International level. Activities in North East: CFSI promotes children's films in regional languages through production and exhibition. Sale of VHS & VCDs: The CFSI films are also available on video cassettes and CDs for private screenings. 17 VHS cassettes and 1123 VCDs were sold during the year 2007-08. Organisation of International Children's Film Festivals: CFSI organizes a biennial International Children's Film Festival called `The Golden Elephant'. The 15th Edition of `The Golden Elephant' was held at Hyderabad from 14th to 20th November, 2007.

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NATIONAL FILM DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION LIMITED

National Film Development Corporation of India is the central agency established to encourage the good cinema movement in the country. The primary goal of the NFDC is to plan, promote and organize an integrated and efficient development of the Indian Film Industry and foster excellence in cinema. Over the years NFDC has provided a wide range of services essential to the growth of Indian Cinema. The NFDC (and its predecessor the film Finance Corporation) has so far funded / produced over 300 feature films. These films, in various Indian languages, have been widely acclaimed and have won many national and international awards. Some of the landmark films of NFDC includes, Gandhi (English) by Sir Richard Attenborough, Salaam Bombay (Hindi) by Mira Nair, Mirch Masala (Hindi) by Ketan Mehta, Jaane Bhi Do Yaaron (Hindi) by Kundan Shah, The Making of the Mahatma (English/Hindi) by Shyam Benegal, Rudaali (Hindi) by Kalpana Lajmi, Ghare Bhaire (Bengali) by Satyajit Ray. NFDC encourages new talent and to promote the multi-lingual diversity of Indian Cinema, produces entirely the first feature film of a Director to be made in any Indian language subject to budgetary cap under this scheme. The films are in various stages of production / completed: Bioscope (Malayalam) by K M Madhusudhnan Paltadacho Munis (The Man Beyond the Bridge) (Konkani) by Laxmikant Shetgaonkr Sanskar (Bengali) by Nabyendu Chatterjee Maya Bazaar (Bengali) by Joydeep Ghosh (Under Production) Parichay (Rajasthani) by Seema Kapoor (Under Production) Simultaneously, the Corporation also endeavours to co-produce small budget, good quality commercially viable films with partners within India and abroad on a public-private partnership basis. Under this scheme, the following films are in various stages of production / completed: Via Darjeeling (Hindi) by Arindam Nandy Manjadikuru (Malayalam) Lucky Red Seeds by Anjali Menon The White Elephant (Hindi) by Aizaz Khan Bubble Gum (Hindi) by Sanjeevan Lal (Under Production)

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NFDC also aims to promote the growth of Indian Cinema through other activities such as Script development, promotion of films made by independent filmmakers in markets abroad, and creation of platforms for greater interaction between Indian filmmakers and members of the film fraternity abroad through the Film Bazaar organized by NFDC along side the International Film Festival of India in Goa since November, 2007. NFDC participates regularly in major Film Markets across the world with a view to not only promoting its own films, but also facilitating the expansion of global markets for Indian Cinema as a whole. NFDC also offer subtitling facilities at discounted rates on films for which NFDC is the Marketing Agent. NFDC also provides pre-production and postproduction technical infrastructure support to the film industry, keeping in pace with the latest technological developments. NFDC has set up a Laser Subtitling Unit which undertakes subtitling of films in various Indian and Foreign languages. This Unit caters to positive and inter positive celluloid films with several Hindi Feature Films having been subtitled in various Indian languages. The recent incorporation of new software has enabled Laser Subtitling in Russian language as well. The Unit is also equipped with Video Subtitling facilities in multi-language formats for all formats of video as well as DVD/VLD Mastering facilities for all formats of Video. NFDC has also provides other technical facilitie's such as; Cine Camera 35mm ARRI BL III and ARRI III with latest flicker free video to assist pre-production facilities available at all centres. Video Center, Chennai, undertakes Telecine Transfer, Video Duplication, Multi-lingual Subtitling, Avid Non-Linear and VCD/DVD Mastering Duplication facilities. The Chennai Center also imparts training workshops for students in the Avid Non-Linear Editing. Equipments and facilities in all formats of Video are available at the Mumbai Project Section for editing and post-production work. The Unit is equipped with SDI and component facilities for recording. NFDC continues to organize festivals of its own and acquired films all over the country in collaboration with Film Societies, Universities, State Film Development Corporations, on a regular basis. The National Film Circle conducts screening of films in all the four metros with a view to spreading culture of cinema. NFDC has set-up a Trust in 1992 known as Cine Artistes Welfare Fund of India (CAWFI) which extends Financial Assistance to needy Cine Artiste

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of yesteryears. This is the biggest ever trust in the Indian Film Industry. The total amount of the Trust (including the Corpus of Rs.4.89 Crores) stands at Rs.6.70 Crores. More than 969 cine artistes have availed pension and other benefits from the Trust and about 445 cine artistes are currently availing financial assistance from the trust. Rs.42.36 lakhs have been disbursed as pension to cine artistes in Financial Year 2007-2008.

Review of Plan Schemes (Financial/Physical Targets Statement showing Financial/Physical targets for 2008-09. Sr No. Name of the scheme Whether new or existing scheme Existing New Existing New Proposed Xlth Plan Outlay (Rs. In Crores ) 30.00 25.00 2.50 2.50 up to 30.11.2008

Year-wise phasing 2008-09 (Rs.ln Crores) 6.50 5.00 0.50 0.50

Annual Physical Targets 2008-09 5 2 Nil 8 Scripts Films Films

1. 2. 3. 4.

Film Production in various regional languages International / Domestic coproductions Promotion of Indian Films in Global Markets Script development

Financial / Physical Exenditure upto 30.11.2008 Sr Name of the scheme No. Year-wise phasing 2008-09 (Rs. In Crores) 6.50 Annual Physical Targets 2008-09 5 Films Actuals 30.11.2008 Financial (Rs. In Crores) 4.06 Actuals upto 30.11.2008 Physical 5 Films 1..Bio scope (Malayalam) 2..Paltadcho Munis ( Konkani) 3..Maya Bazaar (Bengali) 4..Parichay (Rajasthani) 5..Sanskar (Bengali) 4 Films 1. Lucky Red Seeds (Malayalam) 2. Via Darjeeling (Hindi)

1.

Film Production in various regional languages

2.

InternationaiJ Domestic coproductions

5.00

4 Films

1.12

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Mass Media in India 3. The White Elephant (Hindi) 4. Bubble Gum (Hindi)

3. 4.

Promotion of Indian Films in 0.50 Global Markets Script development 0.50

Nil 8 Scripts

Highlights of the Performance of the Corporation in the last five years.

(Rs. in lakhs ) 2003-04 Authorised Capital Paid Up Capital Turnover 1400.00 1399.99 3690.65 2004-05 1400.00 1399.99 2209.28 2596.02 2005-06 1400.00 1399.99 3786.71 3538.56 2006-07 2007-08 1400.00 1399.99 2402.95 2908.55 1400.00 1399.99 3318.99 3456.55

Expenditure including provision 4616.14 for depreciation, interest, amortisation and debts Profit / Loss before tax (925.49) *

(386.74)* 248.15

(505.60)* (227.57)*

Media Organizations - State Governments & Union Territories

199

MEDIA ORGANIZATIONS

STATE GOVERNMENTS

ANDHRA PRADESH

CAPITAL: Hyderabad; Principal Languages: Telugu and Urdu; Area: 2,75,069 sq. kms.; Population: 762.10 Lakhs ( 2001 ); Literacy percentage: 60.5; Number of Newspapers: 1898 (281 dailies); Circulation of Major & Medium Newspapers as on 28.5.2007 Eenadu (Telugu) all editions 11,29,849, Andhra Prabha (Telugu) 3,78,041, Andhra Jyothi (Telugu) 3,65,000, Rahnuma-E-Deccan (Urdu) 26,612, Siasat (Urdu) 43,201, Deccan Chronicle (English) 6,07,446, Citizens Evening (English) 52,338; Radio Stations (AM): Hyderabad, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam., Cuddapah and Adilabad; Radio Stations (F.M.): Nizamabad, Kothagudem, Warangal, Kurnool, Anantapur, Tirupati, Markapur Vijayawada, Visakhpatnam and Hyderabad; FM (Rainbow) : Hyderabad, Vijayawada & Visakhpatnam ; Vividh Bharati : Hyderabad ; Private FM Stations in Andhra Pradesh : Big FM 92.7 SFM 93.3 Radio City 91.1 Radio Mirchi 98.3; Doordarshan Kendra: High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Hyderabad, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Anantapur and, Tirupathi Hills; Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Rajahmundry, Cuddapah, Tirupati, Kurnool, Kakinada, Nellore, Mahabubnagar, Bhadrachalam, Khammam, Srikakulam, Amalapuram, Bhimadole, Ongole, Chittoor, Proddatoor, Adoni, Ramagundam, Guntakal, Nandyal,, Yellandu, Hindupur, Siddipet, Bheemavaram, Giddalur, Atmakur, Jagityal, Gadwal, Hyderabad (DD-2); Private channels : ETV, ETV2, Gemini, Teja, Z-telugu, TV9, MAA TV Number of Cinema Theatres.-2378; Multiplexes : 2 ; Film Studios : 8.

Organisation

Information and Public Relations Department is headed by a Special Commissioner assisted by Director, Additional Directors, Joint Directors, Chief Information Engineer, Deputy Directors, Regional Information Engineers, Assistant Directors and Editors. The Commissionerate has different sections namely, Media Relations, Publications, Photo, Planning

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and Field Publicity, Advertisements, Film, Song and Drama, Exhibitions, Media Information Monitoring Section, Audio/Video Engineering, Administration, Inspections and Accounts section. In addition there is a separate `Publicity Cell" in the Secretariat.

Media Relations

During the year (2006-07) 45,772 press releases, 1060 feature articles, 1734 success stories and 40,560 photographs were released from the Commissionerate.

Field Publicity

The District Public Relations Officers and Divisional Public Relations Officers look after field publicity in their respective jurisdiction.

Song and Drama

The traditional art forms like Harikatha, Burrakatha, Gollasuddulu, Oggukatha and street plays are being used to project Government policies and development programmes to have a better reach to the masses in rural areas. Special cultural programmes and audio cassettes, utilising the services of professional artists were also arranged. 2514 Song and Drama programmes were arranged during the year 2006-07.

Advertisement

The Government has centralised issue of classified advertisements w.e.f. January 1, 1994 in respect of Government Departments and Public Sector Undertakings and Government Corporations through the Department of Information and Public Relations. During the year from April 2006 to March 2007, 4339 classified advertisements, 30 display - advertisements to newspapers, 274 classified advertisements of Corporations and 302 land acquisition notifications were issued.

Publications

During the year (2006-07), 46 adhoc publications containing developmental activities of State Government were brought out. The department is bringing out a monthly journal "ANDHRA PRADESH" in Telugu and Urdu languages. Special articles on Cultural Heritage, Literature, Tourism, Sports, Films, etc., are being covered in the journal. The copies of AP Journal are being sold in open market and made available to VIPs, Writers, Editors, Accredited Journalists, all District Libraries, Gram Panchayats and Subscribers.

Media Organizations - State Governments & Union Territories

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Exhibitions

Periodical exhibitions highlighting the various developmental programmes and schemes of the Government were organised. Department arranged photo exhibitions whenever the Central and State Committees visited the state to assess damage caused by natural calamities. A week-long photo exhibition was arranged at Jubilee hall on the occasion of 75 year Golden Jubilee Celebrations.

Information Centres

There are 8 State Information Centres functioning at Hyderabad, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Rajahmundry, Tirupathi, Tirumala, Warangal and Kurnool apart from AP Information Centre at New Delhi. District Information Centres at District Headquarters and Divisional Information Centres at Divisional Level are supervised by the officers concerned. Research and Reference A well equipped Reference Library with over 20,000 books and reports is maintained by the Department.

Feedback Services

The Department furnished clippings in English, Telugu and Urdu from newspapers to the Hon'ble Chief Minister/Ministers and Secretaries in the Government every day to keep them abreast with the trends in public opinion.

State Level Awards

The A.P. State Film, Television & Theatre Development Corporation, established during 1975 for promotion of film industry in the state, produced 4 documentaries, 3 short films, 12 newsreels and 103 quickies on different subjects during 2006-07. The Corporation has disbursed an amount of Rs. 7.43 lakhs towards cash subsidy to children film and issued Entertainment Tax Concession Certificates to 81 Telugu feature filims during 2006-07. The Corporation proposes to organise Nandi Film/TV Awards for the year 2005 and 2006 in the year financial year 2007-08. It has organised Theatre Award for the year 2006 at Nizamabad during January, 2007.

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

CAPITAL: Itanagar; Principal Languages: Local dialect of different community (Monpa, Miji Aka, Sherdukpen, Nyishi, Apatani, Tagin, Hill Miri, Adi, Khampti, Nocte, Idu-Mishmi, Tangsa, Wancho); Area: 83,743

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sq. kms.; Population: 10,96,702; Literacy Percentage: 54.74; Number of Newspapers: 4 dailies, 2 weeklies; Circulation of Newspapers: N/A; Principal Dailies: Arunachal Times, Echo of Arunachal, Eastern Citizen, The Dawn Lit Post and weeklies: Arunachal Front and Arunachal News; Radio Stations: N/A; FM N/A; Doordarshan Kendra: (i)High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Itanagar; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Pasighat, Tezu and Miao; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters, (VLPTs) : Along, Geku, Ziro, Raga, Daporijo, Manigong, Pipidipu, Yomcha, Basar, Mariyang, Palin, Taliha, Baririjo, Darak, Mechuka Sangram, Boleng and Sagalee (the Maintenance of these Transmitters is at Itanagar), Tawang, Seijosa, Chayangtajo, Bomdila, Seppa, Dirang, Kalaktang, Rupa (the maintenance centre of these transmitters is DDMC Tezpur), Namsai, Roing, Changlang, Hayuliang, Khonsa, Anini, Nampong, Gensi, Tirbin,Tuting, Hunli, Liromoba, Yingkiong, Kaying and Khimyong (the maintenance of these transmitters is DDMC, Dibrugarh); (iv) Relay Centres: N/A; Number of Cinema Theatres: N/A ( Permanent N/A ....; Touring........N/A.....).

Organisation

The Directorate of Information, Public Relations and Printing is headed by a Director, who is assisted by three Deputy Directors, one Assistant Director and number of Technical officers. They include Photographic Officer, Art Expert, PROs, Publication Manager and Administrative Officer. The Directorate has ten sections namely (a) Publication Cell (b) Projection Cell (c) Community Listening Cell (d) Art and Exhibition Cell (e) Song and Drama Unit (f) Photographic Cell (g) Film Production Cell (h) Advertising Cell and (i) Video and TV cell. Press Publicity Daily press releases, photo releases are carried out both from headquarters as well as the District Offices of the Directorate covering VVIP/VIP visits and important developmental activities. Feed back services are also provided to the government by the Directorate in various forms. Projection Cell The Directorate has 41 Projection Units all over the State with necessary

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staff and equipment. Each projection unit on an average puts up 15 films shows in a month apart from other allied activities including publicity campaigns on various issues. Art and Exhibition Cell This organizes photographic exhibitions on various important occasions including participation in the Republic Day Tableau at New Delhi. Song and Drama The unit performs cultural programmes at various places within and outside the State to promote national integration and cultural development of the State. Publications Cell It deals with publication of " Arunachal Review ", a quarterly magazine, Arunachal Pradesh Gazette, folders, pamphlets, booklets, brochures, posters, stickers, diary and calendar and other related works. Photo and Films Photo coverages are provided to different developmental activities and are made available to different press media for publication. It also preserve photos for future record/reference. Community Listening Cell There are as many as 2260 Community Listening centers spread all over the State disseminating information through radio network. Film Production Cell The Directorate has produced 22 documentary films both on VHS and celluloid on different subjects so far. Printing Press It undertakes printing of all publications of the State Government. Advertisement Cell All Government advertisements are released to the newspapers by this cell.

ASSAM

CAPITAL: Dispur; Principal Language: Assamese; Area: 78,438 Sq. Kms; Population: 26,63,807; Literacy Percentage: 64.28; Number of

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Mass Media in India

Newspapers: N/A.; Dailies: 28; Bi-Weeklies: 7; Weeklies: 9; Circulation of Newspapers: Cover 32% of total population; Principal Dailies: English: The Assam Tribune, The Sentinel, the North East Times; Assamese: Ammar Asom, Asomiya Pratidin, Dainik Janambhumi, Dainik Agradoot, Dainik Asom; Radio Stations: 11; FM Stations: 4; Doordarshan Kendra: 3; (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 5;(ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 21; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): I; (iv) Relay Centres: 33; Number of Cinema Theatres: 144; Permanent : 129; Touring : 15.

Organisation

The Directorate of Information and Public Relations is a level one Directorate of the State Government headed by a Director and consists of numbers of media units like Press Liaison, Production, Exhibition, Field Publicity, Film, Photography, Cultural Unit, Press Research and Information Centre, etc. The Directorate has a hill wing with head quarters at Haflong. One Additional Directorate is incharge of Hill wing. Besides, there are three Regional Officers at Jorhat, Kokrajhar and Silchar and one Deputy DIPR's office at Karbi-Anglong, Diphu. At District level, there are 19 (Nineteen) District Information and Public Relations Officers and at Sub-Divisional level, there are 23 (Twenty-Three) Sub-Divisional Information and Public Relations Officers. In addition, there are Assam Information Centres each in Delhi and Kolkata. The Directorate of Information and Public Relations is headed by a Director, who is assisted by 2 (two) Additional Director of Information and Public Relations, 4 (four) Joint Director of Information and Public Relations, 4 (four) Deputy Director of Information and Public Relations, and, 11 (eleven) Liaison Officers, Press Research Officer, Publication Manager, etc. The Directorate has several sections namely (a) Publication (b) Art and Exhibition (c) Song and Drama (d) Photographic (e) Film Production (f) Advertising (g) Video and TV (h) Computer (i) Paper Clipping, etc. Press Liaison Section The Press Liaison Section is one of the most important functionary of the Directorate. This section keeps close liaison with the press and media

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organisations. It issues regularly press releases, press notes, government statements, clarifications, photographs, etc., and co-ordinates to organise programmes of VVIP, VIP and important government functions, meeting, seminars, etc. It takes care of conducted tours, issuance of Accreditation and Recognition Card to the press and media persons. This Section keeps close watch over various news items appearing in the newspapers and paper clippings are sent to the concerning authorities regularly. Field Publicity In every District and Civil Sub-Division of the State there is District and Sub-Divisional Information and Public Relations Officer under this Directorat equipped with vehicles, public address system, film projector, cinema, etc. Seminars, Group discussions and Essay competitions are organised amongst the students of school, college and university. In addition, launching of anti-insurgency programmes, campaign on peace and non-violence have also been taken up. Song and Drama The Directorate has its own Cultural troupe attached to Head Office at Dispur consisting of staff artists and also a mini cultural troupe for Barak Valley region and this is attached to the District Information and Public Relations Office, Cachar, Silchar. Advertisement The Directorate has an Advertising Section. All the State Government Advertisements are routed through this Directorate. Expenditure for display and classified advertisements is also borne by this Directorate. Publications The Directorate publishes one weekly newspaper Raijor Batori, one monthly journal Asoma in Assamese language and a monthly Assam Information in English language and also publishes two monthly news bulletins Raidoni Khurand in Bodo language and Sillo Millo in Mising language. Besides booklets, pamphlets, folders, posters, etc., are published from time to time. Photo and Films The Directorate releases press photographs to various newspapers and news agencies. There is a photo laboratory in this Directorate. Video films are also regularly sent to DDK. This Directorate uses to send digital still photographs to various newspapers and news agencies through Internet regularly.

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Mass Media in India

Community Viewing Scheme In Block and Panchayat level some community viewing centres have been established for viewing Television and Video programmes for rural masses. Exhibition This Directorate has a self contained Exhibition Unit at headquarter Dispur apart from 3 (Three) mini Exhibitions units at Haflong (Hill Cell), Jorhat and Tezpur. Information Centres / Library The Directorate consists of three Information Centres, one at Dispur with a reference Library and another two at New Delhi and Kolkata. Research and Reference Section The Research and Reference section is responsible to provide services to journalists, Officials and Scholars and also makes available the newspaper clippings. Feed Back Services Press and People's opinion and reactions are compiled and submitted to the Government regularly. The Inter Media Publicity Co-ordination Committee (IMPCC) reviews and monitors the functioning of the Media organisations based at Guwahati. All the heads of media wings of the State and Central Government are the members of this Committee. Website and E-mail Address www.assamgov.org and E- mail - [email protected] / Janasanyog mail@cijrediffmaiLcom

BIHAR

CAPITAL: Patna; Principal Language: Hindi; Area: 94,163 sq. kms, Population:8,29,98,509; Literacy percentage: Male-60.32 Female-33.57; Number of Newspapers: 1581 (Dailies 404); Circulation of Daily Newspapers: 38,75,534 copies of 131 Newspapers; Principal Dailies:

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Hindustan (Hindi), Patna. Aj (Hindi) Patna; Doordarshan Kendra: High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Patna, Ranchi, Katihar, Daltonganj; Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Gaya Munger, Dhanbad, Purnia, Bhagalpur, Jamshedpur, Darbhanga, Bettiah, Bokaro, Begusarai, Motihari, Forbesganj, Buxar, Gopalganj, Deoghar, Madhepura, Dumka, Ghatshila, Khagaria, Jamui; Relay Centre: Nil; Number of Cinema Theatres: 386.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations which is headed by a Director General has the following sections (a) Press and Advertisement (b) Publications (c) Song and Drama (d) Periodicals (e) Exhibition Film Production (g) Maintenance, and (h) Radio, At the Headquarters the Director General is assisted by Directors, joint and Deputy Directors in charge of various media and an Assistant Director. The Film Section is headed by the Film Production Officer, Maintenance Section by a Maintenance Engineer and Radio Section by a Radio Engineer. The Exhibition Officer is in charge of the Exhibition Wing of the department. The Department has constituted a service known as Bihar Information Service since April, 1981 and has a cadre strength of 75 sectioned posts. In the field, there are Joint and Deputy Directors at the Divisional Headquarters and District Public Relations Officers at the District Headquarters. Additional District Public Relations Officers are posted at many of the Sub-Divisional Headquarters. Besides there is a Press Advisor in charge of the Bihar Information Centre at New Delhi. Song and Drama The Song and Drama Section which utilises live entertainment media for creating awareness among the masses in rural Bihar was set up in 1956 as an in built cell of the Information and Public Relations Department. Today, it has become a major section of the Information and Public Relations Department. Besides a unit at Headquarters, it has six Divisional units posted at Divisional Headquarters. The basic theme handled by the section in these field programmes is related to various aspects of national integration, communal harmony, democratic values and development activities. Special shows were organised on eradication of untouchability, family welfare, rural health scheme, village and small industries, adult education and different aspects of socio-economic change. Publications Monthly Bihar, is published in English, Hindi and Urdu from

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Mass Media in India

Headquarters and The Adivasi, a Hindi weekly and Hor Sambad Santhali weekly are published from Ranchi and Dumka respectively. Special issues of these journals are published on Independence Day and Republic Day. Publicity literature. such as posters, booklets, leaflets on different development activities, national integration and communal harmony were published. Films There are ten Divisional Units working under this section. A total of 80 units are functioning at the Divisional and District Sub-Divisional level. During 2006, 2007 and 2008 Film festivals were organized in Patna. Film Appreciation Course was conducted at Soochna Bhawan. Exhibitions Exhibitions are organised in tribal areas also, which are visited by thousands of Adivasis and non-Adivasis. Besides, small exhibitions are organised on activities cultural aspects. The Exhibition Wing is well equipped and has two mobile units each at Ranchi and Muzaffarpur. Information Centres There is one State Information Centre at the Headquarters, seven Divisional Information Centres at the Divisional Headquarters, 70 Information Centres at District and Sub-Divisional levels. In Delhi there is one Information Centre headed by a Press Advisor which caters the needs of parliamentarians, pressmen and the public with respect to news and materials regarding Bihar. It is equipped with teleprinter, T.V. library facilities and photography section. In all there are 80 Information Centres. Special arrangements were made to impart latest information during the Kosi disaster. Field Publicity Eighty-two Mobile Units are fully equipped with cinema projectors, generators and publicity vans. Film shows are arranged with the help of these units. Ten Divisional Headquarters units are equipped with super power public address sets equipment and District Headquarters units with 78 pieces of high power public address sets. Besides, there are 170 low power public address sets in various sub-divisional units. Two exhibition wings are also fully equipped with cinema projectors, public address sets and other equipment for publicity. The units also arrange public meetings and group talks and launch intensive publicity campaigns on subjects of local and national importance.

Media Organizations - State Governments & Union Territories

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Information Cell For collecting developmental news from various departments with a view to giving adequate publicity at the policy making stage, the Directorate has created an Information Cell. Research and Reference The section maintains indexing and clipping services and library facilities at the State Headquarters. Press The Press Section of the department feeds the electronic and print media regularly. Regular press-notes are issued. Video coverage of important programmes is done. The officers of the department posted at headquarters tagged with different government departments file stories, which are duly released. Photography wing of this section also covers the government programmes. Advertisement The classified and display advertisements of the government are released to the newspapers through the advertisement section of the department. Feedback Services Press reactions are analysed regularly. Public Relations studies are collected, and compiled and sent to concerned departments by the Field Officers.

CHHATTISGARH

CAPITAL : Raipur; Principal Language : Hindi; Area : 1,35,100 Sq. k.m.; Population : 2,07,95,956; Literacy percentage: 65.18. Number of Newspapers: 219. Dailies 64, Weeklies 112; Fortnightlies 17, Monthlies 26; Principal Dailies: Raipur : Dainik Bhaskar, Navabharat, Deshbandhu, Haribhoomi, Agradoot, Jansatta, Central Cronicle, Hindustan Times, Hitavada, Raudramukhi Swar, Pratidin Rajdhani, Samachar Lok,

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Mass Media in India

Rashtriya Hindi Mail; Bastar : Dandakaranya Samachar, Highway Channel, Bastar Kiran, Hindsat; Dhamtari : Prakhar Samachar, M.P. Deluxe Times; Durg : Chintak, Amar Kiran, Pahat, Shram Bindu; Rajnandgaon: Sabera Sanket, Nandgaon Times, Chhattisgarh Jhalak, Chhattisgarh Yug, Dainik Dawa; Bilaspur: Bhaskar, Navabharat, Deshbandhu, Haribhoomi, Lok Swar, Prajashakti, Agradoot; Raigarh : Raigarh Sandesh, Kelo Pravah, Ajitwani; Sarguja : Ambikavani; Korba : Aranyachal, Tarun Chhattisgarh, Karnapriya, Samvad Sadhana, Rashtriya Vijay Mail, Sandhya Samikshak Dainik Lokswar; Doordarsahan : There are two programming stations at Raipur and Bastar; High Power Transmitters : 4 at Jagadalpur, Ambikapur, Raipur 2; Low Power Transmitters : 15 at Manendragarh, Pendra Road, Korba, Kharasia, Sakti, Raigarh, Bilaspur, Champa, Kharod, Dongargarh, Dalli Rajhara, Narayanpur, Konta, Bailadila; Very Low Transmitters: 7 at Patthalgaon, Jashpurnagar, Sarangagarh, Koelibeda, Pankhajur, Kondagaon, Bijapur. Akashwani: There are 5 all India Radio Stations - Raipur, Bilaspur, Ambikapur, Jagadalpur and Raigarh; Number of Cinema theatres : 88

Organisation

The Directorate of Public Relations is headed by a Director, an LA.S. officer of the Joint Secretary rank. The Directorate structure consists of 2 Additional Directors, 5 Joint Directors, 10 Deputy Directors and 12 Assistant Directors. District Offices of the Directorate of Public Relations are functioning in all 16 districts of the State. There are information Centres at Raipur and Bilaspur. Directorate also plans to set up informations centre at Delhi and Bombay very soon. All headquarters the work is mainly divided into following wings: (1) Press Release and Public Relations, (2) Publications, (3) Field Publicity, (4) Advertisement, (5) Administration and Accounts, (6) Films, (7) Registration and Reference. Website Website of Directorate of Public Relations `dprchhattisgarh.org' is being developed. Once launched, the website will provide all necessary information about Chhattisgarh State, daily press releases, photographs, etc. Field Publicity Filed Publicity Section organizes exhibitions and cultural programmes throughout the State. This wing also arranges tableau for Republic Day celebrations. In Republic day celebrations 2002 Chhattisgarh though being a newborn state, state's tableau and cultural programme was widely appreciated by Hon'ble Prime Minister and viewers.

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Song and Drama Song and Drama is a part of field publicity. To ensure wide publicity of the government policies and welfare programmes, cultural programmes based on folk songs, plays and puppet show in local dialects are organised. Reference Section Reference Section provides reference materials to journalists, research scholars and departmental officers on various subjects and events- both contemporary and past. The section supplies reference material pertaining to Chhattisgarh to various yearbooks published by different organizations in the country. Feedback Services Newspapers clippings are provided to Governor, Chief Minister and Ministers and high officials of various departments enabling them to take follow up action. Press Publicity The press section of the Directorate feeds the electronic and print media regularly. Press releases, photographs and feature articles are issued throughout the year. The Directorate co-ordinates publicity activities with all other departments. Also, visual coverage of various government events and activities are done. Publications In order to encourage journalists to pursue professional excellence, the Department of Public Relations has announced Chandulal Chandrakar fellowship of Rs. two lakh award annually. Chhattisgarh Samvad Chhattisgarh Samvad, an institution registered under cooperative act is engaged in multimedia activities. It has recently started publishing a weekly newspaper `Rojgar Aur Niyojan' from November 2002.

GOA

CAPITAL: Panaji; Principal Languages:Konkani (Official language), Marathi, English. Area: 3,702 sq. kms; Population: 13,48,000 (As per 2001 Census); Literacy percentage: 82.32; Number of Newspapers: 10; Principal Dailies: Navhind Times, (English), 25,000 Herald (English), 25,000

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Gomantak Times (English), 5000, The Times of India (Goa Editions), Gomantak (Marathi) 22,000, Navprabha (Marathi) 5,000 Tarun Bharat (Marathi) 25,000, Goa Doot (Marathi), 5,000, Sanatan Prabhat (Marathi), 2,000 Sunaparant (Konkani), 3,000 Rodio Stations : All India Radio (Prasar Bharti), MW/SW/FM and Gyanwani. Doordarshan Kendra Local Channels : Goa Doordarshan, AltinhoPanaji; Number of Cinema Halls/ Multiplexes : 14. Cultural Centres: Kala Academy, Ravindra Bhavans and Rajiv Kala Mandir.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Publicity is headed by a Director who is assisted by Joint Director and two Information Officers. Press Publicity The Department regularly issues press releases/advertisements and photographs, besides TV coverages, organises press conferences and tours of journalists to various development projects in Goa as well as neighbouring areas and also provide feedback to government. Field Publicity The Department organises film shows, exhibitions and state film festival. Publications The Department brings out publications of various types including welfare schemes and other issues concerning Goa. Besides, achievements of governments are highlighted through books/pamphlets. Special issues of "Nave Parva" are also published for projecting Goa's development.The Department also purchases books on Goa's history, culture, etc. Films There is a plan scheme `production of films'under which films on various aspects of goan life, welfare scheme and on `eminent Goans' are produced. The Government has formulated a scheme "The Goa Scheme of Financial Assistance for Films 2006" to extend financial assistance to Goan

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filmmakers to encourage production of quality celluloid as well as telefilms, short films, documentaries, etc., and to boost the image of the state of Goa in the film world. An assistance of upto 50% of the cost of production of the film is given under the scheme.

The scheme is implemented by Entertainment Society of Goa. The Entertainment society of Goa organises International Film Festival of India (IFFI) every year.

Song and Drama Services The traditional media is being utilised for propagating government schemes and programmes. Under the scheme the department provides finances for the cultural programmes for propagating Government's welfare schemes.

GUJARAT

CAPITAL: Gandhinagar; Principal Language: Gujarati; Area: 1,96,024 sq. kms; Population: 5,06,71,017 (as per 2001); Literacy Percentage: 69.29 %; Number of Newspapers: 4045; Principal Dailies: Gujarat Samachar, Sandesh, Divya Bhasker, Jansatta, Loksatta, Jai Hind, Times of India, Indian Express, Phool Chhab, Saurshtra Samachar, Akila, Gujarat Mitra, Kutch Mitra, Saurashtra Bhoomi, Radio Stations (FM) Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Rajkot, Surat, Godhra Non F.M. Stations: Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Rajkot, Bhuj, Himmat Nagar and Ahwa. Doordarshan Kendra: 73 Centres (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs). 8 centres: Ahmedabad DD-1 and DD-2 Rajkot DD-1 and DD-2 Surat DD-1 and DD-2 Dwarka, Bhuj (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs) 62 Centres :(iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs) 3 Centres :(iv) Relay Centres: NIL; Number of Cinema Theatres: 313 and Multiplexs 36.

Organisation

Information Department of the state encourages the journalists by awarding prizes for the best writings. For the welfare of active journalists, State has introduced Group Insurance Scheme, under this scheme at least 732 journalists have been covered till now. In case of natural death Rs. 50,000/- and in case of accidental death Rs. 1,00,000/- is paid to the kin of the deceased accredited journalist.

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State Government brings out its own publication `Gujarat'(News feature fortnightly) with circulation of more than two lakh copies "Rojgar Samachar" (Employment news weekly) with circulation of 57000 copies. Information Department brings out outlets, folders, posters, etc., on various welfare schemes of Government for free distribution among the people.Department had provided 52,315 news items, 337 articles and features to the press for publishing. Press Publicity State has taken up various liberal policies for the press. As a result, State has 215 dailies, 1500 weeklies and 2330 other periodicals, to provide better services in the field of news and features to the press. State has strengthened Information Offices with modem electronics equipments and e-Governance. Doordarshan Gujarat has two DD studio one at Ahmedabad and other at Rajkot. Moreover, there are 7 AIR Stations with 6 FM Stations which highlight the local culture, customs and tradition to create the public opinion. The Directorate of Information does constant monitoring of news channels and draws attention towards negative news and also gives clarification for the same. The Department also records programmes for telecast on electronic media. It also prepares CDs of the Government's programmes. State government has produced the following programmes 1. Zarookho 2. Parivartan 3. Yashgatha Gujaratni 559 episodes 480 episodes 212 episodes

to highlight culture, customs tradition, history, geography and welfare schemes of the state. State Government also produces the Cassettes on culture, history, customs and traditions, education and development programmes which are screened by the local cable network in the important cities of the state throughout the year. State has adopted Information Technology policy. Under this policy, Government is upgrading the facilities in District Information Offices. All the 25 District Offices and state headquarters have been interconnected with electronic data communication facilities In the last decade, the importance and use of the electronic media has increased on a large scale. For the maximum usage of the electronic media G-Smart "Gujarat State Multimedia Resource Techno-wing " has been

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activated. An independent structure for electronic media has been set-up. The department and its district offices are now well-equipped with modern apparatus along with latest camera units in all districts with a view to giving information and total picture of achievements and progress report of public welfare schemes, which can be telecast through T.V. and Radio. This network has been connected with G-SMART. The Doordarshan and radio are used to create maximum awareness among the people. The Department has its own three websites: www.gujaratinformation.net, www.statetenders.com and www.gujaratpublication.com The electronic media has been utilized to its maximum and government has been successful to reach to five crore people of the state with true and authentic information. The Department has produced CDs. on various achievements and developmental work and telecast through a powerful medium of cable network of atleast 2601 cable operators of state.The Department also provided visuals, news clippings during this year to Doordarshan by network of high bend. Moreover, M.R.S. (Media Response System) has been activated in information department. Photo and Films For the benefit and entertainment to the trible villages, Government provided colour T.V. sets free of cost. Colour TV have been installed in the village panchayats, schools and other community centres. Film and Exhibition branch also made jingles for broadcast under TASP and SCP schemes and produced documentary films on various subjects relating to tribal areas. District and Taluka offices of the Information Department are equipped with film projector and VCR to arrange regular film shows in rural and urban areas. Folk Media Rural areas do not have access for film, T.V. and such other electronic media. Traditional media like Diaro, Drama, Bhavai, Puppet show, Katha kirtan etc. are very popular in the rural population. Information department exclusively uses these media for spreading messages of development and welfare schemes of Government. Website and E-mail Address Websitewww.gujaratinformation.net E-mail dirinfo(a)gularat.gov.in

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HARYANA

CAPITAL : Chandigarh; Principal Language: Hindi; Area: 44,212 Sq kms.; Population: 2,11,44,564 (2001); Literacy Percentage: 67.91; Number of Newspapers:455 Circulation of Newspapers: N/A; Radio Stations (AM/ FM), 3; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 21 Number of Cinema Halls/Multiplexes : 76/19.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations is headed by a Director, assisted by Addtional Director. Besides, there are five Joint Directors who look after the work of the Press, Field Publicity, Production, Research and Reference and Technical Wing. There is also one Project Director and one Senior Exhibition organiser. There are 12 Deputy Directors including three RPLO's (for press liaisoning work) to look after the work of the press, TV, Research and Reference, Production, Magazines, Field, Feedback and Photography and one Film Officer for the Film Wing. Publication The Department's Major Publications are: Haryana Sanvad (Hindi) Jai Haryana (Hindi fornightly wall poster), Tamir-e-Haryana (Urdu monthly) and other publicity literature. Exhibitions This wing organises exhibitions in and outside the State by displaying model charts, photographs, depicting the State's developmental projects. Press Publicity The Press Publicity Wing releases Press notes, articles, messages, radio and TV talks, interviews displays and classifies advertisement and reserves press clippings for official use. Field Publicity The field Publicity units are located at Districts, Sub-Division and Block levels. These units organise regular film-shows, drama shows, bhajans,

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public meetings, seminars on different aspects and the over-all development of the State. Information Centres The network of information Centres in the State provide necessary information to masses through newspapers and magazines. Each information Centre is equipped with T.V. and VCP facilities. Resesearch and Reference This section communicates information regarding State Government's policies to the masses through its Sanket Vartas and other annual and monthly publications. This section also provides reference facilities through its Research and Reference Library. The feedback of Government policies is done through press clippings and a daily dairy of events. The State Government has announced the first ever media policy of the State, which included creation of a "Patrakar Kalayan Kosh" with Rs. 50 lakh as State Government's contribution, allotment of plots by HUDA for group housing societies of journalists, enhancement in insurance cover from Rs. one lakh to Rs. 2.5 lakh, accreditation to those working on contractual basis and the representatives of electronic media and enhancement of the limit of free travel facility in Haryana Roadways buses for accredited journalists from 2500 kms to 4000 kms per year. The outlay for plan schemes of the department is Rs. 25 crore for the year 2008-09. Website and E-mail Address E-mail Address [email protected] and [email protected]

HIMACHAL PRADESH

CAPITAL : Shimla; Principal Language: Hindi; Area: 55,673 sq. kms.; Population:60,77,900; Literacy Percentage: 77.13; Number of Newspapers:8; Circulation of Newspapers:5,00,000 (approx) ; Principal Dailies: Amar Ujala, Dainik Bhasker, Divya Himachal, Amar Ujala Punjab Kesri, Dainik Jagran, The Tribune, Hindustan Times, Times of

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India and Indian Express ; Number of weekly newspapers: 23; Radio Station: AIR Shimla; FM Stations: Shimla Dharamsala and Hamirpur (Local Radio Stations); Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Shimla and Kasauli; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 11; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters(VLPTs): 38; (iv) Relay Centre: Shimla and Kasauli; Number of Cinema Theatres: N/A.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations in Himachal Pradesh is headed by the Director. It has its Press Liaison offices at Delhi. Chandigarh and Jalandhar and Regional office at Dharamshala, Mandi and District Public and Information Offices in all the 12 district headquarters. The Department has also its own Electronic News Gathering ( ENG) Unit. Press Publicity The Department issues press releases of important functions and meetings of VVIPs/VIPs and other important meetings and also issues features on development, historical, cultural and other aspects at State, District and SubDivision level. Press publicity is also being done through press Liasion Offices located at Delhi and Chandigarh. The Department organizes Press Conferences and conducts press parties at various levels. Field Publicity Field Publicity Units have been setup at district, sub-divisions and block levels and all the field publicity is being done through exhibitions, song and drama, distribution of publicity literature, video shows, public meetings, seminars, workshops and rallies besides holding group discussions for the general public. Song and Drama The Department has four Drama units, one at the State Headquarter and one each at District Headquarter at Shimla, Dharamsala, and Kullu Districts. Regional Drama Units are also being engaged from time to time to do the publicity of Government policies and programmes. Publications The Department has its two Publications one Giriraj weekly and another Himprastha monthly.

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Photo and Films Photo section of the Department covers functions of VVIP's/VIPs visits, fairs, festivals, development events and various other functions. These photographs are kept in library record and are also issued for publication in different newspapers, magazines and the website. Photographs are also available on payment basis to the common man. Community Viewing Scheme A community viewing scheme is also run by the Department. 500 TV sets and 300 Dish Antennas and 4035 DTH receive systems have been installed under this scheme. Information Centres There is one Information Centre at the state level besides one each in all the twelve districts of the state. Press Clubs/Rooms For the convenience of the press people, one Press Club is being run at state headquarter Shimla and Press Rooms are available at the district headquarters and sub-divisions. Website The Department has developed its own web portal himachalpr.gov.in having database facilities. The website is provided easy accessibility to the information both to the the public and to the media resulting into the transparency in the working of the Government. Daily Press releases, photographs, routine features and articles are being uploaded on the website. Moreover, news clippings pertaining to Himachal Pradesh from all the newspapers are being made available which has improved the flow of information within the Department. E-mail Addresses : dprhp cr,yahoo.com ; dprhimachal(n,gmail.com ; [email protected]

JAMMU AND KASHMIR

CAPITAL : Srinagar (Summer); Jammu (Winter); Principal Languages: Urdu, Hindi, Kashmiri, Dogri, Pahari, Punjabi, Ladakhi, Balti, Gojri, Derdi and Badharwahi; Area : 2,22,236 sq kms; Population: 101.43 lakhs;

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Literacy percentage: 65; Number of Newspapers: 378 (including 132 dailies and 152 weeklies) Principal Dailies: Kashmir Times, Daily Excelsior, State Times and Himalyan Mail (Jammu), Greater Kashmir, Kashmir Monitor, Kashmir Observer, Mirror of Kashmir and Kashmir Images (Srinagar); Doordarshan Kendra: High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 29; Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 23; Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 115; Relay Centres: 7; Radio Stations: 4: Srinagar, Jammu, Leh Kargil and Kathua; Commercial Broadcasting Service: Srinagar; Yuvawani Service: Srinagar and Jammu; Number of Cinema Halls:13

Organisation

The Department of Information and public Relations is headed by Director and the cadre strength (Gazetted) includes four Joint Directors (including one Director PR, New Delhi) 12 Deputy Directors, 8 Assistant Directors, 3 Assistant Directors and 27 Information Officers or equivalent in status, one Information Officer in Horticulture P&M, besides there is one Film Production Officer, one Script Writer, 3 Films Officers, one Chief Photo Officer, two Photo Officers, one Films Editor, one Exhibition Officer and one Store and Maintenance Officer. The Divisions of Kashmir and Jammu are headed by Joint Directors. The Department has two Bureaus in New Delhi and Jalandhar. It has divisional level offices at Srinagar and Jammu and District Information Centres in all the districts barring the newly created eight districts. The Department has 28 Tehsil Information Centres. Of these, 15 are in Kashmir division and 13 in Jammu division. There are also two Ladies Information Centres, two Youth Information Centres, two Cultural Centres and two Field Publicity Units, one each at Srinagar and Jammu. In addition, there are two Model Information Centres, one each in Srinagar and Jammu. One Mobile Information Centre at Pahalgam and one Information Centre at Katra. While the Youth Information Centres, Cultural Offices and Field Publicity Units are headed by the officials of the rank of Information Officers, all other units are supervised by Assistant Information Officers. Functions Essentiallly, the job of all the units of the Department is the image building

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of the Government, dissemination of information about its policies and programmes and ensuring coverage by the print and electronic media. To achieve its objective, the Department functions through various units like Press and Public Relations, Film, Photo, Exhibition, Culture, Field Publicity, Publications, Advertisements, Scanning and Monitoring and Reference and Research. It normally works in three shifts starting from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. and some times up to midnight. Press and Public Relations This is the nerve centre of the Department. The primary job here is to obtain Government news, shape it in professional manner and circulate to the media in Srinagar, Jammu and outside the State. Interaction with media persons to achieve maximum coverage of the official handouts, scan and monitor news and other material, issue clarifications/rebuttals where necessary, and forward the feedback to the concerned quarters in the Government are other jobs attended to by this unit. The unit functions both at the Directorate and the Divisional levels. The Accreditation Cards to media persons are issued by the unit at the Directorate level. At present, 165 correspondents belonging to print and electronic media within the State and Country are accredited with the Government and Accreditation Cards have been issued to them by the Department. Having strengthened the news transmission apparatus, the Department releases handouts in English, Urdu and Hindi languages and ensures their dissemination to media offices through Modem, E-mail, Fax and manual delivery. The photographs of official functions are sent through E-mail to newspaper offices while as video footage is delivered to Doordarshan and cable network channels. During the year 2007-08, as many as 4290 handouts were released by the Directorate. During the current year up to June, 1261 handouts have been issued. The coverage of the handouts and photo and film footage in the media has been almost 100 percent. Besides, the two divisional offices released 6002 handouts during the same period. During the current year, 1646 handouts were issued by the Divisions till June 2008. Likewise, the Film and Photo Units covered as many as 5548 official functions during the year 2007-08. The visuals and footage of these functions were delivered to the media organizations and journalists with near 100 percent coverage. Between March and June this year, 303 official functions have been covered, photos released and film footage provided to media organizations.

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Some of the very important events covered by the Department over and above its routine work include the visit of the President of India, Prime Minister of India, Chief Justice of India, Union Ministers and Union Secretaries. The Film Unit produces weekly programme, Aks-e-Parwaz, based on development activities in the State and telecast by Doordarshan Kendras of Srinagar and Jammu. The Film Unit has also produced two documentaries on the developmental activities which were telecast from Doordarshan and all local cable television network channels, besides screening these at district headquarters. Publications The Department has a Publication Unit which undertakes the publication of periodicals, booklets, brochures, leaflets, books, etc. On regular basis, following bi-monthly periodicals are published: "Tameer" (Urdu), "Yojana" (Hindi), "Kashmir Today" (English), "Aalove" (Kashmiri), "Lo" (Dogri) and "Kasheer" (Urdu-Kashmiri Bi-Lingual). During the year 2007-08, as many as 17 issues of regular publications and four special publications were issued. A special publication brought laurels for the Department when issue of `Aalove' was included in the syllabus of M. A. (Kashmiri) University of Kashmir. Advertisements The Department is the nodal agency for release of Government advertisements to newspapers. Advertisements are issued according to the guidelines laid in the Advertisements Policy formulated by the J&K Government in 1996. The State Government approved rates for advertisements are Rs. 27 per single column cm. to dailies and Rs. 22 per single column cm. to weeklies and fortnightlies. Cultural Units Two Cultural Units of the Department are functional at Srinagar and Jammu which publicise Government policies and programmes by way of staging cultural shows, dramas, variety programmes and also educate people on social issues. During the year 2007-08, as many as 218 cultural shows were organized across the State. In addition, 33 variety programmes, 6 dramas/skits were also staged. The significant cultural events organized by the Department include programmes at the Sindhu Darshan Mela, Leh and Kashmir Haat.

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During the current year up to the end of June 2008, as many as 57 Cultural programmes, 20 variety programmes and 8 dramas/ tourist shows, etc., were performed by the Cultural Units. Exhibition Wing Exhibition is another visual medium used by the Department to reach out to the masses with policies and programmes of the Government. Photo exhibitions are held at State, provincial and district level in which the achievements of the Government are being displayed. Besides, similar messages are disseminated though hoardings at 12 prominent places in the State. During the year 2007-08, as many 25 exhibitions were organized at various places in the State. Two exhibitions were held at New Delhi and one, in collaboration with Indian Railways, at Jammu. Field Publicity Units The Department has two Field Publicity Units, one each at Jammu and Srinagar. The units install and operate PAS (Public Address System) at official functions, meetings and conferences throughout the State. The PAS facilities are also provided during the Amarnathji Yatra through mobile and stationary Public Address Systems. The District Information Centres have also facility for providing PAS at local level. During the last year, the Units covered 1418 functions in the State including the Republic Day and Independence Day celebrations throughout the State. Besides, PAS is installed at the functions attended by the President, Prime Minister and Union Ministers during their visits to J&K. The Units also make important announcements and record speeches of VVIPs. Scanning and Monitoring To keep the Government abreast with the material being carried by newspapers and other periodicals, the Department monitors and scans all the papers at various levels. Daily Press Round-ups are prepared and sent to the concerned Government quarters for perusal. The scanning and monitoring of newspapers and cable network channels has been revamped. A full fledged unit has been created. The daily press round ups are prepared in the morning at Srinagar, Jammu and New Delhi. These reports are consolidated at the Directorate level and sent to the Chief Secretary and Secretary to Government, Information Department for perusal.

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Besides, clippings of national and local newspapers and periodicals on important subjects are sent to the concerned quarters for perusal. Adverse press clippings are forwarded to the concerned Administrative Secretaries and Chief Secretary's Office for perusal and necessary action. The rebuttals/ clarifications are issued on the basis of the response from these quarters for publication in the newspapers. Regular statement of follow up of adverse press reports is sent to the Chief Secretary. Collection of feed back is yet another activity undertaken by the Department which helps the Government to analyse the impact of its policies on the masses. Reference and Research The Department has Research and Reference units comprising books of high reference value both at Srinagar and Jammu. The units also maintain important newspaper clippings, reference and research material, historic documents of archival value and material on important events. Besides, old valuable reference books are also preserved in this section for journalists and research scholars. Address: Department of Information & Public Relations Jammu/Srinagar Winter (Jammu) Ph.: 0191-2544076, 2578835 Summer (Srinagar) Ph.: 0194- 250130, 2500175 e-mail: dir_ [email protected] e-mail: dirinformationl7(,q)t;maiLcom Divisional Offices: Joint Director Information, Jammu Ph.: 0191 - 2542762 Joint Director Information, Kashmir Ph.: 0194-2452230

JHARKHAND

CAPITAL : Ranchi; Principal Languages: Hindi, Urdu, Bangla, Santhali, Mundari, Kurukh, Khortha, Nagpuria, Sadri, Khariya, Panchparagnia, Ho, Malto, Karmali etc.; Area: 79,700 sq. kms.; Population: 2,69,09,428; Literacy Percentage: 59.13; Number of

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Newspapers.-16; Circulation of Newspapers: Prabhat Khabar (Ranchi: 1,31,522) (Dhanbad: 28,802) (Deoghar: 11,078) (Jamshedpur: 54,439), Hindustan Times (Ranchi: 19,495), Hindustan (Ranchi: 72,631) (Dhanbad: 49,603) (Jamshedpur: 28,242), Dainik Jagran (Ranchi: 39,407) (Dhanbad: 37,322) (Jamshedpur: 49,507), Aaj (Ranchi: 48,360), Ranchi Express (Ranchi: 57,500), Farooque Tanzeem (Ranchi: 55,505), Qaumi Ranzeem (Ranchi: 48,150), Jharkhand Jagran (Ranchi: 62,218), Bihar Observer (Dhanbad: 85,162), Rastriya Naveen Mail (Palamu: 73,146), Indian Punch (Deoghar: 65,140, Uditbani (Jamshedpur: 37,972), Chamakta Aaina (Jamshedpur: 19,812), Avenue Mail (Jamshedpur: 16,073), Siyasi Ufuque (Ranchi: 20,987), Pioneer (Ranchi: A/F), Apni Ranchi (Ranchi: 32,145); Principal Dailies: In Hindi Prabhat Khabar followed by Hindustan, Dainik Jagran, Aaj, Ranchi Express; Radio Stations: Ranchi, Jamshedpur, Daltonganj and Dumka; Television Stations/Channels: Etv Bihar-Jharkhand & Sahara TV Bihar-Jharkhand; No. of Cinama Halls/Multiplexes: 55/Nil; Film Studios: Nil

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations is headed by the Secretarty, assisted by Joint Secretary/Deputy Secretary and 2 (two) under Secretaries whereas, the Directorate is headed by the Director, 3 (three) Joint Directors, 2 (two) Deputy Directors and 7 (seven) Assistant Directors. Besides at Headquarters the post of Electronic Engineer, Library Superintendent, Chief Cameraman with their subordinate staff are under the control of the Director. The Directorate and the whole setup is situated in Audrey House, Ranchi. All the 5 Divisions, 22 districts and 11 sub-divisions have one departmental office with all the necessary setup. SUCHNA BHAWAN is proposed at all the districts and at present 3 have already been completed and fully functional at Dumka, Jamshedpur & Palamu. At the Divisional level, there is a Deputy Director and DPRO's at the district HQ's. ADPRO's are posted at district and sub-division HQs. Operating right from the day of its creation the department is functional in disseminating news, development programmes, policies, social-welfare programmes to the common people through various media channels, both print and electronic. Reports on people's problems, natural disasters, local problems through print and electronic media are also provided to the government through press clippings as feedback. Adivasi, Ranchi and Hod Sombad, Dumka Journals are being published. Apart from it, posters and pamphlets/booklets are printed regularly and

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distributed thoughout the state via the district HQs. Government Advertisement are also carried out by the Directorate. Other activities include film making and exhibitions. Main Section of the Department Situated at HQ, Ranchi, Audrey House, it looks after the activities of the department and employees. Press Section State Level/National Level activities of the government are covered by this section through developmental programmes, policies, achievements, declaration and news of public importance with the help of all the print and electronic media. Publications For better publicity of government activities and policies/achievements, the department publishes ­ Jharkhand on the Fast Track and distributes throughout the state from time to time. Exhibition Exhibitions are organized and installed at important occasions both at the state and district headquarters, each having its own set-up during melas, government functions, bazaar/hats, kisan mela, etc. Advertisement There is provision of on-line advertisement of the government/department through its official website www.jharkhandwv.in/ http://210.212.20.88. The newspapers entlisted in the advertisement list are provided advertisements through these on-line provisions. Apart from this, colourful and display advertisements according to the need on special festivals or national festivals, etc (15th Aug, 26 Jan) are given in several other newspapers and magazines. On-line payment facility to the newspaper owner/authority has been proposed. Budget and Account Budget for all the offices at division, district and sub-divisional level are provided by this section. Film Important programmes and development activities of the Governor and Chief Minister are looked after by this Section. Still photos, video coverages, etc, are carried out by this section.

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Film shows are arranged with the help of this unit. High Power/Low power P.A. sets cater to government programmes. Exhibition wings have all the necessary infrastructure. Apart from the Directorate of IPRD, some other departments viz. Family Welfare, Arts and Culture, Agriculture, Khadi Board, Horticulture, Tourism, etc., also have their own publicity set-up. Address: Director, IPRD, Audrey House, Ranchi, Contact No. - 0651-2283654, 2281522, Fax: 0651-2283675, e-mail: [email protected] & lrkhandiprd@yahoo_com

KARNATAKA

CAPITAL: Bangaluru; Principal Language: Kannada; Area: 1,91,791 sq. kms; Population: 5,74,45,608; Literacy Percentage: 70.66; Number of Newspapers: 2,450; Circulation of Newspapers: 72,05,200 (424 newspapers); Principal Dailies: English: (1) The Hindu (2) The New Indian Express (3) Deccan Herald (4) Times of India (5) The Asian Age (6) Vijay Times; English Financial Dailies: (1) Business Standard (2) Economic Times (3) Business Line (4) Financial Express; Principal Kannada Dailies: (1) Prajavani (2) Kannada Prabha (3) Smyukta Karnataka (4) Udaya Vani (5) Ushakiran (6) Vijaya Karnataka (7) Suryodaya; Radio Stations: 14 - Bangaluru, Bhadravathi, Dharwad, Gulbarga, Mangalore, Mysore and F.M. Stations at Hassan, Chitradurga, Hospet, Mercara, Karwar, Raichur, Bijapur and Bellary. Doordarshan Kendra: High Power Transmitters (H PT): I I Bengaluru, Dharwad, Shimoga, Gulbaraga, Hassan, Mangalore, Bangaluru Metro, Bengaluru DD-2, Gulbarga DD-2, Dharwar DD-2 and Mysoor DD2 Low Power Transmitters (LPT): 49 - Munmdaragi, Davanagere, Bijapur, Bellary, Gadag, Raichur, Udupi, Belgaum, Hospet, Madikeri, Chickmagaloor, Bidar, Karwar, Chitradurga, Kolar Gold Fields, Athani, Tiptur, Sirsi, Ranebennor, Chikkodi, Sandur, Bantwal Ramadurga, Bagalkot, Gangavathi, Mandya, Pavagada, Mudigere, Puttur, Kumta, Gokak, Basavakalyan, Talikot, Hungund, Tumkur, Hattihal, Arasikere, Holenarasipur, Sagar, Harappanahaul Jamakhandi, Mudhol and Bhatkal,

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Koppa, Dandeli, Heriyur, Indi, Belthangadi, Bellary DD-2, Davangere DD2; Very Low Power Transmitter Centres: 6 - Mudugiri, Sakaleshpura Huvinahipparagi, Badami, Kudligi and Sulya; Number of Cinema theatres: Permanent: 760 and Touring: 325.

Organisation

The basic function of the Department is to give wide publicity for various plans and programmes of the State Government. The Department is also helping the general public to actively participate in the policies and programmes of the Government. The Department is using different modes and means for publicity like Press and News, Exhibition, Song and Drama, Photo and Films, Commercial Publicity and Mobile exhibitions to reach the mass. The modern means of communication are being utilized extensively across the world for dissemination of information both by government and private organisations alike. Karnatka reaches the hub of information technology where mass media plays a very vital and significant role in dissemination of information. The responsibility of information dissemination on behalf of the government lies on the Department of Information. The Department, in order to discharge its responsibility effectively, has Bengaluru as its headquarter and all the 26 districts for its subordinate offices. Commissioner is the Head of Department. It has a Director, 4 Joint Directors, 12 Deputy Directors 14 Senior Assistant Directors and 33 Assistant Directors. The Department comprises of total staff strength of 540. With this manpower, the Department utilises different means and modes of communication to ensure the people oriented schemes, plans and programmes, reach the people in general and targeted one in particular. Commercial Publicity For publicity through print media i.e. press, the Department has altogether 424 approved newspapers. It releases tenders and other classified notifications of various departments of the government everyday in these publications. Also with an aim to educate and create awareness among the public about important national and state events and occasions like Independence Day, Republic Day, Rajyotsava, Gandhi Jayanthi, etc., special display advertisements are released on such occasions. The Department also promotes the interests of small newspapers. Press and News It is one of the important means of the Department. It mainly deals with Editors, Reports and Correspondents of various publications and electronic media. It organises the press tours to various parts of the state and even outside the state to gain glimpses of progress in various facets and get

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reported the same for the awareness of the general public. It also arranges press conferences and meet the press programmes to get feedback on government policies and programmes and releases press notes pertaining to government activities. The Department subscribes the new services of UNI, PTI and Karnataka Newsnet for utility of these news services by various publications all over the state. For extensive coverage in rural areas the state government provides free bus coupons valued Rs. 1000/- per head to journalists to travel in KSRTC buses. It has increased the monthly pension from Rs.500/- to Rs.1000/- for retired journalists and journalists who are facing hardship from Rs.100/to Rs.300/- for families of deceased journalists. The Department, on behalf of the government confers TSR Award, that has been instituted after late T.S. Ramachandra Rao a veteran journalist of the state, on eminent journalists every year. In addition, two more awards in the field of journalism relating to reports on environment and development are given. Publications The Department has separate wing to bring out special publications time and again highlighting the important schemes and achievements of the government. The Department also brings out two monthly magazines, one in Kannada namely, "Janpada ", and other in English, namely, "March of Karnataka ". The magazines contain articles on culture, art, literature, sports, etc., besides, novel developmental activities in the State. Photo Films It is meant for wide coverage of functions organised by the Government and also to produce documentaries on important subjects like cultural heritage, historical places or person who have excelled in the fields of public importance. Last year it has produced tele films on Rain Harvesting, Bio Fuels, Rural Drinking Water Suply, Free Legal Aid and Right to Information, etc. The films were telecast on different television channels. Films The Department in accordance with the Government's policy of encouraging the local film industry grants subsidy of Rs.10 lakh each to chosen quality based Kannada and other regional films every year. The Department also confers awards on Kannada films, artists and technicians of the film industry at an annual event. Field Publicity The Department through its field publicity is attempting to create a general

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public against social evils like, Dowry, Female Foeticide, Child Labour, Aids, etc. It arranges audio visual exhibitions in fairs, Uras and other places of mass gatherings. It also arranges exhibitions on tin plates and eracts, highway hordings depicting the social health and environment related messages. Media Academy Earlier known as Karnataka Press Academy, it has now been renamed as Karnataka Media Academy. The Academy organises various programmes of the academic interest to journalists and confers annual academy awards on journalists in recognition of their services in the field. Website : www.karnatakainformation.org

KERALA

Capital: Thiruvananthapuram; Principal Language: Malayalam; Area: 38,863 sq. kms.; Population: 3,18,41,374. Literacy Percentage: 90.92; Number of Newspapers: 51; Principal Dailies in Malayalam and their circulation: Malayala Manorama (15,89,823), Mathrubhumi (11,06,824), Deshabhimani (2,88,462); (ABCAverage-Ist July to 31 st December 2007); Madhyamam (3,65,200); Chandrika (2,81,712); Thejas (2,23,900); Mangalam (2,03,225); Deepika (1,93,492); Kerala Kaumudi (1,72,437): Siraj (1,52,200); Veekshanam (1,28,750) Janmabhumi (1,18,980); Janayugam (1,18,950); Kerala Kaumudi Flash (85,891); Rastradeepika (83,023); Radio Stations: Medium Wave: Alpuzha, Kozhikode, Thiruvananthapuram, Thrissur; FM Stations: Devikulam, Kannur, Kochi, Kozhikode, Manjeri, Thiruvanathapuram; Television: 27 transmitters; Doordarshan has 3 studios one each at Thiruvanathapuram, Thrissur and Kozhikode; Principal Private T. V. Channels : Asianet, Asianet Cable Vision, Surya, Kairali, India Vision, Amritha, Jeevan and Manorama News; Cinema Theatres: 1100 approximately, of these 10 are in government sector. Organisation The Information and Public Relations Department (I&PRD) is the nodal

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agency of the government of Kerala for disseminating information on various activities of the government to the people through the media and providing feedback to the government on important matters reflected in the media. The Department is also charged with activities connected with cultural affairs. It is headed by a Director of Public Relation and assisted by an Additional Director, three Deputy Directors at the headquarters and six Regional Deputy Directors at Kollam, Kottayam, Ernakulam, Kozhikode, Thrissure and Kannur. The District Information Officer is Incharge of a District Information Office attached to each Collectorate. There are 14 District Information Offices and one Kerala Information Office at New Delhi. The Department functions mainly through thirteen sections, at Directorate level, District Information Offices and Kerala Information Office, New Delhi. The sections are (1) Scrutiny, to watch reactions and provide feedback on people's and press reactions reflected in newspapers. (2) Planning and Development, to highlight the achievements and to organise radio and TV programmes. Also provide special features or editorial section for publishing necessary publicity materials, production of video films and digital archiving, and content development for the official website of government of Kerala www.kerala.gov.in and that of Information and Public Relations Department www.prd.kerala.gov.in (3) Cultural Section is to arrange and manage various cultural programmes including inter-state cultural exchange programmes; (4) Press Release wing feeds the printing and electronic media through its daily press release, photos and features, and also summary of News agency (5) Editorial works in two sections viz. Malayalam and English publications. In addition to `Janapatham' (Malayalam) and `Kerala Calling' (English) monthlies, booklets and leaflets in both languages are also published, (6) Field Publicity and Exhibitions conducts exhibitions, film shows and other programmes to send necessary PR messages. (7) Advertisement, deals with advertisements of all departments of the government, prepare and release special display advertisements on special occasions. (8) Circulation and Distribution looks after the marketing side fo editorial publications. It is the duty of this wing to make sure that the booklets, pamphlets, etc, reach the public in due course. (9) Research and Reference deals with the registration of periodicals and books received, maintains a reference library and an Information centre at the Directorate level, provides information to the public and training to department officials. (10) Photographic unit provides news and other photos to the media and public and keeps a collection of old and rare photos on various subjects and personalities. (11) Feature Editor: Production of monthly news letter `Kerala Interface' (English) and compilation of district handbooks. (12) Printing and Reprinting deals with production of monthly

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newsletter `Vikasana Samanwayam' (Malayalam), monitoring of printing and reprinting works. Video Production The I&PR Department has now a non-linear edit suit. News clippings are edited by this unit. The unit also produces documentaries and serials intended to build up the cultural heritage of Kerala. Fifty profile series of prominent personalities have been completed. Digital video archives encompassing art, culture, history, profile, economy and life style are also maintained. Press Press accreditation facilities to the media people are provided by the department. Pension scheme for the journalists and non journalists working in the newspaper establishments is also managed by the department. Publications Two monthly publications - "Janapatham" in Malayalam and "Kerala Calling" in English are being published by the department. Besides these publications two monthly newletters "Kerala Interface" in English and "Vikasana Samanwayam" in Malayalam are being published. Exhibition and Field Publicity Exhibitions at national level and mini exhibitions at district levels and rural areas are arranged by the department. Frequent film shows, public meetings and group discussions are also arranged. In addition, intensive campaigns are also organised on special occasions. Cultural Affairs The Department arranges cultural programmes on special occasions such as Republic Day, Independence Day, Tourism Week, etc. The Tagore Theatre, Thiruvanathapuram equipped with 35 mm projector is being controlled by the department and is let out to the film societies and cultural organisations. Information Centres The Department has Information Centres at State and District levels which provide information on exclusive topics. There is also an Information Centre functioning at New Delhi. Research and Reference The wing provides facilities for reference on various topics. It has a well

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equipped reference library with a good number of books including books registered under Press and Registration of Books Act and a large number of books from State and the Central Government. This wing also provides training to department officials. Feedback Services Daily press cuttings from print media and news clippings from electronic media are prepared and sent to concerned Ministers and government officials on line. A fortnightly economic news capsule compiled from various newspapers named `Economic News Digest' is also published. Departmental Co-ordination The Director at the State level, the Deputy Directors at the regional levels and directorate, the District Information Officers at the district level and Information Officers at Directorate level and at New Delhi co-ordinate the different activities of the Information and Public Relations Department. Electronic Media Division An Electronic Media Division will soon become an integral part of the Department. The new division assumes significance in view of the new developments in the media and to equip the department with the latest media trends. Kerala Press Academy The Academy is a joint venture of Government of Kerala, Kerala Union of Working Journalists and Indian Newspaper Society, located in Cochin (Website: www.pressacademv.org). Sri S. R. Shaktidharan is the Chairman and Smt. V. G. Renuka, Deputy Director, I&PRD is the Secretary of the Academy. Kerala Press Academy offers postgraduate diploma courses in journalism, mass communication, public relations and advertising.

MADHYA PRADESH

CAPITAL: Bhopal; Principal Language: Hindi; Area: 3,08,000 sq. km.; Population: 6,03,48,000 (Census); Literacy Percentage: 63.7%, Males 76.1%, females: 50.3%;

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Newspapers: Principal Dailies: Bhopal : Nav Bharat, Dainik Bhaskar, The Hindustan Times, Dainik Nai Duniya, Raj Express, Deshbandhu, Swadesh, Rashtriya Hindi Mail, Sandhya Prakash, Pradesh Times, Central Chronicle, Dainik Jagran, Nav Dunia, Nadeem, Afqar, Express News, Pioneer, News Express; Indore Nai Duniya, Dainik Bhaskar, Nav Bharat, Chautha Sansar, Indore Samachar, Agni Ban, Swadesh, Garha Chronicle, Free press Journal; Gwalior: Dainik Bhaskar, Nav Bharat, Acharan, Swadesh, Nai Dunia, Raj Express, Nav Prabhat; Ujjain: Dainik Awantika, Dainik Madhyanchal, Dainik Agnipath; Sagar: Acharan, Chanchal Yatharth, Rahi; Jabalpur: Nav Bharat, Dainik Bhaskar, Naveen Duniya, Swatantra Mat, Deshbandhu, Swadesh; Raj Express, Nai Dunia, Hari Bhomi, Rewa: Dainik Jagran; Satna: Deshbandhu, Nav Swadesh, Nav Bharat, Dainik Bhaskar; Radio Station: 14 AIR stations and three Vividh Bharti Station, AIR station (Primary Channel): Bhopal, Indore, Gwalior, Jabalpur, Chhatarpur, Rewa; Local Radio Stations (FM): Balaghat, Betul, Chhindwara, Guna, Khandwa and Sagar; Vividh Bharti Stations: Bhopal, Indore and Jabalpur; Doordarshan: Three station of Doordarshan are functioning at Bhopal, Indore, Gwalior city of Madhya Pradesh. The programme telecast by these centers are by 78 center of Doordarshan Kendras which include 10 High Power Transmitters, 63 Low Power Transmitters and 5 Very Low Power Transmitters; Number of Cinema Theatres: 315; Permanent: 272; temporary : 12, Touring: 31. Organisation The Directorate of Public Relations is headed by a Commissioner, an IAS officer of the rank of a Secretary. The departmental structure consists of Additional Director, 04 Joint Directors, 12 Deputy Directors/Visualizers/ Film Officers, 26 Assistant Directors/Chief Photographer/Accounts Officer/ Chief Artist, Cameraman and Administrative Officer. The Department of Public Relations exist in seven Divisional offices and 38 districts offices. There are Information Centres at Delhi, Mumbai, Indore, Rewa, Jabalpur, Gwalior, Sagar, Bhopal and Hoshangabad. At the headquarters, the work is mainly divided into following wings (1) News (2) Publications (3) Field Publicity (4) Advertisement (5) Administration and Accounts (6) Films (7) Registration and Reference. Press Publicity Press releases, photographs and feature articles are issued throughout the year. The Directorate of Public Relations co-ordinates government activities with all other departments. Also visual coverage of various government functions and activities are done.

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Field Publicity Field Publicity Section organises exhibitions and cultural programmes throughout the state. This wing also arranges the tableauax for the Republic Day Celebrations in New Delhi. Its activities include puppet shows and street plays on eductional themes. Information camps are also organised in predominantly tribal districts to publicise government schemes. Publications The Directorate brings out books, booklets, brochures and posters from time to time. These publications are distributed at various conventions, special occasions, departmental information camps and through various offices of the department. Madhya Pradesh Sandesh a monthly magazine is regularly published by the Directorate. Photo and Films Photo Section: Photo coverages relating to Governor, Chief Minister, Ministers, official programmes and developmental activities are carried out by the photo section. After coverage, the section makes available these photos to different dailies and magazines for publication. The photo section has a photo bank which supplies photos of developmental activities to newspapers and magazines regularly. Since April 2007 to March 2008 total coverages numbering 3688 were done and one lakh forty six thousand photos released. Film Section: Video coverages of government programmes of Governor, Chief Minister and all Ministers, etc., are done and released to Doordarshan and other local channels. Kanyadaan Yojana, Ladali Laxmi, Gaon Ki Beti and other government schemes are also sent for release. News capsule relating to government schemes and programmes are sent for telecast from time to time. Since April 2007 to March 2008 a total T.V. coverage numbering 1537 were done and sent to Doordarshan and other channels for telecast. Information Centres Information Centres co-ordinate public relations and publicity work in their respective areas besides providing information about the state. Newspapers, Magazines and publications are also made available at these centres for general readers. There are Information Centres at Delhi, Mumbai, Indore, Rewa, Jabalpur, Gwalior, Sagar, Bhopal and Hoshangabad. Website and E-mail address The department has its website w-vvw.mpinfo.org which is updated regularly.

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Besides, a website regarding scrutiny of newspapers and magazines is also available at www.rnpnewseaxch.org and clippings of various newspapers of regional and national level are uploaded every day. The E-mail address of the Department is [email protected] and [email protected]

MAHARASHTRA

CAPITAL : Mumbai; Principal Language: Marathi; Area: 3,07,713 sq. km.; Population: 9,67,52,247; Literacy Percentage: 77.27% ; Number of Newspapers: 1081; Circulation of Newspapers N/A; Principal Dailies: N/A; Radio Stations: 20 Aurangabad, Ahmednagar, Akola, Beed, Chandrapur, Dhule, Jalgaon, Kolhapur, Mumbai, Nagpur, Nanded, Nashik, Osmanabad, Pune, Parbhani, Ratnagiri, Sangli, Solapur, Satara and Yavatmal.; F.M. Stations: 8; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 14; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 89; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 20; (iv) Transponder Centres: 1; Number of Cinema Theatres: N/A.; (Permanent : N/A.; Touring : N/A.).

Organisation

The State Directorate General of Information and Public Relations is headed by the Directorate General (Information and Public Relations). It has two wings. Information and Public Relations - covers activities like news dissemination, publications, public relations, advertising, exhibitions, research and references. Examiner of Books and Publications -Implementation of Press and Registration Act, 1867, registration of all newspapers / periodicals published in the State, examination of the published contents, preparation of annual index of newspapers as well as classification of books are some of the tasks performed by the Examiner. Verification of newspapers is done so as to maintain the Government approved list of newspapers for advertisement distribution.

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Press Publicity The Directorate General regularly issues press releases, features, articles in Marathi, Hindi, Urdu, Gujarati and English. Besides arranging press conferences, visual clippings of important functions are sent to Doordarshan Kendra and other private channels, daily. This section keeps liaison with field offices. Departmental Liaison Section (DLO) looks after the liaisoning with various departments and concerned ministers for the purpose of giving information and wide publicity to various Government schemes. Field Publicity Divisional Offices and District Offices cover their day to day functions, meetings of ministers and other important events. The coverage is sent to Headquarters, which in turn is sent to Doordarshan Kendra for the due coverage. Important District Offices are having digital cameras and other modern equipments for coverage and publicity. Publication The Department brings out monthly bulletin entitled Lokrajya. For easy access to people Lokrajya is available on book depots at reasonable price. It also brings out casual publications. Apart from this, booklets, folders, leaflets, posters and other printed literature are published as and when required. Exhibitions Exhibitions are arranged by the Divisional and District offices. The department also prepares advertisements for the special campaigns. There are number of Hoardings in the State. Information Centres / Library There are six major Information Centres in New Delhi, Mumbai, Pune, Aurangabad, Nagpur and Panjim (Goa). Photo/Films/Audio Vision The Department supplies photographs of day to day activities of the Government to newspapers. Audio-Visual Section prepares documentaries on various subjects. Research and Reference The Research Section scrutinises all the daily newspapers and periodicals

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and preserves the relevant clippings for references. There is also Central Library, which has more than 60,000 books for use of Government Offices as well as for press.

Chief Minister / Deputy Chief Ministers Publicity Cell

There is a Departmental Cell attached to the Chief Ministers and Deputy Chief Ministers Offices that looks after the public relations activities. Awards in the field of Press, Films, Radio, T.V. and Folk Media, etc. The following state level awards for promotion to Journalism are given for the developmental news. Late Balshastri Jambhekar Award (Marathi Section)-Rs. 41,000 cash, a citation and Scroll of letter. Late Yashwantrao Chavan Award (Government Section)-Rs. 21,000 cash, a citation and Scroll of letter. Late Anant Gopal Shewde Award (English Section)-Rs. 21,000 cash, a citation and Scroll of letter. Late Baburao Vishnu Paradkar Award (Hindi Section)-Rs. 21,000 cash, a citation and Scroll of letter. Late Moulana Abul Kalam Azad Award (Urdu Section)-Rs. 21,000 cash, a citation and Scroll of letter. Late P.L. Deshpande Award (For Electronic Media) - Rs.21,000 cash, a citation & a Scroll of letter. Apart from this 8 Divisional Awards are given-Rs. 21,000 cash, a citation and a Scroll of Letter to each. Special aid is given for construction of Patrakar Bhavan in many districts. Special Accreditation card is given to media persons. To prevent attacks on journalists District-Level Committees have been formed. Maharashtra State Film Awards The 43rd Maharashtra State Film Awards were presented by the Chief Minister, Vilasrao Deshmukh. The best feature film award was won by `Dombivali Fast' and Chitrapati V. Shantaram award was conferred on veteran actress Ashok Saraf while Rajanikant alias Shivaji Gaikwad bagged the Raj Kapoor Award. Lata Mangeshkar Award Maharashtra Government has announced to confer renowned music composers with Lata Mangeshkar Award for their outstanding contribution

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to the field of music. The award carries a cash prize of Rs.l lakh, a citation and a scroll. Website and E-mail Address Website - www.maharashtra.gov.in/ newsroom E-mail address - dgipr@hotmaiLcom

MANIPUR

CAPITAL: Imphal; Principal Language: Manipuri; Area: 22,327 Sq. Kms; Population: 22,93,896 (Census 2001); Literacy Percentage : 66.87; Number of Newspapers: Dailies: 21; Weeklies: 3 and Monthly: 4; Principal Dailies with Number of Circulation: Poknapham (Manipuri 29,738), Naharolgi Thoudang (Manipuri 27,153), Matamgi Yakairol (Manipuri 24,404), Sangai Express (Manipuri 24,034), Hueyen Lanpao (16,279), Imphal Free Press (English - 11,218), Sangai Express (English - 10,248), Manipur Mail (English - 10,141), Lamka Post (Paite - 8,781), Sikni Eng (Lushai - 7,132), Aja (Tangkhul - 6,358), Kangla Pao Evening (Manipuri - 5,883), Ireibak (Manipuri - 5,836), Paojel Evening (Manipuri - 5,128), Kangleipakki Meira Evening (Manipuri - 3,653); Radio Station: Imphal ; FM.- Imphal; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitter (HPT): Imphal; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPT): Ukhrul; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): Moreh, Chandel, Kangpokpi, Senapati ;(iv) Relay Centres: Nil; Number of Cinema Theatres: Nil.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations functions under a Commissioner. The Department has a Directorate office at the state capital, Imphal. The Directorate functions under a Director. The contract nos. of the Directorate are 2450156 (fax ), 2450640 and 2452999. Nine District Infromation Offices are functioning at each District Headquarters of Imphal East, Imphal West, Bishnupur, Thoubal, Chandel, Tamenglong, Churachandpur, Senapati, Ukhrul. The Manipur Information Centre at New Delhi is under a Joint Director. This Centre liaises with the Central Ministries, Departments and other State Government representatives in New Delhi.

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Press Publicity The Department issues press releases, press notes, press communique and feature articles on various development programmes taken up by the government. Besides, the Department covers important functions and issues the same as press release/press notes to the local press, news agencies, AIR, DDK, etc., for publication or broadcast. The Department also arranges press conference for VVIP/VIPs so as to enable them to express policies and programmes of the Government to the media persons. It also arranges conducted press tours from time to time. In order to give feedback on the activities and policies of the Government, views and comments appeared in both local and national newspapers are submitted to the Government. Field Publicity The Department has been organising Multi Media Publicity Campaign across the length and breath of the state highlighting the various achievements of the government. Song and Drama The Departmental Drama Unit performs live media communicating the people about the various important themes like peace and development, national integration, communal harmony, social evils, impact of Bandh and Blockade, etc. In the Khongjom Day celebration held at Khongjom, the Unit staged Khongjom Lan drama. Publication The Department has been bringing out its occasional issue of Manipur Today, Wall Calendar, Manipur Diary, Thakhaigee Chephong regularly. Photo and Films All important functions like Manipur Legislative Assembly Session, National and State functions like Republic Day, Independence Day, Statehood Day, Khongjom Day, Patriots Day, etc., are covered with Departmental Video crew for telecast in National Network as well as local channels. The Department supplied photographs of important events and development activities to media organisations. Information Centre For dissemination of information to the public, the Department is at present running Information Centre in New Delhi, Imphal and all District Headquarters. Manipur Information Centre, New Delhi continued its

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functions of maintaining a close liaison with different Ministries of the Central Government, other information units of various State Governments and media persons working at the capital city. State Information Centre, Imphal maintains reference books relating to land and people, cultural heritage, encyclopedia, etc., of the State of Manipur in particular and India in general. There are more than 3500 books on various subjects in the Centre. Local and national newspapers are also provided to the public. The District Information Offices are also running Information Centre which provides reading facilities of newspapers and reference books to the public.

MEGHALAYA

CAPITAL : Shillong; Principal Languages: Khasi, Garo, English; Area: 22,429 sq. kms.; Population: 23,18,822 (2001 Census); Literacy Percentage: 62.6; Number of Newspapers: 25; Dailies: 8 Circulation of Newspapers: 1,50,000 (8 Newspapers) Oldest Existing Newspapers: A Chikni Ripeng, (Garo Monthly, Garo Hills)-1881. Principal Dailies: Shillong Times (Shillong Edition, Shillong Times (Tura Edition), Meghalaya Guardian, Mawphor, Rupang, Nongsain Hima, Peitngor, Salantini Janera Radio Station :(AM) Shillong, North-East service, Tura, Jowai, Willamnagar and Nongstoin; (FM) Laitkor Doordarshan Kendras: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Shillong and Tura: (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Jowai: Cherrapunjee, Williamnagar (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): Nongstoin, Baghmara and Nongpoh (iv) Relay Centres: N/A; Number of Cinema Theatres: 11.

Organisation

The Directorate of Information and Public Relations, headed by a Director, has five main Sections. (a) News, (b) Publication, (c) Photo, (d) Field Publicity, and (e) Advertising. Press Publication News section keeps liaison with the various government departments for arranging departmental publicity through Press Releases and Feature articles.

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Field Publicity Every Public Relation Officer in the districts is provided with mobile cinema units and public address systems for field publicity. One of the major field publicity activities of the Department to organise Special Interactive Programmes in different remote villages of the state. Through this programme, local populace have the opportunity of a face to face interaction with different officials on topics pertaining to general welfare. The programme also promotes better understanding and coordination between the local people and the government project implementing agencies. Advertising Advertisements are released by the Department to the newspapers on behalf of the State Government Departments. Publications The publications section brings out brochures, pamphlets, monthly magazine and other publicity materials and also news bulletins in the local languages.

MIZORAM

CAPITAL : Aizawl; Principal Languages: Mizo and English; Area: 21,087 Sq. kms.; Population: 8,91,058; Literacy Percentage: 88.49%; Number of Newspapers: 70; Circulation of Newspapers N/A; Principal Dailies: Vanglaini, Aizawl Post, Zozam Times, Mizo Aw, Tawrh Bawm, Highlander, Newslink, Dingdi, Hnehtu, Mizo Arsi, Romei, Mizoram Post; Radio Stations: Aizawl ; FM Station : Lunglei ; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): Aizawl -2, Lunglei -1; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Lawngtlai; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): Saiha, Champhai; (iv) Local TV Channels; LPS Vision, Skylinks, ZONET; (v) Relay Centres: Nil; Number of Cinema Theatres: 6.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations (I and PR) has its Directorate at Aizawl, the state capital with 8 District Offices (Aizawl, Lunglei, Saiha, Kolasib, Champhai, Mamit, Lawngtlai and Serchhip), 2

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Sub-Divisional Offices ( Chawngte, Blabung) and Information Centres at Hnahthial, Saitual, Tuipang, Sangau, Saiha. With Director at the head, the Department has 1 Joint Director, 4 Deputy Directors, 20 IPROs. The Department has six branches; (a) Press Relations, (b) Photo Division, (c) Technical Section (d) Publication (e) Library, Research and Reference Section and (f) Public Field Publicity Wing. Budget The budget of the Department for the year 2007-08 was Rs. 280.60 lakhs under Non-Plan and Rs. 250 lakhs under Plan. Press Relations This Section feeds local newspapers, AIR, DDK and local TV Channels with news relating to Government activities, development programmes, and important events, etc., and is also responsible for gathering feedback. From time to time it organises Press tour for Journalists within and outside the state to cover events concerning Mizoram. Photo Division The Photo Division is responsible for documentation of important events and incidents taking place in Mizoram as well as the overall developmental efforts and achievements of the State Government. Technical Section The Technical Section is an important store bank of audio visual documents and it feeds all the local TVs and DDK daily with ready material for telecast. Live -Telecast of Assembly Session through local TV channels has become a regular feature of DIPR since the past 10 years. Publications Besides its three regular publications, the Department brings out publications from time to time on the development programmes, achievements and new policies concerning public welfare in the forms of newsletters, booklets, pamphlets, etc. Library Besides keeping the existing books and other material in order this section upgrades its material from time to time with new books and research materials. It also functions as a distribution section for incoming and outgoing news items.

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Field Publicity Wing The Field Publicity units located at different districts and sub-divisional headquarters are the main instruments of public relations work at the village levels. These units organise public meetings, seminars, workshops, awareness campaigns, etc., on different aspects and over-all development activities of the government. All India Radio AIR Aizawl station started functioning as an auxiliary station in May 1966 with Frequency of 150-watt medium wave. Transmission from short wave with a frequency of 10 Kilowatts was started in 1992. A 6KW FM Radio Station was started in Lunglei in 1995. A community radio has been opened at Saiha as well. Doordarshan Doordarshan installed its first VLP transmitter at Tuikhuahtlang Aizawl from where it started relaying since 1982. HPT telecast commenced in 1995 and LPT telecast on 12.6.1995. Another HPT -Relay Centre was opened at Lunglei in 1995 and two VLPT Centres opened at Saiha and Champhai. Song and Drama Song and Drama comes under the Department of Art and Culture. The Music and Fine Arts Wing of the Department gives training to youth in the arts of modern and folk music, traditional dance and also sponsors artistes to undergo training in drama. On various occasions it organises competitions in music, drama, paintings, cultural dance, etc., on its own and also in association with other organisations like the NEZCC. It also sends cultural troupes to different places of India and abroad to participate in important events. Other activities The I&PR Department acts as coordinator of the whole media operation in Mizoram. Apart from organising important events, programmes and functions in association with other government departments. The Department also teams up with various NGOs and semi government organisations in organising important seminars, workshops, festivals and campaigns through the state. The Department continues to distribute TV sets and radios to various villages entrusting VCs to look after the viewing sets and organising tours for senior citizens, press tours, Bharat Darshan and taking part in Republic Day celebration in Delhi by staging tableau, etc.

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All the district offices have now been equipped with computers with internet facilities. In order to fully computerise office works at Directorate level, all establishment staff and officers are being given computer training.

NAGALAND

CAPITAL: Kohima; Principal Language: English; Area: 16,576 sq. kms.; Population: 19,88,636; Literacy Percentage: 67.11%; Number of Newspapers: Dailies: 5 (English), 5 (Vernacular); Weekly: 2 (English), 1(Vernacular) and I (English); Circulation of Newspapers: NA; Principal Dailies: NA; Radio Stations: One-AIR Kohima; FM Stations: One Mokokchung; Doordarshan Kendra with Studio: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): One - Kohima; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Three Dimapur, Tuensang and Mokokchung; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): Three - Wokha, Zunheboto and Mon; (iv) Relay Centres: NA; Number of Cinema Theatres: NA.

Organisation

The Directorate of Information and Public Relations was established in 1963 and has the following staff: Director, Additional Director, Joint Directors-2, Deputy Directors-3, Technical Executive-1, Information Officers-3, Journalists-6, News Assistants-7, T.V. Cameraman-1, Movie Cameraman-1, Still Cameraman- 11, Photo Technician-1, T.V. and Radio Mechanics-8, Technical Supervisors-4. There are seven District Public Relations Offices and sixteen sub-divisional information centres. Number of Information centres cum library is 32. Press Publicity and Press Relations The activities achievements and programmes of the State Government are collected by the IPR officials in the capital, district and sub-divisional headquarters and published by the Directorate as a daily bulletin known as Naga News. This bulletin is distributed to all local papers, electronic media units, news agencies and correspondents of news organisations. The Department organises press meets/conferences with the Governor, Chief Minister, Ministers, senior government officials and visiting dignitaries.

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Accredited journalists are provided free travel facilities in government transport buses in the state and facilitated through various ways whenever possible. Conducted tours are also organised from time to time. A Press Relations Office attached to Nagaland House is functioning at New Delhi. Field Publicity Field Publicity of Government of India distributes booklets, folders, etc., pertaining to Central Government activities and policies and organises photo exhibitions, dance and drama shows, essays and painting competitions, etc. All India Radio All India Radio, Kohima produces and broadcasts news, features in most local dialects besides English and Nagamese. F.M. station in Mokokchung also produces programmes in local dialects and English and broadcasts its own programmes as well as relays AIR, Kohima programmes. Doordarshan Doordarshan Kohima produces and telecast programmes from 6:00 p.m to 8:00 p.m relay DDI and DD2 at other times. A 15 minutes daily news bulletin from 7:00 p.m. has started recently. Publications The Department brings out a news bulletin Naga News (Daily), which caters to the local press, electronic media and news agencies like PTI, UNI. The Warrior (Monthly) and other booklets for publicity purpose like commemorative booklets, `Who's Who', `Nagaland Annual', `Basic Facts', Nagaland Calendar and Diary (Yearly) are also broughout. Photo and Films The Department runs 8 Photo Studios (B/W). Photographs of developmental activities local festivals and other important official, social, religious and sporting functions/events are taken in B/W, Colour and digital formats and issued regularly to the local and national press. These photos are also used extensively in the departmental publications. The Department conducts film shows, video film shows throughout the State. DPROs are provided necessary infrastructure for regular film shows. More than 400 video cassettes on government developmental activities were recorded and produced by the department. Video clippings are also given regularly to DDK Kohima for use as news clippings in their news bulletins.

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Information Centres / Library There are 32 Information Centres cum Mini Libraries under the Department located at various block headquarters all over the State. Computerisation The news section at the Directorate has been computerised. Computerisation of the whole Directorate and district offices and setting up of a Wide Area Network (WAN) has been implemented. Website and E-mail Address The Department has recently launched its own web site: http//: www.iprngi.nic.com. The e-mail address of the Directorate is : ipr_ [email protected]

ORISSA

CAPITAL: Bhubaneswar ; Principal Language: Oriya; Area : 1,55,707 Sq. Km.; Population: 36,804,660 ; Literacy Percentage : 63.61; Number of Newspapers: 45 ; Circulation of Newspapers: 30,888,04; Principal Dailie: Samaja : Oriya, Cuttack; Prajatantra : Oriya, Cuttack; Pragatibadi : Oriya, Bhubaneswar ; Dharitri: Oriya, Bhubaneswar; Sambad : Oriya, Bhubaneswar ; Samaya: Oriya, Bhubaneswar ; Anupam Bharat : Oriya, Berhampur; Radio Stations: N/A; FM Station: N/A ; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitter (HPT): 04; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPT): 75; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 24; (iv) Relay Centres: N/A; Number of Cinema theatres: N/A. Organisation The Information and Public Relations Department serves as a link between people and the Government. This Department not only informs the public on the plans, policies and programmes of the Government, but also works to ensure people's participation in the successful implementation of different developmental programmes and schemes. To implement these programmes and to make them people-oriented, the Department also functions at District and Sub-divisional levels.

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The Department was created originally as a part of the Home Department and was named as Home (Public Relations) Department. Subsequently it was separated from the Home Department on the 8th July 1978 and started functioning as an independent Department of the State Govt. in the name of Information and Public Relations Department. At present 32 Publicity Districts (Including Bhubaneswar and Rourkela) each headed by District Information and Public Relations Officer are functioning under the administrative control of this Department. There are 3 Deputy Directors to supervise the work of DIPROs at 3 Revenue Divisional Headquarters i.e. Cuttack, Sambalpur & Berhampur respectively. The total staff strength of the Department is 975 out of which Group-A officers are 21, Group-B officers are 95, Group-C personnel are 495 and Group-D personnel are 364. Publications In order to create public awareness, this Department brings out two monthly journals i.e. Utkal Prasang in Oriya and Orissa Review in English. In these two monthly journals, articles and features based on Art and Culture, Trade and Commerce, Science and Technology and activities of the Government are published. Besides, on the occasion of Birth and Death Anniversary of eminent persons and other functions, 29 types of folders, leaflets, booklets, etc. have been published both in English and Oriya languages and features have been translated and compiled. A detailed list is given below. Swatantra Utkal Divas (Oriya Folder) Nua Rajadhani Bhubaneswar (Oriya Booklet) Saheed Raghu Dibakar (Oriya Folder) Dr. B.R.Ambedkar (Oriya Folder) Maharaja Krushna Chandra Gajapati (Oriya Folder) Utkal Gourab Madhusudan Das (Oriya Folder) Biplabi Dharanidhar Bhuyan (Oriya Folder) Sri Jaydev (Oriya Booklet) Car Festival, Puri - 2007 Guide Book (Both English & Oriya) 10. A Devotional Song collections Car Festival, Puri - 2007 - What to Do and What Not to Do (English and Oriya leaflets) Sri Sri Baladev Jew Rath Yatra - 2007 - Kendrapara (Oriya booklet) Utkalamani Pandit Gopabandhu Das (Oriya Folder) Saheed Baji Rout (Oriya Folder)

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Biplabi Jayee Rajguru (Oriya Folder) Saheed Birsa Munda (Oriya Folder) Orissa : Heralding a New Era of Prosperity (English Folder for IITF, New Delhi) Saheed Laxman Naik Jayanti (Oriya Folder) Utkal Keshari Dr. Harekrushna Mahatab (Oriya Folder) Mahan Jananayak Nabakrushna Choudhuri (Oriya Folder) Maharaja Sri Ram Chandra Bhanja Deo (Oriya Folder) Biplabi Chandan Hajuri (Oriya Folder) Veer Surendra Sai (Oriya Folder) Netaji Subash Chandra Bose (Oriya Folder) Buxi Jagabandhu (Oriya Folder) Biju Patnaik (Oriya Folder) Jayaprakash Narayan (Oriya Folder) Activities Report of the Information and Public Relations Department (Eng.and Oriya booklet) "Orissa on the track of Fast Development" in English and "Druta Pragatipathe Odisha" in Oriya (booklet in the achievement of Government.) A sum of Rs.1091 has been estimated for publication work during the financial year 2008-09. Press Information Service A Press Information Unit is functioning under this Department at State Headquarters. Seven Information Officers and eight other Departmental Officers of O.I.S Cadre are working in this unit to collect press notes, handouts, background materials, features and other information on developmental activities from various Departments of the Government and release them to different Media Organisation, both Print and Electronic. A Deputy Director (Press) - cum-Deputy Secretary has been kept in charge of this unit to supervise the work. During this year 871 Press handouts and 10 press notes have been released. Besides, the Information Officers submit press clippings daily to Ministers and Principal Secretaries, Commissionercum-Secretary and Secretaries of the respective Department. 30238 nos. of press clipping submitted during the financial year 2007-08. Moreover

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two Public Relations Officers and two A.P.R.Os have been posted in the office of the Governor and the Chief Minister. So far, accreditation has been granted to 140 Correspondents at the State level and 85 at the District, Sub-division and Block level. The accredited Correspondents are being provided with various facilities including railway travel concession. This Department also organizes conducted tours for the Journalists on different important occasions like Car Festival, Konark Festival, Sea Beach Festival and to the spot during natural calamities. An inter-media publicity co-ordination committee was formed under the Chairmanship of the then Minister, Information and Public Relations in the year 2003. During natural calamities, control rooms are also opened to cater information to the Information Cell which works round the clock. For Press Information Service, a sum of Rs.519 has been estimated for the Financial year 2008-09 under Non-Plan scheme. Electronic Display Board Providing news through Electronic Display Boards (EDB) is a novel initiative by this Department to augment it's broad mission of information dissemination. Starting on April 1, 2005, it aims at providing instant information on Government's plans, policies and actions, important events, public service guidelines and issues in public interest. At present, three EDBs have been installed, at Bhubaneswar one at Capital Police Station, one at OMC premises and another at State Information Centre (Jayadev Bhawan), three busy public places of Bhubaneswar. during November 2006 another EDB has been installed at Orissa Bhawan, New Delhi, which has become a centre of attraction for delhities. A sum of Rs. 500 has been proposed for 2008-09. T.V. News Production The T.V. Unit of this Department has been producing news items of day to day programmes of VIPs, VVIPs, news capsules of important events, tele-documentaries on various developmental activities of the government and ensuring their telecast on various electronic media channels including Doordarshan. During the year 2007-08 this unit has covered 1167 news items on various developmental activities and programmes of government. Out of which 1104 news items were telecast on the regional news bulletin from DDK, Bhubaneswar and 27 were telecast in the State scanned from National Network.

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A sum of Rs.3114 has been estimated for T.V.Unit during the financial year 2008-09. Telecast of Developmental Schemes (Ama Katha Odisha Katha) Audio-visual magazine on various success stories relating to the different people oriented development programmes of the Government. For the first time, Information and Public Relations Department, has been producing an audio-visual magazine on the various success stories of the Government for wide publicity and awareness of the common man. Various Departments of the Government are getting an opportunity for publicity of their plans and programmes. Till now 74 episodes with a viewership of more than 31 lakhs in urban and rural Orissa has been gone for telecast. The programme started from January 2006. The programme goes for telecast every Saturday at 7.15 p.m. on DD-l. The programme has achieved a reputation of one of the most popular programmes in Doordarshan. Further, gradually people all over the state particularly from the rural areas are showing their positive response to the programme by regular mail. A sum of Rs.1500 has been estimated for this unit during the financial year 2008-09. Photo Services The Photo Unit of this Department provides essential support to publicity programmes. This helps in keeping records of important events. Besides, it releases photographs to different print media organizations daily on various day-to-day programmes of the VIPs, VVIPs and other important programmes pertaining to Government. It provides support for publications of Booklets, Folders, Posters, etc., and preparation of exhibitions by the Information and Public Relations Department. This unit has been modernized with Digital Set-up having Internet facilities. Now photographs are being released to different media organizations through Internet. Besides, action has been initiated to have a separate studio. This year photo unit is planning to release photographs by mobile laptop service from the spot of programme. During this period this Unit has covered 1265 number of programmes through manual & digital systems and produced 8272 number of photographs and supplied to above mentioned purpose. Besides, this unit also released 819 nos. of photographs to different media organisation for publication. For Photo Unit a sum of Rs.423 has been estimated for the Financial year 2008-09. Films Unit Film is one of the powerful Media of Mass Communication through which

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message of Government and achievements made on different developmental programmes in the State can be carried out and conveyed to the illiterate mass living in the rural areas. The repair work of preview theater has been completed. Besides, a full-length feature film on Utkalmani Gopabandhu Das is under production. A number of films and documentaries has been circulated in the film library for publicity purpose. Six feature films have been previewed in the state headquarter Preview Hall for selection of state award. A sum of Rs.1382 has been estimated for Film Unit during the Financial year 2008-09 both under Non-Plan and Plan. C.V. Unit A Community Viewing Unit has been functioning in this Department Radio Inspectors are attending the work relating to installation and repair of TVs provided to different establishments. They also attend the recording of the important proceedings of the programmes including Assembly proceedings. Government under C.V. Scheme has provided 972 T.V. sets to different Educational Institutions and Information Centres of the State free of cost, 857 T.V. sets to different Gram Panchayats on cost sharing basis i.e. 75 percent cost is borne by the State Government and the rest 25 percent by the Grama Panchayats concerned. A sum of Rs 250 has been estimated for installation of colour TV sets instead of black and white T.V. sets to all I/ C-cum- R.R. in a phased manner. A sum of Rs.548 has been estimated for C.V Unit during the Financial year 2008-09. Audio Visual Publicity Unit An Audio Visual Publicity Unit is functioning in the Department. Apart from organizing film shows at the field level, this unit makes arrangements of Public Address System at the meeting places. A sum of Rs.4019 has been estimated for A.V.P. Unit during the Financial year 2008-09 both under Non-Plan & Plan. Digitisation of Immortal Voice Government have decided to preserve the speech / immortal voices of Eminent State Leaders and Freedom Fighters of the State. Speech/ immortal voices of some eminent State Leaders and Freedom Fighters have been collected and steps are being taken to contact other leaders and Freedom Fighters to record their speech / immortal voice for preservation. A sum of Rs 50 has been estimated for the purpose during the financial year 2008-09.

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Advertisement All Government Advertisements released by this Department through different Newspapers and Periodicals have become effective. Besides, Classified Advertisements such as Tender Notices, Quotation Call Notices, Advertisements for recruitments and Notices for admission to the Educational Institutions, etc., are published in newspapers through this Department for general information of the public. Tender notices and other quotations of different Corporations and State Government Undertakings are also routed through this Department for publication. Till January, 2008, 4402 Classified Advertisements, 1174 Land Acquisition Advertisements and 202 Display Advertisements have been issued. A total sum of Rs.49000 has been estimated towards cost of Advertisements for the financial year 2008-09 both under Non-Plan and Plan. Research, Reference and Training The Research, Reference and Training unit of this Department collects background materials, up-to-date facts and figures from various departments of the Government and keeps them intact for reference purposes. This unit also collects and preserves basic information through newspaper clippings, articles from standard research Journals and informative literatures published by Government and make information available to the research scholars, writers and intellectuals as and when required. The Department also maintains a reference library, which preserves informative books, maps, publicity booklets and features, etc. This unit has published the Orissa Reference Annual 2006 as per last year. Important news articles were given to Utkal Prasanga for publication in its different issues for general awareness. 48 nos. of DIPROs, Senior Officers and 36 nos of SDIPROs have been imparted with IIMC training at Dhenkanal and computer training respectively during this year. A sum of Rs.275 has been estimated for this Unit during the Financial year 200809 for the above purpose. Oriya Translator's Unit The State Government has constantly been endeavouring to strengthen its feedback gathering mechanism. Public reactions as reflected in the Print and Electronic Media are closely being scanned by the Oriya Translator's Unit of Information and Public Relations Department in the form of "Daily Press Round-Up" and "Internet News Brief' to enable respective Executive Heads of different Departments to effect suitable changes in the process of planning and execution of developmental programmes. As a part of micro-analysis approach, Oriya Translator's Unit of the State Information set-up has gathered a record no. of 2820 Press Round-Ups during this year.

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Information Centre-cum-Reading Room Information Centre-cum-Reading Rooms have been opened in Urban and Rural areas which play a significant role in disseminating information and enriching the intellectual growth of the society through books, magazines, newspapers and other informative literatures. Besides, TVs and Radios have been supplied to the Information Centers. At present 85 Information Centre-cum-Reading Rooms are functioning through out the State including one at the State Capital and one each at New Delhi and Kolkata. During last year the State Information Centre (Jaydev Bhawan) has been renovated and a separate counter for sale of Government of India publication has been operated during current financial year. Steps are being taken for purchase of new books worth of Rs. 400 for Information Centrecum-Reading Room during current financial year. Steps are being taken for augmentation of funds for modernisation of Information Centre-cumReading Rooms during the financial year 2008-09. A sum of Rs.12269 has been estimated for Information Centre-cum-Reading Rooms during the Financial year 2008-09. Exhibition Exhibitions on plans, programmes, policies and achievements of the Government are organised in rural and urban areas of the State in order to create awareness among the people. The exhibition also includes show casing of materials on Orissan art, culture, tradition, handlooms, handicrafts, agriculture, industries, infrastructure development of other major development in steel, power, ports sector etc. This unit participates in IITF, New Delhi every year. During the current financial year 13 exhibitions including IITF-2007 at New Delhi have been organised by this Department. A sum of Rs.10000 has been estimated for Exhibition Unit during the Financial year 2008-09. Special Celebration The Department organizes Special Celebrations like Independence Day, Republic Day, Orissa Day, Gandhi Jayanti, Birth & Death Anniversaries of eminent persons, National Press day at the State, District and Subdivisional Headquarters. During the year, 33 such Special Celebrations have been organised. The tableau was exhibited at Republic day parade-2008, New Delhi by this Department. Besides, Information Centres are opened during Ratha Yatra at Puri. A sum of Rs.4821 has been estimated for Special Celebration during the Financial year 2008-09 both under Non-Plan and Plan.

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Song and Drama This is an effective medium of publicity. The traditional folk dance like Palla, Daskathia, Ghodanacha, Street play and Musical programmes highlighting plans, programmes and policies of the Government are organised by this Department in rural and urban areas of the State. During the year 1505 nos. of Programmes have been organized by this Department. Besides, the Department organised Oriya Film and Cultural Festival at Chennai under Inter-State Cultural Exchange Programme. A sum of Rs.2100 has been estimated for Song and Drama during the Financial year 2008-09. Computerisation Scheme To make media coverage more effective and purposeful with regard to dissemination of up-to-date information, this Department has taken initiative to computerize the District Public Relations Offices. Fifteen district offices at Angul, Sundargarh, Cuttack, Dhenkanal, Berhampur (Chatrapur), Jagatsinghpur, Kendrapara, Koraput, Sambalpur, Puri, Rourkela, Mayurbhanj, Balasore, Nabarangpur and Keonjhar have been provided with computer facilities. Besides, there is a computerized system operating at the State Head quarters. One KIOSK has been installed to provide upto date information to public. New computer system has been installed to send Advertisement text and tender document to State Government website through portal group of LT. Department. DIPRO Kalahandi, Bolangir and Jayadev Bhawan, type, issue and despatch section of the Department has been computerised and each section has also been provided with computer facility. Three computers have been installed in the Information Centre at Secretariat, where Group of IOs are working, for collection and dissemination of information of different Department. A sum of Rs.3588 has been estimated for Computer Unit during the Financial year 2008-09. Right to Information The Information and Public Relations Department has shouldered onerous responsibility of implementing Right to Information Act, 2005 in Orissa as the nodal department. The implementation has been geared up through the formation of a State Right to Information Implementation Cell in the department. The process of implementation has witnessed a record success of formulating Orissa Right to Information Rules, 2005, Operational Guidelines, formation of a Central Cell at Reception Counter of Secretariat,

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training of PIOs and Appellate Authorities, constitution of Orissa Information Commission and facilitation of proactive disclosure through Government of Orissa website. A sum of Rs.30000 has been estimated for this unit during the financial year 2008-09.

PUNJAB

Capital: Chandigarh; Principal Language: Punjabi; Area: 50,362 Sq. Kms; Population: 2.43 Crore (2001); Literacy percentage: 75.63 (Male), 63.55 (Female); Number of Newspaper: 119 (Dailies 57): Principal Dailies: Punjab Kesri (Hindi), Jalandhar; Ajit Samachar (Hindi) Jalandhar, Ajit (Punjabi), Jalandhar; Jagbani (Punjabi) Jalandhar; Akali Patrika (Punjabi) Jalandhar, Nawan Zamana (Punjabi) Jalandhar, Aaj Di Awaz (Punjabi) Jalandhar, Hind Samachar (Urdu) Jalandhar; Radio Station: Jalandhar, Patiala, Bathinda; Television: Doordarshan Kendra: Jalandhar; High Power Transmitter (HPT): Bathinda, Jalandhar, Amritsar, Fazilka; Low Power Transmitter (LPT): Pathankot, Gurdaspur, Ferozepur, Abohar, Patiala, Kasauli ; Very Low Power Transmitter (VLPT): Talwara; Relay Centres: Amritsar, Bathinda, Kasauli; Relay Centre for Punjabi Regional Services: Jalandhar, Amritsar, Bathinda, Talwara.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations headed by the Director, is responsible for giving proper publicity to various programmes and policies of the State Government. There are 21 District Public Relations Officers one at each district headquarters. Besides, there are two Additional District Public Relations Officers at Fazilka and Anandpur Sahib. The Department has the following wings - (1) Field Publicity (a) Audio- Visual (b) Technical Section (c) Song and Drama (d) Light and Sound (2) Press Publicity (a) Advertisement (b) Teleprinter, (c) Photo and Cinema (3) Films Division (4) Computer Section (5) Publications and Magazines (6) Communication (a) Research and Reference (b) Library Reference and General (c) Clipping Section (7) Arts (8) Exhibition (9) Administration (10) Accounts.

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Budget During the year 2008-09 Rs. 16.18 Crore were sanctioned under Plan Scheme and Rs. 14.25 Crore under Non-Plan Scheme. Press Publicity A total of 750 Press notes were issued and a number of press conferences of the Governor, Chief Minister, Ministers and other VIPs were arranged. Advertisement Advertisement worth about Rs. 2.75 Crore were released to the newspapers, weeklies and magazines by the Government Departments, Boards and Corporations. Photo and Films The Films Division of this Department prepared 5 documentary films, 31 quickies, 10 video/songs and 10 Audio Jingles, cassettes of which were supplied to Doordarshan Kendra Delhi and Jalandhar and City Cables in the districts. Photo and Cinema Section covered about 620 functions and around 3500 photographs were supplied to the press. Films Division The Films Division of this Department prepared 7 quickies, 3 Audio Jingles, cassettes of which were supplied to PTC. CH-l, MH-1, ETC (Punjabi) and Zee (Punjabi). T.V. coverage of about 400 functions of Hon'ble C.M.Punjab also done by this section. Field Publicity The Department had arranged 1919 Press parties, 1105 Press conferences, 6499 Public Meetings, 2379 Mela Conferences, 2631 Media T.V. Coverage, 2362 Cable T.V. Coverage, 1537 Radio Coverage and released 7262, Press Notes & 978 Development Stories. Information Centres There are at present 10 Sub Centres at Sub- Divisional level working in the State. In addition to this, one Information Centre at each District Headquarters as well as at New Delhi. These information Centres are visited by a large number of readers daily. Publicity literature on various topics such as National Integration, Communal Harmony, achievements and developmental activities of the popular government are displayed at these sub-centres for the benefit of the readers.

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Publications The Department brought out one monthly magazine i.e. Jagriti in Punjab and two quarterly magazines, i.e. Jagriti (Hindi) and Advance (English). It also brought out Wall Newspaper "Sada Punjab" every fortnight. In addition, the Department produces books, posters and pamphlets dealing with the publicity of the policies and programmes of the State Government with a special thrust to generate the public opinion amongst the masses at grass-root level. Commemorative Projects Review meeting was held on 20.6.08 under the Chairmanship of Hon'ble Chief Secretary, Punjab to commemorate the 150`h Anniversary of Kuka Movement. Grant of Rs. I Lakh to Lala Lajpat Rai Memorial Committee Dhudike (Moga) was sanctioned during the year under report. To commemorate the birthday anniversaries of martyrs and freedom fighters, life size statues are being established at public places/chowks. During the years 2008-09 a life size statue of Shaheed Udham Singh ji has been installed at his birth place Sunam, District Sangrur with cost of 18.00 lac. The statue was unveiled on 31.7.08 by the Chief Minister, Punjab. Exhibition The Department has a full-fledged Exhibition Unit. The entire visual publicity material is produced by this Section in the form of photographs, chasts and visuals. Research and Reference The Department has its own Research and Reference Section. The Section keeps record of clippings on important subjects and happenings. Statistical data pertaining to development activities of the State Government is compiled by this section. The material regarding the activities and achievements of various Departments is supplied to the Hon'ble Members of Parliament and Members of Punjab Vidhan Sabha.

RAJASTHAN

CAPITAL : Jaipur; Principal Languages : Hindi, Rajasthani; Area :3.42 lakh Sq. Km.; Population: 5,64,73,122; Literacy Percentage: 61.03; Number of Newspapers: 678 newspapers and magazines are on the list of accredited papers. Out of these are 173 dailies, 198 weekly, 293 fortnightly and 14 are other newspapers and magazines. Principal dailies with

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circulation: Rajasthan Patrika, (754949) Dainik Bhaskar, (809732) Navjyoti, (365028) Rashtradoot, (272157) Samachar Jagat,(149732) Mahaka Bharat, (97702) Radio Stations: Jaipur, Kota, Ajmer,Udaipur, Alwar, Jodhpur, Suratgarh,Barmer, Bikaner, Chittourgarh, Churu, Jhalawar, SwaiMadhopur, Jaiselmer and Banswara. There are two relay centers: Ajmer and Mount Abu. Apart from these All India Radio Station, Jaipur launched a FM Channel. 93.5 SFM, 94.3 My FM, 95 FM Tadka , 98.3 Radio Mirchi and Raido City are Five private Channels. Doordarshan: One Studio, Two Transposers, Ten High Power Transmitters, 70 Low Power Transmitters and 17 Very Low Power. There are two Channel MCPC mode digital Earth station is One and 8 Doordarshan Maintenance Centers; Number of Cinema Theatres: 206. University of Rajasthan Jaipur, Vardhman Mahaveer University Kota, Mohanlal Sukhariya University Udaipur and JaiNarain Vyas University Jhodhpur are conducting various courses examination of Mass Communication and Journalism Organisation The Directorate of Information and Public Relations is headed by a Commissioner. Besides the Commissioner, the departmental structure consists of one Additional Director, 4 Joint Directors, 5 Deputy Directors, 8 Assistant Directors, one Chief Photo Officer, one Cameraman, one Senior Photographer, one Senior Accounts Officer, one Assistant Accounts Officer, one Producer, one Programmer, one Senior Artist and 42 Information and Public Relations Officers. Under the Directorate there is one Information and Public Relations office in each of 33 districts and Assistant Information and Public Relations Office at Beawar. Rajasthan Information Centres are working at Delhi, Mumbai and Calcutta. The Directorate has the following sections: - (i) Establishment Section; (ii) Accounts Section (iii) News Section (including ENG Units); (iv) Literature Distribution, Research, Reference and Library Section; (v) Press Registration Section; (vi) Regional Publicity Section; (vii) Advertisement Section; (viii) Computer Section; and (ix) Photo Section.

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ENG Units Electronic News Gathering units for Doordarshan covered over 883 programmes during the year. Literature Section This section published booklets, folders, posters, stickers, pamphlets, etc., regarding the targets and achievements made by the government schemes."Sujas" a bio monthly magazine is being published regularly by the section since 1992. Research and Reference Section The section compiles and maintains records of different departments of the state government, important press releases of the government and clippings of important events. It supplies reference materials to all the Information and Public Relations Officers in the 33 districts of the State, editors of the newspapers, researchers and other agencies. Library Section This section purchase reference books for all the Information Centres including the libraries at Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata information centres. News Section The News Section of DIPR issued 4428 Hindi and 109 English press notes from April 2007 to March, 2008. During this period 96 features were released in English and Hindi Languages. 458 coverage were made and 32 journalists' conferences and 12 journalists' journeys were organised. Advertisement Section This Section issues classified advertisements. Computer Section It is responsible for computerisation of all the activities of the Directorate. It also prepares and makes available speeches and messages for the Chief Minister from time to time. Photo Section During the period, 22033 black and white and colour photos were forwarded to various newspapers for their use. Information Centres Besides three Information Centres at Delhi, Mumbai and Kolkata, the

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Directorate has one centre at State Headquarter at Jaipur. 29 centres are operating with necessary facilities at other district level. Patrakar and Sahityakar Kalyan Kosh During the Financial year 2007-08 thirty three journalists and writers were provided with financial assistance of Rs. 3.55 Lacs from Patrakar and Sahityakar Kalyan Kosh. Patrakar Aavas Yojana To solve the residential problems 18 senior and the family members of deceased journalists were allotted land in Jaipur through Jaipur Development Authority in the first phase. 376 plots have been allotted till date. Address: Directorate of Information & Public Relations, Secretariat, Jaipur. E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] and diprnewsjd@hotmaiLcom.

SIKKIM

CAPITAL: Gangtok; Prinicipal Languages: Nepali, Bhutia, Lepcha, Limboo and English; Area: 7096 sq. kms.; Population: 5,40,851; Literacy Percentage: 82; Number of Newspapers: 70; Circulation of Newspapers: 500 to 5000 Copies; Principal Dailies: Sikkim Express, Now, Sikkim Mail, Sikkim Reporter, Himalaya Mirror (English), Samay Dainik, Hamro Prajashakti, Himali Bela, Sikkim Darpan, Shangrila Times (Nepali) and Anugamini (Hindi); Radio Station: lGangtok; FM: 1, Doordarshan Kendras: (I) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 2(DD-1 and DD News); (ii) Low Power transmitters (LPTs): Nil; Very Low Transmitters (VLPTs): 6; Relay Centre: 6; Number of Cinema Halls/ Multiplexes: 2.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations is the mouthpiece of the Government and covers various functions and programmes related to the Government. It works as a Public Relation division and mediates between the Government and the Press Fraternity.

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Press Publicity and Press Relations The Department disseminates information of the Government functions and Programmes to the Public and Press and gives mass media awareness. It is also involved in publicizing Government activity and receiving feedback on the same. Field Publicity Posters, Hoardings, film shows, video screening, and phto exhibitions. All India Radio AIR Sikkim gives information in the form of news in Nepali, Lepcha and Bhutia languages to educate people through various programmes and also to provide entertainment. Doordarshan News related to the state is sent to the DD (News). Agriculture programme on Sikkim, Sikkim round-up and news are being telecast through Guwahati Kendra. Live telecast/OB recording of crop seminars and sport events utilizing OB/EFP van are also arranged by Guwahati Kendra. Song and Drama The Culture Affairs and Heritage Department, Government of Sikkim has a separate Song and Drama unit. Publications The Department publishes Sikkim Herald a weekly newspaper in thirteen state languages and also publishes Sikkim today a quarterly English News Magazine and yellow page advertisement bulletin Herald Classified. Besides, ad-hoc publications conciding with various occasions are also published from time to time. Photo and Films Photos of all important government activities, functions, and programmes are displayed at the Secretariat and other important places. Films on Sikkim made by the Department are also screened in cable, DD and other News Channels. Information Centres/Library There are four (4) Information Centres headed by the District Information Officers. They feed news to the Sikkim Herald and cover all the government programmes in their respective districts. The Government libraries are

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under the Cultural Affairs and Heritage Department and Rural Management and Development Department. Computerization The entire IPR Department and District Information Centres are computerised with access to internet facility. Awards in the field of Press, Films, Radio, TV and Folk Media, etc. State Government has introduced Positive Journalism Grant to the Accredited journalists to enable them to consult libraries, archives and visit to the other institutions anywhere in India for professional exchanges. Awards on Best Rural Reporting and film are also being given. Any other Activity The State Government has created Media Development Fund which is being utilized for the visit of Sikkimese Media Personnel for training, Seminar, Conference, Workshops anywhere in India and in SAARC region. It could also be utilized for organizing programmes in any part of the State in media awareness and development. Website and E-mail www.sikkimipr.org E-mail: dio [email protected] and sikkimherald [email protected]

TAMILNADU

CAPITAL: Chennai; Population: 6,21,10839 (Census 2001); Area: 1,30,058 Sq.Kms; Principal Langauge: Tamil; Literacy Percentage : 62.66; Number of Newspapers and Periodicals : 3303 (2003-04); Principal Dailies : The Hindu (English), Chennai: The New Indian Express (English), Deccan Chronicle (English),Times of India (English), Dinamani (Tamil) Daily Thanthi (Tamil); Dinakaran (Tamil), Dinamalar (Tamil); Circulation of Newspapers: 36,14, 526 (268 Newspapers)(2005-06) (2007-08 not available); Radio Station : Coimbatore, Chennai, Madurai, Tirunelveli, Ooty, Kodaikkanal, Tiruchi, Nagercoil, Tuticorin;

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Doordarshan Kendra: Studio Set up in Tamilnadu: 3 Nos. Chennai, Madurai & Coimbatore; High Power Transmitter - 6 Nos. Chennai, Kodaikkanal, Dharmapuri, Rameswaram, Kumbakonam and Tirunelveli; Low Power Transmitter: 44 Nos. Coimbatore, Coonoor, Udhagamandalam, Udumalpetai, Pollachi, Courtallam, Marthandam, Nagercoil, Rajapalayam, Sankarankoil, Tiruchendur, Tuticorin, Ambasamudram, Athur, Denkanikottai, Krishnagiri, Tirupathur, Yercaud, Kallakuruchi, Erode, Arani, Arcot, Cheyyar, Gudiyatham, Tiruvannamalai, Vandavasi, Vaniambadi, Ambur, Vellore, Pernampet, Thanjavur, Nagapattinam, Pattukottai, Natham, Tiruvaiyaru, Pudukottai, Palani, Tiruchirapalli, Chidambaram, Cuddalore, Mayiladuthurai, Neyveli, Tindivanam and Villupuram; Number of Cinema Theatres: 1628 (2006-07).

Organisation

The Directorate of Information and Public Relations headed by a Director, has the following wings: (1) Press Relation (2) Advertising (3) Film Institute (4) Exhibition (5) Photographs (6) Memorials (7) Field Publicity (8) Tamil Arasu Journals Publications and Press (9) Functions and Centenaries (10) Information Centres, Theatres and Public Halls, Film City. (11) Reference and Scrutiny of newspapers and journals and (12) General Administration. Press Publicity And Reference The Press Relation Section handles media relations, press releases, feature articles and photo features. A reference unit attached to this Department attends to indexing reference matter and press clippings. Press accreditation, journalists family benefit fund, journalists pension, journalists family pension, allotment of flats, homes under easy installments are some of the important schemes being implemented for the benefit of journalists in Tamilnadu. Publications Besides publishing `Tamil Arasu' in Tamil and English, the Department brings out publications on various developmental activities. The Department has its own printing press. Advertising Advertisements of all Government Departments, Corporations, Boards and Statutory Bodies are released through this wing. Exhibition The Exhibition Section organises local exhibitions at district headquarters

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and mini exhibitions in smaller towns besides participating in National exhibitions including IITF. Photo and Films The Photographic Section looks after photo coverage of State's functions and developmental activities. The Films Division functions under this Department and it produces fortnightly newsreels, and monthly video magazines and documentaries for other Departments. Field Publicity Field Officers are working at the district level. Publicity is organised with the help of video vans, projectors and VCDs. Multi Media Campaigns Multi Media Campaigns are being organised at district levels by involving all publicity media units of the Government departments to create awareness about the various Government developmental programmes in the rural areas. Publicity Coordination Committees are functioning in all the districts to propagate the welfare schemes. Memorials This Department maintains the memorials of great men of the State. Film Awards Every year awards are given for best feature films, actors, actresses and technicians. MGR Film and Television Institute The Institute conducts courses on direction and screenplay writing, cinematography, sound recording and sound engineering, film broadcasting and film editing.

TRIPURA

CAPITAL: Agartala; Principal Languages: Bengali and Kokborak; Area: 10.491 Sq. kms.; Population: 31,99,203 (2001 Census) Literacy Percentage: 80.14; Number of Newspapers: 49 : Dailies, 20; Weeklies: 29. Circulation of Newspapers: N/A; Principal Dailies: Dainik Sambad, Daily Desher Katha, Syandan, Tripura Darpan, Dainik Ganadoot; Aajkaal (Local Edition); Radio Stations: 3- Agartala, Kailashahar and Belonia; FM Stations: Agartala, Kailsashahar and Belonia; Doordarshan Kendra: I-

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Agartala (1) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 2 (10 - K.W.); (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 5; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 5; (iv) Relay Centres: 5; Number of Cinema Theatres: 10.

Organisation

Initially started with a cart, and a magic lantern under one Director, the Information Department in Tripura keeps abreast with the pace of modern information technology. This Department is responsible to ensure public relations activities on behalf of the state government right down to the grass root level through different media and to ensure feed back. Press Publicity and Press Relations The State Government has provided reporters and correspondents upto the Block Level for collection and dissemination of news on different activities of the state government. The field level reporting staff regularly send news, success stories, interviews and features, etc., to the News Bureau at the state headquarters and in turn the editorial desk releases this information to the different media including electronic media for wide publicity. Photographs on different activities are also supplied to different print media on regular basis. In addition, conducted tours of the journalists, organization of press conferences, arrangement of special video coverage, etc., are also being taken care of by this wing of the state government. Publications Books, magazine, leaflet, posters, booklet, folder, etc., are published in different languages from time to time to bridge the gap of information imbalance. In addition, the Department publishes five language newspapers in Kakborok, Chakma, Mampuri, Bishnupriya Manipuri and Bengali languages. Besides, one monthly Bengali wall magazine for neoliterates, one literary Bengali and one Kakborok magazine are also being published by the Department. Advertising and Visual Publicity To communicate messages of public importance including development activities in the state, exhibitions are organized in and outside the state.

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Publication of special supplements and advertisements in different newspapers are being taken care of by this wing. Information Service To bridge the gap between the people and the policy makers as well as to resolve the areas of conflict Information-cum-Facilitation Centres have been set up at different places of the state. Up to date information, newspapers and publications, printed publicity materials are being supplied to these centres regularly. Seminars/discussions are organised in all 69 Informationcum-Facilitation Centres. Song and Drama The State Government has set up 160 Lokaranjan Sakhas i.e. rural folk entertainment units with the help of local artistes who are responsible for communicating messages of public importance through different traditional folk-art forms. Particularly in the rural areas these units play a vital role in organising multi-media campaigns special publicity campaigns and in strengthening the emotional and cultural integration amongst the different ethnic groups residing in the state. Field Publicity Services Field officers working under this Department also organise group talks and group meetings during their tour in remote areas in addition to Audio Visual and Video shows to communicate the message of public importance. Though extensively covered by All India Radio and Doordarshan the Department plays a major role in spreading the message to the people residing in areas of the state where these facilities are not available. All India Radio The Agartala Station started functioning as an auxiliary station of All India Radio, Guwahati, till it became a full fledged station on 19 April, 1974. In addition to the Agartala Station, All India Radio has got two other stations at Belonia in South District and Kailashahar in North District. All India Radio, Agartala Station is a medium wave station with 10 × 2 KW transmitting capacity while the other two stations at Belonia and Kailashahar are F.M. Stations 10 K.W. F.M. Band has been introduced in Agartala station. All the radio stations in Tripura cater to the need of various multi-lingual and ethnic groups of the population. In additon, one radio station at Sikaribari under Dhalai District and one community radio centre at Natun Bazar in South District are expected to come up very soon. Modernization of the Agartala startion is in progress. One FM radio station has been started in Agartala from August 7, 2007.

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Doordarshan In Tripura, since its commencement on 10 September, 1991 Doordarshan has made some positive progress though it is yet to bring the entire state under its cover. Initially, transmission of local programmes began 30 minutes per day which has now been extended to two and half hours a day for five days and five hours on Saturday in a week. The first studio originated programme was introduced on 26 December, 1995. Local news bulletin in Bengali and Kokborok language has been introduced in Agartala Doordarshan Kendra. On August 7, 2007, a private TV station also started functioning at Agartala. Press Information Bureau The Press Information Bureau situated in the state capital is engaged in providing information about the various development and welfare activities of the Central Government. Press releases are regularly issued by them to the print and elctronic media for wide publication of the same. They also organize conducted tours for Media persons within and outside the state at times. Field Publicity There is a Field Publicity Units functioning in Tripura on behalf of the Information & Broadcasting Ministry that organizes TV shows and special publicity campaign on different subjects in the rural areas of the state. Field Exhibition Unit The Field Exhibition Unit of the Directorate of Advertising & Visual Publicity (DAVP) organizes exhibitions in different parts of the state to create awareness among the people from all walks of life.

UTTAR PRADESH

CAPITAL: Lucknow; Principal Language: Hindi, Urdu; Area: 2,40,928 Sq. kms.; Population: 16.62 Crore (2001 Census), Literacy Percentage: 56.3; Number of Newspapers: 2261 ; Dailies: 551; Circulation of Newspapers: Dainik Jagran: (Kanpur: 251896), (Agra: 97106), (Lucknow: 183170), (Varanasi: 145312), (Gorakhpur: 100458), (Jhansi: 35074),

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(Meerut: 145867); Dainik Aaj: (Agra: 38575), (Gorakhpur: 44092), (Varanasi: 210076), Lucknow: 59048); Swatantra Bharat: (Lucknow: 68066), (Kanpur: 75000); Rastriya Sahara: (Lucknow: 99293); Amar Ujala: (Agra: 163914), (Meerut: 149540), (Bareilly: 89708); Hindustan: (Lucknow: 156192); Prabhat: (Meerut: 31537); Bhaskar: (Jhansi: 32770); Janmorcha: (Faizabad: 33198); Amrit Prabhat: (Allahabad: 73154); Jan Vaarta: (Varanasi: 37036); Sainik: (Agra: 56471); English Dailies: The Pioneer (Lucknow: 81899); The Times of India (Lucknow: 101612); Northern India Patrika (Allahabad: 56662); Hindustan Times (Lucknow (34739); Urdu Dailies: Indinon (Lucknow: 70784); Sahafat (Lucknow: 68276); Siyasat Jadid (Kanpur: 55959); Qaumi Morcha (Varanasi: 18105); Paigham (Kanpur: 30177); Anwar-e-quam (Kanpur: 39693); Radio Stations: 9 - Agra, Allahabad, Gorakhpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Mathura, Rampur, Varanasi and Najibabad ; Local Radio Stations: Bareilly, Obra, Faizabad, Jhansi; Doordarshan Kendra: 6 - Lucknow, Bareilly, Mau, Allahabad, Gorakhpur and Varanasi; (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 7 - Agra, Allahabad, Gorakhpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Mau and Varanasi; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 54 - Akbarpur, Aligarh, Athdama, Amroha, Auraiya, Bahraich, Balia, Balrampur, Banda, Basti, Chibramau, Deoria, Etah, Etawah, Faizabad, Farrukhabad, Fatehpur, Gauriganj, Gonda, Hardoi, Jagdishpur, Jhansi, Kasganj, Kashipur, Lakhimpur, Lalganj (Pratapgarh), Lalganj (Rae Bareilli), Lalitpur, Mahoba, Mainpuri, Mahroni, Mathura, Mauranipur, Moradabad, Mahmudabad, Nanpara, Navgarh, Obra, Orai, Pilibhit, Puranpur, Rae Bareilli, Rampur, Rashra, Rath, Rudauli, Sambhal, Shahjahanpur, Sinkandarpur, Sitapur, Sultanpur, Tanakpur, Tirwa and Mau; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 2 - Mankapur and Churk; (iv) Relay Centres: N/A; Number of Cinema Theatres: 925.

Organisation

The Department of Information and Public Relations headed by the Director has ten wings: (a) Press Publicity (b) Field Publicity (c) Exhibition (d) Film & Photography (e) Publication (f) Advertising (g) Technical (h) Scrutiny of Newspapers and Periodicals (I) Song and Drama (J) Reference and Research Centre (K) Plan Cell (L) Information Centre, New Delhi (M) State Information Centre, Hazratganj, Lucknow. Budget During the financial year 2007-08, a sum of Rs. 53.92 crore was spent under the non-plan and Rs. 166 lakhs under the plan. In the current financial year 2008-09 a budgetary provision with first supplementary of Rs. 90,77,36,000 under the non-plan head and Rs. 60,00,000 under the plan head, has been made.

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Press Information Bureau About 4998 press notes (Hindi, English and Urdu) had been published from April 2007 to March 2008. Besides, press tours to various developmental projects were conducted in addition to extensive broadcast and telecast of the activities of various departments through Akashwani, Doordarshan and other T.V. channels. Reference and Research Centre A well equipped modern reference library has been set up at the headquarter comprising of 22000 books of referential value. Reference Library provides reference material to researchers, departmental officers/employees and Senior officers of the Government. A massive collection of informative and referential books based on important subjects including yearbooks, reports, gazetteer, mass media, computer, journalism, history and biographies, etc., are available in the library. Utility of the Library has been increased as a result of its modernisation and strengthening. Publication Bureau The Department plays an important role in publishing useful publications based on information like policy decisions, achievements and programmes of the Government such as- magazines, folders, booklets and other publicity materials. The publication bureau is bringing out regularly Nayadaur, a literary Urdu monthly magazine Uttar Pradesh Sandesh, a monthly on development and Uttar Pradesh Varshiki, a year book. Every week Saaptahiki in Hindi is released from the department for fecilitating weekly newspapers. A special issue on Maulana Mohammad Jauhar has been published in `Naya Daur' both in English and Hindi. Its other regular publication include Information Diary, Information Directory and Soochna Panchang. Field Publicity With a view to ensuring information regarding developmental programmes and achievements of the Government and establishing direct interaction with the people, District Information Offices had been set up at districts, all over the State. These offices use to release press notes regarding promulgation of the policies and schemes being carried out in the district. District Information Centres are equipped with libraries. Exhibition The Exhibition Wing of the Department organised exhibitions last year on

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all important occasions and fairs including International Trade Fair, New Delhi. The Department also organises small exhibitions at Block and Tehsil levels. The exhibition unit also manages to put up hoardings on developmental activities. Song and Drama To ensure wide publicity of the Government policies and welfare Programmes, Cultural programmes based on folk songs and plays in local dialects are organised. Cultural parties were entrusted the task of making proper promulgation of Pulse Polio Drive in collaboration with UNICEF and Family Welfare Department. Films and Photography Insurgance of visual media in Mass-media activities is an unprecedented phenomenon of the modern era. The Photo-film unit utilizes modern equipments for publicity of the Government schemes, programmes, policies and decisions keeping in mind the modern communication requirements. Documentaries and newsreels are also produced. During the year 2007-08, 3715 video coverages were acoomplished for transmitting on Doordarshan/other channels, 31617 Photo coverages press release through Newspapers including a 9213 b/w photographs and 45917 colour phtographs. In addition, a total 1347 large size color phtographs and 613 b/w photographs are made.

UTTARAKHAND

Capital: Dehradun; Principal Language: Hindi; Area: 53,484 sq. kms.; Population: 84,89,349. Literacy Percentage: 72.28 Number of Newspapers: 300 ; Circulation of Newspapers: NA; Principal Dailies: 39; Radio Stations: 3; FM Station: Nil; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): 02 Mussoorie (DDI & DDII) ; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): 16; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): 16; (iv) Relay Centres: Radio-3; (v) Number of Cinema Theaters: 59.

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Organisation The Information and Public Relations Department functions as a bridge between the government and the people. The Department shoulders the onerous responsibility of disseminating various programmes, schemes and decisions of the government and welfare work undertaken by it among the people through media. Press Publicity The Uttaranchal Government facilitates press/media representatives of print and electronic media access to information so that the policies and programmes of government can be publicised. Field Publicity All districts of the state are equipped with infrastructure of publicising the Government schemes and policies. District Information Officers are entrusted with the task of creating awareness among the masses about Government works to the grass root level. Song and Drama The government's policies, decisions and achievements are publicised through folk cultural programmes. For this purpose cultural troupes are selected at district level. Besides, two units of Song and Drama Division of Govermnet of India are active in Dehradun and Nainital. Publication Bureau Publication Bureau performs the job of informing the people about Government policies, schemes, programmes, achievements, etc., through printed literature. Besides, periodic publications, books, booklets, folders, handbills, posters, albums etc. are published. "Uttaranchal Darshan", a monthly newsletter is being published to publicize the policies of the Government. Photo ­ Films Unit Photo - Films Unit is engaged in publicity of Government's schemes, programmes, policies, etc., through photographs and films. State government also telecast a news magazine on DD-I. Community Viewing Scheme The Government policies and programmes are publicised through exhibition, puppet shows and other cultural activities.

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Information Centres There is a State Information Centre in New Delhi. It caters to the requirements of the national and international print and electronic media. The Information and Public Relations Department has 13 District Information Offices in each district to look after the publicity at all levels. Website and E-mail Address Currently the website of I&PRD is on www.uttara.in/. The e-mail address is : [email protected]

WEST BENGAL

CAPITAL : Kolkata; Principal Language: Bengali; Area: 88,752 Sq. kms.; Population: 8,02,21,171; Literacy Percentage: 57.7%; Number of Newspapers: N/A; Circulation of Newspapers: N/A; Principal Dailies: Anandabazar Patrika (Bengali), Sambad Pratidin (Bengali), Aajkaal (Bengali), Bartaman (Bengali), Ganashakti (Bengali) The Statesman (English), Telegraph (English), The Asian Age (English),Times of India (English), Hindustan Times (English), Viswamitra (Hindi), Sanmarg (Hindi), Jansatta (Hindi), Chhapte Chhapte (Hindi), Aabshar (Urdu), Azad Hind (Urdu), Akbar-E-Mashriq (Urdu),; Radio Stations: Kolkata, Kursenong, Siliguri, Baharampur and Bolpur; F.M. Stations: N/A; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs) (Digital): Kolkata - Channel-I, Channel-II and DD Bangla, Murshidabad DD-II, Baharampur, Kurseong, Krishnagar; Santiniketan DD-I, Balurghat, Asansol, Asansol Metro; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Kharagpur, Garbeta, Jhargram, Contai, Midnapore, Bardhaman, Kalna, Ryna, Jhalda, Purulia, Bagmundi, Balarampur, Ranaghat, Bishnupur, Basanti, Farakka, Malda, Aliporeduar, Coochbehar, Kalimpong, Darjeeling, Santiniketan DD-11; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): Egra Organisation The Department of Information and Cultural Affairs consists of four

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Directorates and one Language Cell headed by the Secretary namely (a) Information, (b) Culture (c) Film and (d) Archaeology. All these Directorates have Directors at the helm. The language Wing is headed by the Deputy Secretary. Press Publicity and Press Relations News Bureau of the Information Directorate is engaged in preparing and issuing press releases to feed the press radio and TV with government news. The officers attached to News Bureau are entrusted with the responsibility of maintaining press liaison with all the departments of the government. News Bureau discharges the duty by issuing press notes/press releases and backgrounders by organising press conferences of the Ministers and other senior government functionaries and organising press parties. This Bureau provides feed back by sending newspaper clippings to the Ministers and Secretaries. During all-important elections, a special newsroom is set up to cater the election results to the press and media. Similar arrangements are made during natural calamities and other catastrophes that have adverse bearing on the people of the state. Besides during national and international programmes of significance media centre is set up by News Bureau to extend facilities to the media representatives and to organise press conferences, etc., of the visiting dignitaries from home and abroad. Organising press coverages during the visits of the Heads of States and other VVIPs frequenting, West Bengal is also within the purview of the News Bureau. Posters, folders, booklets in different languages highlighting the message of the State Government are distributed to various information pockets in districts and sub-divisions by our DICOs and SDICOs. A Mass Media Centre under the aegis of the Information and Cultural Affairs Department was made to set up media-related information bank and to explore avenues for the uplift of the rural and moffusil based small newspapers. It has also arranged training of rural journalists and students of journalism. It has set up a journalistic and media library. Field Publicity The Rural Information Wing of the Information Directorate maintains constant liaison with the people of the State through 18 District and 59 Sub-divisional Information and Cultural officers. A Special District Information and Culture Office has been set up to cater information and assistance to the people of that remote area. While the District Information

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and Cultural Officers are in charge of the district offices, the departmental offices of the sub-division are headed by the Sub-divisional Information and Cultural Officers. The Field Workers have been redesignated as Junior Field Information Assistants. There are field workers in 90 blocks. The Rural Wing functions in close tandem with the panchayats and other local self-government bodies. The wing makes rural people aware of different policies, programmes and activities of the government. At the same time the wing feeds the government with rural sector information. A special drive is on to highlight the achievement of the government in the fields of Panchayat, Land Reforms, Agriculture, Welfare of the Backward Classes, Information Technology and Tourism, etc., through multi-media campaigns like exhibitions, advertisements, hoarding, screenings of documentaries and videofilms, press releases and seminars. Song and Drama Music and Dance workshops on different items are organised in collaboration with Rajya Sangeet Akademi of the Cultural Directorate. The Birth anniversary of Rabindra Nath Tagore is celebrated in all districts and sub-divisons. Seminars followed by cultural programmes are arranged to pay tribute to the poet laureate. The Rural Wing observes `Baishe Sraban' in a solemn manner in all districts and sub-divisions. `Patha Natak Utsav' and Drama Festival are organised in the districts in collaboration with Paschim Banga Natya Akademi. Besides, Drama workshops are also arranged. This year seminars and cultural functions to celebrate the birth anniversary of Kazi Nazrul Islam were held. Seminars and cultural functions were also held on communal harmony. With a view to ensuring cultural bond transcending all discriminations and narrowness `Teesta Ganga Utsav' was held in Jalpaiguri. This festival paved the way for an exchange of thoughts and ideas amongst the artistes of North Bengal and South Bengal in the real sense of the term. Publications One of the major objectives of the Department of Information and Cultural Affairs is to make the plans and programmes of the government public, to gather news and views, to earmark and denote the exact identity of a common citizen in the magnitude of socioeconomic development. The Publication Wing publishes journals in languages of the State viz. Bengali, English, Hindi, Urdu, Santhali, and Nepali. These journals have become popular amongst the people. The editing of the journals is carried out by a team of editors, sub-editors and translators.

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Besides regular and general issues, special journals are brought out commemorating eminent personalities and highlighting important subjects and issues. A publication on education is brought out quarterly by the Information Department with a special supplement on important and relevant issues concerning education. A quarterly bulletin of the Mass Media Centre is also published from this Department. The Information Directorate also brings out theme based casual publications on different occasions. Booklets and pamphlets highlighting the policies and achievements of the government are also brought out. Photo and Films Photographers of the Information Department assist the News Bureau in maintaining media relations on behalf of all the departments of the State Government. Coverage of important events, natural calamities, visit of VVIPs is also made by our official photographers. Films Wing is headed by the Director of Film. He is assisted, among others, by one Joint Director, one Deputy Director, one Assistant Director and a Production Officer. Nandan, a film centre, is run by this Wing for propagation of film culture. It has three auditoriums, two film archives (one general and the other Satyajit Ray) and one library. The West Bengal Film Development Corporation has been entrusted with the distribution of Government produced films, exhibition of films in two cinema houses, Chaplin and Ahindra Mancha and running of a colour film laboratory named Rupayan. Besides, an educational audio-visual training cum production centre has been set up as a joint venture with the Government of Italy to provide an opportunity to produce educational audio-visual in a professional way. This training centre has been named `Roopkala Kendra'. Community Viewing Scheme A.V./Video shows are arranged throughout the State in a planned and organised way, though there are various infrastructural constraints. With the objective of modernizing the whole process, 18 districts and 28 subdivisions have been provided with colour TV and VCP sets. There are 104 audio-visual units in operation in the State. Funds have been placed in 13 districts and 16 sub-divisions for purchase of VCD players. Video films on Polio Eradication, Total Sanitation, Self-help Group are being screened regularly by our A.V. Units.

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Information Centres / Library Kolkata Information Centre was established as a State Level Information Centre mainly to provide information to common people on various developmental activities of West Bengal government. The activities of Kolkata Information Centre have gained much importance in recent times. The centre is being built up as a model Information institution with Information Kiosk, auditorium, exhibition-hall, reading room, library and other facilities. Within the State, the project of opening one Information Centre in each district and sub-division is now cpmplete. As a result the State has now 58 such information centres. Besides, State Level Information Centres have also been set up at Siliguri, Asansol and Durgapur. There are three State Information Bureaus at New Delhi, Chennai and Agartala. These Bureaus are engaged in disseminating information about West Bengal, promoting its tourism and building up cultural relations. Information Wing It is headed by the Director of Information who is assisted among others by four Joint Directors of Information, eleven Deputy Directors including one each at Delhi and Darjeeling, six Assistant Directors, twenty-two Information Officers, one Research Officer, one Copy Writer, one Executive Engineer, one Public Relations Officer for Jhargram Affairs. At the field level there are twenty-four (including two Labour Information Officers, one each at Asansol and Siliguri), District Information and Cultural Officers and sixty-five Sub-divisional Information and Cultural Officers. Post of Field Information Assistants - one in each district have been created to strengthen the rural set up. Also ninety Field Workers have been posted in the same number of Blocks so far to stretch the rural information network down to the grassroots level. Rural Orientation The Rural Information Wing provides the real basis of the Information and Cultural Affairis Department. This Wing covers the rest of the State except Kolkata,. The officers and workers of the Rural Information Wing work all over the State, diseminating information about the welfare policies of the Government and propagating the message of fraternity and harmony. Exhibitions, hoardings, advertisements, documentaries are used to disseminate information about the various prgorammes and message of the Government. To work in closer co-ordination with the 3-tier Panchayat system, district officers of the I & C A Department have been attached to the Zilla Parisads

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and Parisad Information Functionaries. Field workers, too, have been attached to the Panchayat Samitis. News Bureau The News Bureau plays a vital role in highlighting the policies and activities of the Government through mass media. It also arranges press conferences of ministers and other public dignitaries. The News Bureau is also the issuing authority of press-accreditation cards to the media persons according to the recommendations of the Press Accreditation Committee. The Department of Information and Cultural Affairs runs three outside State Information Bureaus - one each at New Delhi (opened in the year 1964). All the three Information Bureaus run Information Centre-cum-Libraries in their offices and make available the information as well as publicity materials to the commonmen, government officials, press and media. Publication Wing The Publication Wing brings out journals, which furnish details of public events that occur in remote part of the State. The journals are Paschim Bangal (Bengali), West Bengal (English), Pachhim Bangla (Santhali), Paschim Bangal (Hindi). A magazine in the Nepali language is also published by the department. Another journal, Siksha Darpan, which is the organ of the different Education Departments of the State is also publihsed by the Information and Cultural Affairs Department. The Special issues of the journals, which are brought out occasionally, are designed to pass on to readers and varied information on the concerned subject through serious essays and articles contributed by the acknowledged authorities and experts in the field. Mass Media Centre The Mass Media Centre, came under the aegis of the Information and Cultural Affairs Department on September 28, 1987 and it functions from the Kolkata Information Centre. Its objectives include (a) cultivation of mass communication as a pre-requisite for economic and social development, (b) organising seminars on relevant topics, (c) setting up media related information bank, and (d) exploring avenues of revitalising the rural and mofussil-based small newspapers. Film Directorate Film is the most powerful medium of communication as well as the most potent means of creating mass consciousness. Committed to using the

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celluloid and electronic (video) media to promote mass education and enhance awareness the Information and Cultural Affairs Department has successfully created an infrastructure for making and screening good films. For almost 25 years now, this Department has consistently striven and played a meaningful role at all stages of film-making, including preproduction and public shows. Films Producation The State Government has entered into an agreement with the National Film Development Corporation for producing feature films. So far three films, namely, `Shilpi', Nayantara' and `Swapner Sandhane' have been jointly produced. Proposals for a fourth feature film are under consideration. Since 1977 State Government has produced as many as 24 feature films. This apart, Film Directorate attaches special importance to documentaries as well and every year it buys a number of documentaries of real merit made by young directors or private producers. When the need is felt for a documentary on some important, significant subject, this Directorate engages empanelled specialist documentary experts to make such films. It is pertinent to mention here that on the occuasion of the birth centenary of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose, a documentary highlighting Netaji's life and career was made. In matters of production of films, the opinion and recommendations of the West Bengal Films Advisory Council are followed. Technicians' Studio Technicians' Studio Private Limited was taken over by the State Government in 1983. Over the years the infrastructural facilities have been thoroughly revamped transforming the old studio into an eminently suitable one for filmmakers in this region. The work of modernisation is in full swing of the studio. It is expected that the studio will become increasingly self-supporting. The Film Centenary Building now being built on the old premises of the former Radha Films at Tollygunge is nearing completion. The history of film making in Kolkata goes back to eighty or ninety years. Right from the the era of silent films Kolkata has contributed richly to the world of international films. Proud inheritance consists of the triumphant films made by the legendary Satyajit Ray and the other great directors. The Centenary Building is being built to collect and preserve this wealth of cinema. No doubt cine enthusiasts and students, research workers and the numerous film societies will benefit from this project which, when completed, will house the proposed film museum, a library, a theatre, an auditorium, etc. The archive has been built up by the film Directorate. Its collection consists of the negatives of hundreds of documentaries and newsreels including

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some rare ones. From this collection prints of films and videocassettes are supplied to the different audio-visual units in the districts. West Bengal Film Development Corporation The Colour Development laboratory `Rupayan' under this Corporation has created adequate infrastructure to extend post-production facilities to film makers in the Eastern and North-Eastern India. It processes and develops about 40 feature films every year and thus caters to the local demands. In order to promote a healthy cinema and film culture in the city, the West Bengal Film Development Corporation screens films regularly at Chaplin. The Corporation is also in charge of the distribution of feature films produced by the State Government and to address effectively the various problems of production, distribution and screening in this field. Nandan: the Hub of Cinema in West Bengal Establihed in 1985, the Nandan Complex very soon emerged as the nerve centre of all cinemas and the film related activities in the State. Internationally acclaimed Indian and Foreign films are regularly screened in the auditoriums of the Nandan Complex which also functions as the central venue of the seven year old Kolkata International Film Festival. Every year from November 10 to 17, Kolkata hosts the Festival, which has already won the recognition from the International Film Festival Federation. The Festival now forms an intergral part of the annual agenda of the State Government and has been accepted as one of the major cultural events of the city. In November every year film personalities from India and abroad come to Kolkata and an exciting interface follows, a hundred flowers bloom and the considerabale crop of world films screened at Nandan and the cinema-theatres in the city for seven days ignites a various of interactive sessions, seminars and interviews in which film makers, directors and artistes from within and outside India take part. The Film Festival Directorate, the Government of India, National Film Development Corporation, the film Archives of India, Eastern Indian Motion Picture Association, kindred organizations and different commercial entitles are associated with the Festival. Over the last few year Nandan has been organising film appreciation courses. Recently the duration of these courses has been extended to ten weeks. Steps are being taken to spread and promote the cultivation of good, aesthetic films in the districts also. Cinema Workers' Welfare Fund The Fund was started in 1981 to provde financial relief to indigent cinema

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workers and technicians. Every year over a hundred indigent workers and the technicians receive the much-needed help from this fund. In sector four at Salt Lake, a state-of-the-art video film studio is coming up. When completed and fully operational Roopkala Kendra will function both as a hub for making people-oriented video films and training centre for students intending to make video films. The need has long been felt for such an institution in the estern and NorthEastern India. A project which Satyajit Ray had visualised long ago became a reality when the Government of India and Italy signed an agreement in 1995. Information and Cultural Affairs Department is executing this Indo-Italian joint venture. Roopkala Kendra is gearing up to play a major role in the production of animations. No facilities woth the name are abailable in Eastern India for making educational and serious animations, nor does any training institute function here. Animation can perform a critical rolein communication with chldren and the semiliterate segments of society.

UNION TERRITORIES

ANDAMAN AND NICOBAR

CAPITAL: Port Blair; Principal Languages: Hindi, Nicovarese, Bengali, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu; Area: 8,249 sq. kms.; Population: 3,56,152 (2001 Census); Literacy percentage: 81.3; Number of Newspapers: 31; Principal Dailies with Circulation (Approx.): Daily Telegrams: 8000; Dweep Samachar: 1000. Radio Station: Port Blair and Car Nicobar; Number of Cinema Theatres: 3; Doordarshan Kendra: Low Power TV Transmitter (LPT): Port Blair and Car Nicobar; Very Low Power Transmitter (VLPT): Digilipur, Mayabudnder, Rangat Middle Andaman, Hut Bay, Nancowry and Campbell Bay; DR sets and Dish Antenna are also installed.

Organisation

The Directorate of Information, Publicity and Tourism is functioning under the Secretary and headed by the Director.

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Exhibition The Administration participated in the India International Trade Fair held in New Delhi. On 27th of November Andaman Day was celebrated at Lal Chowk Theatre, New Delhi. A cultural evening was organised by presenting Panchavadyam, Kuchipudi, Folk dances of the Islands, Talvadyam and Quawali. Publications Two daily newspapers `The Daily Telegrams' (English) and Dweep Samachar (Hindi) are being published regularly by the Administration. A publicity campaign was undertaken in the media on the mainland with a view to promoting tourism in the Islands. Field Publicity There are eight mobile cinema units; two in South Andaman, one each at Car Nicobar, Campbell Bay, Nancowrie, Mayabunder and Diglipur and Hut Bay operated by the Department. Film Library The Department maintains a good film library at Port Blair. There are 97 feature films (Hindi) and 1487 documentaries and newsreels on various subjects. One video film on A and N Islands has also been made for the benefit of tourists. These films are screened in rural areas as well as issued to various departments, agencies for free screening along with documentaries on social and family welfare. Photo Unit The Department arranged phtography and videography of development activities. All state functions and VIP's visit were covered during the year. Training of local Youth and Employment Many local youths were trained in Hotel Reception and Book Keeping and House Keeping at the Local Polytechnic viz. Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Government Polytechnic, Port Blair and also in a private Organisation assisted by the Department. A few trained youths were employed in Government and Private sectors. Information Centres A total of 31 Information Centres functioned during the year. These centres were provided with newspapers/periodicals etc., besides colour TVs and dish Antenna wherever necessary. 23 Panchayats headed by women

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Pradhans were also provided with colour television sets as an encouragement to the women in these Islands. Press Facility A press room is available for the journalists. This press room is set up and manned by the Directorate of IP&T.

CHANDIGARH

CAPITAL: Chandigarh; Area: 114 sq.km.; Population : 900635; Literacy Percentage: 81.76; Principal Languages: Hindi, English and Punjabi; Number of Newspapers: 18; Circulation of Newspapers: 5 lakh ; Principal Dailies: Tribune, Hindustan Times, Dainik Bhaskar, Times of India, Indian Express, Amar Ujala, Punjab Kesri; Radio Station: FM-3, AM1 (AIR); Television Station: One; Number of Cinema Halls/ Multiplexes:6/1.

History of Chandigarh

Le Corbusier's creation fulfilled the dream of Pandit Jawahal Lal Nehru. Today Chandigarh is a fully grown town of most modern architectural splender. It has acquired the enviable reputation of being the "CITY BEAUTIFUL". Chandigarh nestles in a picturesque setting in the foothills of Shivalik hills and enjoys the popular epithet the City Beautiful. Chandigarh and the area surrounding it were constituted as a Union Territory on 1 November 1966. It serves as a joint capital of both Punjab and Haryana states. It is bounded on North and West by Punjab and on the East and South by Haryana. Salient Features 1. Chandigarh symbolizes modern India. The residents of Chnadigarh are proud of their unique city due to its distinctive character and ambience. Along the path of economic development this city, the vision of Pandit Nehru, has been able to maintain its traditional cultural spirit. 2. Chandigarh Administration is moving on four broad fronts. First, it aims to provide an accessible and transparent administration with the help of Information Technology. The UT was among the earliest to

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implement the provisions of Right to Information Act. A number of services are now available on computer and mobile phones. All rules are being reviewed to see what simplification can be carried out to make them user-friendly. The purpose is to minimize the exercise of discretion, and minimize the leg work of the citizens in dealing with the Administration. 3. Secondly, the Administration is working towards a higher rate of economic growth by encouraging economic activities which provided greater value addition, such as knowledge based industries, high end commercial activity, etc. 4. Thirdly, the Administraion is seeking to provide infrastructural services such as electricity supply, water supply, health and educational services and public transport which should compare with those in advanced countries. 5. Fourthly, the Administration is conscious of the fact that the benefits of development do not reach everyone equally. Hence, there is a special emphasis on reaching out to those whom development has by-passed.

Organisation

Public Relations Department is headed by the Director Public Relations who is assisted by two Public Relations Officers. The Office staff includes two Assistant Public Relations Officers, one Section Officer, three Senior Assistants entrusted with the work of publicity, accounts and establishments. The technical staff includes one Movie Cameraman, one Assistant Photo and Cinema Officer, one Dark Room Attendant and one Technical Assistant (Sound).

General

The day to day functioning of the Department includes the media coverage of all functions of the Administrator, Adviser to the Administration, Home Secretary, Finance Secretary and other concerned officers of the UT Administration. The Department is also responsible for covering VIP visits, organising press conferances and cultural programmes, releasing of Press Notes highlighting activities and achievements of all the Departments of Administration and their future plans and Programmes. National Integration The Department has been carrying out sustained publicity on National Integration and Communal Harmony through various media at its disposal. It also acts as a coordinating agency for various prestigious. annual events

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like Independence Day, Republic Day, National Unity Week celebrations, Sadbhavana Day, Kaumi Ekta Week, and Martyrdom Day, etc. Press Wing The Press Wing of the Department carries out extensive publicity of programmes, policies, activities and achievements of the Administration and Government as a whole in form of Press Releases, Handouts, Articles, Radio talks and advertisements. Public Relations Offices are attached to various departments of the Administration for drafting press notes, writing messages and speeches for officers. During the year, the department released 1027 press notes for publication in the newspapers. Two speeches and 75 messages were written for the Adviser to the Administrator, Home Secretary and Finance Secretary. Display Advertisements highlighting the progress, development and achievements of the Administration in various fields were prepared and got published in newspapers on special occasions. All advertisements of different departments of Chandigarh Administration are routed through the Wing. During the year under report more than 1879 display and classified advertisements from various departments were released to various newspapers in and outside the Union Territory. The Department played key role in making the major events of the Administration including Chandigarh Film Festival, Chandigarh Carnival, Rose Festival and New Year Festival a huge success. Photo Section During the year photo coverage was given to 471 important functions. In connection with these functions, photos were supplied to different newspapers for publication. The wing also prepared colourred photographs relating to development activities of the city for exhibitions arranged from time to time. Coloured Photographs highlighting the progress of the city in different field were also displayed on notice boards. Publications The Department undertakes the publication work to highlight the activities and achievements of various departments of the Administration. Some other publications are also brought out from time to time besides publishing New Year Diaries, Table Chart of telephone numbers and Telephone Directory of the Administration. Administration The Administrative branch looked after the personal needs of the

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department to ensure efficient discharge of its various functions and coordinated the work of different schemes effectively. Steps were taken to solve day-to-day problems promptly. Field Publicity The Field Publicity Wing of the Administration works in conjunction with other departments of the Administration in publicizing their programmes, policies and achievements and the benefits accruing to the people, and in highlighting decisions beneficial to the scheduled castes, backward classes and weaker sections of the society. Public Meetings and Conferences This Department helped cultural groups to organize melas and conferences in the Union Territory of Chandigarh which were addressed by the Administrator, Adviser, Home Secretary and dignitaries of the Administration. In these meetings topics like national integration, anticommunalism, eradication of untouchability, etc., were highlighted. Special Campaigns As usual, Independence Day and Republic Day were celebrated with great enthusiasm. World Health Day, World Environment Day were also celebrated in the Union Territory. Technical Wing The Technical Wing extended all help. Public Address System was provided at various meetings and press conferences. Name/Address/Website/E-Mail of the Department Public Relations Department; Sector 9 , U.T. Secretariat, Chandigarh, www.chdpr.gov.in; dpr@&chd.nic.in, (Ph.01722740056,274059); [email protected]

DADRA AND NAGAR HAVELI

CAPITAL: Silvassa; Principal Languages: Gujarati, Hindi and Marathi; Area: 491 sq. kms.; Population: 2,20,451; Literacy Percentage: 57.63; Number of Newspapers: one; Circulation of Newspapers: 5000 copies (Weekly); Principal Dailies: Nil; Radio Stations: Nil; F.M Station: Nil; Doordarshan Kendra: (i) High Power

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Transmitters (HPTs): Nil; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): Nil; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (VLPTs): One; (iv) Relay Centres: One; Number of Cinema Theatres: Two.

Organisation

This Administration has only one Field Publicity Unit. The Publicity Unit issues Press Notes on developmental activities and releases Government advertisements. The Land Reform Officer - I has been designated as exofficio Chief Publicity Officer who looks after the whole functions of the Publicity Unit. The Chief Publicity Officer is assisted by a Field Publicity Officer and other staff. Press Publicity During the year, the Department has carried out following activities (i) Press Notes Released: 144 (ii) Publication of Advertisment/Tender Notice/ Notification Government, etc.: 99 (iii) Provided Public Addressing System during Government programmes: 64 (iv) Sent Script materials to the AIR Correspondent of AIR Newsletter for Dadra and Nagar Haveli (D.N.H.): 10 (v) Film Shows arranged: 18. Field Publicity The Field Publicity Unit organises Film Shows regularly in remote areas of the territory on 16 mm Projector as well as Video. Song and Drama Song and Drama Division, Pune, sponsored Artists programmes on R.D.A. campaign, AIDS awareness, etc., in interior places of the Union Territory of D.N.H. Photo and Films Photo services are provided in each and every function and film shows are arranged by the Department in interior parts of this territory through TV. Community Viewing Scheme This Department has provided eleven T. V. sets at the Panchayat Head Quarters for entertainment. Website and E-mail Address E-mail Address: silvassatourism@sit;v.com Website: www.silvassatourism.com

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DAMAN AND DIU

CAPITAL: Daman; Prinicipal Language: Gujarati; Languages spoken: Gujarati, English, Hindi, Portuguese; Area: 112 sq. kms.; Population: 15,58,204 (2001); Literacy percentage: 78.18; No. of Newspapers: 4; Circulation of Newspapers: 25,125; Principal Dailies with Circulation: Savera India Times (Hindi) 7700; Ash Aajadi (Hindi) 3915; Vartaman Pravah (Gujarati) 5000, UT's Voice (English) 8510 (Fortnightly); Radio Station: 2; Doordarshan Kendra: High Power Transmitter (HPT): Nil; Low Power Transmitter (LPT): 2; Relay Centres: 2; Number of Cinema Halls/Multiplexes: 2.

Organisation

The Administration is headed by the Administrator. In the Secretariat there are also the Development Commissioner, Finance Secretary and Law Secretary. Then there are two collectors each for Daman and Diu Districts. The Collector is the Head of Department for various offices and the Collector is also the Director of Tourism. Press Publicity and Press Relations The Department of Information and Publicity issues press releases, photographs, advertisements and the materials for public education, safety, tourist conveniences and general information such as consumer rights and write-ups on different forts and churches. Daman and Diu have also got good coverage on prime channels and magazines. Field Publicity Film shows on subjects like health, education, sanitation, etc., are shown frequently. Song and Drama Bal Bhavan, Daman, organizes programmes and dramas, etc., on different occasions. Publications This Division published brochures and pamphlets which are in great

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demand by the tourists. The brochures are printed in the English, Protuguese and German languages. The post cards cover the multifaceted sites namely the forts, churches and beaches. The calendars also show the same along with the newly developed garden i.e. Damanganga Lake Garden, Kachigam, Kadaiya Tourist Complex, Kadaiya and Satya Sagar Udhyan, Dalwada, etc. Community Listening cum ­ Community Viewing Centre For the literate and illiterate population, the B.D.O. runs a Community Listening Centre. It serves as a meeting point in the area where important information is disseminated through the Sarpanchs. Each Centre has been equipped with T. V. and Radio. There are 11 Community centres. Since these Centres are also equipped with T.Vs. they are called Community Viewing Centres where mainly visual communciation is used.

DELHI

CAPITAL : Delhi; Principal Languages: Hindi, Punjabi, Urdu; Area: 1483 Sq. kms.; Population: 138.50 Lakhs; Literacy Percentage: 81.67; Number of Newspapers: N/A; Circulation of Newspapers: N/A; Principal Dailies: English - Hindustan Times, Times of India, Indian Express, Hindu, Pioneer, Asian Age, National Herald, Tribune, Statesman; Hindi - Punjab Kesari, Jansatta, Rashtriya Sahara, Nav Bharat Times, Hindustan, Dainik Jagran, Amar Ujala, Veer Arjun; Urdu - Quami Awaz, Pratap, Milap, Awam, Faisal Jadeed, Rashtriya Sahara (Urdu), Akhbar-e-Mashriq, Tej, Sada-e-watan. Eveningers: Mid-day, Today, Sandhya Times, Sandhya Veer Arjun; Radio/ T. V. Station - Akashwani, Delhi Doordarshan Kendra: Delhi; FM Stations: N/A; Doordarshan Kendra: Delhi Doordarshan Kendra l; (i) High Power Transmitters (HPTs): N/A; (ii) Low Power Transmitters (LPTs): N/A; (iii) Very Low Power Transmitters (ULPTs): N/A; (iv) Relay Centres: N/A; Number of Cinema Theatres: 48 (Permanent : 48; Touring : NIL).

Organisation

The Department of Information Publicity (DIP), located at Block IX, Old Secretariat, Delhi- 110054, is entrusted with the job of informing and publicising the programmes, policies and activities of the Government of

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NCT of Delhi for citizens' welfare, particularly for weaker sections of society. The Department is headed by a Director, who functions under the overall supervision of the Principal Secretary, Information and Public Relations, Government NCT of Delhi. The Director is assisted by the Deputy Directors, Information Officers, Assistant Information Officers, Field Publicity Officer and Publicity Assistants in carrying out the work entrusted to the Directorate. The officers of the Directorate look after the publicity work of the different departments of the Government of Delhi and for this purpose the Information officers and Assistant Information Officers are attached with different dignitaries like Lieutenant Governor Speaker, Deputy Speaker, Chief Minister and other Ministers for the publicity of the departments under them. On the Administrative side, the Director is assisted by an Administrative Officer, Office Superintendent and Account Officer along with other administrative staff under them. The Directorate accomplishes the information dissemination and publicity functions through its 8 units namely, Press Unit, Hospitality Unit, Publication Unit, Research and Reference Unit, Advertisement Unit, Field Publicity Unit, Film & Video Publicity Unit and Photo Unit. Press (Media) Unit This unit arranges Press Conferences, Press briefings and Press Tours of media persons and keeps liaison with Press, Radio and T.V. The Media Unit is entrusted with the work of issuing of daily Press Releases. It also issues Press Accreditation Cards to reporters and camerapersons and arranges other press related facilities for them. The Media Unit also maintains a wellfurnished Press Room (renamed as Media Facilitation Centre) for the accredited journalists at the Delhi Secretariat, where the facilities of fax, telephone, computer and television, etc., have been provided for the reporters. A modernization plan is underway to modernize this Press Room by equipping it with the state of the art facilitating equipments. Unit also organizes regular meetings of Delhi Press Accreditation Committee to finalise issue and renewal of accreditation cards to the journalists covering Delhi Government beat and to discuss issues pertaining to welfare of the Delhi-based journalists. Research and Reference Unit Research and Reference Unit provides ready reference material for different publicity oriented activities and is an integral part of the functioning of this office. Under this unit a library is being maintained, wherein reference

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books, periodicals and newspapers are kept. About 20 newspapers are scanned daily for news and around 27 hard copies of news clippings are prepared everyday and sent to LG, Speaker and Deputy Speaker, Chief Minister and Ministers, Leader of Opposition and some Secretary/ Principal Secretaries. A system of e-media clipping is being introduced wherein these clippings are mounted in the Directorate's website and can be freely accessed by public. Advertisement Unit This unit organizes the publicity of Delhi Government through advertisements in print media. Release Order of display and classified advertisements of various departments are issued on a day to day basis. There are 11 Group `A' agencies and 62 Group `B' agencies empanelled by the GNCTD. The concerned advertising government department invites all the ll Group `A' agencies and gives them the brief on the subject and these agencies prepare creatives and submit them to the brief-giving department. On receipt of creatives, the advertising department sends them directly to the Principal Secretary to Chief Minister or may route the same through the DIP for obtaining approval of the Chief Minister. After obtaining approval of CM, the advertising department does the media release by obtaining the DIP number from the advertising unit of the Directorate of Information and Publicity. It is noteworthy that the proper Government Department of GNCTD shall compulsorily get the creatives made from the 11 Group `A' empanelled agencies at a rate similar to Government of India's DAVP print media advertising rate. The noteable exception, however, is the Directorate of Information and Publicity which can utilize the services of both empanelled Group `A' and Group `B' agencies of GNCTD at a rate similar to DAVP. Further, the profit oriented PSUs, Corporations and other bodies of GNCTD may utilize services of both Group `A' and Group `B' agencies, but only at a commercial rate. So far as giving of any advertisement to print media, souvenir, etc., at commercial rate is concerned, the proper Government Departments need to compulsorily obtain the creative approval of the Chief Minister, GNCTD and financial concurrence of the finance department of the GNCTD. It may be noted that on the important occasions of national importance such as Independence Day, Republic Day, Gandhi Jayanti and New Year, etc., public awareness campaigns on relevant issues are also undertaken by the DIP and it issues advertisements not only to the empanelled print media of GNCTD but also to other DAVP empanelled print media who have made advance request in writing to the Director, DIP.

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Publication Unit Besides printing publicity literature, calendar, telephone directory, etc., this unit also publishes booklets, brochures, handbills and posters from time to time pertaining to important achievements and the campaigns of Delhi government. Trilingual monthly magazine ` Dilli Masik `(in Hindi, Punjabi & Urdu) is brought out by this Unit. Annual Working Reports of the Government of NCT of Delhi in Hindi and English are published by this Directorate. This Directorate has undertaken a project to compile district profiles of all the 9 revenue districts of Delhi. Film and Video Publicity Unit This unit is responsible for the production of the documentaries, short films, and docu-feature films pertaining to the publicity of the Delhi government. The unit also gets `spots' for TV and `jingles' for radio made for projecting Delhi Government's achievements. Departments can get such spots or jingles made either directly through TV and radio channels or through production company who agree to make these creatives free of cost and mount the approved creatives (by CM) on the channel at rate that is similar to DAVP rate. Head of Departments of Delhi Government have full power of sanctioning money for publicity at prescribed rates (rates either similar to DAVP or rates of DIP). `Channels or Production House' as the case may be, prepare these spots or jingles free of cost and recover their production cost out of the mounting cost or its commission to be received from the channel where the spot or jingle has been mounted. If the channel or the production house are asking for production cost for making spot or jingle separately, it is considered as a commercial rate and the codal formalities of limited or open tender, as the case may be, shall be gone through. A weekly programme titled " Delhi Round Up" is telecast on Doordarshan channel I at 7.15 PM on every Friday, reflecting the developmental activities and programmes of the Government of Delhi undertaken during the week. Directorate of Information and Publicity have made short films on subjects such as Bhagidari, traffic, education, regularization of unauthorized colony, bed & breakfast scheme in 2007-08. This directorate has also commissioned an hour long docu-feature film on Delhi titled " Delhi : India in One City ". This film is at an advanced stage of preparation and is likely to be aired on national & international TV channels very soon. Photo Unit Photo unit arranges photo coverage of the functions and activities of various departments of the Government of Delhi and releases photos to Press and

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Television for publicity. It also prepares photographs for exhibitions and photo albums. A plan is underway to digitalize all the photo-stock available with the Directorate. Another plan in the pipe-line is to organize annual photo-contest and photo-exhibition. The unit subscribes to the professional, journals and website on photography. Photographers in the Directorate are issued the latest digital cameras in the Nikon series. Field Publicity Unit This unit organises photo-exhibitions and cultural programmes to highlight the policies and programmes of the Government and also puts up banners, kiosks, electronic boards and hoardings for the information of general public on important issues and for mounting different campaigns of Delhi Government. This Directorate has mounted about 100 outdoor creatives on Bus Queue Shelters, and public utility sites. This Directorate has mounted about 600 panels on the achievement of Delhi Government inside metro coaches in two major routes of Metro network in Delhi . Organising photo exhibitions is a regular feature of the Department and the exhibitions are put up in different parts of capital on various occasions like Gandhi Jayanti, Trade Fair, etc. This unit also organises functions like Shaheedi Diwas, Gandhi Jayanti, Madan Mohan Malviya Jayanti and participates in the state level functions on Independence Day, Republic Day, Bal Diwas, New Year Day, etc., and looks after their publicity. This Department also presents the tableau of Government of NCT of Delhi for Republic Day parade every year. Hospitality Unit This unit arranges hospitality for the press reporters and other media persons on the occasions of press conferences and press meets of the dignitaries of Delhi Government. Website : www.publicity.delhigovt.nic.in E-mail Address : dirip(a)hub.nic.in

LAKSHADWEEP

CAPITAL : Kavaratti; Principal Language : Malayalam, except in Minicoy; Area :32 sq. km.; Population: 60,650; Literacy percentage: 87.52; Number of Newspapers: 4 (Twice-weekly and fortnightlies 3); Principal Dailies: one "The Lakshadweep Times" by UT Admin. of Lakshadweep. Radio Stations: N/A; Doordarshan Kendra: N/A; High Power Transmitter

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(HPT): Low Power Transmitter (LTP); 9 (one each at Minicoy, Kavaratti, Amini Androth, Agatti, Kalpeni, Chetlath, Kadmath Kiltan); Relay Centre: Nil; Cinema theatre: Nil.

Organisation

The Information Publicity and Tourism Office is headed by the Director (Ex-officio). There are nine Information and Publicity Units functioning in various islands. Field Publicity All the activities of mass communication including the various sectors of Information and Broadcasting Ministry like Photo Video/Press Coverage and conduct of Exhibitions, etc., are the activities of this Department. Film shows, Group Discussions. Quiz, Essay Competitions, seminars, Public Meetings, Public Awareness Programmes and Celebrations and Observance of National Days are also organised by this Department. During April 2008 to March 2009, the Department organised 2 photo exhibitions, 27 Public Meetings, 200 Publicity Campaigns, 21 Group Discussions, 18 Cultural Programmes, 2 Seminars, 27 Competitions in different events and covered 300 events through photo video, etc., and 5 development programmes telecast through Doordarshan. Publications One regular newspaper, `The Lakshadweep Times', is published on every Tuesday and Friday from Kavaratti and a weekly Bulletin in Mahi Language from Minicoy is published by the Department. Publicity materials like Calendar, Diary, Telephone Directory and Information Brochure, other gimmicks and souvenirs have been prepared and distributed to advertise the natural beauty and cultural heritage of the islands and attract tourists. Name/Address//e-mail of the department 1. Rajanish Kumar Singh, Director, Information & Public Relations U.T. of Lakshadweep Kavaratti - 682 555 Phone: 04896-262207 2. Shri.P.Mohammed Koya, Publicity Officer, Directorate of Information & Public Relations, Secretariat New Wing U.T. of Lakshadweep Kavaratti - 682 555 Phone: 04896-262298(0) 263845

Media Organizations - State Governments & Union Territories

295

PUDUCHERRY

CAPITAL: Puducherry; Principal Languages: Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, English and French; Area: 479 Sq. Kms.; Population:9.74 lakhs (2001); Literacy Percentage: 81.24; Number of Newspapers: Puducherry -21; Karaikal - 22; Mahe -15 and Yanam - 13; Circulation of Newspapers: 2,68,270; Principal Dailies with circulation: Dinakaran (Tamil) 70015; Dinamalar (Tamil) 54000; Maalai Malar (Tamil) 16,500; Dina Thanthi (Tamil) 15,450, Thamizh Murasu (Tamil) 18,000; The Hindu (English) 11,000; Radio Station: AIR (Prasar Bharati) Puducherry (AM), and FM radio Stations: 4 including Karaikal (FM): Doordarshan Kendra/Channels: Doordarshan (Pothigai) and six other Major Cable TV Operatators projecting 100 National/International and Local Channels; Cinema Threatres: 20+2 (Yanam).

Organisation

The Directorate, headed by a Director handles various schemes concerning Mass Media viz. Field Publicity, Song and Drama, Exhibition, Visual Publicity, Press Advertisements, Public and Press Relatios, Information Centres, Publications, Radio and Rural Forums, Communituy Listening sets and Community viewing sets. Field Publicity Wing This Wing arranges the distribution of publicity literature, posters, slides, pamphlets, etc., received from Government of India and other States/ Union Territories, Government organizations and educational institutions, etc. Social problems like Family Planning, Evils of drinking, AIDS Awareness, Untouchability, Dowry Menance, Child Labour, Atrocities on Women, Abortion of female foetus and topics of general interest like Education, Agriculture, Industries. Small Savings are being highlighted through songs and Street Plays/Drama Programmes in co-ordination with Song and Drama Division of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, Government of India. Local Drama troupes are given oppourtunities to enact plays as a way of encouragement.

296

Mass Media in India

Advertising To publicise the activities and policies of the Government and to encourage small newspapers in the Union Territory, advdertisements of government departments are released to the press, through this Directorate. Information Centres There are four State Information Centres in Puducherry, Karaikal, Mahe and Yanam which disseminate information through periodicals, magazines and photographs. Press Publicity Issuing of press releases, arranging of photos, All India Radio and T.V. coverage of important events, ceremonies and functions are done by this Directorate. Publications A Citizen Chapter was brought out highlighting salient features of functioning of this Department besides, Right to Information Act booklet as per the directives of the Government of India. Radio Rural Forums Sixty six Radio Rural Forums are now functioning in different areas of the Union Territory of Puducherry for ensuring feedback to agriculturists/ rural folk about the schemes of Government of India under the community Listening Scheme. Community Viewing The Territory has installed in different villages, 66 colour Television sets for community viewing under the community viewing scheme. Address: The Director, Department of Information and Publicity, No. 18, Bellecombe Street, Puducherry - 605 001. Telefax No. (0413) 2334398 Ph. (0413) 2337078 (0413) 2336415

Media Organizations - State Governments & Union Territories

297

PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATIONS

PRESS TRUST OF INDIA

Press Trust of India is the country's leading news agency. It is a non-profit sharing cooperative owned by the Indian newspapers with a mandate to provide efficient and unbiased news to all subscribers. Established in 1947, PTI has been in the news agency business now for six decades. And, if we take note of our pre-Independence predecessor the Associated Press of India that was set up in 1908, it is now a full century. News services in English and Hindi languages and photo services are the primary services that the agency offers to its clientele that includes about 500 newspapers in India and scores abroad. All major TV/radio channels in India and several abroad, including BBC in London, receive PTI news service. Leading internet portals also take the service. PTI delivers its services through satellite broadcast, Internet, WorldSpace radio and e-mail. Over the years, PTI has expanded the scope and range of its news and photo services and has also invested heavily in staff and on technology. With a set up of over 70 offices within India and a few abroad and a network of correspondents and photographers in all important cities of the country, PTI today offers very exhaustive and specialized political, economic, legal, sports and other coverages, besides photos. In addition to the news and photo services, the other services of the agency include mailer packages of Feature, Science service, Economic service and Data India, and screen-based services as News-scan and Stockscan. A television facility, PTI-TV, does features and undertakes corporate documentaries on assignment basis. PTI is now planning to launch a video clip service to cater to the needs of mobile phone companies. Also on anvil is an audio clip service to cater to the needs of radio stations. PTI has arrangements with the Associated Press (AP) and Agence France Presse (AFP) for distribution of their international news in India. AP's international photo service is also distributed in the country through PTI. The Dow Jones and Bloomberg international commercial services are also distributed in India through PTI. PTI is a partner in Asia Pulse International, a Singapore-registered

298

Mass Media in India

company, formed by PTI and a few other Asian media organisations to provide an on-line data bank on economic developments and business opportunities in Asian countries. PTI is also a participant in Asianet, a cooperative arrangement among news agencies of the Asia-Pacific region, for distribution of corporate and government press releases. PTI is a leading participant in the NAM News Network, the Internet-based news exchange arrangement of the Non-Aligned Countries, and the Organisation of Asia-Pacific News Agencies. It also has bilateral news exchange arrangements with several news agencies belonging to the countries of Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America. Some additional information about PTI Name & Address of the Organisation : Press Trust of India PTI, Building, First Floor 4, Parliament Street, New Delhi- I 10001, India 91-11-23716621-24 91-11-23 718714/23716527 [email protected], [email protected] htt ://www. tinews.com M.K. Razdan Editor-in-Chief & Chief Executive Officer

Telephone Nos. Fax Nos. E-Mail Addresses Internet Address Name & Designation of the Head of the Organisation

: : : : : :

UNITED NEWS OF INDIA

United News of India (UNI) was incorporated under the Companies Act 1956 on December 19, 1959 and started functioning effective from March 21. 1961. Launched to infuse a sense of competition in news gathering and dissemination, UNI has emerged, in the past four decades, as one of the most vibrant news organisations, providing regional, national and international news, news photos and graphics of the highest quality and reliability to a wide spectrum of subscribers in India and abroad. With innovation and enterprise being its watchwords, UNI became the first Indian news agency in 1981 to serve subscribers abroad, when it extended its service to newspapers and radio stations in the Gulf, followed by its service to media clients in Singapore. In May 1982, UNI launched

Media Organizations - Professional Organisations

299

UNIVARTA, its full-fledged Hindi wire service to cater to Hindi newspapers. UNIVARTA is today the largest and the most comprehensive service of its kind in the country. Another ambitious venture, UNI's Photo Service, was launched in 1987, followed by its Graphics Service in 1991. Also, it has a Scan Service and UNI Direct Service. News pictures from around the world are also delivered to subscribers through a collaborative arrangement with Reuters and EPA, the European Pressphoto Agency. UNI's Urdu Service, launched in June 1992, is the only one of its kind in the language. UNI distributes world news from Reuters, the world's largest information company. Besides, it has news exchange arrangements with Xinhua of China, RIA Novosti of Russia, UNB of Bangladesh. Anadolu of Turkey, WAM of the United Arab Emirates, GNA of Bahrain, KUNA of Kuwait, ONA of Oman, QNA of Qatar and CNA of Taiwan. UNI has always been in the vanguard in adapting modern technology to suit its requirements in news gathering and dissemination. As part of its modernisation drive, UNI has computerised all its offices. It was a quantum jump for UNI when it upgraded its nation-wide teleprinter network, extending to over 10,00,000 km. From 50 baud to 300 baud Data circuits. This again was a temporary changeover as UNI further advanced to 1,200 baud speed Data Circuits and then to the state-of-the-art satellite technology for distribution of news at a speed of 100 kbps. Switching over to VSAT technology has meant that all our subscribers across the country would get out stories simultaneously without any loss of time. Further, we would also be able to deliver our pictures through this system. UNI is the only news agency in the country to deliver its entire news services in English and Hindi, as well its Photo and Graphics Service, through the Internet. Subscribers across the Globe round the clock can download stories and pictures from LTNI and UNIVARTA web sites. The web sites are: UNI: http://www.uniindia.com & UNIVARTA: http:// www.univarta.com

300

Mass Media in India

APPENDICES

CENTRAL BOARD OF FILM CERTIFICATION INDIAN FEATURE FILMS CERTIFIED FROM 1-1-2007 TO 31-12-2007 (REGION-WISE-LANGUAGE-WISE (CELLULOID FILMS) SL. LANGUAGE No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Hindi Tamil Telugu Malayam Kannada Bengali Gujarati Marathi English MUM KOL CHE BAN THI HYD DEL CUT GUW TOTAL 186 4 17 3 33 97 12 2 75 5 2 1 1 1 1 440 39 6 1 1 1 3 51 18 131 53 1 1 204 5 2 8 2 111 1 129 1 2 13 67 1 84 45 10 150 15 2 222 2 2 2 11 1 14 257 149 241 85 111 44 33 97 16 17 1 2 76 5 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 1 1146

10. Oriya 11. Chhattisgarhi 12. Rajasthani 13. Bhojpuri 14. Punjabi 15. Haryanvi 16. Angika 17. Kortha 18. Manipuri 19. Santhali 20. Maithili 21. Nepali 22. Tulu Total

MUM-Mumbai, KOL-Kolkata, CHE-Chennai, BAN-Bengaluru, THI-Thiruvananthapuram, HYD-Hyderabad, DEL- Delhi, CUT- Cuttack, GUW- Guwahati

Appendices CENTRAL BOARD OF FILM CERTIFICATION THEMATIC CLASSIFICATION OF INDIAN FEATURE FILMS CERTIFIED FROM 1-1-2007 TO 31-12-2007 (CELLULOID) SL. CLASSIFINo. CATION 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Social Crime Horror Devotional Action Fantasy Mythological Comedy MUM KOL CHE BAN 338 7 5 6 4 7 23 35 2 1 2 1 440 48 1 2 51 147 9 3 1 34 1 2 1 1 1 1 3 204 86 31 4 3 1 2 1 1 129

301

THI HYD DEL CUT GUW TOTAL 59 12 4 1 8 84 176 5 2 5 4 2 4 3 10 8 2 1 222 2 2 14 14 870 64 13 15 44 12 9 11 33 12 1 37 3 1 9 1 4 1 2 4 1146

Children's Film 9

10. Action/Thriller 11. Patriotic 12. Thriller 13. Historical 15. Others 16. Adventure 17. Suspense 18. Sex Education 19. Animation 20. Biographical Total

14. Science Fiction -

MUM-Mumbai, KOL-Kolkata, CHE-Chennai, BAN- Bengaluru, THIThiruvananthapuram, HYD- Hyderabad, DEL-DeIhi, CUT-Cuttack, GUW-Guwahati

302

Mass Media in India CENTRAL BOARD OF FILM CERTIFICATION CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FILMS CERTIFIED FROM 1-1-2007 TO 31-12-20007 CELLULOID

U INDIAN FEATURE FILMS FOREIGN FEATURE FILMS INDIAN SHORT FILMS FOREIGN SHORT FILMS INDIAN LONG FILMS OTHER THAN FEATURE FOREIGN LONG FILMS OTHER THAN FEATURE Total 2575 6 629 75 1712 152 1

UA 310 101 128 124 -

A 207 185 33 37 -

S -

TOTAL 1146 361 1873 313 1

-

-

-

6

663

462

-

3700

VIDEO U INDIAN FEATURE FILMS FOREIGN FEATURE FILMS INDIAN SHORT FILMS FOREIGN SHORT FILMS INDIAN LONG FILMS OTHER THAN FEATURE FOREIGN LONG FILMS OTHER THAN FEATURE Total GRAND TOTAL 14230 16805 2072 2735 494 956 2 2 16798 20498 986 1602 10666 485 490 UA 121 995 830 83 44 A 24 277 169 13 11 S 2 TOTAL 1131 2874 11667 581 545

Appendices

303

RECIPIENTS OF DADA SAHEB PHALKE AWARD

Name Year

Tapan Sinha ­ Director Shyam Benegal ­ Director Adoor Gopalakrishnan ­ Director Mrinal Sen ­ Director Dev Anand ­ Actor, Director, Producer Yash Chopra ­ Director, Producer Asha Bhosle ­ Singer Hrishikesh Mukherjee ­ Director B.R. Chopra ­ Director, Producer Pradeep ­ Lyricist, Poet Sivaji Ganesan ­ Actor Dr. Raj Kumar ­ Actor, Singer, Producer Dilip Kumar ­ Actor Majrooh Sultanpuri ­ Lyricist Bhupen Hazarika ­ Composer, Singer, Producer Bhalji Pendharkar ­ Producer, Director A. Nageshwar Rao ­ Actor Lata Mangeshkar ­ Singer, Producer Ashok Kumar ­ Actor, Singer Raj Kapoor ­ Actor, Director B. Nagi Reddi ­ Producer V. Shantaram ­ Director, Producer, Actor Satyajit Ray ­ Director, Producer Durga Khote ­ Actress L.V. Prasad ­ Actor, Director, Producer Naushad ­ Composer Jairaj ­ Actor, Director, Producer Sohrab Modi ­ Actor, Director, Producer R.C. Boral ­ Composer Nitin Bose ­ Cinematographer, Director, Producer Kanan Devi ­ Actress, Singer, Producer Dhiren Ganguly ­ Actor, Director, Producer B.N. Reddi ­ Director, Producer Sulochana ­ Actress Pankaj Mallick ­ Singer, Actor, Composer Prithviraj Kapoor ­ Actor, Director, Producer B.N. Sirear ­ Producer Devika Rani ­ Actress

2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970 1969

304

PAST WINNERS OF SWARNA KAMAL Sr. Film No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Shyamchi Aai Mirza Ghalib Pather Panchali Kabuliwala Do Ankhen Barah Haath Sagar Sangame Apur Sansar Anuradha Bhagini Nivedita Director P.K. Atre Sohrab Modi Satyajit Ray Tapan Sinha V. Shantaram Debaki Kumar Bose Satyajit Ray Hrishikesh Mukherjee Bijoy Basu Sudhir Mukherjee Khwaja Ahmed Abbas Satyajit Ray Ramu Kariat Basu Bhattacharya Tapan Sinha Satyajit Ray Mrinal Sen T. Pattabhiram Reddy Satyajit Ray Adoor Gopalakrishnan M.T. Vasudevan Nair Mrinal Sen B.V. Karanth Mrinal Sen Girish Kasaravalli

Mass Media in India

Language Marathi Hindi Bengali Bengali Hindi Bengali Bengali Hindi Bengali Bengali Hindi Bengali Malayalam Hindi Bengali Bengali Hindi Kannada Bengali Malayalam Malayalam Bengali Kannada Hindi Kannada

Year 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978

10. Dada Thakur 11. Shehar Aur Sapna 12. Charulata 13. Chemmeen 14. Teesri Kasam 15. Hatey Bazare 16. Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne 17. Bhuvan Shome 18. Samskara 19. Seemabaddha 20. Swayamvaram 21. Nirmalyam 22. Chorus 23. Chomana Dudi 24. Mrigaya 25. Ghatashraddha 26. No award recommended 27. Shodh 28. Akaler Sandhane 29. Dakhal

Biplab Ray Choudhri Mrinal Sen Goutam Ghose

Hindi Bengali Bengali

1979 1980 1981

Appendices

305

Director Language Year

Sr. Film No. 30. Chokh 31. Adi Sankaracharya 32. Damul 33. Chidambaram 34. Tabarana Kathe

Utpalendu Chakraborty G.V. lyer Prakash Jha G. Aravindan Girish Kasaravalli

Bengali Sanskrit Hindi Malayalam Kannada Assamese Malayalam Hindi Tamil Bengali Sanskrit Bengali Bengali Malayalam Bengali Kannada Hindi Malayalam Malayalam Kannada Bengali Marathi Hindi Bengali

1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

35. Halodhia Choraye Bodhan Kahi Jahnu Barua 36. Piravi 37. Bagh Bahadur 38. Maruppakkam 39. Agantuk 40. Bhagavad Gita 41. Charachar 42. Unishe April 43. Kathapurushan 44. Lal Darja 45. Thai Saheb 46. Samar 47. Vanaprastham 48. Shantham 49. Dweepa 50. Mondo Meyer Upkhyam 51. Shwaas 52. Page 3 53. Kaalpurush Shaji N. Karun Buddhadeb Dasgupta K.S. Sethumadhavan Satyajit Ray G.V. lyer Buddhadeb Dasgupta Rituparno Ghosh Adoor Gopalakrishnan Buddhadeb Dasgupta Girish Kasaravalli Shyam Benegal Shaji N. Karun Jayaraj Girish Kasaravalli Buddhadeb Dasgupta Sandeep Sawant Madhur Bhandarkar Buddhabeb Dasgupta

306

Mass Media in India

FIFTY-FOURTH NATIONAL FILM AWARDS

1. FEATURE FILM

S.N. Category (1) 1. (2) Best Feature Film Film (3) Pulijanman (Malayalam) Recipient (4) M.G. Vijay (Producer) Awards (5) Swarna Kamal and cash prize of Rs. 2,500,000/Citation (6) For using metaphors to address global and local issues of a contemporary society (a) For sensitively portraying the solitude of to ageing brothers who have lost everyone around them. (b) For capturing through the journey of two Indian journalists the collapse of Taliban in post 9/11 Afghanistan For revalidating the philosophy of non-violence in a strife torn world and helping rediscover the Gandhi within the common man.

2.

Indira Gandhi Award for the Best Film of Director

(a) Eakantham (Malayam) (b) Kabul Express (Hindi)

(a) Anthony (a) Swarna Joseph Kamal and a (b) Aditya cash prize of Chopra Rs. 62,500/(Producers) each (a) Madhu (b) Swarna Kaithapuram Kamal and a (b) Kabir Khan cash prize of (Directors) Rs. 62,500/each

3.

Best Popular Lage Raho Film Providing Munna Wholesome Bhai (Hindi) Entertainment

Vidhu Vinod Chopra (Producer) Raj Kumar Hirani (Director)

Swarna Kamal and Cash Prize of Rs. 2,00,000/Swarna Kamal and Cash Prize of Rs. 2,00,000/-

In the following categories the Producer and Director get a Rajat Kamal and a cash prize of Rs. 1,50,000/- each. The Producer and Director of Best Children's Film get a Swarna Kamal in place of Rajat Kamal. The Best Director gets a Swarna Kamal and a cash prize of Rs. 2,50,000/-. The Best Animation film gets a Swarna Kamal and a Cash prize of Rs. 1,00,000/- for its Producer and Director. S.N. Category (1) (2) 4. Film (3) Recipient (4) Citation (5) For depicting the sanctity of loyalty to one's

Nargis Dutt Award for the Kallarli S. Madhu Bangarappa Best Feature Film on Huvagi (Producer) National Integration (Kannanda) T.S. Nagabharna

Appendices (Director)

307

land and amity through a love story set in the times of Hyder Ali. (a) For redefining family values in the slums of a city through the life of a man who irons clothes for a living. (b) For delineating the need for family through the predicament of an illegitimate child. For focusing on the need to reexamine the present-day education system that leads many young people to commit suicide. -

5.

Best Film on Family Welfare

(a) Karutha (a) Kaladharan Pakshikal K.V. & Vallabhan (MalayaK.G. lam) (b) Arindam Chaudhury (Producers)

(b) Faltu (a) Kamal (Bengali) (b) Anjan Das (Directors)

6.

Best Film on Other Social Hope Issues such as Prohibition, (Telugu) Women and Child Welfare, Anti-Dowry, Drug Abuse, Welfare of the handicapped, etc.

Policherla Venkata Subbiah (Producers) K. Satyanarayana (Director)

7.

Best Film on environment No Award Conservation/Preservation Best Children's Film Care of Foothpath (Kannada)

-

8.

Shylaja Shrikanth (Producers) Kishan S.S. (Director)

For articulating the burning desire for educa tion in a slum dweller. The issue is particularly rel evant as the film is directed by a nine year old boy. The film is made with characters and concerns that reflect the Indian ethos in a

9.

Best Animation Film

Kittu (Telugu)

K. Bhargava (Producer) B. Satya (Director)

308

Mass Media in India format so far identified with the West.

10. Best Direction

Traffic Signal (Hindi)

Madhur Bhandarkar (Director)

For weaving in the lives, livelihoods and concerns of the street dwellers in a metro and the inspiring stand that makes the protagonist a role model across society.

II. BEST ARTISTES AND TECHNICIANS The recipients in the following categories get a Rajat Kamal and a cash prize of Rs. 50,000. The recipient of special Jury Award gets Rs. 1,25,000 in place of Rs. 50,000.

S.N. (1) 11. Category (2) Best Actor Film (3) Podokkhep (Bengali) Recipient (4) Soumitra Chatterjee Citation (5) For etching the agonies and elation of an elderly person trying to keep peace with changing times. For Portraying the ferocity of love in a firebrand village girl. For the sincere portrayal of a wide range of emotions of two divergent and equally challenging characters of Gandhi in Lage Raho Munna Bhai and a benign middle class clerk in Shevri. For the textured characterization of a village woman trying to bring sanity in the violent lives of a political family in Uttar Pradesh.

12.

Best Actress

Paruthi Veeran (Tamil)

Priyamani

13.

Best Supporting Lage Raho Dilip Actor Munna Bhai Prabhavalkar (Hindi)

14.

Best Supporting Omkara Actress (Hindi)

Konkona Sen Sharma

Appendices 15. Best Child Artist Antarnad (Konkani) Divya Chahadkar For evoking the complex emotions of a talented child overshadowed by a celebrity mother.

309

16.

Best Male Waris Shah Gurdas Mann Playback Singer Ishq Da Waris (Punjabi) Best Female Antarnad Playback Singer (Konkani) Aarti Anklekar Tikekar

For building the entire narrative through his singing of Heer.

17.

For the sonorous rendering that gives conviction to the cen tral character of a classical vocalist. For creating evocative moods and capturing the nuances of a feudal system changing to modern times.

18.

Best Yatra Cinematography (Hindi)

(a) Goutam Ghose (b) Rainbow Colour Lab

19.

Best Screenplay Lage Raho Abhijat Joshi, Raj For the original vision with Munna ehai Kumar Hirani & which Gandhi's philosophy (Hindi) Vidhu Vinod of non violence is given life in Chopra popular parlance. Best Audiography Omkara (Hindi) K.J. Singh and Subhash Sahoo For the brilliant sound design that enhances the moods and emotions through different lay ers of sound in the film.

20.

21.

Best Editing

Paruthi Veeran (Tamil)

Raja Mohammed For innovative editing that enhanced the director's vision to fashion a powerful film. For the authentic recreation of a historic and culturally rich era.

22.

Best Art Direction

Waris Shah Rashid Rangrez Ishq Da Waris (Punjabi) Waris Shah Manjeet Mann Ishq Da Waris (Punjabi) Traffic Signal (Hindi) Antarnad (Konkani) Anil Moti Ram Palande

23.

Best Costume Designer

For accurate and convincing costumes, reflecting the socio cultural fabric of a historic era.

24.

Best Make Up Artist

For subtle and convincing make-up for a range of characters. For a judicious range of music from the classical to pop, elevating the film.

25.

Best Music Direction

Ashok Patki

310

26. Best Lyrics Lage Raho Munna Bhai (Hindi) Omkara (Hindi)

Mass Media in India Swanand Kirkire For rousing words that lyrically combine tradition with modernity to reach the masses.

27.

Special Jury Award

Vishal Bhardwaj

For an outstanding film that synergises international treat ment with an earthy rooted sen sibility. For impressive effects and technical finesse that enhances the magical quality of the film. For choreography that displays modern and innovative aesthet ics in rhythm and movement.

28.

Best Special Effects

Krrish (Hindi)

EFX, Chennai

29.

Best Choreography

Ratri Mazha Madhu Samudra (Malayalam) & Sajeev Samudra

Ill.

BEST FEATURE FILM IN EACH REGIONAL LANGUAGE

In the following categories the Producer and Director get a Rajat Kamal and a cash prize of Rs. 1,00,000 each.

S.N. Category (1) 30. (2) Assamese Film (3) Aideu Producer (4) Nabomika Borthakur Director (5) Arup Manna Citation (6) For highlighting a lesser known, pio neering heroine of Indian cinema.

31.

Bengali

Anuranan & (a) Indrani (a) Aniruddha (a) For sensitively Podokkhep Mukhjerjee, Roy exploring nuances in Jeet Banerjee Chowdhury relationship. & Aniruddha (b) For convincing Roy depiction of an old Chowdhury (b) Suman man coping with (b) Nitesh Ghosh loneliness. Shrama No Award Khosla Ka Ghosla Savita Raj Hiremath Dibakar Banerjee For an original portraying of the middle class struggle against the real estate mafia. For highlighting the impact of youth

32. 33.

Gujarati Hindi

34.

Kannada

Kaada K.M. Veeresh, Beladingalu K.N.

B.S. Lingadevaru

Appendices Siddalingaiah & B.S. Lingadevaru

311

migration and media opportunism on the older generation.

35.

Malayalam

Drishtan tham

M.P. Sukumaran Nair

M.P. Sukumaran Nair

For a powerful trib ute to the co-modi fication of ancient tradition family. For an empathetic portrayal of the struggles of middle class married woman estranged from her. For an empathetic portrayal of the struggles of middle class married woman estranged from her. For an evocative portrayal of the rich, musical Sufi traditional. For moving por trayal of sibling bonding in a turbulent family.

36.

Marathi

Shevri

Neena Kulkarni

Gajendra Ahire

37.

Oriya

Pooja Paeen Padmini Puty Phoolatie

Gadadhar Puty

38.

Punjabi

Waris Shah- Ishq Da Waris

Sai Production

Manoj Punj

39.

Tamil

Veyil

S. Shankar Balan

G. Vasanta

40.

Telugu

Kamli

B.C. Hari Charana Prasad and P.V. Sukanya

K.N.T. Sastry For a Convincing portrayal for the courage of a disadvantaged woman in her fight against female feoti cide and child swap ping. Amol Palekar For a bold film addressing issues of sexuality. Rajendra Talak For a sensitive por trayal of an artist

41.

English

Quest

Amol Palekar

42. 43.

Bhojpuri Konkani

No Award Antarnad

Rajendra Talak

312

Creations

Mass Media in India and her conflicting relationship with her daughter. Anand P. Raj For Promoting caste reform and integra tion.

44.

Tulu

Kotti Channaya

R. Dhanaraj

Jury:

Chairman: Budhadeb Dasgupta Members: Rahul Dholakia, P. Sheshadri, Ratnotama Sengupta, Shekhar Das, Bidyut Chakrabarty, Siva Shankari, Sharada Ramanathan, Hari Kumar, N. Krishan Kumar (Unni), Himanshu Khatua, Meenakshi Shedde, Sharad Dutt and Ashok Rane. IV. NON-FEATURE FILMS The recipients in the following categories get a Rajat Kamal and Cash Prize of Rs. 50,000 each except the Producer and Director of the best non-feature film who get a Swarna Kamal and Rs. 1,00,000 each and Best Director who gets a Swarna Kamal and Rs. 1,00,000.

S.N. Category (1) 45. (2) Best NonFeature Film Film (3) Bishar Blues Producer (4) Amitabh Chakraborty Director (5) Amitabh Chakraborty Citation (6) For courageously treating a sensitive subject in a poetic form. It demol ishes the myth that the practice of Islam is monolithic and not mul tifaceted. For displaying command over the medium that goes for beyond the level expected from a first film. -

46.

Best First Non-Feature Film of a Director Best Antho logical/ Ethnographic Film Best Biographical

Andhiyum N. Dinesh Rajkumar

Jacob Varghese

47.

No Award

-

-

48.

(a) Min kku

(a) Devadasan

(a) M.R Rajan

(a) The Film succeeds in imaginatively presenting

Appendices /Historical/ Reconstruction Film Keezptt & Bina Narayanan

313

the life story of `Kottakkai Sivaraman' the legendary Kathakali artist, who specialized in performing female roles. In the process it also highlights some as pects of traditional kathakali dance. (b) Aribam Syam Sharma (b) For the simplicity and grace with which the Director has related the story of the great Manipuri dance and theatre artist `Guru Laimayum Thambalngoubi Devi For creatively presenting the transformation of Oriya Jatra from a folk form to highly commercialized and mainstream form. For bringing out the symbiotic relation between forest and human life and underlining the need of conserving the rich bio-diversity still in our remaining forests. For sensitively evoking the spirit of the cultural heritage of Madhya Pradesh. For its direct and convincing approach to the need and methods of organic farming.

(b) Guru (b) Aribam Liamay Syam um Sharma Thamba lngoubi Devi

49.

Best Arts/ Cultural Film

Jatra Jeevan Jeevan Jatra

Kailash Chandra Bhuyan

Kapilas Bhuyan

50.

Best Scientific Film/Environ ment/Conser vation/Preser vation Film

Kalpavr Mike Pandey ikshaLegacy of Forests

Nina Subramani

51.

Best Promotional Film

Rendez Madhya vous with Pradesh Times Madhyam

Rajendra Jangaly

52.

Best Agricultural Film

Jaivik Kheti

Ravindra Alias Nitin Prabhakar Bhosale & Mrunalini Ravindra Bhosale

Mrunalini Ravindra Bhosale

314

53. Best Film on Social Issues Children Leoarts of Communi Nomads cation Meenakshi Vinay Rai

Mass Media in India For gently drawing attention to the depri vation experienced by the children of nomads and for creating sensi tive interaction between an urban child and a group of nomadic rural children. For a straight forward and matter of act treatment of a major health problem that has no cure but that can be controlled. -

54.

Best Education/ Motivation/ Instructional Film

Filariasis A.S. Nagaraju

M. Elango

55.

Best Exploration/ Adventure Film Best Investigative Film

No Award

-

-

56.

Mere Rajiv Desh Ki Mehrotra Dharti

Sumit Khanna

For exploring in depth the problem of falling agro production and poisoning of the food chain due to the use of chemical fertilizers and chemical pesticides. For relating a beautiful folk tale form Nagaland lyrical colours of fluid animation. For presenting the ritualistic significance and the colourful nature of the Lama mask dances in cinematic language. For sensitively bringing out the moral dilemma created by existence at a subsistence level in a hostile environment. -

57.

Best Animation Film

Nokpo kliba

Children's Film Society, India

Meren Imchen

58.

Special Jury Award

Lama Anuradha Dances Mookerjee of Sikkim

Manas Bhowmick

59.

Best Short Fiction Film

Ek Children's Aadesh- Film Society, Command India for Choti

Ramesh Asher

60.

Best Film on Family Welfare

No Award

-

-

Appendices 61. Best Direction Ek Children's Aadesh Film Society, Command India for Choti Ramesh Asher

315

For making imaginative use of the locale and cast of characters, and displaying complete command over all disciplines of film making. For stretching the technical possibilities of videography and capturing the varying moods of river Narmada. For creating a sound track by combining location sound and music that enhance the "meaning" of the film. For creating a rhythm which is unhurried and profound and that is in tune with the life worldview of Fakirs in rural Bengal. For creating a music score which becomes an invocation of the holy river Narmada.

62.

Best Cinematography

Raga of Rajendra River Janglay & Narmada Sanjay V (Cameramen)

-

63.

Best Audiography

Bishar Blues

Partha Barman (Audiography)

64.

Best Editing

Bishar Blues

Amitabh Chakraborty & Amit Debnath (Editors)

-

65.

Best Music Direction

Raga of Ramakant & River Umakant Narmada Gundecha (Music Directors) Minukku Nedumudi Venu (Narrator)

-

66.

Best Narration Voice Over

-

For the unique style of first person narration, the quality of narrator's voice and the selective use of narration that advance the story of the film. The film highlights the problem faced by spe cial children or differ ently abled children and their families an aspect of our society that is still not receiving ad equate attention.

67.

Special Mention

Special Kuldip Sinha Children

Suresh Menon

316

Mass Media in India

Jury:Chairman: K.Bikram Singh Members: Arvind Sinha, Apurba Sarma, Biyot Projna Tripathi, Satheesh, Venganoor and Iftikhar Ahmed. V. BEST WRITING ON CINEMA

S.N. Category (1) 1. (2) Best Book on Cinema 2006 Title (3) Recipient (4) Award (5) Swarna Kamal and cash prize of Rs. 75,000/each Citation (6) For an insightful and witty account of a marginal yet iconic persona of the Hindi cinema.

Helen: (a) Jerry Pinto The Life (Author) and (b) Penguin Times of Books India An HPvt. Ltd. Bomb (Publisher) (English) -

2.

Best Film Critic 2006

(a) G.P. Ram Swarna (a) For his analytical and chandran Kamal and perceptive writing (Malayalam) cash prize of on a wide range of (b) Rafique Rs. 3,75,000/themes and cinemaA.R. each tic styles. Baghdadi (b) For his writings on the history of cinema as well as his cogent analysis of contemporary cinema.

Jury:

Chairperson: Madhu Jain Members: Rashmi Doraiswamy and Vasiraju Prakasam

Appendices

317

Andhra Pradesh State Film Awards

The Nandi Film Awards were presented by the Andhra Pradesh Government on November 16, 2008 for the year 2005 and 2006. The best actor award for the year 2005 was given to Mahesh Babu for his performance in the film Athadu while Tirsha bagged the best actress award for her role in Nuvvu Vasthanante Nenu Vadhantana. The Best Film Award for 2005 was won by Pothe Poni directed by Thamareddy Bharadwaja, Actors Srihari, Bhanupriya, Sunil, Chandramohan, Singers S.P. Balasubramaniyam, Nityasantoshini won the awards for the year 2005. Actor Nagarjuna won the best actor award for the year 2006 for his film Sri Ramadasu while Nandita Das won the best actress award for her film Kaamli. Actors Prakash Raj, Kota Srinivas Rao, Sai Kumar, Venu Madhav, Eashweri, Director Shekhar Kammula, Singer Jesudas and Sunitha bagged the awards for 2006. The NTR National Award were given for the years 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006 to Actor Krishna, Music Director Ilayaraja, Actor Ambarish and Actress Waheeda Rehman respectively.

318

Mass Media in India

Karnataka State Film Awards

Girish Kasarvalli's much acclaimed film Gulabi Talkies has won the best Kannada film award at the recently announced Karnataka State Film Awards for 2007-08. Moggina Jade has bagged the second best film award while Maathad Maathad Mallige has been declared the third best film. The detailed list of awardees is as follows: 1. Best Film 2. Second Best Film 3. Third Best Film - Gulabi Talkies by Girish Kasarvalli - Moggina Jade by Ramdas Naidu - Mathad Mathad Mallige by Nagathihalli Chandrashekhar

4. Movie with Social Impact - Banad Neralu by Umashamkar Swamy 5. Best Children's Movie 6. Best Actor 7. Best Actress 8. Best Supporting Actor 9. Best Supporting Actress - Ekalavya by Baragur Ramchandrappa - Punit Raj Kumar for Milana - Umashree for Gulabi Talkies - Rajesh for Moggina Jade - Smitha for Avva

10.Best Dubbing Artist (Male) - Sudarshan for Aa Dinagalu 11. Best Dubbing Artist (Female) 12.Best Music Director 13.Best Lyricist 14.Best Play Back Singer (Male) 15.Best Play Back Singer (Female) 16.Best Story 17.Best Screenplay 18.Best Dialogues - Champa Shetty for Kurunadu - Sadhu Kokila for Inthi Ninna Preetiya - Gollahalli Srinivas for Mathad Mathad Mallige - S.P. Balasubramanyam for Savi Savi Nena Pu - Vani for Inthi Ninna Preetiya - P. Lankesh for Avva - Girish Kasarvalli for Gulabi Talkies - Agni Sridhar for Dinagalu

Appendices

319

19.Best Cinematography 20.Best Editing 21.Best Art Director 22.Best Child Artist (Male)

- H.C. Venu for Accident - Suresh Urs for Savi Savi Nenapu - G. Murthy for Kurunadu - Master Likhit for Nanu Gandhi

23.Best Child Artist (Female) - Baby Prakruthi for Gubbachichigalu 24.Best Regional Film - Birse (Tiulu)

The prestigious Puttanna Kanagal award went to Renuka Sharma while Dr. Raj Kumar award was bagged by Vishnuvardhan, Parvathamma Raj Kumar was honoured with the Life Time Achievement Award.

320

Mass Media in India

Kerala State Film Award

Orupennum Randanum,produced and directed by well known film maker Adoor Gopalakrishnan has won the best feature film award in the recently announced Kerala State Film Awards, 2008. The film based on four short stories of famous writer Thakazhi has also won the best director and best scriptwriter awards. Bhoomi Malayalam directed by T.V. Chandran has bagged the second best film award. The detailed awards are as follows: 1. Best Film 2. Second Best Film 3. Best Actor 4. Best Actress 5. Best Director 6. Best Story Writer 7. Best Playback Singer (Male) 8. Best Playback Singer (Female) 9. Best Music Director 10.Best Lyricist - Orupennum Randanum - Bhoomi Malayalam - Lal for Thalapavu - Priyanka for Vilapangalkapuram - Adoor Gopalakrishnan for Orupennum Randanum - Aryadan Shoukat for Vilapangal Kapuram - Shankar Mahadevan - Manjeri - M Jayachandran for Madambi - O.N. Kurup

Appendices

321

Maharashtra State Film Awards

The State Government recently presented its film awards at Pune. Noted Marathi Lyricist Jagdish Khebundkar, who has written songs for scores of Marathi films over five decades, was felicitated with the V. Shantaram award. The award carries a cash prize of Rs. 2 lakh and a citation. Director Mahesh Kothare was also felicitated for his contribution to Marathi cinema. The rest of the awards are as follows:1. 2. 3. 4. Best Film Second Best Film Third Best Film Best Director - Harishchandrachi Factory - Jogwa - Dhudgus - Paresh Mokashi for Harishchandrachi Factory 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Second Best Director Third Best Director Best Film for projecting Socially relevant issues Best Director - Rajiv Patil for Jogwa - Rajesh Deshpande for Dhudgus - Made in China - Santosh Kolhe

Best Film on Rural issues - Gho Mala Asla Hawa by Sumita Bhave and Sunil Sukhtankar - Rajan Khan for Dhudgus - Prasad Mirajdar and Santosh Kolhe for Made in China - Girish Salvi and Rajesh Deshpande for Dhudgus - Sanjay Patil for Jogwa - Shreerang Umarani for Gho Mala Asla Hawa - Ravindra Sathe for Uroos - Supriya Ghadekar for Gho Mala Asla Hawa

10. Best Story 11 Best Screenplay 12. Best Dialogues 13. Best Lyrics 14. Best Music Director 15. Best Male Playback Singer 16. Best Female Playback Singer

322

Mass Media in India

17. Best Choreographer 18. Best Male Actor 19. Best Female Actor 20. Best Actor in a Special Appearance 21. Best Actress in Special Appearance 22. Best Male Actor in a Comic Appearance 23. Best Actor in a Suppor ting Role 24. Best Actress in Suppor ting Role 25. Best Debutant Actress 26. Best Sets 27. Best Cinematography 28. Best Editing 29. Best Sound 30. Best Costume 31. Best Make-up Artiste 32. Best Advertisement 33. Best Child Artiste

- Subhash Nakoshe for Gho Mala Asla Hawa - Upendra Limaye for Jogwa - Mukta Barve for Jogwa - Vijay Chavan for Tee - Deepa Parab ­ Chaudhury for Uroos - Nikhil Ratnaparkhi for Gho Mala Asla Hawa - Jeetendra Joshi for Gulmohar - Amita Khopkar for Joshi Ki Kamble - Radhika for Gho Mala Asla Hawa - Nitin Desai for Harishchadrachi Fac tory - Chandrashekhar lyer for Tya Ratri Paus Hota - Vidhyadhar Pathare for Sawariya.com - Pramod Thomas for Gho Mala Asla Hawa - Meha Nupara for Jogwa - Kiran Sawant for Marmabandh - Balakrishnan for Tee - Kaumudi Valekar for Tuzya Mazyat

Appendices

323

15th International Children's Film Festival 2007 Awards

S.N. Category 1. Best Live Action Fiction Feature length film (more than 60 minutes) Film Recipient Award Golden Elephant and Rs. 2,00,000/-

Invisible Wings Feng Zhenzhi (China)

2.

Second Best Live Mother Nanny Action Fiction (Phillipines) feature length film (more than 60 minutes) Best Live Action Bawke Short Fiction Film (Norway) (less than 60 minutes) Best Animation Film Hunting (Latvia)

Pablo Biglangawa Jr. and Veronica B Velasco Hisham Zaman

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/

3.

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/

4.

Janis Cimermanis

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/-

5.

Best Director

Mother Nanny (Philippines)

Pablo Biglangawa Jr. and Veronica B Velasco -

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/-

6.

Best Non Fiction Film Jury Special Award

-

No Award

7.

My Eyes (Denmark) Ek Aadesh (India)

Erland E Mo

Certificate

8.

Jury Special Award Best Child Artist

Ramesh Asher

Certificate

9.

Shared by Care Shared by of Foot Path Kishan S.S. and (India) and Feng Zhenzhi Invisible Wings (China) Tragic Story Shared by With Happy Normand Roger Ending (France) and Denis Chartnand Butterfly Wings Somaratne (Sri Lanka) Dissanayake

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/- (to be shared)

10. Best Music Score

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/- (to be shared)

11. Best Feature length Film (Asian Panorama Jury)

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/-

324

12. Best Short Film (Asian Panorama Jury) 13. Best Child Artist Once A Crow (Iran) Abdollah Alimorad

Mass Media in India Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/-

Will To win (India) Mother Nanny (Philippines)

Devashish Paranjpe Pablo Biglangawa Jr. and Veronica B Velasco

Silver Elephant and Rs. 1,00,000/Golden Plaque and Rs. 1,00,000/-

14. Best Film (Child Jury)

Appendices

325

EXISTING A.I.R. STATIONS

TOTAL STATIONS- 231 TOTAL TRANSMITTERS-372 Sl.No. Stations ANDHRA PRADESH [13] 1. 2. 3. 4. ADILABAD ANANTAPUR CUDDAPAH (Kadapa) HYDERABAD LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL 1 KW MW 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 200 KW MW 20 KW MW 6KW FM VB 5 KW FM, RAINBOW 50 KW SW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 3 KW FM 10. VIJAYAWADA REGIONAL 100 KW MW 1 KW MW VB 1 KW FM (Int. set up ) 100 KW MW 10 KW FM , RAINBOW 10 KW FM 3 KW FM Category Transmitter

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

KOTHAGUDAM KURNOOL

REGIONAL LRS

MERKAPURAM (Markapur) LRS NIZAMABAD TIRUPATHI LRS LRS

11. 12. 13.

VISHAKHAPATNAM WARANGAL MACHERLA

REGIONAL LRS LRS

ARUNANCHAL PRADESH [5] 14. ITANAGAR REGIONAL 100 KW MW 50 KW SW 10 KW FM 10 KW MW 10 KW MW 10 KW MW 1 KW MW

15. 16 17. 18.

PASSIGHAT TAWANG TEZU ZIRO

REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS

326

ASSAM [10] 19. 20. 21. 22. DHUBRI DIBRUGARH DIPHU GUWAHATI RELAY REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL

Mass Media in India

6 KW FM 300 KW MW 1 KW MW 100 KW MW 10 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 50 KW SW REG.SERV. 50 KW SW 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 20 KW MW

23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

HAFLONG JORHAT KOKRAJHAR NOWGONG SILCHAR TEZPUR

LRS LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL

BIHAR [6] 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. BHAGALPUR DARBHANGA PATNA PURNEA SASARAM AURANGABAD REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS LRS LPT RELAY 20 KW MW 20 KW MW 100 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 100 W FM

CHHATTISGARH [6] 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. DELHI 41. DELHI [1] REGIONAL 200 KW MW `A' AMBIKAPUR BILASPUR JAGDALPUR RAIGARH RAIPUR SARAIPALLI REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL LRS 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 1 KW FM (Int set up) 1 KW FM

Appendices

327

100 KW MW `B' 20 KW MW `C' VB 10 KW MW `D' (Yuv Vani) 10 KW FM (RAINBOW) 5 KW FM (GOLD) 20 KW MW NC 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 100 KW SW EXT. SERV. 100 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV.

GOA [1] 42. PANAJI REGIONAL 100 KW MW 20 KW MW VB 6 KW FM,RAINBOW 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV.

GUJARAT [8] 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. AHMEDABAD AHWA BHUJ GODHRA RAJKOT REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL 200 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 1 KW MW 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 1000 kW MW EXT. SERV. 6 KW FM, VB 10 KW FM 1KWMW

48. 49. 50.

SURAT VADODRA HIMMATNAGAR

LRS VB EXCL. LRS

HARYANA [3] 51. HISSAR LRS 6 KW FM

328

52. 53. KURUKSHETRA ROHTAK LRS REGIONAL

Mass Media in India 6 KW FM 1 KW FM (Int. set up) 20 KW MW

HIMACHAL PRADESH [6] 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. DHARMSHALA HAMIRPUR KASAULI KINNAUR(KALPA) KULLU SHIMLA REGIONAL LRS RELAY RELAY RELAY REGIONAL 10 KW FM 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 1 KW MW 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 50 KW SW 1 KW FM (Int. set up) Area-48.05% Populatic REGIONAL 300 KW MW 3 KW FM YUV VANI 10 KW FM VB 50 KW SW 1 KW MW 200 KW MW 62. 63. 64. 65. KATHUA LEH POONCH SRINAGAR LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL 10 KW FM 20 KW MW 10 KW SW 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 10 KW MW YUV VANI 10 KW FM VB 50 KW SW 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 1 KW MW 20 KW MW 10 KW FM 1 KW MW 1 KW MW 1 KW MW 1 KW MW

JAMMU & KASHMIR [15] 60 JAMMU

61.

KARGIL

REGIONAL

66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74.

BHADARWAH KUPWARA KHALSI NAUSHERA RAJOURI DRASS TIESURU NYOMA DISKIT

REGIONAL RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY RELAY

Appendices JHARKHAND [5] 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. CHAIBASA DALTONGANJ HAJARIBAGH JAMSHEDPUR RANCHI LRS LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 6 KW FM 1 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 100 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 50KW SW

329

KARNATAKA [141 80. BENGALURU (Banguluru) REGIONAL 200 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 10 KW FM, RAINBOW 500 KW SW EXT. SERV. 500 KW SW EXT. SERV. 500 KW SW EXT. SERV. 500 KW SW EXT. SERV. 500 KW SW EXT. SERV. 500 KW SW EXT. SERV.& VB 20 KW MW 1 KW FM (INT SET UP) 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 200 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 20 KW MW 1 KW FM (INT SET UP) 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 3 KW FM 20 KW MW 10 KW FM 6 KW FM 10 KW FM 6 KW FM

81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86.

BHADRAWATI BELLARY BIJAPUR CHITRADURG DHARWAD GULBARGA

REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL

87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93.

HASSAN HOSPET KARWAR MANGALORE/UDUPI MERCARA (Madikeri) MYSORE RAICHUR

REGIONAL LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS

330

KERALA [8l 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. ALLEPPY (Alappuzha) CALICUT (Kozhikode) CANNANOR (Kannur) COCHIN (Kochi) IDUKKI (DEVIKULAM) TRICHUR (Thrissur) THIRUVANANTHAPURAM MANJERI RELAY REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL

Mass Media in India

200 KW MW 100 KW MW 10 KW FM (VB) 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 10 KW FM VB] 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 20 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 50KW SW 3 KW FM, RAINBOW

101.

LRS

MADHYA PRADESH [16] 102. 103. 104. BALAGHAT BETUL BHOPAL LRS LRS REGIONAL 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 10 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 50 KW SW 20 KW MW 6 KW FM KW FM 20 KW MW 200 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 200 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 1 KW FM 3 KW FM

105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117.

CHHATARPUR CHHINDWARA GUNA GWALIOR INDORE JABALPUR KHANDWA REWA SAGAR SHAHDOL SHIVPURI MANDLA RAJGARH

REGIONAL LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS LRS

Appendices MAHARASHTRA [20] 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. AHMEDNAGAR AKOLA AURANGABAD BEED CHANDRAPUR DHULE JALGAON KOLHAPUR MUMBAI LRS LRS REGIONAL LRS LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 1 KW MW I KW FM (Int. set up) 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 6 KW FM

331

100 KW MW `A' 100 KW MW `B' 50 KW MW VB 10 KW FM (RAINBOW) 10 KW FM (GOLD) 100 KW SW 50 KW SW 300 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 1000KW MW NC 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 100 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 20 KW MW 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 1 KW MW 6 KW FM

127.

NAGPUR

REGIONAL

128. 129. 130. 131. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137.

NANDED NASIK OSMANABAD PARBHANI PUNE RATNAGIRI SANGLI SATARA SOLAPUR YEOTMAL

LRS LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS LRS LRS

MANIPUR [1] 138. IMPHAL REGIONAL 300 KW MW 50 KW SW 10 KW FM

332

MEGHALAYA [5] 139. 140. 141. JOWAI INONGSTOIN SHILLONG LRS CRS REGIONAL

Mass Media in India

6 KW FM 1 KW MW 100 KW MW, 50 KW SW NE INTEG. 10 KW FM, RAINBOW 20 KW MW 1 KW MW

142. 143.

TURA WILLIAMNAGAR

REGIONAL CRS

MIZORAM [3] 144. AIZAWL REGIONAL 20 KW MW 10 KW SW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 1 KW MW

145. 146.

LUNGLEH SAIHA

REGIONAL CRS

NAGALAND [4] 147. KOHIMA REGIONAL 100 KW MW 1 KW FM (Interim set up) 50 KW SW 6 KW FM 1 KW MW 1 KW MW

148. 149. 150.

MOKOKCHUNG MON TUENSANG

LRS CRS CRS

ORISSA [13] 151. 152. 153. 154. 155. BARIPADA BERHAMPUR BHAWANIPATNA BOLANGIR CUTTACK LRS LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL 5 KW FM 6 KW FM 200 KW MW 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 1 KW MW VB 6 KW FM,RAINBOW 100 KW MW 50 KW SW 1 KW MW 1 KW MW 3 KW FM

156. 157. 158. 159.

JEYPORE JORANDA KEONJHAR PURI

REGIONAL LRS LRS LRS

Appendices 160. 161. 162. 163. ROURKELA SAMBALPUR DEOGARH SORO LRS REGIONAL LPT RELAY LRS 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 100 W FM 1 KW MW

333

PUNJAB [3] 164. 165. BHATINDA JALLANDHAR LRS REGIONAL 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 200 KW MW 1KWMWVB 10 KW FM, RAINBOW 6 KW FM

166.

PATIALA

LRS

RAJASTHAN [17] 167. 168. 169. 170. 171. 172. 173. 174. AJMER ALWAR BANSWARA BARMER BIKANER CHITTORGARH CHURU JAIPUR RELAY LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL 200 KW MW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 1 KW MW 6 KW FM Tr. VB 50 KW SW 10 KW FM 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 6 KW FM VB 20 KW MW 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 300 KW MW 20 KW MW 1 KW FM (Int. set up)

175. 176. 177. 178. 179. 180. 181. 182. 183.

JAISALMER JHALAWAR JODHPUR KOTA MOUNT ABU NAGAUR SAWAI MADHOPUR SURATGARH UDAIPUR

REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL LRS LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL

334

SIKKIM [1] 184. GANGTOK REGIONAL

Mass Media in India

20 KW MW 10 KW SW

TAMILNADU [11] 185. CHENNAI REGIONAL 200 KW MW `A' 20 KW MW `B' 20 KW MW VB 20 KW FM,(RAINBOW) 20 KW FM,(GOLD) 50 KW SW 100 KW SW VB SYNC. 20 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 10 KW FM 20 KW MW 1 KW FM (Int. set up) 10 KW FM 1 KW MW 100 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 20 KW MW 200 KW MW EXT. SERV. 10 KW FM TR. 100 W FM

186. 187. 188. 189. 190. 191. 192. 193. 194. 195.

COIMBATORE KODAIKANAL MADURAI NAGARCOIL OOTTACAMUND TIRUCHIRAPALLI TIRUNELVELI TUTICORIN DHARMAPURI SALEM (YERCAUD)

REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIONAL LRS LPT RELAY

TRIPURA [3] 196. 197. 198. AGARTALA BELONIA KAILASHAHAR REGIONAL LRS LRS 20 KW MW 10 KW FM 6 KW FM 6 KW FM

UNION TERRITORIES 199. CHANDIGARH [1] VB EXCL. 6 KW FM

Coverage: Area-99.00% Population -99.00% DAMAN and DIU 200 DAMAN [1] LRS 3 KW FM

Appendices PUDUCHERRY [2] 201. 202. PUDUCHERRY KARAIKAL REGIONAL LRS 20 KW MW 5 KW FM (Int set up) 6 KW FM

335

L & M ISLANDS [1] 203. KAVARATTI REGIONAL 1 KW MW

A & N ISLAND [1] 204. PORT BLAIR A&N REGIONAL 100 KW MW 10 KW SW 10 KW FM

UTTAR PRADESH [14] 205. 206 AGRA ALIGARH REGIONAL RELAY 20 KW MW 6 KW FM, RAINBOW 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 250 KW SW EXT. SERV. 20 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 6 KW FM 6 KW FM 100 KW MW 50 KW SW EXT. SERV. 1 KW FM (Int. set up) 6 KW FM VB EXCL. REGIONAL 1 KW MW 1 KW FM (Int. set up) 300 KW MW 10 KW MW VB 10 KW FM,Rainbow 50 KW SW 1 KW MW 100 KW MW 6 KW FM 20 KW MW 100 KW MW

207. 208. 209. 210.

ALLAHABAD BAREILLY FAIZABAD GORAKHPUR

REGIONAL LRS LRS REGIONAL

211. 212. 213.

JHANSI KANPUR LUCKNOW

214. 215. 216. 217. 218.

MATHURA NAJIBABAD OBRA RAMPUR VARANASI

REGIONAL REGIONAL REGIO NAL REGIONAL REGIONAL

336

Mass Media in India 1 KW MW VB 1 KW FM (Int set up)

UTTARAKHAND [6] 219. 220. 221. 222. 223. 224. ALMORA GOPESHWAR(CHAMOLI) MUSSOORIE PAURI PITHORAGARH UTTARKASHI REGIONAL REGIONAL RELAY REGIONAL RELAY RELAY 1 KW MW 1 KW MW 10 KW FM, RAINBOW 1 KW MW 1 KW MW 1 KW MW

WEST BENGAL [7] 225. 226. ASANSOLE KOLKATA RELAY REGIONAL 6 KW FM RELAY 200 KW MW `A' 100 KW MW `B' 20 KW MW VB 10 KW FM Tr.,(GOLD) 10 KW FM,(Rainbow) 50 KW SW 1000 KW MW EXT. SERV. (Chinsurah) 50 KW SW 1 KW MW REG. SERV. 5 KW FM, RAINBOW 6 KW FM 3 KW FM 200 KW MW 10 KW FM VB 100 W FM

227.

KURSEONG

REGIONAL

228. 229. 230. 231.

MURSHIDABAD SHANTINIKETAN SILIGURI DARJEELING

LRS LRS REGIONAL LPT RELAY

**As on 1 February 2008. Source : www.allindiaradio.org/address/addNew.html

Appendices

337

LIST OF OPERATIONALISED PVT. FM RADIO STATIONS IN INDIA

S. City No. Cate- State gory Name of the Company Channel Identity Date of Operationalisation 7

01.09.2006 29.04.2003 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

Remarks

1

1. 2.

2

DELHI DELHI

3

A+ A+

4

5

6

8

DELHI (UT) CLEAR MEDIA HIT-FM DELHI (UT) DIGITAL RADIO RED-FM

3.

DELHI

A+

DELHI (UT) E.N.LL.

RADIOMIRCHI

29.04.2003

4.

DELHI

A+

DELHI (UT) H.T. MUSIC

FEVER 104 RADIOCITY

30.10.2006

5.

DELHI

A+

DELHI (UT) M.B.P.L

29.04.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

6.

DELHI

A+

DELHI (UT) RADIO MID-DAY DELHI (UT) RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD. DELHI (UT) ADLABS FILMS MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA ADLABS FILMS DIGITAL RADIO

RADIOONE [1] RADIOMEOW

23.09.2006

7.

DELHI

A+

28.05.2007

8.

DELHI

A+

BIG-FM

24-09-2006

9.

MUMBAI A+

BIG-FM

14.11.2006

10.

MUMBAI A+

RED-FM

29.04.2002

ALREADY IN

338

Mass Media in India

OPERATION FROM PHASE-1 11. MUMBAI A+ MAHARASHTRA E.N.LL. RADIOMIRCHI 29.04.2002 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

12.

MUMBAI A+

MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA

H.T. MUSIC

FEVER 104 15.01.2007

13.

MUMBAI A+

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY

21.05.2002

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

14.

MUMBAI A+

MAHARASHTRA

RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD RADIO MID-DAY

RADIOMEOW

26.01.2008

15.

MUMBAI A+

MAHARASHTRA

RADIO ONE [1]

29.04.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

16.

KOLKATA A+

WEST BENGAL WEST BENGAL

ADLABS FILMS RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD ANANDA OFFSET DIGITAL RADIO

BIG-FM

21.10.2006

17.

KOLKATA A+

RADIOMEOW

04.10.2007

18.

KOLKATA A+

WEST BENGAL WEST BENGAL

FRIEND 91.9 RED,FM

28.02.2007

19.

KOLKATA A+

03.05.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

Appendices

339

WEST BENGAL E.N.I.L RADIOMIRCHI 03.05.2003 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1 ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

20.

KOLKATA A+

21.

KOLKATA A+

WEST BENGAL

HITZ FM

POWERFM

03.05.2003

22.

KOLKATA A+

WEST BENGAL

INDIA FM

AMARFM

03 05.2003

23.

KOLKATA A+

WEST BENGAL TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

H.T. MUSIC

FEVER 104 BIG-FM

23.01.2008

24.

CHENNAI A+

ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL.

27.09.2006

25.

CHENNAI A+

RADIOMIRCHI

05.05.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

26.

CHENNAI A+

TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY

10.07.2006

27.

CHENNAI A+

MALAR HELLO FM 02.10.2006 PUBLICATIONS MUTHOOT FINANCE NOBLE BROADCASTING RADIO MID-DAY SUN TV CHENNAI LIVE AAHAAFM 04.01.2008

28.

CHENNAI A+

29.

CHENNAI A+

18.01.2007

30.

CHENNAI A+

TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

RADIO ONE [1] SURYANA FM

10.01.2007

31.

CHENNAI A+

05.05.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

340

32. AGARTALA AGRA D TRIPURA POSITIVE RADIO ADLABS FILMS PAN INDIA OOLALA FM BIG-FM

Mass Media in India

07.08.2007

33.

B

UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH GUJARAT

18.08.2007

34.

AGRA

B

Z-FM

28.05.2008

35.

AGRA

B

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM E.N.L.L. RADIOMIRCHI

08.07.2007

36.

AHMEDABAD

A

10.12.2001

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

37.

AHMEDABAD AHMEDABAD AHMEDABAD AHMEDABAD AHMED NAGAR

A

GUJARAT

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCity RADIO ONE [1] S. FM

25.07.2007

38.

A

GUJARAT

RADIO-MID -DAY SOUTH ASIA

26.08.2007

39.

A

GUJARAT

20.04.2008

40.

A

GUJARAT

SYNERGY MEDIA

MY-FM

21.07.2007

41.

C

MAHARASH B.A.G. TRA INFOTAINMENT MAHARASH M.B.P.L. TRA RAJASTHAN RAJASTHAN RAJAS THAN MAHARASHTRA ADLABS FILMS KUSHAL GLOBAL SYNERGY MEDIA M.B.P.L.

RADIODHAMAL

01.03.2008

42.

AHMED NAGAR AJMER

C

RADIOCITY BIG-FM

07.02.2008

43.

C

28.08.2007

44.

AJMER

C

SUPER FM

12.09.2007

45.

AJMER

C

MY-FM

31.08.2007

46.

AKOLA

C

RADIOCITY

13.03.2008

47.

ALIGARH C

UTTAR PRADESH

ADLABS FILMS

BIG-FM

08.12.2006

Appendices

48. ALLAHA- C BAD ALLAHA- B BAD ALLAHA- B BAD AMRITSAR AMRITSAR AMRITSAR B UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH PUNJAB ADLABS FILMS PAN INDIA BIG-FM 29.10.2007

341

49.

Z-FM

29.05.2008

50.

SOUTH ASIA

S. FM

18.03.2008

51.

ADLABS FILMS PAN INDIA

BIG-FM

01.08.2007

52.

B

PUNJAB

Z-FM

26.01.2008

53.

B

PUNJAB

RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD SYNERGY MEDIA ADLABS FILMS SOUTH ASIA

RADIOMEOW

15.05.2008

54.

AMRITSAR

B

PUNJAB

MY-FM

27-7-2007

55.

ASANSOL B

WEST BENGAL WEST BENGAL MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA

BIG-FM

29.06.2007

56.

ASANSOL B

S. FM

03.06.2008

57.

AURANGABAD AURANGABAD BENGALURU BENGALURU BENGALURU BENGALURU BENGALURU BENGALURU

C

E.N.LL.

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

24.07.2007

58.

C

SOUTH ASIA

21.04.2008

59.

A

ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL.

BIG-FM

09.10.2006

60.

A

RADIOMIRCHI FEVER 104

17.04.2006

61.

A

H.T. MUSIC

06.03.2007

62.

A

INDIA RADIO RADIOVENTURES INDIGO KAL RADIO S. FM

01.10.2006

63.

A

06.11.2006

64.

A

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY

10.06.2001

ALREADY IN OPERATION

342

Mass Media in India

FROM PHASE-1 65. BENGALURU A KARNATAKA RADIO MID -DAY UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH ORISSA ADLABS FILMS RADIOONE [1] BIG-FM 01.08.2006

66.

BAREILY C

30.03.2007

67.

BAREILY C

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM ADLABS FILMS E.N.I.L. BIG-FM

09.04.2007

68.

BHOPAL

B

20.05.2007

69.

BHOPAL

B

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

26.05.2007

70.

BHOPAL

B

SOUTH ASIA

06.11.2007

71.

BHOPAL

B

SYNERGY MEDIA ADLABS FILMS

MY-FM

26.05.2007

72.

BHUBA- C NESHWAR/ CUTTAK BHUBA- C NESHWAR/ CUTTAK BHUBA C NESHWA R/CUTTAK BIKANER C

BIG-FM

14.04.2007

73.

ORISSA

EASTERN MEDIA

CHOCOLAT E

04.05.2007

74.

ORISSA

SOUTH ASIA

S. FM

28.06.2007

75.

RAJASTHAN ADLABS FILMS CHHATTISGARH CHANDIGARH (UT) CHANDIGARH (UT) KERALA SYNERGY MEDIA ADLABS FILMS SYNERGY MEDIA KAL RADIO

BIG-FM

19.01.2007

76.

BILASPUR C

MY-FM

27.09.2007

77.

CHANDI- C GARH CHANDI- C GARH COCHIN B

BIG-FM

12.02.2007

78.

MY-FM

19.02.2007

79.

S. FM

17.05.2008

80.

COCHIN

B

KERALA

MALAYALA MANGO MANORAMA FM

18.05.2008

Appendices

343

B KERALA THE MATHRABHUMI E.N.L.L. CLUB-FM 17.05.2008

81.

COCHIN

82.

COIMBA- B TORE COIMBA- B TORE COIMBA- B TORE

TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

RADIOMIRCHI RADIOCITY

03.11.2007

83.

M.B.P.L.

12.11.2007

84.

MALAR PUBLICATIONS SUN TV

HELLO-FM 29.10.2007

85.

COIMBA- B TORE

TAMIL NADU

SURYANA FM

07.03.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-I

86.

DHULE

C

MAHARASHTRA

B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT CHINAR CIRCUITS PCM CEMMENTS

RADIODHAMAL

15.08.2007

87.

GANGTOK D

SIKKIM

NINE-91.9 FM MISTY FM

10.08.2008

88.

GANGTOK D

SIKKIM

31.01 2009

89.

GORAKH- C PUR GULBER- C GA GUWAHATI GUWAHATI GUWAHATI C

UTTAR PRADESH KARNATAKA ASSAM

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM KAL RADIO S. FM

03.06.2007

90.

02.06.2008

91.

ADLABS FILMS POSITIVE RADIO PURVY BROADCASTING SOUTH ASIA

BIG-FM

14.04.2007

92.

C

ASSAM

OOLALA FM GUP-SHUP

13.04.2007

93.

C

ASSAM

09.10.2007

94.

GUWAHATI

C

ASSAM

S. FM

11.04.2008

95.

GWALIOR C

MADHYA PRADESH

ADLABS FILMS

BIG-FM

06.08.2007

344

96. GWALIOR C MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH HARYANA GWALIOR FARMS ITM SOFT CHASKA

Mass Media in India

04.08.2007

97.

GWALIOR C

SUNO LEMON MEDIA MY FM BIG-FM

07.09.2007

98.

GWALIOR C

SYNERGY

06.08.2007

99.

HISSAR

D

ADLABS FILMS B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT

02.03.2007

100. HISSAR

D

HARYANA

RADIODHAMAL

18.06.2007

101. HISSAR

D

HARYANA

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM SINGLA PROPERTY ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL. TARANG

21.03.2007

102. HISSAR

D

HARYANA

17.03.2007

103. HYDERA- A BAD 104. HYDERA- A BAD 105. HYDERA- A BAD 106. HYDERA- A BAD 107. INDORE B

ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH

BIG-FM

25.09.2006

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

19.04.2006

KAL RADIO

06.11.2006

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY BIG-FM

30.05.2006

ADLABS FILMS E.N.IL.

03.08.2007

108. INDORE

B

RADIOMIRCHI

01.10.2001

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

109. INDORE

B

MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH ARUNACHAL PRADESH

SOUTH ASIA

S. FM

09.12.2007

110. INDORE

B

SYNERGY MEDIA POSITIVE RADIO

MY-FM

11.08.2007

111. ITANAGAR

D

OOLALA FM

05.08.2008

Appendices

345

B MADHYA PRADESH B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT E.N.LL. RADIODHAMAL 01.03.2008

112. JABAL PUR

113. JABALPUR 114. JABALPUR 115. JABALPUR 116. JAIPUR

B

MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH MADHYA PRADESH

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

15.02.2008

B

SOUTH ASIA

19.03.2008

B

SYNERGY MEDIA

MY-FM

15.02.2008

A

RAJASTHAN E.N.LL.

RADIOMIRCHI RADIOCITY RADIOTADKA S. FM MY-FM

17.04.2006

117. JAIPUR

A

RAJASTHAN M.B.P.L.

08.09.2006

118. JAIPUR

A

RAJASTHAN RAJASTHAN PATRIKA RAJASTHAN SOUTH ASIA RAJASTHAN SYNERGY MEDIA PUNJAB ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL.

15.08.2006

119. JAIPUR 120. JAIPUR

A A

06.11.2006 28.05.2006

121. JALANDHAR 122. JALANDHAR 123. JALANDHAR 124. JALANDHAR

C

BIG-FM

14.04.2007

C

PUNJAB

RADIOMIRCHI

24.04.2007

C

PUNJAB

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM SYNERGY MY-FM

14.04.2007

C

PUNJAB

19.04.2007

125. JALGOAN C

MAHARASHTRA

B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT M.B.P.L.

RADIODHAMAL

22.04.2008

126. JALGOAN C

MAHARASHTRA J&K

RADIOCITY BIG FM

21.05.2008

127. JAMMU

C

ADLABS FILMS ADLABS FILMS SOUTH ASIA

07.12.2006

128. JAMB SHEDPUR 129. JAMB SHEDPUR

JHARKH AND JHARKHAND

BIG-FM

07.11.2007

S. FM

13.04.2008

346

130. JAMB SHEDPUR 131. JHANSI B JHARKHAND UTTAR PRADESH NEUTRAL DHOOM PUBLICATION FM ADLABS FILMS BIG-FM

Mass Media in India

18.07.2008

19.01.2007

132. JODHPUR C

RAJASTHAN ADLABS FILMS RAJASTHAN KUSHAL GLOBAL RAJASTHAN RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD RAJASTHAN SYNERGY MEDIA KERALA ASIANET COMMUNICATION KAL RADIO

BIG-FM

14.12.2007

133. JODHPUR C

SUPER FM RADIOMEOW

14.12.2007

134. JODHPUR C

01.06.2008

135. JODHPUR C

MY-FM

20.12.2007

136. KANNUR C

BEST FM

13.01.2008

137. KANNUR C

KERALA

S. FM

12.03.2008

138. KANNUR C

KERALA

MALAYALA MANGO MANORAMA FM THE MATHRA BHUMI ADLABS FILMS E.N.L.L. CLUB-FM

30.12.2007

139. KANNUR C

KERALA

30.12.2007

140. KANPUR

A

UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH HARYANA

BIG-FM

14.06.2007

141. KANPUR

A

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

16.06.2007

142. KANPUR

A

SOUTH ASIA

28.01.2008

143. KARNAL

D

B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT

RADIODHAMAL

18.06.2007

144. KARNAL

D

HARYANA

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM E.N.LL. RADIOMIRCHI

02.04.2007

145. KOLHAPUR

C

MAHARASHTRA

18.09.2007

Appendices

347

C MAHARASHTRA WEST BENGAL PUDHARI TOMOTO PUBLICATION FM RADIO MID-DAY RADIOONE [1] BIG-FM 21.09.2007

146. KOLHAPUR

147. KOLKATA A+

12.12.2008

148. KOTA

C

RAJASTHAN ADLABS FILMS RAJASTHAN RAJASTHAN PATRIKA RAJASTHAN SYNERGY MEDIA KERALA KAL RADIO

21.01.2008

149. KOTA

C

RADIOTADKA MY-FM

25.02.2008

150. KOTA

C

02.02.2008

151. KOZIKO DE 152. KOZIKO DE

C

S. FM

07.12.2007

C

KERALA

MALAYALA MANGO MANORAMA FM E.N.LL. RADIOMIRCHI RADIOCITY

29.11.2007

153. LUCKNOWA

UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH

13.08.2007

154. LUCKNOWA

M.B.P.L.

10.12.2001

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

155. LUCKNOWA

UTTAR PRADESH TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

SOUTH ASIA

S. FM

06.11.2007

156. MADURAI B

E.N.LL.

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

28-09.2007

157. MADURAI B

KAL RADIO

05.10.2007

158. MADURAI B

MALAR PUBLICATIONS ADLABS FILMS E.N.L.L.

HELLOFM

01.10.2007

159. MANGALORE 160. MANGALORE 161. MANGALORE

C

KARNATAKA KARNATAKA KARNATAKA

BIG-FM

24.11.2007

C

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

24.11.2007

C

KAL RADIO

21.02.2008

348

162. MUZAFFARPUR C BIHAR B.A.G. INFOTAIN MENT ADLABS FILMS KAL RADIO RADIODHAMAL

Mass Media in India

01.08.2007

163. MYSORE

C

KARNATAKA KARNATAKA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA GOA

BIG-FM

14.10.2007

164. MYSORE

C

S. FM

07.12.2007

165. NAGPUR

A

E.N.L.L.

RADIOMIRCHI RADIOCITY S. FM

18.10.2007

166. NAGPUR

A

M.B.P.L.

21.10.2007

167. NAGPUR

A

SOUTH ASIA

04.05.2008

168. NAGPUR

A

SYNERGY MEDIA M.B.P.L.

MY-FM

21.10.2007

169. NANDED C

RADIOCITY RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

15.05.2008

170. NASIK

C

E.N.LL.

06.07.2007

171. NASIK

C

SOUTH ASIA

16.04.2008

172. PANAJI

D

ADLABS FILMS E.N.L.L.

BIG-FM

22.05.2007

173. PANAJI

D

GOA

RADIOMIRCHI

22.05.2007

174. PANAJI

D

GOA

INDIA RADIO RADIO VENTURES INDIGO ADLABS FILMS B.A.G. INFOTAINMENT PAN INDIA RADIO TODAY BROADCASTING LTD BIG-FM

25.06.2007

175. PATIALA

C

PUNJAB

01.08.2007

176. PATIALA

C

PUNJAB

RADIODHAMAL

18.06.2007

177. PATIALA 178. PATIALA

C C

PUNJAB PUNJAB

Z-FM RADIOMEOW

26.01.2008 01.06.2008

Appendices

349

B BIHAR E.N.I.L. RADIOMIRCHI BIG-FM 02.04.2007

179. PATNA

180. PUDUCHERRY 181. PUDUCHERRY 182. PUDUCHERRY

C

PUDUCHERRY (UT) PUDUCHERRY (UT) PUDUCHERRY (UT)

ADLABS FILMS KAL RADIO

01.12.2007

C

S. FM

20.12.2007

C

MALAR PUBLICATIONS E.N.I.L.

HELLO-FM 22.12.2007

183. PUNE

A

MAHARASHTRA

RADIOMIRCHI

18.10.2002

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

184. PUNE

A

MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA JHARKHAND JHARKHAND

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY RADIOONE [1] S. FM

06.04.2008

185. PUNE

A

RADIO MID-DAY SOUTH ASIA

12.05.2008

186. PUNE

A

22.07.2008

187. RANCHI

C

ADLABS FILMS B.A.G. INFOTAIN MENT

BIG-FM

24.10.2007

188. RANCHI

C

RADIODHAMAL

15.11.2007

189. RANCHI

C

JHARKHAND JHARKHAND

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM NEUTRAL PUBLICA TION E.N.L.L. DHOOM FM

27.10.2007

190. RANCHI

C

18.07.2008

191. RAIPUR

C

CHHATTISGARH CHHATTISGARH CHHATTISGARH

RADIOMIRCHI RADIOTADKA RANGILA FINCOM 104.8

11.01.2008

192. RAIPUR

C

RAJASTHAN PATRIKA RANEKA

10.02.2009

193. RAIPUR

C

15.01.2008

350

194. RAIPUR C CHHATTISGARH ANDHRA PRADESH GUJARAT SYNERGY MEDIA KAL RADIO MY-FM

Mass Media in India

16.01.2008

195. RAJAHC MUNDRY 196. RAJKOT A

S. FM

19.01.2008

ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL.

BIG-FM

13.06.2007

197. RAIKOT

A

GUJARAT

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM BIG-FM

13.06.2007

198. RAJKOT 199. ROURKELA 200. ROURKELA

A C

GUJARAT ORISSA

SOUTH ASIA ADLABS FILMS EASTERN MEDIA

18.04.2008 06.01.2008

C

ORISSA

RADIOCHOCOLATE RADIOCITY OOLALA FM S. FM

22.01.2008

201. SANGLI

C

MAHARASHTRA MEGHALAYA MEGHALAYA MAHARASHTRA MAHARASHTRA WEST BENGAL WEST BENGAL WEST BENGAL

M.B.P.L.

08.02.2008

202. SHILONG D

POSITIVE RADIO SOUTH ASIA

16.10.2007

203. SHILONG D

13.06.2008

204. SHOLAPUR 205. SHOLAPUR

C

ADLABS

BIG-FM

08-11.2008

C

M.B.P.L.

RADIOCITY NINE-91.9 FM MISTY FM

14.11.2007

206. SILIGURI C

CHINAR CIRCUITS PCM CEMMENTS SYNTECH INFORMATICS SOUTH ASIA

12.03.2008

207. SILIGURI C

14.11.2007

208. SILIGURI C

HIGH FM

24.11.2007

209. SILIGURI C

WEST BENGAL J&K

S. FM

25.10.2008

210. SRINAGAR 211. SURAT

C

ADLABS FILMS ADLABS FILMS

BIG-FM

10.12.2006

A

GUJARAT

BIG-FM

29.08.2007

Appendices

351

A GUJARAT E.N.LL. RADIOMIRCHI MY-FM 21.08.2007

212. SURAT

213. SURAT

A

GUJARAT

SYNERGY MEDIA M.B.P.L.

27.08.2007

214. SURAT

A

GUJRAT

RADIOCITY BIG-FM

22.08.2007

215. THIRUVA- C NANTHAPURAM 216. THIRUVA- C NANTHAPURAM 217. THIRUVA- C NANTHAPURAM 218. THIRUVA- C NANTHAPURAM 219. THRISSUR C

KERALA

ADLABS FILMS

29.01.2008

KERALA

E.N.LL.

RADIOMIRCHI

29.01.2008

KERALA

KAL RADIO

S. FM

06.02.2008

KERALA

THE MATHRAB HUMI ASIANET COMMUNICATION KAL RADIO

CLUB-FM

29.01.2008

KERALA

BEST FM

23.12.2007

220. THRISSUR C 221. THRISSUR C

KERALA KERALA

S. FM

26.12.2007 14.12.2007

MALAYALA MANGO MANORAMA FM THE MATHRA BHUMI KAL RADIO CLUB-FM

222. THRISSUR C

KERALA

14.12.2007

223. TIRUCHI

C

TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU

S. FM

17.01.2008

224. TIRUCHI

C

MALAR PUBLICATIONS MALAR PUBLICATIONS SUN TV FM

HELLO-FM 14.01.2008

225. TIRUNELVELI

C

TAMIL NADU

HELLO-FM 13.10.2007

226. TIRUNELVELI

C

TAMIL NADU

SURYANA

07.03.2003

ALREADY INOPERATION FROM PHASE-1

352

227. TIRUPATI C ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH TAMIL NADU TAMIL NADU ADLABS FILMS KAL RADIO BIG-FM

Mass Media in India

01.08.2007

228. TIRUPATI C

S. FM

27.08.2007

229. TUTICORIN 230. TUTICORIN

C

KAL RADIO

S. FM

05.10.2007

C

MALAR PUBLICATIONS

HELLO-FM 15.10.2007

231. UDAIPUR C

RAJASTHAN ADLABS FILMS RAJASTHAN RAJASTHAN PATRIKA RAJASTHAN SYNERGY MEDIA GUJARAT ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL.

BIG-FM

03.08.2007

232. UDAIPUR C

RADIOTADKA MY-FM

27.08.2007

233. UDAIPUR C

07.07.2007

234. VADODARA 235. VADODARA 236. VADODARA 237. VADODARA 238. VARANASI 239. VARANASI 240. VARANASI 241. VARANASI 242. VIJAYAWADA 243. VIJAYAWADA

B

BIG-FM

05.06.2007

B

GUJARAT

RADIOMIRCHI RADIO-

05.06.2007

B

GUJARAT CITY GUJARAT

M.B.P.L.

11.06.2007

B

SOUTH ASIA

S. FM

17.04.2008

B

UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH UTTAR PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH

E.N.L.L.

RADIO-

14.07.2007

B

PAN INDIA

Z-FM

29.05.2008

B

SHRI PURAN MANTRA MULTIMEDIA FM SOUTH ASIA S. FM

20.07.2007

B

29.12.2007

B

E.N.L.L.

RADIOMIRCHI S. FM

11.12.2007

B

KAL RADIO

25.12.2007

Appendices

353

ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ANDHRA PRADESH ADLABS FILMS E.N.LL. BIG-FM 27.10.2007

244. VISHAKA- B PATNAM 245. VISHAKA- B PATNAM 246. VISHAKA- B PATNAM 247 VISHAKA- B PATNAM

RADIOMIRCHI RADIOCITY VISAKHA FM

26.10.2007

M.B.P.L.

29.10.2007

UDAYA TV

06.02.2003

ALREADY IN OPERATION FROM PHASE-1

248

WARANGAL

C

KARNATAKA

KAL RADIO

S. FM

28.05.2008

Source: www.mib.nic.in

354

Mass Media in India

DOORDARSHAN NETWORK

(as on 31.03.2009)

S. State/UT No. Primary Channel (DD 1)

No. of HPTs LPTs Studios VLPTs Trp Total HPTs

No. of Transmitters Transmitters relaying Regional programmes during entire duration

HPTs LPTs VLPTs Total

New Channel (DD News)

LPTs VLPTs Total

1. Andhra Pradesh

3

9 1 4 4 3 1 7 2 3 10 3 8 4 8 2 8 2 2 2

75 3 20 32 16 51 13 7 7 17 47 20 60 3 79 1 1 2

39 1 2 8 39 69 2 6 2 4 2 6

1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2

85 44 26 38 27 1 58 15 51 87 22 55 24 74 8 87 7 6 12

4 1 2 2 1 1 4 1 2 5 2 4 3 4 2 5 1 1 1

6 1 2 3 7 1 3 2 2 2 10 1 1

1 -

10 1 3 4 1 1 7 8 3 8 5 6 5 4 2 15 1 2 2

4 -

8 -

10 3 18 7 4 20 -

10 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 30 0 7 4 0 0 20 1 0 0

2. Arunachal 1 Pradesh 3. Assam 4. Bihar 4 2

5. Chhattis- 2 garh 6. Goa 7. Gujarat 8. Haryana 1 2 1

9. H.Pradesh 1 10.Jammu 4 & Kashmir 11.Jharkhand 2 12.Karnataka 2 13.Kerala 14.Madhya Pradesh 3 3

15.Meghalya 2 16.Maharashtra 17.Manipur 18.Mizoram 3 1 1

19.Nagaland 1

Appendices 20.Orissa 21.Punjab 3 2 5 4 7 1 6 1 11 1 8 1 1 1 62 5 65 44 5 52 15 19 1 1 1 2 1 1 17 6 1 3 33 17 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 68 68 91 7 51 8 66 51 27 19 1 1 2 1 2 3 2 2 4 1 2 1 7 1 4 1 1 7 7 4 9 1 10 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 5 7 11 11 8 1 11 2 18 3 6 7 0 0 0 1 7 1 1 1 16 7 1 7 1

355

16 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 1

22.Rajasthan 1 23.Sikkim 24.Tamil Nadu 25.Tripura 26.Uttar Pradesh 27.Uttaranchal 28.West Bengal 29.A.&N. 30.Chandigarh 1 3 1 7 1 3 1 1

31.Dadar & Nagar Haveli 32.Daman & Diu 33.Delhi 34.L'Dweep Islands 35.Puducherry Total 2 1

66 130 728 259

18 1135 73

78

16

167

6

8

94

108

Note : In addition, there are four digital transmitters (HPTs) at four metros **As on 31.03.2009 Source : http://www.ddindia.gov.in/About+DD/Doordarshan+Transmitters

356

Mass Media in India

CONSOLIDATED LIST OF CHANNELS ALLOWED TO BE CARRIED BY CABLE OPERATORS/MULTI SYSTEM OPERATORS/ DTH LICENSEES IN INDIA (IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER)

Sl. No. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Name of Channel 360 24 GHANTA 365 DIN 9X 9XM A TO Z A TO Z DOCUMENTARY & TELEFILMS A TV AAJ TAK AAJTAK TEZ AALAMISAHARA AASEERVATHAM AASTHA BHAJAN AASTHA ABC NEWS NOW ABN ANDHRA JYOTI ACTION CINEMA ADITHYA TV AHIMSAA AKASH B AM RITA ANANDA ANGEL TV Category of Channel News News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News News News News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News

Appendices

357 Non-News Non-News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News

24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54.

ANIMAL PLANET ANIMAX APNA NEWS ARADANA ARIRANG ASHIRWAD ASIANET ASIANET NEWS ASIANET PLUS AUSTRALIA NETWORK AWAAZ AXN AZAD B TV B4U MOVIES B4U MUSIC BABY TV BALLE BALLE BBC ENTERTAINMENT BBC WORLD BHAKTHI BHOJPURIA MAGIC BIG BONDHON BIG CHITRAPAT BIG CHOBI BIG FAMILY BIG FITNESS 24 7 BIG FOOD BIG GAURAV BIG HEALTH BIG HITS

358 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. BIG HOLLYWOOD BIG ISAI BIG JUICE BIG MAGIC BIG MAUJA BIG SANGEET BIG SANJHA BIG SPIRITUAL BIG ULLAS BIKAS 365 BINDAAS MOVIES BINDAAS BIZ 24 BIZZ NEWS BLOOMBERG TELEVISION ASIA-PACIFIC FEED 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. BOOMERANG BRINDAVAN TV BUSINESS TODAY C BEEBIES CARE TV CARE WORLD CARTOON NETWORK CCTV-9 CHANNEL 10 CHANNEL EIGHT CHANNEL NEWS ASIA INTERNATIONAL CHANNEL NO.1 CHANNEL V INTERNATIONAL CHANNELV CHARDIKALA TIME TV

Mass Media in India

Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News News News

Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News News

Appendices

359 News News Non-News News News News News News News Non-News News News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News

85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 113. 114. 115.

CHINTUTV CHUTTI CLASSIC CINEMA CNBC-TV 18 CNEB CNN INTERNATIONAL CNN-IBN CHANNEL -1 CNN-IBN CHANNEL -2 CNN-IBN COLORS CTVN-AKD-PLUS DAY "N" NIGHT NEWS DAY STAR TELEVISION NETWORK DELHI AAJ TAK DHALIWAL TV DISCOVERY CHANNEL DISCOVERY TRAVEL AND LIVING DISNEY CHANNEL DIVYA DNN DW TV DY 365 E 24 E-LIVE ENTERR 10 MOVIES ENTERR 10 ERA CHANNEL ESPN ET NOW ETC-HINDI ETC-PUNJABI

360 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 131. 132. 133. 134. 135. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. 141. 142. 143. 144. 145. 146. ETV 2 ETV ASSAM ETV BENGALI EN BIHAR JHARKHAND EN GUJARATI ETV KANNADA ETV MADHYA PRADESH CHATTISGARH ETV MALAYALAM ETV MARATHI ETV ORIYA ETV PUNJAB ETV RAJASTHAN (HINDI) ETV TAMIL ETV TELUGU ETV URDU ETV UTTER PRADESH UTTARANCHAL EXPLORE TV FOCUS TV FOOD FOOD TV FOX CRIME FOX HISTORY AND ENTERTAINMENT FRESH TV ftv.com INDIA FX GANGA GEMINI CABLE VISION GEMINI MUSIC GEMINI NEWS GEMINI TV GOD TV G-TV

Mass Media in India

News News News News News News News News News News News News News News News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News News Non-News News

Appendices

361 News News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News News News News News Non-News News News News News News News Non-News News News News News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News News

147. 148. 149. 150. 151. 152. 153. 154. 155. 156. 157. 158. 159. 160. 161. 162. 163. 164. 165. 166. 167. 168. 169. 170. 171. 172. 173. 174. 175. 176. 177.

HAMAR TV HBC NEWS HBN HBO HEADLINES TODAY HM TV HOME SHOP 18 HUNGAMA TV HY TV i NEWS IBN LOKMAT IBN-7 IMAGINE SHOWBIZ IMAYAM TV INDIA NEWS INDIA TV INDIAVISION NEWS ITV NEWS J MOVIE JAGRAN JAI HIND JAIN TV JAN SANDESH NEWS JAYA MAX JAYA PLUS JAYA TV JEEVAN TV JHANKAR MOVIES JUST TV MUSIC JUST TV PUNJABI K TV

362 178. 179. 180. 181. 182. 183. 184. 185. 186. 187. 188. 189. 190. 191. 192. 193. 194. 195. 196. 197. 198. 199. 200. 201. 202. 203. 204. 205. 206. 207. 208. KAIRALI KALAIGNAR CHITHIRAM KALAIGNAR ISAI ARUVI KALAIGNAR SEITHIGAL KALAIGNAR SIRIPPOLI KALAIGNAR TV KAMYAB TV KANAK SAMBAD KASTHURI KBC NEWS KBS WORLD KHOJ INDIA KIRAN TV KOLKATA N KUSHITV LAMHAS CLASSIC LEHEREN LEMON TV LIFE 24 LIVE INDIA M-3 MAA MUSIC MAA NEWS MAA POOJA MAA TV MAHAA TV MAHUAA MUSIC MAHUAA NEWS MAHUAA MAKKALTV MALLEMAALA

Mass Media in India

News Non-News News News Non-News News News News News News News News News News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News Non-News News News News Non-News

Appendices

363 Non-News News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News News Non-News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News

209. 210. 211. 212. 213. 214. 215. 216. 217. 218. 219. 220. 221. 222. 223. 224. 225. 226. 227. 228. 229. 230. 231. 232. 233. 234. 235. 236. 237. 238. 239.

MANA TELUGU MANORAMA NEWS CENTRAL MANORAMA NEWS INTERNATIONAL MANORAMA NEWS NORTH MANORAMA NEWS SOUTH MANORAMA VISION MANORAMA YUVA MANORANJAN TV MARINE BIZ TV MAURYA MEGA TV MH 1 MH ONE NEWS MH ONE SHRADDHA MI MARATHI MIRACLENET MOON TV MOVIE ON DEMAND-ENGLISH MOVIE ON DEMAND-HINDI MTV MTV2 MUNSIF TV MUSIC CHOICE MUSIC INDIA N TV NAT GEO ADVENTURE NAT GEO MUSIC NAT GEO WILD NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC HD NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC NAXATRA TV

364 240. 241. 242. 243. 244. 245. 246. 247. 248. 249. 250. 251. 252. 253. 254. 255. 256. 257. 258. 259. 260. 261. 262. 263. 264. 265. 266. 267. 268. 269. 270. NDTV 24X7 NDTV GOOD TIMES NDTV IMAGINE NDTV INDIA NDTV LUMIERE NDTV METRO NATION BENGALURU NDTV METRO NATION CHENNAI NDTV METRO NATION KOLKATTA NDTV METRO NATION MUMBAI NDTV METRO NATION NDTV PROFIT NE BANGLA NE TELEVISION NE-HI FI NEO CRICKET NEO SPORTS NEPALI NEWS 24 NEWS 9 NEWS LIVE NEWS X NHK WORLD PREMIUM NHK WORLD TV NICK O TV P7 NEWS PEOPLE PLAY TV POGO POLIMER POWER VISION

Mass Media in India

News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News News News News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News News News News News News Non-News News News News News Non-News News Non-News

Appendices

365 Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News News News News News News Non-News News Non-News News News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News

271. 272. 273. 274. 275. 276. 277. 278. 279. 280. 281. 282. 283. 284. 285. 286. 287. 288. 289. 290. 291. 292. 293. 294. 295. 296. 297. 298. 299. 300. 301.

PRAGYA TV PREMIERE CINEMA PTC CHAK DE PTC NEWS PTC PUNJABI PUNJAB TODAY R PLUS R TV RAAZ RAJ DIGITAL PLUS RAJ MUSIX KANADA RAJ MUSIX MALAYALAM RAJ MUSIX TELUGU RAJ MUSIX RAJ NEWS KANNADA RAJ NEWS MALAYALAM RAJ NEWS TELUGU RAJ NEWS RAJ PARIWAR RAJ TV REAL ESTATE REAL TV RUSSIA TODAY SiTADKA SiTV SAAM TV SAB SADHNA NEWS BIHAR SADHNA NEWS SADHNA SAHARA FILMY

366 302. 303. 304. 305. 306. 307. 308. 309. 310. 311. 312. 313. 314. 315. 316. 317. 318. 319. 320. 321. 322. 323. 324. 325. 326. 327. 328. 329. 330. 331. 332. SAHARA FIRANGI SAHARA ONE SAHARA SAMAY BIHAR SAHARA SAMAY MP SAHARA SAMAY MUMBAI SAHARA SAMAY NCR SAHARA SAMAY UP SAHARA TV SAI TV SAKSHI SAMAY SAMAYA SANATAN TV SANGEET BANGLA SANGEET BHOJPURI SANSKAR SATHIYAM TV SATSANG SET MAX SET PIX SHAKTI TV SHALOM TELEVISION SHOPPING ZONE SITARA SMILE TV SOBHAGYA MITHILA SONY ENTERTAINMENT TELEVISION (SET) SPACE TV SPACETOON KIDS TV SPLASH TV SRI SANKARA

Mass Media in India

Non-News Non-News News News News News News News Non-News News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News

Appendices

367 Non-News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News News News Non-News News News News News Non-News News

333. 334. 335. 336. 337. 338. 339. 340. 341. 342. 343. 344. 345. 346. 347. 348. 349. 350. 351. 352. 353. 354. 355. 356. 357. 358. 359. 360. 361. 362. 363.

SRI VENKATESWARA SS ENTERTAINMENT SS MUSIC STANDRAD WORLD STAR ANANDO STAR CRICKET STAR GOLD STAR GUJARATI STAR JALSHA STAR MAAZZA STAR MOVIES STAR NEWS STAR ONE STAR PLUS STAR PRAVAH STAR SPORTS STAR TELUGU STAR UTSAV STAR WORLD STUDIO 1 STUDIO N STV GOA NEWS STV HARYANA NEWS STV UP NEWS SUBHA VAARTHA SUDARSHAN SUN MUSIC SUN NEWS SUN TV SUPER STAR-JOSH SURYA TV

368 364. 365. 366. 367. 368. 369. 370. 371. 372. 373. 374. 375. 376. 377. 378. 379. 380. 381. 382. SUVARNA NEWS SUVARNA TAMILAN TELEVISION TARA MUSIX TARA PUNJABI TARANG MUSIC TARANG TBN CHANNEL TCM TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES TEHKEKAAT TEJA TV TEN SPORTS THE MGM CHANNEL TIMES NOW TMG ENTER TML VOICE OF INDIA LIFESTYLE TML VOICE OF INDIA MADHYA PRADESH TML VOICE OF INDIA MUSIC TML VOICE OF INDIA PUNJAB, HARYANA,HIMACHAL PRADESH 383. 384. 385. 386. 387. 388. 389. 390. 391. 392. 393. TML VOICE OF INDIA RAJASTHAN TML VOICE OF INDIA UP TML VOICE OF INDIA TOON DISNEY TOPPER TOTALTV TULSI TV 1 TV 100 TV 24 TV 5 MONDE

Mass Media in India

News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News

News News News Non-News Non-News News Non-News News News News News

Appendices

369 News News News News News News News Non-News News News News News News News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News Non-News Non-News

394. 395. 396. 397. 398. 399. 400. 401. 402. 403. 404. 405. 406. 407. 408. 409. 410. 411. 412. 413. 414. 415. 416. 417. 418. 419. 420. 421. 422. 423. 424.

TV 5 TV 9 TV 99 TV SOUTH ASIA TV9 GUJARAT TV9 KANNADA TV9 MUMBAI TVC ONLINE UDAYA MOVIES UDAYA TV UDAYA TV-II UDAYA VARTHEGALU USHETV UTV i UTV MOVIES VANITHA TV VASANTH VH 1 VIJAY VIJAY VISION TV ENTERTAINMENT VISION TV MUSIC VISION TV SHIKSHA VISSA VOYAGES TELEVISION WB WE WELLNESS WIN TV WORLD MOVIES YES-IN DIAVISION

370 425. 426. 427. 428. 429. 430. 431. 432. 433. 434. 435. 436. 437. 438. 439. 440. 441. 442. 443. 444. 445. 446. 447. 448. 449. 450. 451. 452. 453. 454. YO TV ZAPAK TV HINDI ZAPAK TV (E) ZEE 24 GHANTALU ZEE 24 GHANTE-CHATTISGARH ZEE 24 TAAS ZEE BANGLA NEWS ZEE BOLLYWOOD ZEE BUSINESS ZEE CAFE ZEE CINEMA ZEE GUJARATI NEWS ZEE KANNADA ZEE MARATHI NEWS ZEE NEWS UTTAR PRADESH ZEE NEWS ZEE NEXT ZEE PUNJABI NEWS ZEE PUNJABI PLUS ZEE RX ZEE SPORTS ZEE STUDIO ZEE TALKIES ZEE TAMIL ZEE TELUGU ZEE TRENDZ ZEE TV ZING ZOOM DIVA ZOOM TV

Mass Media in India

News Non-News Non-News News News News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News News News News News News Non-News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News News News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News Non-News

Disclaimer: Whereas all precaution has been taken to prepare the above list, car-

Appendices

371

riage of channels by cable TV network/ DTH/ IPTV/ HITS/ any other broadcasting platforms merely on the basis of above list shall not be valid. They are advised to conduct due diligence before retransmitting any channel on their platform. Source:http://www.mib.nic.in/ showContent.aspx?uid1=2&uid2=82&uid3=0&uid4=0&uid5=0&uid6=0&uid7=0

372

Mass Media in India

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(BROADCASTING-2007)

BROADCASTING (Europe) SIMS (Martin). Spectrum management and the EU: Liberalisation secondary trading, interference and the "toughest test of TV ". Inter Media. 35 (2); May 2007; G-10. Discusses the present state of spectrum managementt across the countries of the European Union. BROADCASTING, BBC SACHDEVA (Gautam). Badlauv Ke daur mein BBC. Dainik Jagran. 13 December 2007; 8. A critical appraisal of BBC's plan to shift BBC Hindi Service and Internet service to Delhi. BROADCASTING AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PALIWAL (Gauri). Internet radio our internet T. V. Kadambini. 47 (4); February 2007; 26. Gives a brief account of the history and working of internet radio and internet television. BROADCASTING, BILL (India) BABURAJAN (K). Blurred vision. Voice & Data. 14 (2); August 2007; 22-24, 26. Highlights the recommendations of the draft Broadcasting Services Regulation Bill 2007. Also gives the reactions of the broadcast fraternity and the impact of these recommendations on the Broadcasting industry. BAJPAI (Shailaja). Shadow on my screen. Indian Express. 9 August 2007; 11. Critically analyses the provisions of the proposed Broadcasting Services Regulation Bill, 2007 and suggests for an independent regulatory mechanism to frame guidelines or content code for broadcast sector rather than government. GHOSH (Lakshmi B). Radio wants change in music royalty law. Asian Age. 3 July 2007; 14. Focuses on the draft Broadcasting Services Regulation Bill, 2007 which proposes multiple compulsory licenses to enable private radio channels to play songs of all music companies. BROADCASTING, CODE (India) RAY (Ashis). Don't gag news TV. Times of India. 21 December 2007; 20. Keeping in view the present broadcasting scenario discusses, whether a legislation/content code is essential for electronic media. BROADCASTING, HISTORY(India) MITRA (Ashish). Making waves . Screen. 56 (16); 9 February 2007; 28. Traces the history of news broadcasting in India. BROADCASTING, PUBLIC (India) MURALIDHARAN (Sukumar). Public ownership over the broadcast spectrum. Vidura. 44(l); Jan-Mar 2007; 22-24. Commenting on broadcast spectrum in India emphasises on the public control over the airways. MURTHY (N.V.K). Public service broadcasting : Illusion and reality. Mainstream. 45 (31) ; 21 July 2007 ; 19-21. Takes a close look at the Indian broadcast media, Akashvani and Doordarshan, owned and controlled

Bibliography

by the Government of India and referred as the public service broadcasting media. BROADCASTING, REPORTING

373

HERMAN (Francis). Broadcaster and conflicts: The need for strategic partnership in post ­ conflict mediation. Inter Media. 35 (1); February ­ March 2007; 24 - 26. Discusses the role of broadcasters in resolving conflicts and maintaining peace in the nation by serving the truth through responsible and unbiased reporting. BROADCASTING, TECHNOLOGY (India) RAKESH RAMAN. Flying in the open sky. Voice & Data. 13 (9); March 2007; 163-164, 166. Focuses on emerging technologies for digitization of broadcasting in India. RADIO TULLY (Mark). Radio is here to stay. Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007; 25-27. Comments on radio's remarkable recovery despite the challenges it faced from television and print media. RADIO (U.S.A) MI'I'RA (Ashish). Golden times. Screen. 56 (21); 16 March 2007; 24. Traces the history of radio between 1935 and 1950 in United States of America. RADIO CHANNEL, FM JHA (Pallavi). Boom time on the radio. Screen. 56(3 1); 25 May 2007; 27. Comments on the fast growing FM radio market in India. NITYA JACOB. Radio revolution. Hindu. 4 February 2007; 4. Writes about FM community radio stations set up by the NGOs and other reputed voluntary organisations in the country under the new policy announced by the government in November 2006. RADIO CHANNEL, FM SHARMA (S.P). Radio making waves. Tribune. 29 July 2007; 7. Comments on the growing popularity of FM radio in Jammu and Kashmir. WALUNJKAR (Somashukla Sinha). Honey, let's get married on FM !. Screen. 56 (18); 23 February 2007; 28. Comments on the growing popularity of FM channels, the main aim of which are to address issues of public interest besides entertainment. RADIO CHANNEL FM, COMMERCIAL KHANDELWAL (Payal). Top FM players are ready to grow. Screen. 56 (38) ; 13 July 2007 ; 27. Abraham Thomas, Chief Operating Officer of Red FM, talks about advertising on radio and the influence of new niche players on advertising revenue. RADIO, COMMUNITY BHARATI (Seerna). Paanv pasarte campus radio. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 59-61. Traces the history of campus radio which was started in India in 2004. RADIO, COMMUNITY GUIDELINES for setting up community radio stations. Voice & Data. 13 (10); April 2007; 59-60,62.

374

Mass Media in India

Gives details of guidelines approved by the Government of India for setting up of Community Radio Stations (CRS) in the country. JACOB (Nitya). Communities ride the new communication wave, Vidura, 44(1); Jan- Mar 2007; 1517. Discusses community radio which is emerging as the third wave of communication in India - print was the first and television the second. MALIK (Kanchan K). Concept and worldwide practice. Vidura.44 (1); Jan-Mar 2007; 4-7. Describes the concept of comrnunity radio and how it started in different continents of the world. VAISH (Nandini). Message of the medium. India Today. 32 (9); 5 March 2007; 66-67. Discusses how community radios are bringing in socio-economic changes by focusing on local issues and creating awareness among people. VENNIYOOR (Sajan . Evolution not revolution. Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007;18-21. Critically analyses the provisions of the new community radio policy notified by the government on 16 November 2006. RADIO, COMMUNITY AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NORONHA (Frederick). Forging an e-community. Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007; 8-10. Discusses the role played by the community radio - India mailing list in linking scattered campaigners in different parts of the country. TELEVISION (India) BAJAJ (Vikas). In India, golden age of'TV is now. Asian Age. 18 February 2007; 14 ; Deccan chronicle. 18 February 2007; 8. Discusses the fast growing television ownership and programming in India during the last five years. PACHAURI (Sudhish). Hamara aina hai T.V. Kadambini. 47 (11); September 2007; 11-16. Discusses how television broadcasting scenario has changed over the past forty - eight years. Also discusses its impact on the society. TOAST of the town. Voice & Data. 14 (1) ; July 2007 ; 68-70, 72. Reviews the growth.of Indian television industry during the financial year 2006-07. UNNIKRISHNAN (Chaya). Telly track: Tracing history, trends and milestones. Screen. 56 (53); 21 July 2007; 25-26. Traces history, trends and milestone of Indian television which has taken a marathon leap in three decades specially in the last thirteen years. TELEVISION AND CHILDREN (India) CHRISTAKIS (Dimitri). TV watching by kids: The myths and truths. Tribune. 6 January 2007; 13. Weight the pros and cons of television watching on the lives of kids. TELEVISION AND CIIILUREN (USA) ROE (Keith) and MINNEBO (Jurgen). Antecedents of adolescents' motives for television use. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 305-315. Hypothesizes that adolescents' television use for mood management is predicted by factors related to the school and family contexts.

Bibliography

TELEVISION AND ELECTIONS (USA)

375

FOX (Julia R) et al. No joke: A comparison of substance in the daily show with Jon Stewart and Broadcast Network Television coverage of the 2004 presidential election campaign. Journal of Broadcasting. & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 213-227. Examines substantive political coverage of the first presidential debate and the political conventions in 2004 on the daily show with Jon Stewart and Broadcast Television network's nightly newscasts. TELEVISION AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ABOUT technology. Hindustan Times. 31 August 2007; 2. Describes meaning, features and functioning of Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) technology. CREATING your own TV content. Hindustan Times. 31 August 2007; 1-2. Gives the salient features and advantages of Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) technology. IPTV vs cable TV. Cable Quest. 13 (12); March 2007; 58-59. Discusses the characteristics of IPTV service launched by Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd (MTNL) in metros. TELEVISION AND PUBLIC OPINION (USA) GLYNN (Carroll J). et al. When oprah intervenes: Political correlates of daytime talk show viewing. Journal of Broadcast & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 228-244. Examines the influence of daytime talk shows on public opinion formation. TELEVISION AND SOCIETY (USA) NABI (Robin L). Determining dimensions of reality: A concept mapping of the reality TV landscape. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 371-389. Examines the dimensions under lying reality based TV programmes as a first step towards uncovering the reality programming sub-groups that might exist in viewers minds and the themes that might distinguish them. PAPACHARISSI (Zizi) and MENDELSON (Andrew L). An exploratory study of reality appeal: Uses and gratifications of reality TV shows. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 355-370. Examines the reasons why individuals watch reality and considers how social and psychological antecedents influence reality TV viewing from a uses and gratifications perspective. SHIM (Jae Woong) and PAUL (Bryant). Effects of personality types on the use of television genes. Journal of `Broadcasting & Electronic Media. 51 (2); June 2007; 287-304. Examines the role of three personality characteristics Psychoticism, Extraversion and Neuroticism (PEN), on viewers' level of attention to five different genres of television programming ­ news, soap operas, reality shows, talk shows and crime dramas. TELEVISION, CABLE (India) ANAND (Arun). Gavon-kasho mein ghumte TV camre. Vidura.44 (2); April-June 2007; 55-56. Discusses the process of decentralization of' media. TV channels are also launching their regional channels to focus on rural consumers like the small city editions of riewspapers. BUDKI (Sandeep). Tightening the noose. Voice & Data. 14(5); November 2007; 116. Writes about Telecom Regulatory Authority of India's (TRAI ) amendments to the provisions of the

376

cable services in non CAS (Conditional Access System) areas.

Mass Media in India

CAS roll out VI : A new era begins. Cable Quest 13 (11); February 2007; 34-35,38-39. Assesses the state of cable television in the four metros where Conditional Access System (CAS) has been implemented by the government. CAS to speed up digital migration. Cable Quest. 13 (11 ); February 2007; 43, 46. Reports how CAS's successful implementation has given Telecom Regulatory Authority of India a magic wand to shape the cable industry in a digital format of operation. TELEVISION, CABLE (India) JHA (Nilabh). Riding on CAS. Voice & Data. 13(11); May 2007- 74-75. Discusses how the implementation of' Conditional Access System will increase the production of indigenous set-top boxes (STBS) in the wake of a strong demand from the cable and DTH consumers. MISRA (Nripendra). Nothing conditional about CAS. Screen. 56(12); 19 January 2007; 23. Discusses how the Conditional Access System (CAS) implemented in 2006 will benefit the television viewers and the television industry MITRA (Ashish). SAB TV gets young. Screen. 57 (12); 7 December 2007, 21. Writes about SAB TV, a channel known for its comedy shows, has changed to youth specific serials, after its acquisition by Sony Entertainment Television. MITRA (Ashish). Zee Network launches Zee Next. Screen. 57 (14); 21 December 2007; 21. Tarun Mehra Operating Head of Zee Entertainment Enterprises Ltd (ZEEL) which has launched its second general Entertainment channel - Zee Next to cater to the needs of the younger section of the audience. RAYMACKERS (Thierry). Digital migration in India. Cable Quest. 13 (11) ; February 2007; 50-51, 54. Defines the fundamentals of digital cable technology. TELEVISION, CABLE (India) ROOPINDER SINGH. CAScading effect: TV viewers will be spoiled for choice. Tribune. 5 January 2007; 11. Discusses the impact of Conditional Access System (CAS) on the television industry which has more than 25,000 cable operators and about 65 million cable viewers in India. SHARMA (Roop). Revenue sharing forimula for service providers in CAS areas. Cable Quest. 13 (12); March 2007; 43-44, 46. Examines the revenue sharing formula for service providers in the light of the changing scenario of the cable television operation in India. UDASI (Harshikaa). Tube's tombola. Week. 26 (5); 24 December 2007; 70-74. Throws light on the programme plans of satellite channels for the year 2008 to woo their audience. UNNIKRISIINAN (Chaya). News channel for youth. Screen. 57 (14); 21 December 2007; 21. Anurradha Prasad, Managing Director, BAG Films and Media, talks about her recently launched news channel -- News 24 and its shows for young adults. VOLUNTARY implementation of CAS. Cable Quest. 13 (12); March 2007; 38-39,42.

Bibliography

377

Gives details of new model developed by TRAI sub-group, for voluntary implementation of Conditional Access System (CAS) in order to speed up the digitalization of cable television in India. TELEVISION, CABLE (India) WALUNJKAR (Somashukla Sinlia). Licensing their way into living rooms. Screen. 56(28); 4 May 2007; 28. A report on Indian television channels that are waking up to the magic of merchandising and licensing which has become an important alternate; source of revenue for entertainment industry. WALUNJKAR (Somashukla Sinha). Shopping for blockbusters. Screen. 56 (26); 20 April 2007; 28. Discusses why Indian movie channels often pay very high prices to acquire satellite rights of the latest Hindi film. TELEVISION, CABLE (India-South) MATHEWS (A. Saj). Party tiine for channels. Tribune. 30 September 2007; 1,7 A look at the phenomenal growth of vernacular private television channels in southern part of India. TELEVISION, CABLE, NEWS CHANNELS MURTHY (C.S.H.N). News of haste. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 35-37. Analyses the format adapted by channels like Aaj Tak, Headlines Today and NDTV (both Hindi and English) with regard to showing headlines every half-an-hour. TELEVISION, CABLE, NEWS CHANNELS PRABHAT RANJAN. Sama bhi manoranjan hai. Vidura (Hindi).44(2); April-June 2007; 41-44. A critical analysis of contents of satellite news channels of television. VYAS (Deepak). Sansani, par sawar news channel : Is samachar ki prayojak hai TRP. Nai Duniya. 25 March 2007; 1. A critical appraisal of satellite news channels. TELEVISION, CABLE, PROGRAMME CHOUGULE; (A.L). Need to regulate television content. Screen. 56 (18); 23 February 2007; 23. Expresses concern over the contents of television programmes aired by cable channels and suggests to set up a regulatory body to regulate television content which is not suitable for family viewing. HEADING towards TV censorship...! Another political gimmick or real moral policing. Cable Quest. 13 (12); March 2007; 47-48. Comments on the governments decision to ban AXN channel for showing indecent contents. Also suggests to constitute a separate body to monitor contents of TV programmes like Central Board of Film Certification for films and Press Council of India for print media. TELEVISION, CABLE, PROGRAMME NEGI (S.S). SC to examine media role in agitations. Tribune. 5 July 2007 ; 11. Examines the role of media, particularly the television news channels, in the coverage of agitations. VASANTI (P.N). It is perverse to view rules for TV as moral policing. Screen. 56 (17); 16 February 2007; 23. Commenting on the present broadcasting scenario in the country emphasizes on a content code in order to protect viewers from exposure to unsolicited material that they find offensive.

378

TELEVISION, CABLE, STING OPERATION

Mass Media in India

BROADCASTING Bill: cure worse than the ills. Tribune. 12 September 2007; 12. Citing the example of recent three sting operations which exposed a trible MP, a school teacher and Monica Bedi, suggests for a content code for the electronic media as the present Broadcasting Regulation Bill, 2007 is also unable to address such ills. DUTT (Barkha). A tale in the sting. Hindustan Times. 8 September 2007; 12. Condemns the television expose on a Delhi school teacher and advocates for a code of conduct and self scrutiny system to distinguish between good and bad journalism. TELEVISION, CABLE, STING OPERATION PUNJ (Balbir). Jhoot ki sansanikhej kahani. Dainik Jagran. 11 September 2007; 8. Critically analyses television private channels programmes and suggests for a content code for television media. SURYA PRAKASH (A). 24 X 7 channels lack ethics. Pioneer. 11 September 2007; 6. Criticises the working of media organizations in the light of sting operation conducted by a private television channel to expose a school teacher. THAKUR (Ramesh). Media ka daayra, tay hona chaaheeye. Rashtriya Sahara. 19 September 2007' 10. Priyaranjan Das Munshi, Minister for Information & Broadcasting, expresses his reaction on the sting operation which exposed a school teacher. TELEVISION, COMMERCIAL DANGOR (Kimi). Hinterland hits. India Today. 32(20); 21 May 2007; 88-89. Focuses on the changing face of television advertising which are now using more and more regional dialects in their commercials. TELEVISION, PROGRAMME, NEWS ADAMS (Terry). Producers, directors and horizontal communication in television news production. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 51 (2); June 2007; 337-354. Examines the horizontal communication between producers and directors as they put together a television newscast. TELEVISION, PROGRAMME, PRODUCTION CHOUGULE (A.L). Back in action. Screen. 56 (47); 14 September 2007; 23. Prem Krishen, Chairman of Cinevistaas, the first television production house speaks about company's troubled times and future Plans which is celebrating its silver jubilee this year. TELEVISION, PROGRAMME, VIEWERSHIP HOW the world watches television. Hindu. 20 June 2007; 13. Studies the television viewership trends in countries like China, India, Great Britain, France and United States of America. TELEVISION, PROGRAMME, VIEWERSHIP, ABROAD SINGLETON (Angela). Desi invasion. Statesman. 24 June 2007; 12-13. Writes how Indian television programming is making history in terms of viewer participation in the United Kingdom.

Bibliography

TELEVISION, SATELLITE

379

S. NIHAL SINGH. Potentials of satellite TV. Tribune. 16 January 2007; 10. Citing the example of international channel CNN and Qatar based Al-Jazeera, discusses the potentials of satellite television.. TELEVISION, TECHNOLOGY AHMED SHAIKH. The high-definition itch. Digit. 7(1); January 2007; 35-38. Looks at some of the numerous high-definition technologies available. Also discusses the pros and cons of each technology. (THE) CUSTOMER is king. Voice & Data. 13 (8); February 2007; 50, 52. Looks at the challenges faced by the customers who booked Direct-toHome (DTH) connections from Tata Sky and also those who opted for Conditional Access System (CAS) launched by the government. JHA (Vivekanand). Interactive digital television. Cable Quest. 13 (12) ; March 2007; 66-69. Describes the main features of interactive digital television which enables the convergence of many types of media. OLSON (Jim). Beyond IPTV-Why plain old television won't cut it for telcos. Cable Quest. 13 (11); February 2007; 72-73. Elaborates salient features of IPTV, the most advanced system providing the best features in terms of choice interactivity and mobility. TELEVISION, TECHNOLOGY PANDEY (Prateek). Aa gaya hai television dekhne naya jamana. Kadambini. 47 (4); 24-25. Discusses how new technologies like Direct-to-Home (DTH) and Conditional Access System (CAS) introduced in many parts of the Country will revolutionise the television broadcasting in India. RAO (Malovika). Coming attraction : HDTV. Voice & Data. 13 (8); February 2007; 46-49. Gives a brief account of High Definition Television (HDTV) service launched in United States Europe, Japan and Asia Pacific region (APAC) during 2005-2006. Also throws light on HDTV scenario in India. TELEVISION, VIEWERSHIP SURVEY KRISHNAN (L.V). First ever peep into the TV viewing habits of the elite. Cable Quest. 13 (11); February 2007; 58-59. Presents the findings of a survey conducted by audience measurement company TAM India, to study the television viewership behavior of the elite audiences in Mumbai and Delhi.

380

Mass Media in India

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(CINEMA ­ 2007)

CINEMA HALLS ARJUN SINGH (Jai). Screen time. Outlook (Delhi city Limits). 3 (9); September 2007; 16-18, 20-25. As the success of a cinema hall depends on a combination of many factors, many single screen halls are changing to multiplexes in Delhi. CHATTERJEE (Saibal). A decade on, multiplexes still have some way to go. Screen. 56 (32) ; 1 June 2007; 2,8. Discusses whether the exponential increase in the number of multiplexes had the desired effect on the overall quality of Indian cinema during the past ten years of its existence. JHA (Pallavi). A multiplex in all cities. Screen. 56 (15) ; 2 February 2007; 11. Focuses on the growth of multiplexes which are exploring new ways of attracting audiences. FILM, ACTING, STUNT SHARA ASHRAF. License to thrill. Asian Age. 29 July 2007; 33. Writes about stunt artistes of Hindi cinema who are also doing stunt shows to popularise the art of stunts in India. FILM AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DATTA (Sudipta). Now showing on the net. Screen. 56 (45); 31 August 2007; 27. Discusses whether blogs on films will change the till-now closed film industry as it establishes a direct contact with the fans and direct communication is a powerful medium. MITRA (Ashok). Enhancing visual effects. Screen. 56 (40) ; 27 July 2007 ; 28. Excerpts from the interview of Siddhartha Jain, Managing Director, Avitel Post Studios Ltd, in which he discusses the new digital intermediate technology being randomly used to give special visual effects to films. SACHDEV (Radhika). Net gain for movies. Screen. 56 (32) ; 1 June 2007; 27. Citing the example of Hindi films Guru, Don, Nishabd and Honey Moon Travels which have been promoted aggressively on the internet, discusses the role of lnternet in movie promotion and marketing. FILM AND NATIONAL INTEGRATION VISVA NATHAN (Shiv). Popcorn nationalism. India Today. 32 (33); 20 August 2007; 90-92, 94. Assesses the role played by Hindi cinema to promote unity and national integration in the country. FILM AND WOMEN BISWAS (Nilosree). Mirror, mirror... Who am I? . Deccan Herald. 15 September 2007; 1. Analyses the depiction of women in Indian films. CHATTERJEE (Saibal). Focus female. Screen. 56(28); 4 May 2007; 31. Gives a brief account of a new breed of young women filmmakers who are carving a strong niche for themselves in the film industry. DHAWAN (M.L). Mother of stereotypes. Tribune. 19 August 2007; 8. Discusses how the portrayal of the mother on screen has undergone a drastic transformation over the years.

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FILM, ANIMATION APARNA HARISH. Cartoons go classic. Telegraph. 21 January 2007; 3.

381

Taking into account the popularity of animation series for television such as Mowgli, Tenali Raman, Chhota Birbal and film Hanunran, comments on the future of animation films in India. BANERJEE (Indrani Rajkhowa). New kids on the block !. Times of India. 15 July 2007; 3. Assesses the growth of animation films in the light of their growing popularity among grown ups. CHANANA (Aashish). Magic of Indian animation. Screen. 56 (22); 23 March 2007; 28. Reveals the insights of India's first 3-D character generated animated film Magic. GUPTA (Ruchi). Producer's best friend. Screen. 56 (38) ; 13 July 2007; 28. Comments on the growing popularity of animation films in India after the release of films like Krissh, Hanumun and My Friend Ganesha. JOSHI (Namrata). Spidersonic. Outlook. 47(22); 28May 2007; 66-67. Writes about Sam Raimi's film Spider-Man 3 which has amassed Rs. 33.5 crore in seven days and set a record opening week collection for a foreign film in India. Incidentally, the film has also set a record internationally of $382 million weekend collections worldwide. KALRA (Vandana). Toon is catching on. Indian Express. 20 March 2007; 6. A report on the fast growing animation industry. MEHROTRA (Mohim). No kidding. Times of India. 6 December 2007; 1. Writes about mythological animation films that proved to be a huge success and have turned the whole market upside down. MITRA (Ashish) Unique blend. Screen. 56 (42) ; 10 August 2007 ; 28. Tilak Shetty, Animation Director of Graphiti, explains how characters are designed for the film Cash in which action and animation has been blended for the first time in India. MITRA (Ashish). Animated ode. Screen. 56 (54); 28 September 2007; 28. Smita Maroo of VP Animation Division, shares her views about Shemaroo Entertainment's fully animated 3D film Bal Ganesh. NAYARE ALI. Animated action. Asian Age. 24 June 2007; 33. Deccan Chronicle. 24 June 2007; 1. Explains the reasons for the growth of animation industry in India after the release of aniniation film Hanuman which was a big hit. PRASHANT SINGH. Toon typhoon to hit 70mm. Asian Age. 10 January 2007; 21. Gives a briefaccount of cartoon feature films being produced by major production houses and producers, most of them based on mythological characters, to be released this year. SAWHNEY (Anubha). Bolywood biggies get animated about toons. Times of India. 2 September 2007; 21. Assesses the phenomenal growth of animated films in India. WADEHRA (Randeep). New look Hanuman. Tribune. 23 December 2007; 8. Discusses how the influx of latest technology in the field of movie making has, given tremendous fillip to the production of full length animated feature films in India.

382

FILM, ANIMATION, CONFERENCE

Mass Media in India

MITRA (Ashish). Exploring filmmaking synergy. Screen. 57 (4); 12 October 2007; 28. Proceedings of the First AITF (Animation of Interactive Technology Forum) conference held in Mumbai. The central theme of the conference was `How do studio imbibe a technology sensibility that will enable better production quality and efficiency'. FILM, ANIMATION, TRAINING SUBRAMANIAN (T.S ). Animated sector. Frontline. 24 (15); 10 August 2007; 118, 120. Taking into account the future prospects of animation industry in India, focuses on the Chennai ­ based animation companies which are offering specialised courses in animation related techniques. FILM, ARCHIVE PAL (Barnali). Neglect makes classics fade out. Asian Age. 17 July 2007 ; 23. Explains why Indian classics including regional films are rarely availaible in the country. FILM, ARCHIVES, NATIONAL MEHTA (Sunanda). The writing on the reel. Screen. 57 (8); 9 November 2007; 3 l. Writes about National Film Archives of India's (Pune) rare collection of film journals since the release of first Indian talkie in 1931. These journals are an authentic account of the evolution of contemporary Indian cinema. FILM, AWARDS FILMFARE Awards. Filmfare. 56 (4); April 2007; 66-108. A report on the 52nd Annual hair one Filmfare Awards, 2006. FILM, AWARDS, OSCARS GERMAIN (David). Scleroses finally scores. Asian Age. 27 February 2007; 12. A report on the seventy - ninth Academy Awards announced on 26th February 2007 in Hollywood, California. FILM, AWARDS, SCREEN SCREEN Awards 2006. Screen. 56(12); January 2007; 19-34. A report on the Hero Honda thirteenth Annual Star Screen Awards announced on 6 January 2007 in Mumbai. FILM, BILL CHATTOPADHYAY (Shibani). Lights, action, funds. Telegraph. 18 April 2007; 11. Reports whether the Cinema Artists' Welfare Bill, 2006, introduced by Jaya Prada, Member of Parliament, will improve the working conditions of the junior artists who are employed by the film industry. FILM, BIOGRAPHY(Asia) ALBERT MOSES: Surviving critics. By Mathures Paul. Statesman. 10 November 2007; 2. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (Great Britain) BEBORAH KERR: Yesterday qeen By Erveil E. Menezes. Tribune. 28 October 2007; 8.

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BEN KINGSLEY: The reel Gandhi. By Sturat Jeffries. Hindustan Times. 27 October 2007; 30. REMEMBERING DAVID LEAN. Screen. 56 (15); & February 2007; 20.

383

MEDELEINE CARROLL : Toast to a real heroine. By Louise Jury. Tribune. 25 March 2007; 7. PETER O' TOOLE: Actor for all seasons. By Erve Menezes. Tribune. 13 May 2007; 8. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (India) A.K. HANGAL celebrates freedom and b'day. Interviewed by Shama Bhagat. Deccan Chronicle. 15 August 2007; 39. A.R. RAHMAN: musical journey. By Smita Sarkar. Telegraph. 29 April 2007; 6-9. AAMIR KHAN: Starlight on his palette. By Namratia Joshi. Outlook. 47 (51); 17 December 2007; 98-100. ADOOR GOPALAKRIHNAN: Compact oeuvre. By Prema Manmadhan. Hindu. l April 2007; 5. ...................All about soul. By Sangeetha Nair. Statesman 10 November 2007; 3. AKSHAY KUMAR: Bollywood hitman. By Aarti Dua. Telegraph. 18 November 2007; 6-9. AKSHAY KUMAR: Mr. Mast. By T. Krithika Reddy.Hindu. 21 December 2007; 1. AMITABH BACHCHAN. By And Rahi. Dainik Bhaskar. 13 October 2007; 2. ANIL KAPOOR : Calling the shots. By Anuj Kumar. Hindu. 9 July-2007; 4. ANUPAM KHER; Saransh was a gift from heaven'. As told to Shoma A Chatterji. Tribune. 19 May 2007; 3. ANURAG BASU: Scripting success. By Sushmita Biswas, Telegraph. 29 April 2007; 10- 11. ARUNA IRANI: Sixty three and still going strong. As told to Jyothi Venkatesh. Deccan Herald. 3 June 2007; 3. ARUP MANNA : Recognition too late. By Sangeeta Barooah Pisharoty. Hindu. 25 March 2007; 5. ASHOK KUMAR. The renaissance man. By Deepa Karmalkar. Screen. 57 (5); 19 October 2007; 30. ATUL KULKARNI: (The) World is his stage. By Utpal Borpujari, Deccan Herald. 20 May 2007; 3. BAPPI LAHIRI, `We've created history. By Roshmila Bhattacharya.Screen. 56 (39) ; 20 July 2007; 5. BEGUM PARA Graph ! By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 57 (10); 23 November 2007; 30. UNFORGETTABLE BIMAL ROY. By M.L. Dhawan. Tribune. 7 January 2007;.8. BISWAJIT : Prince charming. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56(12); 19 January 2007; 30-31. BUDDADEB DASGUPTA: Random harvest. By Shoma A Chatterji Statesman. 16 September 2007; 1. CHETAN ANAND: Maker of innovative, meaningful movies. By Randor Guy. Hindu. 15 June 2007; 1. ...........................Art for heart's sake. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56 (38) ; 13 July 2007; 30. CHITRAGUPT : Man from Chhapra. By R. M. Patwardhan. Hindustan Times. 8 July 2007 ; 13. DANNY DENZONGPA: The Sikkimese storm. By Deepa Karmalkar. Screen. 56 (46); 7 September 2007; 30.

384

Mass Media in India

DARA SINGH: Wrestling with fame. By Deepa Karmalkar. Screen. 57 (12); 7 December 2007; 30. DATTA RAM : The genius from Goa. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (37); 6 July 2007; 25. DEBU BHATTACHARYA : Wide area network. Statesman. 11 August. 2007; IV. DEV ANAND: By Ajit Duara. Hindu. 18 February 2007; 2. ..................................... `Making films is my passion'. By Mohan Sahay. Tribune. 23 September 2007; 8. DHANANJOY MANDAL: Mela will revive memories. By Shoma A Chatterji. Screen. 56 (15); 2 February 2007; 19. DHARMENDRA: Evergreen. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56 (36); 29 June 2007 ; 9. DWARAKISH : Changing times. By Chaitanya. Screen. 57 (5); 19 October 2007; 16. FRANK FERNAND: Father of Konkani films passes away. By Ashish Mitra. Screen. 56 (25); 13 April 2007; 18. G.L. BHARADWAJ : Eye opener. By Namita Niwas. Screen. 56 (22); 23 March 2007; 18. GHULAM ALI : The golden ghulam. By Shaheen Raj. Screen. 57 (5); 19 October 2007; 25. GOUTAM GHOSE : Journey of his own. By Santanu Ganguly. Telegraph. 4 February 2007; 10- 11. GULSHAN BAWARA on a comeback trail. By Shishir Prashant. Deccan Heralaid. 15 September 2007; 3. ..............................: Verse effect. By Deepa `Karmalkar. Screen. 56 (37); 6 July 2007 ; 30. GULZAR : In full bloom. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56(12); 19 January 2007; 25. ..................: A lyrics genius. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Deccan Herald. 4 March 2007; 25. ..................Words are all he has. By Sudeshna Banerjee. Telegraph. 1l January 2007; 25. GURU DUTT: Remembering a genius. By Vidyarthy Chatterjee. Statesman. 19 October 2007; 14. HARIHARAN : Fusion power. By Prornita Mukherjee. Telegraph. 11 February 2007; 6 -9. HEMA MALINI : Ek sapne ki wapsi. By Mahesh Bhatt. Dainik Bhaskar. 17 March 2007; 4. HEMANT, KUMAR: That velvet touch. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (54); 28 September 2007; 25. HIMESH RESHAMMIYA : Zara zoom zoom. By Namrata Joshi. Outlook. 47 (31) ; 30 July 2007 ; 54-55. INDEEVAR : Memories of a master. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (19); 2 March 2007; 25. IRFAN KHAN: A mighty talented actor. Deccan Herald. 28 October 2007; 2. JAGJIT SINGH :Keeper of timeless melodies By AditiTandon. Tribune. 10 March 2007, 2. .........................: Music for the soul. By Aditi Tandon. Tribune. 15 April 2007;1. JATIN PANDIT: Charting success. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56 (54); 28 September 2007; 25. JAYAPRADA: A woman of today. Interviewed by Srikanth Srinivasa. Deccan Herald. 11 Noveniber 2007; 2. JAYASHREE T- time. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 57 (14); 21 December 2007; 31. JESH KRISHNA MURTHY: VFX Guru. By Ashish Mitra. Screen. 57 (5); 19 October 2007; 28.

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JOHNNY LEVER : Art of splitting sides. By Kajari Bhattacharya. Statesman. 10 August 2007; IV. K.K. MAHAJAN : Enduring image. By Partha Chatterjee. Frontline. 24 (15); 10 August 2007; 87-88. KAIFI AZMI, `Kuchh diI ne kahna..........Screen. 56(29); 11 May 2007; 30. KAMINI KAUSHAL : Never say good bye. By Meera Joshi. Filmfare. 56 (9); September 2007; 116 119. KAMINI KAUSHAL : Different strokes. By Raijv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (19); 2 March 2007; 30.

KHAYYAM, `Music has to touch the soul'. Interviewed by Ziya us Salam. Hindu. 8 June 2007 ; 1. KISHORE KUMAR : The child who never grew up. By Rubina P. Banerjee. Cine Blitz. 33 (10); October 2007; 134-136, 138. UNFORGETTABLE KISHORG By Avijit Ghosh. Times of India. 7 October 2007; 8. LATA MANGESKAR Conquering the scale. By Bhawana Somaaya. Screen. 56 (32); 1 June 2007 ; 30. ............................is a living legend. Free Press Journal. 29 September 2007; 17. .............................:The nightingale speaks. By Piyush Roy. Screen 56 (45); 31 August 2007; 30. VINTAGE LATA. By Santosh Subramaniam. Screen. 56 (55); 5 October 2007; 25. MADAN MOHAN : A maestro remembered. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (37) ; 6 July 2007 ; 25. ....................................:The emperor of ghazals. By Nelson Pereira. Free Press Journal. 17 October 2007; 19. MADHURI DIXIT : Beauty and the best. Telegraph. 6 January 2007; 19. MAGICAL MAIA SINHA. By Deepa Karmalkar. Screen. 56 (20); 9 March 2007 ; 30. MAMMOOTTY : The ageless wonder. By Manoj Nair. Economic Times. 28 July 2007 ; 18. MANORAMA : An achiever all through. By Malathi Rangaraian. Hindu. 5 January 2007; 3. MANNA DEY : Sur sadhak. By Jaiprakash Chokse. Dainik Bhaskar. 14 July 2007, 15. THE sheer genius of MEHMOOD MUMTAZ ALI. By Shweta Kulkarni. Cine Blitz. 33 (8); August 2007 ; 110-112, 114, 116. MIKE PANDEY: His wild ways By Sumanaspati. Hindu. 27 Nuvember 2007; 6. MOHAMMED RAFI: The ring of melody. By Binu Nair. Screen. 56 (28); 4 May 2007; 30. ............................: 27 carat gold. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (41); 3 August 2007; 30. MUBARAK BEGUM : House of heartbreaks. By Bhawana Somaaya. Screen. 56 (26); 20 April 2007; 30. MUKUL ANAND. Master of foresight By. Ashish Mitra. Screen. 57 (6); 26 October 2007; 30. NABENDU GHOSH : Back to the classics. As told to Roshmila Bhattachrya. Screen 56 (23) 30 March 2007; 30. NAGESH : Behind that humorous veneer. By Malathi Rangarajan. Hindu. 27 July 2007 ; 1. NA. MUTHUKUMAR : Pearls of emotions. By Malathi Rangarajan. Hindu. 2 February 2007; 3. NASEERUDIN SHAH : jaisa koi nahin. By javrimal Parekh. Kadambini. 47 (8); June 2007 ; 28-31. .............................: Playing tough. By Ayesha Matthan. Hindu. 10 Nuvember 2007; 1.

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Mass Media in India

NAUSHAD: Master of great Indian ragas. By Nelson Pereira. Free Press Journal. 7 November 2007; 21. O.P. NAYYAR : Khamosh ho gaya sangeet ka sur. Rashtriya Sahara. 29 January 2007; 14. .............................: Milestones of a maestro. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (16); 9. February 2007; 25. THE genius of O.P. NAYYAR. By M.L. Dhawan. Tribune. 4 February 2007; 8. SANGEET ke jaadugar the O.P. NAYYAR. By Sharad Dutt. Kadambini. 48 (2); December 2007; 3032. OM PURI run. By Smita Sarkar. Telegraph. 2 September 2007; 12. P.C. SREERAM : Through the master's lens. Interviewed by Sangeetha . Devi. Hindu. 7 June ?007 ; 1. PIYUSH PANDEY and PRASOON JOSHI What's the big idea. By Parag Rabade. Deccan Herald. 9 December 2007; 1. PRAN. By Bunny Reuben. Screen. 56 (16); 9 February 2007; 30. PRASOON JOSHI and PIYUSH PANDEY : What's the big idea. By Parag Rabade. Deccan Herald. 9 December 2007; 1. PRAYAG RAJ :The heart of the matter. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (36); 29 June 2007 ; 30. PRIYA DARSHAN: Just for laughs. By Avinash Kalla Times of'India. 16 September 2007: 3. PYARELAL: The return note. By Piyush Roy. Screen. 56 (47); 14 September 2007; 30. RADHAKRISHNAN : Into realms of the past. By Malathi Rangarajan. Hindi.19 January 2007; 8. RAJ KAPOOR: The Ultimate showman. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Scrcen. 57 (14);.21 Decemher 2007; 30. RAJNIKANTH: Back in sttle. By Kavitha Muralidharan. Week. 25 (30); 24 June 2007 ; 92, 94. ................................................: The boss. By Arup Chanda. Tribune. 24 June 2007; 1,8. ................................................: The boss. By Lakshmi Subramanian. India Today. 35 (27); 9 July 2007; 52-55. .................................................:King airbrushed. By S. Anand. Outlook. 47 (26) ; 25 June 2007; 6062. ................................................South's shining star. By Kalyani Shankar. Pioneer. 13 July 2007.; 7 RAJNI'S rage. By R Bhagwan Singh. Deccan Chronicle. 1 July 2007 ; 1; Asian Age. 1 July 2007 ; 33. RAMESH DEO and SEEMA DEO : Fifty years of togetherness. By Namita Nivas. Screen. 56 (19); 2 march 2007; 17. REKHA ke abhinay ki koi seema-rekha hai! By Kanan Jhingan. Kadambini 47 (12); October 2007; 93-95. RITWIK GHATAK Jinxed legacy. By Partha Chatterjee Frontline. 24 (20); 19 October 2007; 93-95. SABYASACHI MAHAPATRA: Divine designor. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56 (39) ; 20 July 2007 ; 18. SAJID-WAJID harmony. By Namita Nivas. Screen. 56 (43); 17 August ; 25.

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SALIL CHOWDHURY: A genious remembered. By Shoma A Chatterji. Statesman. 23 November 2007; 10. SAMEER: Lessons of life. Screen. 56 (18); 23 February 2007; 30. SAMIR CHANDA: Turning point. By Shoma A Chatterji. Screen. 57 (14); 21 December 2007; 16. SARIKA : From poster girl to parzania. Week. 25 (12); 18 February 2007; 88-89. ........................: `Life has taught me a lot............'. Tells to Jyothi Venkatesh. Deccan Herald. 6 May 2007; 3. SAROJA DFVI : A Kannada queen, Who ruled in four languages. By Veena Bharathi. Deccan Herald. 2 January 2007; 9. SHAAN : Straight speak. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56(12); 26 January 2007; 25. SHABANA AZMI, `I' m primarily a cinema actor'. By Mila Kapur. Hindu. 18 March 2007; 5. SHANKAR - JAIKISHAN :Twice as good. By R.M. Patwardhan. Hindustan Times. 15 July 2007; 17. SHASHIKALA : Positive all the way. By Rajiv Vijaykar. Deccan Herald. 8 July 2007 ; 3. ..............................: Peace and contentment. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen 56(31); 25 May 2007; 30-31. SHYAM BENEGAL, `I am still making films. By Ziya us Salam. Hindu 19 August 2007; 1 ..............................: Smantar cinema ke srijak. Rashtriya Sahara. 9 August. 2007; 11. ..................................: In tune with the times. By Partha Chatterjee. Frontline. 24 (17); 7 September 2007; 37-40. GAMBHIR filmkaar hain SHYAM BENEGAL. By Govind Nihalani. Kadambini 47 (12); October 2007; 65-66. SHEERSH par. SHYAM. Rashtriya Sahara. 10 August 2007; 10. SITARA DEVI : Dancing Queen. Nai Duniya. l0 March 2007; 2. SOUMITRA CHATTERJEE : All-rounder. By Roshmila Battacharya. Screen. 56 (35); 22 June 2007 ; 30. ..................................... : Road to another milestone. By Trara Muzik. Statesman. 15 June 2007 ; 10. SOUMITRA RANADE : Animation allows you to dream. By Kavitha S Daniel. Hindu. 24 July 2007; 1. SOWCAR JANAKI: Inimitable actress. By C.V. Aravind. Deccan Herald. 20 May 2007;3. SUBHASH GHAI : Passion tower. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 57 (7); 2 November 2007; 30. SUDITIR MISHRA : A leading director. By Sarbanti Chakrabarti Deccan Herald. 18 February 2007; 3. SUKHWINDER DHANJAL : Rebel with a cause. By Roshmila Bhattacharya. Screen. 56 (44); 4 August 2007; 16. SUMAN TALWAR : The Villain' is back... with a bang ! By W. Sreelalitha Hindu. 17 August 2007; 1. TARUN MAJUMDAR: Moon lighting. By Shoma A Chatterji. Screen. 57 (12); 7 December 2007; 17.

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Mass Media in India

USHA UTHUP : Pathbreaker. By Rajiv Vijayakar. Screen. 56 (21); 16 March 2007; 22. VANMALA remembered. By Anuradha Mane. Screen. 56 (34); 15 June 2007 ; 17. VICTOR BANERJEE : Living on the edge. By Anuj Kumar. Hindu. 4 July 2007 ; 8. VIDHU VINOD CHOPRA : Bollywood's Mr maverick. By Kaveree Bamzai. India Today. 32 (9); 5 March 2007; 60-62, 64. VIJAY BHATT : The great sage of Indian cinema. By Deepa Karmalkar. Screen. 56 (34); 15 June 2007; 30. VIKRAM GOKHALE : Powerhouse. By Shailaja Bajpai. Screen. 56 (23); 30 March 2007; 23. WAHEEDA REHMAN : Sundar our Sampuran abhinetri hain. By Kanan Jhingan. Kadambini. 47(3); January 2007; 56-58. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (General) DHAWAN (M.L). Queens of hearts. Tribune. 9 December 2007; 8. Looks at Hindi film heroines who left a mark and changed the face of Indian cinema in their own way. INDIA shining. Screen. 56 (43); 17 August 2007; 14. Gives a brief biographical sketch of the most influential actors who have ruled the Hindi cinema during the last sixty years (1947-2007). VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). The singing stars. Screen. 56 (39); 20 July 2007; 26. Gives a brief account of singing stars of Hindi cinema. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (Italy) FNNIO MORRICONE : Maestro of movies, historian of sound. By Jon, Pareles. Asian Age. 17 February 2007; 7. MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI : Seductive power of the boring and the beautiful. By Pritish Nandy. Economic Times. 4 August 2007; 5. ......................................Style and subtlety. By David Thomson. Frontline. 24 (16) ; 24 August 2007 ; 87 - 88. ........................................`S: gaze...By Sian Stott. Telegraph. 2 August 2007; 10. ..........................................and INGMAR BERGMAN : Directors who brought art into 70 mm cinema. By A.O. Scott. Asian Age. 9 August 2007; 15. MICHELANGELO ANTONIONI and INGMAR BERGMAN : The giants of cinema are all gone now. By Philip Hensher. Statesman. 3 August 2007; 7. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (Pakistan) RAGINI : Safar tanha umar tanha. By Zahida Hina. Dainik Bhaskar. 18 March 2007; 4. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (Russia) JULIE CHRISTIE : An Unforgettable performer. By V.Gangadhar Hindu.18 May 2007; 7. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (Sweden) INGMAR BERGMAN : Autumn Sonata falls silent. By Mervyn Rothstein. Telegraph. 31 July 2007; 2. ........................................: Cinematic maestro is dead. Hindu 31 July 2007; 24.

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.........................................: Creator and a craftsman. By Anand Parthasarathy. Hindu. 3 August 2007; 5. ........................................: Inward search. By Ajit Duara. Hindu. 12 August 2007; 5. INGMAR BERGMAN : Joke but not a joke. By Stephen Holden. Week. 25 (38) ; 19 August 2007; 68, 70. .............................: Legendary Swedish film maker. By Luise Nordstom. Econonmic Times. 31 July 2007; 24. .............................: Poet with camera dies. By Mervyn Rothstein. Asian Age. 31 July 2007 ; 12. ..............................:Soul out. By Vikramaditya Motwane. Economic Times. 4 August 2007, 15. BERGMAN'S World. By Parthna Chatterjee. Frontline. 24 (16); 24 August 2007; 82 ­ 86. LEGENDARY filmmaker BERGMAN dead. Free Press Journal. 31 July 2007 ; 21. REMEMBERING a titan INGMAR BERGMAN By Rachit Gupta. Sceern. 56 (42) ; 10 August 2007; 30. INGMAR BERGMAN and MICHELANGLO ANTONIONI : Directors Who brought art into 70 mm cinema. By A.O Scott. Asian Age. August 2007; 15. FILM, BIOGRAPHY (USA) BRUCE WILLIS : Almighty. By Sailesh Ghelani. Fimfare. 56 (6) ; June 2007; 116 - 117. FRANCIS FORD COPPOLA' turn as an upstart filmmaker. By A.O. Scott. Asian Age. 17 September 2007; 15. GORDON SCOTT: (The), `Lord of the jungle'. By V.Gangadhar. Hindu. 11 May 2007; 13. JOHN WAYNE: Quintessential, cowboy. By Janardhan Roye.Hindu. 27 May 2007; 5. KATHERINE HEPBURN: Even at 100, we don't know.Times of India. 11 May 2007;36. NORMAN MAILER : Advertisements for himself. By A.O. Scott. Hindustan Times. 4 August 2007; 26. PAUL NEWMAN : Blue-eyed legend. By Vikramdeep Johal. Tribune. 3 June 2007 ; 8. SIDNEY LUMET: After fifty years and forty four films, still no time for sentimentality. By Dennis Lim. Asian Age. 3 November 2007; 8. FILM, BUDGET SMALL SHAH (Gouri). Film production houses target small budget films. Hindustan Times. 8 November 2007; 27. Discusses why film production houses are setting up separate divisions/companies for small budget films. FILM, CHILDREN DHAWAN (M.L;. Story of reel children. Tribune. 23 September 2007; 8. Writes about the children's films right from the 1950s Jagriti to the recent The Blue Umbrella where children have played significant roles. PRASHANT SINGH. Kiddie films take giant leap. Asian Age. 19 July 2007; 27. A report on children's movies-Taare Zameen Par By Aamir Khan, Blue Umbrella by Vishal Bhardwaj and Aladin by Sujoy Ghosh.

390

FILM, COMEDY

Mass Media in India

GUPTA (Rachit). Is the standard of our comedy films abysmally low? Screen. 57 (15); 28 December2007; 4. A debate on the standard of the comedy films. Anant Mahadevan, actor and Director, appreciate films mado. in the '60s and the `70s and among the recently released films. the Munna Bhai series and Khosla Ka Ghosla while Anee., Bazmee, Director, emphasises on an alternate approuch as the peoples taste, social norms and perceptions have changed. FILM, CONFERENCE CHATTERJI (Shoma A). Brighter sparks at the fest. Screen. 56 (23); 30 March 2007; 18. A report on the sixth International Social Communication Cinema Conference held at Nandan, Kolkata. .....................................Cinema with a purpose. Tribune. 4 March 2007; 8. Gives a brief account of the Sixth International Social Communication Cinema Conference held from 15-21 February 2007 in Kolkata. FILM, CO-OPERATIVES MITRA (Ashish). Cooperative effort. Screen. 56 (44); 24 August 2007 ; 28. Amarjeet Amle, Head of Spandan Parivar Cinema Movement (SPCM), throws light on the activities of SPCM, a voluntary organization aimed at promoting cinema and has made Humne Jeena Seekh Liya which is India's first film made by a cooperative society. FILM, DIGITAL MITRA (Ashish). Redefining entertainement. Screen. 56 (45); 31 Aujust 2007; 28. Pankaj Jaysinh, Chief Operation Officer (Coo) UFo Moviez, explains the proccess of digitizing old films and its impact on the audience and the revenue of the nation FILM, DISTRIBUTION (India) CHATTERJEE; (Mauhusree). Indian films ready for journey beyond diaspora. Tribune. 23 -December 2007; 4. Gives a brief detail of film induatry's plans for distribution and promotion of Indian films abroad. Film industry will use digital distribution networks which has an edge in terms of cost and speed. FILM, DISTRIBUTION (India - North) MITRA (Moinak) and RAGHAVENDRA (Nandini). Northern lights. Economic Times. 8 September 2007; 14. Throws light on the huge groth of Hindi cinema, largely fuelled by the tremendous growth of multiplexes and digital cinema in the northern hemisphere of India. FILM, DOCUMENTARY CHATTERJI (Shoma A). A telling documentary. Screen. 56 (18); 23 February 2007; 18. Gives a brief account of documentary Ab Aur Waqt Nahin, produced by Shape and directed by Abhijoy Karlekar on the history of adivasis. KUMAR (Meenakshi). Real-time change : Documentaries get new lease of life. Times of `India. 10 June 2007; 10. Discusses why documentary-making is now growing in India.

Bibliography

FILM, EXPO REINVENTING film technology. Screen. 56 (32); 1 June 2007; 28.

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A report on the cinema India Expo (CIL), organised by cinema system to highlight technological developments and tacts in Indian and world cinema. FILM, FESTIVAL, CHILDREN GAUR (Shveta Vashist). Children's real life captured on camera. Screen. 57 (10); 23 November 2007; 31. Gives details of a children's film festival, Child's Eye organised by Plan India at the National Film Archives, Pune. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL DARGIS (Manohla) and SCOTT (A.O). France is again centre of the film world Asian Age. 17 May 2007; 15. A report on the 60th International Film Festival of Cannes, France field from 16-27 May 2007. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (Asia) GUPTA (Rachit). Banking on massters. Screen. 57 (7); 2 November 2007; 31 Gives details of the Third Eye 6th Asian Film Festival (AFF) held in Mumbai From 2-4 November 2007. The festival focused on the Competitions, felicitations, and special screenings of films from Akira, Kurosawa, and Tapan Sinha. FILM, FESTIVAL INTERNATIONAL (Canada- Toronto) CHATTERJEE (Saibal). The TIFF principal: Go where the action is. Screen. 56 (47); 14 September 2007; 31. A report on India's participation at the thirty-second Toronto lnternational Film Festival (TIFF). RADHIKA (V). Panning it wide. Week. 25 (43); 23 September 2007; 68-69. A report on Indian entries at the thirty-second Toronto International film Festival held from 6-15 September 2007. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL, (India-Chennai) RAMNARAYAN (Gowri). Calling cineastes. Hindu. 13 December 2007; 5. A brief account of the various sections of the Chennai International Film festival which screened package of films screened at 38th IFFI (Goa). Kolkata and Trivandrurm International Film Festivals this year. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL, IFFI 38th (India - Goa) CUNHA (Uma da). Film India worldwide showcases at IFFI Goa. Screen. 57 (11); 30 November 2007; 18. Writes about the Films screened at the `Film India worldwide' section of the 38th International Film Festival of India held in Goa from 23 November ­ 3 December 2007. The purpose of this section was to connect India with the scene of international filmmaking. D' MELLO (Pamela). IFFI turned focus back to cinema. Asian Age. 6 December 2007; 15. A critical analysis of 38th edition of International Film Festival of India (lFFI) held from 23 November-- 3 December 2007 in Goa. MENEZES (Ervel E). Good show, bad pick. Tribune. 16 December 2007; 8. Compares 38th International Film Festival of India (IFFI) with that of the previous year and finds it was well organised and computerisation was the best thing that happended to IFFI.

392

FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL, IFFI 38th (India ­ Goa)

Mass Media in India

MOTIHAR (Jhilmil). Finally. just films. India Today. 32 (49); 10 December 2007; 80-81. Gives a brief account of films screened in differernt sections of the 38th International Film Festival held from 23 November-3 December 2007 in Goa. TORCATO (Ronita). 38th IFFI: A cellulold feast. Free Press Journal. 3 December 2007; 18. A report on the 38th International Film Festival of India (IFFI) held from 23 November ­ 3'December: in Goa. FILM, FESTIVAL., INTERNATIONAL (India ­ Kolkata) CHATTERJI (Shoma A). Celluloid pearls. Screen. 57 (10); 23 November 2007; 13. A report on the 13th Kolkata Film Festival held from 10 ­ 17 November 2007. Highlights of this festival was retrospective of international masters, tributes to contemporary filmmakers and a well designed exhibition of photographs besides the screening of a special package of Idian and Diaspora films. ..................................In search of truth. Statesman. 9 November 2007; 10. Writes about five Bangladeshi digital films screened at the International Forum of New cinema; a segment of the 13th Kolkata Film Festival organised by Cine Central. All these films are made by young filmmakers who are challenging the dwindling of cincma. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (Italy -Venice) MORRIS (Roderick Conway). Venice fest builds on history of surprises. Asian Age. 2 September 2007; 15. Traces the history of Venice film festival which is celebrating its seventy-fifth anniversary this year. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (MAMI) CUNHA (Uma da). MAMI's window to film India worldwide. Screen. 56 (20); 9 March 2007; 15. A report on the ninth Mumbai Academy of Moving Images (MAMI) film festival held from 8-15 March 2007 in Mumbai. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (OSIAN) AN Osian of cinema. Screen. 56 (37) ; 6.July-2007; 11. A curtain ­ raiser on the ninth Osian's Cinefan Festival, dedicated to Asian and Arab cinema, to be held in Delhi from 20-29 July 2007. BORPUJARI (Utpal). Creating cinematic culture. Deccan Herald. 12 August 2007; 2. Gives an overview of the ninth Osian's Cinefan Festival of Asian and Arab cinema held in Delhi from 20-29 July 2007. GUPTA (Rachit). Osian's ­ Forum for independent filmmakers. Screen. 56 (34); 15 June 2007; 1,10. A report on the premiere of the ninth Asian's Osian's Cinefan Film Festival held in Mumbai on 8 June 2007. LEARNING to read cinenna. Screen. 56 (40) ; 27 July 2007; 11. Glimpses at the ninth Osian's Cine Fan Festival of Asian and Arab cinema held in new Delhi from 20-29 July 2007. TUL1 (Neville). Next cinematic leap. Screen. 56 (40) ; 27 July, 2007 ; 12. Neville Tuli, Founder ­ Chairman of OSIAN Cine Fan, expresses his views on the OSIAN's Cine Fan Festival of Asian and Arab Cinema.

Bibliography

VERGHIS (Shana Maria). Asian stories, world setting. Pioneer 2 August 2007; 16.

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Looks at some of the winners in the Best film and Asian and Arab competition categories at the ninth Osian's Cinefan festival held in Delhi from 20 - 29 July 2007. FILM FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (South Korea-Pusan) CHNHA (Uma da) It pours Film goodies at pusan festival. Screen. 57 (5), 19 October 2007; 18. Gives a brief account of the 12th Pusan International Film festival held from 4-12 October 2007. The aim of the festival is to promote Asian talents worldwide and this year it has extended its spotlight to Asian actors. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL (Thailand - Bangkok) SHANKAR (Lekha J). BIFF to honour Hema Malini. Hindu. 13 July 2007; 1. A report on the Bangkok International Film Festival (BIFF) held from 19-29 July 2007. FILM, FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL, Disability RAMACHANDRAN (Parvathy). No one's excluded. Week. 25 (49); 4 November 2007; 63-64. A report on the second India International Disability Film Festival held in Chennai from 5-8 October 2007. The highlight of the festival was the audio description that helped the visually challenged experience every frame. FILM, FESTIVAL, NGO FILM Festival on Indian NGOs. Screen. 56(l2); 19 January 2007; 4. A report on the film festival of Indian NGO's, organised by Peacock Projects in collaboration with MAM Movies, in Mumbai. FILM, FOREIGN, (India) GHELANI. (Sailesh). World ciema virgins. Filmfare. 56 (10); October 2007; 118-120. Discusses whether the world cinema will find a place in our multiplexes, till now, the entry of which is limited to our festivals and DVD clubs. FILM, INDUSTRY (Bangladesh) CHATTRJI (Shoma A). Bangla filmmakers breathe new life. Screen. 57 (9) November 2007; 19. Appreciates the bouquet of Bangladesh films screened at the thirteenth Kolkata Film fesstival. All these, films arc in Bangali language, on digital mode, and made by young filmmakers which shows a new trend in Bangladeshi cinema. FILM, INDUSTRY (Bhutan) BHUTAN'S shot at cinema. Deccan Chronicle. 19 August 2007; 2. Gives a brief acccunt of Bhutan's film industry since 1989 when first Bhutan's film ­ Gasa Lamai Singye was made in the local Dzongkha language by Ugyen Wangdi, the pioneer of the country's fledgling cinema. FILM, INDUSTRY, (China) CHRONICLES of Chinese film history. Screen. 56 (39) ; 20 July 2007; 11. Excerpts from the book titled 100 Year History of Chinese Film ­ Ningbo firsts, a well researched book on the contribution of Ningbo film personalities in the development of Chinese film industry.

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FILM INDUSTRY (India)

Mass Media in India

AIYAR (Swaminathan S. Anklesaria). How the reforms changed Bollywood. Times of India. 16 September 2007; 22. Discusses how deregulation of a great many sections such as filmmaking, banking, capital markets, TV, theatre building-plus the lifting of `price control on tickets has revolutionized film Industry. BHANDARKAR (Madhur). Magnificent mirror. Week. (Jubilee Special);. 30 December 2007; 130,132, 134. Traces the graph of India's cinematic journey during the past twentyfive years. CHATTRJI (Shoma A). Where East meets West. Statesman. 1 July 2007 ; 1. Focuses on the changing taste, character, personality and complexion of Hindi film audiences over the years. GUPTA (Rachit). Black to grey. Screen. 57 (14); December 2007; 10. Discusses how Hindi cinema has developed new trends with changing times. The angry young men of the seventies and eighties has given way to the lover boys and the evil minded villains has moved on fronl being mere an evil boss to a more believable and better developed negative characters. HARIHARAN (K). Is cinema free enough? Hindu. 28 September 2007; 4. Evaluates the relevance of independent cinema in present times. Also appreciates the setting up of the Indian Independent Filmmakers Foundation (IIFF). JHA (Malati). Desi cinema mein videshi paisa. Rashtriya Sahara. 27 November 2007; 1-2. Focuses, on a new trend in Hindi cinema where foreign film companies are investing money for infrastructure filmmaking in India. This will boost the international market of Hindu. films. KRISHNAKUMAR (R). Good Cinema, bad cinema. Hindu. 15 September 2007; 21. Adoor Gopalakrishnan, a renowned film maker, looks at the ups and, downs of Indian cinema during the sixty years of independence. NAVEEN KUMAR. Lage raho Bollywood. Kadambini. 47 (8) ; June 2007; 11- 18. Comments on the changing, face of Indian cinema in the light of recently released trend-setter films like - Rang de Basnti. Lage Raho Munnabhai, Khosla Ka Ghosla, Nishabd and Guru. PRASHANT SINGH. Small films mean big business. Deccan Chronicle. 22 December 2007; 4. Keeping in view the high box ­ office return by low budget films in 2007, big production houses are planning to set up separate divisions for better execution of small budget projects. RAO (Shakuntala). There's no Hollywood invasion. Tribune. 3 June 2007; 8. Comparing the technical aspect of Hollywood films and Hindi fillms finds that Hindi films using special Visual effects generated through computer imaging are also doing equally well. SACHDEVA. (Seema). Small is big. Tribune. 21 October 2007; 8. Writes about the changing face of Hindi cinema where the production of low budget content-based quality films with off beat themes are increasing. SHARMA (Dvesh). Colour of money. Filmfare. 57 (1); 27 December 2007; 108-109. Reviews the year 2007 and lists the top hits /failures during the period January ­ November 2007. Also gives their approximate box-ffiice earnings. TIWARI (Abhay). Abhishaap ausatpane ka. Rashtriya Sahara. 27 November 2007; 4. Comments on the quality of Indian films. Though India is producing the largest number of films yet a few films are nominated for prestigious film awards.

Bibliography

VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). Milestones in Hindi Cinema. Deccan Herald. 12 August 2007; 3.

395

Reviewing the past sixty years of Indian cinema, highlight the milestones of each decade since independence. .......................................: Sixty trendsetters (1947-2007). Screen 56 (43); 17 August 2007; 13, 15. Looks at those sixty films that hake perhap reflected the most significant of the ongoing kaleidoscopic changes through content, form, music cast etc. .........................................: (The) story so far...Screen. 57 (9); 16 November 2007; 10. Focuses on changing trends of Hindi cinema ie. form, content, script, etc, over the last few years. WALUNJKAR (Somashukla Sinha). Is the dream run over. Screen. 56(29); 11 May 2007; 28. Reviews the films released during the first quarter of 2007. FILM, INDUSTRY (Nepal) SHRESTHA (Deepesh). Nepal films prosper in peace. Asian Age. 20 March 2007; 11. Comments on the present state of Nepal's fledgling film industry. FILM, INDUSTRY REGIONAL (Assam) THAKURIA (Nava). Dull year for Asomiya filmdom. Screen. 56 (12); 26 January 2007; 18. Expresses concern over the present state of seventy year old film industry of Assam. FILM, INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Bengal) CHATTERJI (Shoma A). Much ado about nothing: Return to literary roots. Screen. 57 (15); 28 December 2007; 23. Discusses how Bengali films especially the new directors, new banners and new subjects fared at the box office during the year 2007. FILM, INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Bengali) DAS (Mohua). Twin hi-tech boons for tollywood. Telegraph. 14 January 2007; 24. Discusses how the setting-up of Adlabs Films, a film laboratory, will revolutionise the post production work of films in the entire eastern region including Bangladesh. FILM, INDUSTRY REGIONAL (Bhojpuri) GHOSH, (Avijit). Bhojwood dream big. Times of India. 27 May 2007, 10. Comments on the present state of the Bhojpuri film industry which is riding high, with new markets opening up and its stars revelling in their new found stature. FILM INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Gujarati) BHATNAGAR (Jyotsna). Limping at 75. Screen. 56(28); 4 May 2007; 17. Comments on the state of Gujarati film industry which despite brief flashes of brilliance has only 762 films to its credit and is still dominated by traditional large than life costumes. FILM, INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Malayalam) NAIR (Unni R). Much ado about nothaing: More misses than hits. Screen. 57 (15); 28 December 2007; 23. Comments on the performance of Malayalam Cinema during the year 2007, of the sixty odd films released, there were only a few big hits.

396

FILM INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Oriya)

Mass Media in India

CHOUDHURY (Rabindra Nath). Bollywood masala turns Oriya film bitter. Asian Age. 20 August 2007; 15; Deccan Chronicle. 20 August 2007; 8. Comments on the present state of the Oriya film industry which is adopting Bollywood formula and facing a serious crisis. FILM, INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Punjabi) JASKIRAN KAUR. Punjabi films go global. Screen. 56 (18); 23 February 2007; 18. Discusses the fast changing frames of Punjabi films in the light of film Waris Shah - Ishaq Da Waris which was selected as India's official entry to the Oscars. WADEHRA (Randeep). Punjabi cinema: In search of the bigger role. Tribune. 19 May. 2007; 1. Looks at the record of Punjabi cinema which has seen more downs than ups. FILM INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Tamil) GANGADHAR (V). Indelible impressions. Hindu. 24 August 2007; 1. Reminiscences the charm of Tamil cinema of the 1940s and. 1950s. FILM, INDUSTRY, REGIONAL (Tamil) MENON (Jaya). Brave new wave. Screen. 56 (38) ; 13 July 2007; 18. Throws light on some unconventional low-budget films of recent times, which are making a considerable impact on Tamil movie audience. NARESH. Encouraging trends. Screen. 57 (15); 28 December 2007; 24. Reviews the Tmi1 and Telugu film Industry which saw more box, office successes in 2007 than in the previous year. PILLAI (Sreedhar). Business booms for Tamil cinema. Hindu. 29. June 2007; 1. Reviews the Tamil films produced during the first half of 2007. .......................................Kollywood goes the corporates way. Hindu. 7 September 2007; 8. Focuses on corporatisation of the Tamil film industry where one-man producers are being replaced by corporates and has made industry more systematic and accountable. FILM, INDUSTRY, REPORT BAMZAI (Kaveree). How India watches movies. India Today 32 (50); 17 December 2007; 88-90. Findings of a report titled The New Economics of Indian Film Industry: Creativity and Transformation by Confederation of Indian Industry, (CII) and A. T. Kearney. This is the most exhaustive analysis of the film Industry in India. FILM, MUSIC CHATTERJEE (Sonali Jha). Folk's the way to go. Tribune. 15 July 2007 ; 8. Commenting on the contemporary film music, says that traditional songs which reflect realism and openness in society are an instant hit with listeners. JAVED AKHTAR, Woh subah kabhi to aayegi. Talks to Piyush Roy. Screen. 56 (22); 23 March 2007; 25. Javed Akhtar expresses his views on the changing trends of Hindi film music. M1TRA (Chandan). India at 60 : A musical journey. Pioneer. 12 August 2007; 1.

Bibliography

397

Recalls the magnificent contribution of music to the shaping of India's film industry during the past sixty years. VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). A change of tune. Asian Age. 11 November 2007; 33. Comments that Hindi film music has come over the age of monopoly. Today there is a pool of five hundred talented singers instead of five. ......................................Chartbusters. Screen. 57 (15); 28 December 2007; 21 Lists twenty big hit songs of the Hindi films produced during the year 2007. FILM, MUSIC VIJAYKAR (Rajiv). Notes for children. Screen. 57 (9); 16 November 2007; 25. Takes a look at the Children.'s classics of the 50s, 60s and 70s that yielded sterling number like Tu kitni acchi (Raja Aur Rank), Pappa Jaldi aa Jaana (Taqdeer), Janam din aaya (Baharon ki Matrzil), Bacche man ke Sacche (Do Kaliyan) and Gudiya humse roothi rahogri (Dosti) etc. ............................Striking a new note! Screen. 56 (53); 21 September 2007; 24. Givcs a brief acccunt of how film music has evolved, meta-r-morphised and adoped to tastes, trends and the socio-cultural changes ever the years. .................................Those musical guests, Screen. 56 (30);18 May 2007; 25. Look; at some papular `items songs' of Hindi cinema. .................................Those seventy-five cult songs. Screen. 56 (22); March 2001; 30-31. Attempts to look at seventy-five mega hit songs that have crossed economic, cultural and geographical barriers and thus defined and redefined tastes and trends in Hindi film music. FILM, MUSIC, EXCHANGE VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). Foreign exchange. Screen. 56(28); 4 May 2007; 25. Looks at the musical give-and-take that has officially taken place in Hindi cinema and is now on the upswing with Hindi cinema going global. Also cites the prominent examples of foreign exchange down the years. FILM, OUTSOURCING SENGUPTA (Vishnupriya). Made in India. Telegraph. 17 June 2007; 12. Gives details of post product offshoring of Hollywood films to India. FILM, PARALLEL ZIYA US SALAM. Any takers for serious cinema? Hindu. 8 July 2007; 1. Comments on the state of serious cinema which is struggling to find takers among the private channels. FILM, POSTERS MITRA (Ashish). Changing colours. Screen. 56 (53); 21 September 2007; 18. Vinod and Pramod Guruji, veteran art directors recall old days when there was more art in the film banners/posters. FILM, PUBLICATIONS DIXIT (Rekha Borgohain). The good word Week. 26 (2); 9 December 2007; 62-64. Gives a brief account of books published on Indian cinema during the year 2007.

398

F1LM, REMAKE

Mass Media in India

MOTHER (Jhilmil). [The] recycle bin, India Today. 32 (39); 1 October 2007; 158-159. Writes about foreign films being cloned and redone by the Indian filmmakers during the past many decades and this trend is growing because of many loopholes in our copyright laws. NIVAS (Namita). Found in Translation. Screen. 57 (5); 19 October 2007; 1-2. Discusses why regional remakes, Hindi acaptation of hit regional movies like Ramji Rao Speaking (Malayalam)­ Hera Pheri, Sethu (Tamil)­ Tere Nam (Hindi), Manichitrathazhu (Malayalam)­ Bhool Bhulaiyaa (Hindi) etc are turning out to be a big hit. FILM, SCRIPT WRITING VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). Script ­ teasers. Deccan Herald. 15 September 2007; 2. Writes, about the new breed of professional scriptwriters who are focusing too much on ideas rather than the execution. FILM, STUDIO APARNA HARISH. Enter the behemoth studio. Telegraph. 7 January 2007; 3. Gives a brief account of model studios like Yash Raj Films (YRS), Adlabs Films and UTV which are involved in every aspect of filmmaking ­ from writing of a script to the film production and distribution. VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). Time tested. Screen. 57 (12); 7 December 2007; 28. Looks at the key banners that are reinventing themselves to survive despite changes in tastes and trends of cinema. FILM, STUNTWOMEN SINHA (Meenakshi). Wonder women. Times of India. 10 June 2007; 22. Gives a brief account of stuntwomen of Hindi cinema. FILM, TECHNOLOGY BHATTACHARYA (Roshmila). Colours of war Screen. 50 (18); 23 February 2007; 19. Ketan, son of filmmaker Chetan Anand, narrates his plans to digitally upgrade and Add colour to India's first real was film Haqeequt as a tribute to the memory of his late father's tenth death anniversary falling this year. DATTA (Sudipta). Impacting outsourcers. Screen. 56 (55); 5 October 2007; 28. Discusses why India is slowly gaining ground in visual effects (VFX) outsourcing. DUA (Aarti). It's show time folks. Telegraph. 17 February 2007; 1. Referring to growing demand of DVD's for home entertainment, discusses how an online DVD rental service works. DWIVEDI (Rajeev). Adding grandeur. Screen. 56 (39); 20 July 2007; 28. Explains the process of colorisation of black and white films. MITRA (Ashish). Digital intermediate: Heightening visual quotient. Screen 56 (46); 7 September 2007; 28. Siddhartha Jain of Avitel studio explains digital intermediate technology being used by many filmmakers to enhance their films' visuals.

Bibliography

FILM, TECHNOLOGY MITRA (Ashish). Endearing application. Screen. 57 (9); 16 November 2007; 28.

399

Explains digital colour grading system and digital intermediate solution which has been adopted by the top filmmakers to add high value colour grading to their creative services at low costs. ................................Making of Bal Ganesh. Screen. 57 (14); 21 December 2007; 28. Director Pankaj Sharma explains the process of making of Bal Ganesh, a full length 3 D computer generated animation film based on birth and childhood years of Lord Ganesh. ................................Trendsetting endeavour. Screen. 56 (47); 14 September 2007; 28. Writes about Wilson Louis's horror film Ghat - The Hill Station. The film has been shot in five difterent formats for the very first time in the annals of Indian cinema. ....................................Virtual set studio system soon a reality. Screen. 56 (38); 13 July 2007; 28. Describes virtual set studio system to be launched in India in August 2007 by Monarch Virtual on Air System. The system allows live actors and properties to integrate seamlessly with dynamic 3D computer-generated sets in real time, which results in the culmination of imagination and creativity far beyond the realm of physical limitations. FILM, TECHNOLOGY PRADHAN (Bharathi S). Old wine in a new bottle. Telegraph. 15 July 2007; 15. Writes about B.R. Chopra's Naya Daur which has been colourised and edited by Ravi Chopra. VIJAYAKAR (Rajiv). Naya Daur turns golden. Screen. 56 (41); 3 August 2007 ; 20 Pays tribute to the evergreen, classic Naya Daur, the Coloured version in dolby digital of which will be released this month. FILM, TECHNOLOGY ­ 3D WAXMAN (Sharon). (The) Furture is 3-1. Screen. 56 (33) ; 8 June 2007 ; 28. Discusses how 3 D movies are becoming popular agnin with the emergence of large screen Imax movies and technological advances around the world. ...............................Hollywood goes back to the future with 3-D. Asian Age. 24 May 2007; 15. Discusses, how 3 - D movies are becoming popular again with the emergence of large screen imax movies and technological advances around the world. FILM, THEME BHAGAT (Shama). Fast forward to flashback. Asian Age. 18 November 2007; 33; Deccan Chronicle. 18 November 2007; 1. Writes about Hindi films Om Shanti Om, Khoya Khoya Chand and Jodhaa- Akbar which bring back the look of the glorious past of the Indian cinema. BUNSHA (Dionne). Missing in Gujarat. Frontline. 24 (4); 9 March 2007; 82-84. Writes about Hindi film Parzania, based on the life story of theatre projectionist Dara Mody, which has been released through out the country except Gujarat. CHATTERJI (Shoma A). Director's cut. Tribune. 11 November 2007; 8. Explores the world of self reflexive films including Rituparno Ghosh's The Last Lear. ...............................In the name of the father. Tribune. 22 July 2007; 8 ; Deccan Herald. 22 July 2007; 3.

400

Mass Media in India

Gives a brief account of Feroz Abbas Khan's film Gandhi, My Father which presents Gandhi mainly as the father of his children. .....................................A matter of belief. Tribune. 18 November-2007; 8. Traces the role superstition has played within Indian cinema. CHATTERJI (Shoma A). Windaw within a window. Deccan Herald. 25 November 2007; 2. Explores the world of self-reflexive films a genre that is defined by the filmmaker's fondness for making a film-within-a-film that explores the film world inside out, and also functions as a critique of the filmmaker himself. DASGUPTA (Uma Mahadevan). Two India's. Frontline. 24 (23); 7 December 2007; 85-87. Writes about two recently released films which depict India's diversity. Navdeep Singh's debut feature film Manorama Six Feet under explores the dark corners of small town life and is set in Lakhot (Rajasthan) while Sriram Raghavan's Johnny Gaddaar is set in fast ­ track Mumbai. DHAWAN (M.L) and JOHAL (Vikramdeep). Second coming. Tribune. 2 December 2007; 8. Writes about Hindi films made on the unusual theme of reincarnation or second birth. Also looks at Hollywood films based on this theme. GILBEY (Ryan). Films and graphic novels, cross-pollination. Hindu. 24 November 2007; 15. Looks into how films and graphic novels are transforming each other. JOHAL (Vikramdeep). French twist in the tale. Tribune. 17 June 2007; 8: Discusses why Hindi film directors who were borrowing ideas and stories from Hollywood industry for the past several decades are now shifting to French cinema. .........................Joint (ad) venture. Tribune. 16 December 2007; 8. Writes about multi-director; multi-story films like Dus Kahaniyan, Darna Zaroori Hai and 11,09"01 September 11 (2002). These films depict wide range of perspective and the variety of filmmaking styles. MENEZES (Ervell E). Scoop opera. Tribune. 16 September 2007; 8. Writes about media ­ centric films and how they were dealt with in the last two decades. PATIL (Vimla). Few takers for serious cinema. Tribune. 23 December 2007; 8. Discusse, why issue-based films made with an aim to give message to the society have failed to click with the masses. RAO (Shakuntala). A movie widh a heart, a soul and a message. Tribune. 25 July 2007; 13. Writes about Michael Winterbottom film The Mighty Heart, based on kidnapping and killing of Wall Street Journal's South Asian Bureau chief Daniel Pearl. SEN (Swagata). Out of the woods. India Today. 32 (23) ; 78-79. Writes about the low-budget city-oriented Bengali films made by new-age directors for a bigger audience. FILM, THEME (USA) JOHAL (Vikramdeep). Evergreen tninity. Tribune. 8 July 2007; 8. Writes about Hollywood films Citizen Kane, The Godfather and Casablanca which are named the greatest American films of all time in a movie poll conducted by the venerable American Film Institute. WADIA (Piroj). Casablanca : Matchless. Screen. 56 (12); 26 January 2007; 30.

Bibliography

401

Writes about the film Casablanca which has been ranked by the American Film Institute as the second greatest American film ever made. FILM, THEME, COMEDY DHANDHANIA (Keshav), et al. Laugh out loud. Statesman. 14 June 2007; l. Looks at the cinematic world of comedy and a few of its prominent characters down the year. FILM, THEME, PATRIOTIC JOSHI (Namrata). Mother principle. Outlook. 47(21); 21 May 2007; 42-44. Findings of a survey conducted by research organisation C fore in twelve cities ­ Delhi Mumbai, Kolkata, Bengaluru, Chennai, Hyderabad, Jaipur, Ahmedabad, Chandigarh, Bhopal, Lucknow and Patna between 15-25 April, 2007 to know favourite patriotic Hindi films of all times. ROY (Piyush). Mr. Bharat unplugged. Screen. 56 (43); 17 August 2007 ; 30. Manoj `Bharat' Kumar talks about his favourite and other memorable patriotic Hindi films from the last six decades. FILM, THEME, POLITICAL RAO (Shakuntala). Collective amnesia: Where is the cinema of partition? Tribune. 17 August 2007; 11. Criticises Indian film industry for making less than a dozen films depicting the tragedy and loss during partition of India while European holocaust has been portrayed in more than 5,000 documentaries and films. FILM THEME, SOCIAL SRIVASTAV (Mukul). Filmo mem manav adhikar. Vidura (Hindi). 44 (2); April -June 2007; 47-51. Applauds Hindi cinema for creating awareness about the issues relating to Human Rights.

402

Mass Media in India

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ­ 2007)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY BAKRE (Shoma) and PANDE (Aparna). Blogosphere: Opportunities for the media. Deccan Herald. 15 August 2007; 16. Analyses new non-traditional media channels like blogs and their implications on the corporate communicators and researchers. BROADBAND : Global take off. Voice & Data. 13 (7); January 2007; 81-82. Discusses future prospects of broadband growth across the globe. BUDKI (Sandeep). Increasing reach. Voice & Data. 14 (3); September 2007; 41-42. Focuses on growth of Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT) technology and its advantages over the other technologies to provide quick, cost effective solution to remote destinations. COMMUNICATION to all. Voice & Data. 13 (7); January 2007; 54,56,57. Excerpts from the white paper of GSM Association on improvement of telecommunications networks. MAKWANA (Samir). Completely internet literate. Digit. 7 (2); February 2007; 121-123. A case study of Malappuram district of Kerala where Akshaya Project was launched to provide egovernance and other related utility services to general citizens. The objective of this project is to bridge the digital divide by making residents of the district computer literate. McCARTNEY (Neil). Reaching for 100 Mbit/sec-but how? Inter Media. 35 (1); February-March 2007; 8-12. A report on broadband services. It focuses on the range of high speed services, costs, regulations and subscribers around the world. MURALI (J). Tool for sending multimedia content. Hindu. 24 September 2007; 17. Profiles a tool meant for generating/sending multi media content and messages. POGUE (David). An iphone FAQ : Here's what you don't get. Asian Age. 1 July 2007 ; 14. Describes the functions of iphone which serves as a wireless modem internet machine and a phone. PRAVIN PRASHANT. Global networking platform. Voice & Data. 13 (7); January 2007; 92-96. A report on the premiere international ICT and networking event ITU Telecom world 2006, hosted by the government of the people's Republic of China and organised by ITU. The theme of the event was `Living the Digital world' and the focus was an exploring current and future lifestyles. PREM (Arpita). New kid on the block. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 92-93. Describes the fourth-generation (4G) wireless the stage of broadband mobile communication that will abandon the third generation. It will provide wireless broadband access to rural communities at reasonable cost. ROWLAND (Tom). Striking back at identity thieves. Telegraph. 9 April 2007; 22. Explains how to combat online identity theft which is becoming an area of concern among consumers using internet transactions. SACHDEVA (Sujata Dutta). World's R&D hub. Times of India. 1 April 2007; 10.

Bibliography

403

Gives a brief account of research and product development activities of Indian Research & Development (R&D) Centres of four Information Technology giants-Microsoft India, Intel India, Adobe India and IBM India. SHARMA (Dinesh C). Media exploits internet "Social Networking". Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007; 28-30. Discusses the phenomenon of social networking where people can upload and share video clips through websites, blogs and electronic mail. Also discusses its developing relationship with the traditional media. SHARMA (Sonia). Next gen communication. Voice & Data. 13 (10); April 2007; 74-76. Discusses the future prospect of video-conferencing which has now started moving from group systems to desktop video-conferencing systems. SMITH (Robert Sovereign). Power 2 the people. Digit. 7 (2); February 2007; 29-32, 34. Discusses the working of peer to peer (P2 P) networks and how it will change the future of the net. SWAIN (Gyana Ranjan). Slow and steady wins the race. Voice & Data. 14 (1) July 2007 ; 59-60, 62. Presents the findings of Voice & Data survey on the growth of Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT's). INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Asia - Pacific) CHONG (Janice). Mobile broadband ­ the killer ap' for 3G in Asia-pacific? Inter Media. 35 (1); February ­ March 2007; 17 ­ 19. Discusses the growth of 3G (Third Generation) network/services in the Asia-pacific region during the last five years. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (China) GUNJAN SWGH. Internet in China : The media's changing face. Mainstream. 45 (28); 30 June 2007; 23-24. Looks at the Internet boom in the China in the light of a new cultural phenomenon. DONGMING ZHANG. Slow train to maturity. Voice & Data. 14 (1) ; July 2007 ; 148, 152, 154,155156. A report on the China's telecom industry. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (Europe) SUTHERLAND (Ewan). Spectrum management: The failure to deliver the single European wireless information space is very disappointing. Inter Media. 35 (1); February-March 2007; 20-23. This is part of a background paper prepared for the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) workshop on the subject Market Mechanisms for Spectrum Management. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY(France) CHAMPSAUR (Paul) France: Lowering the entry barriers for very high speed broadband. Inter Media. 35 (1); February-March 2007; 13-16. Extract from a speech by Paul Champsaur, Chairman of France's Electronic Communications and Postal Regulator, on broadband's remarkable success in France. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY(India) ALMANAC. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 120-136. Looks at significant developments such as new technologies, policy decisions and news makers of the year 2007 that influenced the growth of the Telecom industry. BABURAJAN (K). Awaiting broadband push. Voice & Data. 13 (9); March 2007;126,128,130.

404

Focuses on the key growth drivers in the Indian wireline sector.

Mass Media in India

CHANDRASEKHAR (C.P). India's traverse to an information society. Hindu. 15 August 2007; 18. Expresses concern over the limited penetration of information and communication technology due to lack of literacy and educational levels in the country. The internet penetration in India amounted to just 4.7 per cent as compared with 66.5 per cent in Japan and 12.3 per cent in China in 2006. DADEECH (Balendu). Blog ho to baat bane. Kadambini. 47 (12); October 2007; 11-18. Assesses the growth and development of Hindi blog during the last four years. Also throws light on the efforts of some dedicated bloggers to promote Hindi blogging. DASGUPTA (Surajit). India at your fingertips. Pioneer. 26 November 2007; 7. Describes Lekhika, a new software developed by an Israeli IT firm. This application package creates a virtual keyboard with which any Indian language can be typed. JHA (Nilabh). (The) Gold rush. Voice & Data. 14 (5); November 2007; 44, 46. Focuses on the current bidding of the Unified Access Services License (UASL) for which Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) has received more than 500 applications from forty companies. JHA (Nilabh). Filling the gap. Voice & Data. 14 (2); August 2007; 42, 44. Discusses the role of the wireless and wireline in spreading broadband services rapidly in the country. MITTA (Manoj). A recipe for killing internet in India. Times of India. 17 October 2007; 1,18. Comments on the future of the Internet in India in the light of the recommendations of the Parliamentary Standing Committee. PRAVIN PRASHANT. Satisfaction down, expectations same. Voice & Data. 13 (7); January 2007; 28-32,34,36,38,40,42-47. Findings of an online user's satisfaction survey, conducted by Voice & Data in the month of OctoberNovember 2006, to study the overall satisfaction of the subscribers and the future of mobile handset brands. RAO (Malovika). Uphill task. Voice & Data. 14 (1); July 2007 ; 48, 50, 52, 54, 56. Provides a clear picture on the current position of broadband penetration in the country and how the whole ecosystem is being affected by slow growth of broadband services. RAO (Malovika). Mission critical. Voice & Data. 14 (2); August 2007; 36, 38, 40. Explains why the growth of broadband is slow in India. At present there are about 2.4mn broadband subscribers which is about 2 per cent penetration. RAY (Kalyan). Internet is now 12 years old in India. Deccan Herald. 14 August 2007; 11. Traces the history of growth of internet in India. Also discusses how it has benefited the society. SHARMA. (Sonia). Mapping the road ahead. Voice & Data. 13 (7); January 2007; 87,91. A report on the Indian Telecom 2006, organised by the Department of Telecom, Ministry of Communication and Information Technology at Pragati Maidan in New Delhi. SRIDHAR (V). Spectrum war. Frontline. 24 (21); 2 November 2007; 108-111. Discusses why an unprecedented number of applications have been filed for mobile phone licences despite the shortage of spectrum. Also throws light on the recommendations of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) on licence reforms and on capping the number of service providers.

Bibliography

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ADVERTISING ASFAQ TAPIA. Cheapest trumpet. Digit. 7 (9); September 2007; 104-107.

405

Finds out how small business entrepreneurs can effectively reach their target audience through internet. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMERCE SHARMA (Adeesh). et al.. Bank on IT to keep your money safe. PC Quest. November 2007; 14-16, 18, 20, 22, 24,26. Discusses IT channels like phone banking, SMS banking, online banking, biometric banking, ATMs, credit cards etc. introduced by banks to reach out to their customers. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COPYRIGHT SARMA (Sujay V). You paid for it but can you use it freely ? P.C. Quest. January 2007; 22-24, 26, 28-30. Analyses the pros and cons of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) management. Also discusses the ways to control its unauthorised usage. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND EDUCTION RAO (Ram Mohan). Internet instructors. Digit. 7 (2); February 2007; 110-112. Writes about Tutor Vista an exclusive online tutoring provider for Microsoft's MSN Encarta online education portal. SHARMA (Adeesh) et al. Empowering India's future through IT. P.C. Quest. October 2007; 46-48, 50, 54, 58, 60. Discusses how Information technology is redefining education and increasing its reach unshackling the barriers of distance, region and language amongst masses. Also discusses the innovative solutions being used to disseminate information. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND FILM JHA (Pallavi). Bollywood's net gains. Screen. 56(30); 18 May 2007; 28. Discusses the role played by internet in online promotion of Hindi films. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND FINANCE SHARMA (Adeesh) and CHOPRA (Anil). Howz IT improving the business of insurance. P.C. Quest. August 2007; 57-62. Discusses the role of the information technology innovations in shaping the future of insurance sector. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND GAMES MAKWANA (Samir). Be the game. Digit. 7(7) ; July 2007; 89-91. A report of the study conducted by the Internet and mobile Association of India on the growth and future prospects of the Indian online gaining industry. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND GOVERNMENT SHARMA (Adeesh). It's what the government needs. P.C. Quest. July 2007 ; 52, 54, 56-59. Discusses the merits of e-governance . Also throws light on the governments schemes to implement e-governance in letter and spirit.

406

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND INDUSTRY

Mass Media in India

CHOPRA (Anil) and ARORA (Swapnil). Strategies for a healthy WAN: Toward a well connected enterprise. PC Quest. November 2007; 62-64, 66, 68, 70, 72, 74. Findings of a survey conducted to find out how key enterprises are managing their WAN (Wide-Area Network) infrastructures and how they are optimizing their bandwidth. Also explores solution to some key pain points in WAN management. SHRIKANTH (G). Made in India. Voice & Data. 14 (5); November 2007; 22-24, 26, 28. Looks at future prospects of electronic equipment manufacturing in India which is emerging as an ideal destination for Electronic Manufacturing Services (EMS). INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND MUSIC BUDKI (Sandeep). Music in a new bottle. Voice and Data. 13(11); May 2007; 21-22, 24. Discusses the digital music driven by the mobile sector by combining music and mobile technology. Also discusses its impact on the traditional music industry. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND PORNOGRAPHY BHATTACHARJEE ( Subimal). Freedom virtual, fear real. Tribune. 4 February 2007; 7; 1. Expresses concern over the unwanted and objectionable contents of internet. Also outlines the provisions of the Information Technology Act, 2000 (IT Act) related to online censorship. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND PRESS ANANTHAKRISHNAN (G). (The) challenge of growth for the news media. Hindu. 23 April 2007; 12. Findings of an exhaustive survey of the American media conducted by the Project for Excellence in Journalism at the Pew Research Centre in Washington. The findings shows a sharp decline in circulation of American newspapers with the growth of news and advertising on the Internet. E-paper comes of age. Screen. 56 (26); 20 April 2007; 28. Discusses E Ink Corporation's commercially viable electronic paper technology that would make newspaper and books obsolete INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY CHANDIRAMANI (Nimish). Read me my rights. Digit. 7 (2); February 2007; 36-38, 40. Looks at the Digital Rights Management (DRM) technology which is basically an implementation of the copyrights Act of the country. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY PHADKE (Ruchi). (The) next wave. Voice & Data. 14 (5); November 2007; 56-57. Focuses on service providing companies' efforts to bridge the digital divide by providing connectivity to the rural masses. ROY (Anindya). How wireless technologies influence our lives. PC Quest. November 2007; 30-33, 36. Discusses how wireless devices/technologies influence our social, personal and official lives. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY, RURAL ANSHUMAN KUMAR. The heat is on but... Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 22-24, 26.

Bibliography

407

Assesses the plans of the leading telecom operators for rural connectivity as there is a vast scope for growth and expansion of telecom sector in rural areas. .............................. and PHADKE (Ruchi). Taming towering costs. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 44, 46, 48. Emphasises on the setting up of infrastructure in rural areas in order to provide connectivity to the people living in rural and remote areas. BUDKI (Sandeep). The rural way. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 3 8, 40. Discusses the role of rural Indian market in the growth of mobile value-added services (MVAS). BUDKI (Sandeep). Reaching out. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 78, 80, 82, 84. Discusses the role of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) companies in providing connectivity to rural India. PRABHAKAR (R.N). Taking telecom beyond cities. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 53, 56. Gives a brief account of the government's initiatives to make telecom services available to rural masses. PREM (Arpita). Go rural, 3G shows the way. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 88-90. Discusses how third Generation (3G) services on mobile handsets will bring Internet access to rural India and bridge the gap between urban and rural areas. SWAIN (Gyana Ranjan). Mission rural India. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 28, 30, 33-34. Throws light on the state owned Bharat Sanchar Nigam Ltd's strategies for semi-urban and rural areas. .................................Tailor-made for villages. Voice & Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 58, 60, 62, 64, 66-67. Focuses on handset manufacturers innovative ideas and plans to redesign their business models for potential customers in B and C class cities and rural India. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND TELEVISION BUDKI (Sandeep). IPTV: Waiting to fly. Voice & Data. 14 (5); November 2007; 40-42. Shyamal Ghosh, Chairman, IPTV Indian Forum, shares his views about Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) and its future prospects in India as the government and private IT companies are looking to increase broadband penetration. PUNJA (Ranajoy). Complexities of providing IPTV. Economic Times. 12 July 2007 ;15. Unravels the challenges such as scalability, operational complexities and high quality of experience being faced by the Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). UPADHYAY (Piyush). Idiot box! Not any more. Voice & Data. 13(7); January; 2007; 78-80. Discusses how the introduction of high bandwidth applications like TV signals and other Internet applications over Internet protocol (using a set-top box) will transform the idiot box into an intelligent device. SHARMA (Sonia). Me too, not enough. Voice & Data. 13 (10); April 2007; 64-67. Discusses how to boost the growth of Internet protocol Television (IPTV) in India. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND TELEVISION SWAIN (Gyana Ranjan). Getting bigger. Voice & Data. 14 (5); November 2007; 54-55. Throws light on Huawei Technologies, a Chinese company, that plans to tap the relatively unexplored

408

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Indian market for its 3G (Third Generation) and IPTV (Internet Protocol Television) products. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, AWARDS LEADING the way always. Voice and Data. 14 (2); August 2007; 64-66, 68, 70-72, 75-76, 78. A report on the Voice and Data 100 Awards 2007 presented in New Delhi. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, CONFERENCE JHA (Nilabh), Convergence at its best, Voice and Data. 13(11); May 2007; 104-105. A report on the 15th convergence India 2007, an international exhibition and conference, held from 20-22 March 2007. ....................................Leveraging the networks. Voice and Data. 13 (11); May 2007; 96,98, 100,102. Excerpts from a conference on leveraging the multi-service enterprise networks in the next generation (NGN) organized by voice & Data on 09,15 and 16 March 2007 in New Delhi, Mumbai and Bengaluru respectively. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, CONFERENCE (London) WINSBURY (Rex). The search for the new web: Personal blogs about the evolution of the internet. Inter Media. 35 (2); May 2007; 11-34. Presents the comments of speakers on the approaches to the new internet at the two-day Digital Media and Broadcasting conference organised by the Financial Times Conference organisation in London. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, CONFERENCE (SAARC) BUDKI (Sandeep). Unity in diversity. Voice and Data. 14 (2); August 2007; 86. A report on the first SAARC Telecom Advisory Council (STAC) meet held in New Delhi. It was organised by Voice and Data and Confederation of Indian Industry. CEO conclave, 2007: SAARC Communication Industry's own discussion forum. Voice and Data. 14 (6); December 2007; 100-118. Proceedings of the Sixth CEO conclave, 2007 held in Kathmandu (Nepal) from 25-28 October 2007. The theme of the conclave was `Taking Telecom Beyond cities'. RAO (Malovika). Mobility empire in SAARC. Voice and Data. 13(7); January 2007; 20-22,24,26. Throws light on the current telecom scenario in SAARC countries. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, DVD WALUNJKAR (Somashukla Sinha). Cashing in on the couch potato. Screen. 56 (16); 9 February 2007; 28. Comments on the future of home video market which is currently facing threat from video on demand and pay-per-view services provided by cable operators, DTH operator and IPTV.

Bibliography

409

BIBLIOGRAPHY

(PRESS ­ 2007)

JOURNALISM AND HISTORY (USA) WINFIELD (Betty Houchin) and HUME (Janice). The continuous past: Historical reterents in nineteenth--century American journalism. Journalism & Communication Monogyraphs. 9 (3); Autumn 2007; 121 - 156. Examines how writers in American journalism repeatedly relied upon the past and used history, actual past events during nineteenth century when the United States had little or no published history. JOURNALISM, EDUCATION GUHA THAKURTHA (Paranjoy). Journalism education In India Some issues and concern. Vidura. 44 (2); Aprl-June 2007; 10-11. Focuses on the problems and challenges being faced by the institutions imparting media education in India. JOURNALISM, REPORTING SONWALKAR (Prasun). Cultural hegemony as journalism practice. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 38-43. Presents interview responses of senior New Delhi - based journalists to demonstrate how socio-cultural perceptions of the mainstream affect coverage and the non-coverage of events and issues concerning minorities. JOURNALISM, STING SARDESAI (Rajdeep). Media's mediators. Hindustan Times. 14 September 2007; 12. Taking into account some fraudulent sting operations, expresses concern over sting journalism and stresses on a self code of conduct with strict penal provisions for non observance of news journalism. JOURNALISM, WORKING CONDITIONS (Pakistan) BEENA SARWAR. Pak journalists face threats from all sides. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 5152. Comments on the working conditions of journalists who despite press freedom face threats and harassment from all sides in Pakistan. JOURNALIST, BIOGRAPHY (India) BOBBY GOSH: Luck gives him the best in life. By Gayatri Reddy. Asian Age. 2 September 2007; 35. PALAGUMNI SAINATH : Man on mission. By Sujata Anandan. Hindustan Times. 4 August 2007; 12. ................................ Rural journalism redefined. By Harihar Swarup. Tribune. 5 August 2007; 12. SHYAM LAL: Death of a titan. Vidura. 44(1); Jail-Mar 2007; 42. ...............................: Editors then., editors now. By Vinod Melita. Outlook. 47 (11), 12 March 2007; 16. ................................. (1912-2007) : Grand old man of Indian journalism. By Inder Malhotra. Asian Age. 24 February 2007; 7. ..................................: Portrait of a reader as writer. By Manish Chand. Tribune. 4 March 2007; 5.

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.................................:Scholar-editor. By Rudrangshu Mukherjee. Telegraph. 25 February 2007; 10. ..................................:Thinker editor and author extraordinaire. Free Press Journal. 24 February 2007; 2. ..................................: A tribute. By Harish Khare. Mainstream. 45 (13), 17 March 2007; 31. JOURNALIST, BIOGRAPHY (USA) PETER BHATIA, `Good journalism is in the eye of the beholder'. Talks to Nona Walia. Times of India. 1 July 2007; 3. NEWS AGENCY, UNI THOMAS (EC). News agencies fight for survival. Vidura. 44 (2); April - June 2007; 4-5. Narrates the story of United News of India (UNI), which has allotted 50.05 percent of the total shares to Media Vest Pvt. Ltd, owned by Shri Subash Chandra, Chairman of Zee Tele Films Ltd. NEWSPAPERS GOVIND SINGH. Akhbaro ko koi nahi mar sakta. Vidura (Hindi). 44 (2); April-June 2007; 4-5. Discusses the future of newspapers in the light of recently released World Association of Newspapers (WAN) report on World Press Trends. RAM (N). Newspaper futures: India and the World. Hindu. 15 August 2007; 3. Narrates the story of growth and development of Indian newspapers over the past six decades and their contribution to global growth as showcased in the World Association of Newspapers (WAN) report on World Press Trends released in June 2007. NEWSPAPERS, PRICES THAKORE (Aloke). Inexpensive newspapers defeat their purpose. Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007; 3133. Studies the impact of low cover costs of newspapers on readers as consumers, market mechanism and the democratic processes. NEWSPAPERS, REPORTING, RURAL NINAN (Sevanti). A rural newspaper revolution. Vidura. 44 (2); April - June 2007; 12-14. Extract from the author's recently released book-Headlines from the Heartland, published by Sage, New Delhi. PRESS (India) CHATTERJEE (Somnath). Media in India today: Focus shifts to trivial issues. Tribune. 17 November 2007; 12. Text of the address by the Lok Sabha Speaker on `Media as people's Voice - Pre and Post-Independence' on the occasion of National Press Day organised by the Press council of India in Delhi on 16 November 2007. PRESS (India) CHATTERJEE (Somnath). Time for a round of introspection. Hindu. 22 November 2007; 12. Based on an address by Lok Sablia Speaker Somnath Chatterjee at a discussion on `Media as people's Voice - Pre and Post-Independence, organised by the Press Council of India on the occasion of National Press Day on 16 November 2007 in New Delhi.

Bibliography

411

EVANS (Harold). Indian Press a tiger. Tribune. 18 November 2007; 4. Extract from Sir Harold Evans address at the fourth K.C. Mammen Mapillai Memorial Lecture on 15 November 2007 to celebrate the contribution of the editor of Malayala Manorama. KARLEKAR (Hiranmay). Globalisation, media and ethics. Mainstream. 45 (11), 3 March 2007; 2125. Excerpts from the paper presented at a national seminar held on the occasion of the fortieth anniversary of the Press Council of India on November 16, 2006 in New Delhi. PRESS (India-North East) DINKAR KUMAR. Purvottar mein patrakarita ki chunotian. Vidura (Hindi). 44 (2) April-June 2007; 45-46. Discusses the challenges being faced by the press in the north east region of India. PRESS AND ELECTIONS PRADHAN (Anand). Media management ke khatre. Vidura (Hindi). 44 (2); April-June 2007; 13-16. Citing the case of Uttar Pradesh Legislative Assembly elections analyses the role of media management during election. YADAV (Anubhuuti). Opinion polls: Bandwagon or under dog effect ? Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 19-21. Tracing the history of opinion poll surveys attempts to find out the effect of exit and opinion polls on respondents. PRESS AND GOVERNMENT(Pakistan) HAMEED HAROON. Dawn under siege. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 32-34. Analyses the developments occurred during the critical years of 2004-2007 that have caused the present breakdown of communication between the government and the Dawn Group of Newspapers in Pakistan. PRESS AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MATHEWS (Sam). The war of words: Print versus new media. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 4748. Compares print media with new media especially the internet, which also furnishes a platform for journalism, to find out whether the internet will be able to deliver in the primary function of keeping the society informed. SHARMA (Dinesh C). Digging into digital reserves. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 17-18. Writes about online digital archives especially of the Time magazine and New York Times and search engines that allow digging into archives of various newspapers, magazines and other historical documents. PRESS AND INSURGENCY LAITHANGBAM (Iboyainia). Stop press. Frontline. 24 (22); 14 November 2007; 40-41. Comments on the state of media in the insurgency-affected border State of Manipur. PRESS AND JUDICIARY GAGGING the media. Deccan Herald. 24 September 2007; 10. Expresses concern over the Delhi High Court's judgement in a suo motu contempt case initiated against four reporters of Mid Day tabloid in Delhi.

412

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SINGH (Arvind Kuniar). 1857. Akhbaron ki bhumika. Vidura (Hindi). 44 (2); April-June 2007; 17-22. Discusses the significant role played by Indian Newspapers in 1857 when the literacy rate was one percent only. PRESS FREEDOM CAG on press. Deccan Chronicle. 10 December 2007; 6. Cites the incidents when the press was curbed in Andhra Pradesh. GIRVI hai press ki aajadi. Dainik Jagran. 3 May 2005; 11. Critically analyses the annual press freedom report of the Reporters without Borders organisation for the year 2006. NAYYAR (Kuldip). `Talash press swatantrata ki. Danik Jagran. 8 August 2007; 8. Comments on the present state of the press in India. PRESS FREEDOM WORLD press freedom review. IPI Report. 2006; 8-297. A comprehensive annual survey of the state of press Freedom in more than 160 countries around the globe. PRESS LANGUAGE, (Kannada) SANJAY (B.P.) Rendering journalists into mere translators. Vidura. 44(1); Jan-Mar 2007; 44-46. Tracing briefly the history of Kannada journalism analyses the pros and cons of translation editions of the so-called mainstream papers launched in Karnataka. PRESS, LANGUAGE (Urdu) AND MUTINY SHAFEY KIDWAI. The first war of independence and Urdu Press. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 44-46. Discusses the role played by the Urdu press in moulding public opinion against the foreign rule during India's first war of Independence. PRESS, REPORTING DANG (Satyapal). Reflections on the print media. Mainstream. 45 (31) ; 21 July 2007 ; 32-33. Citing the examples, critically analyses the reporting of some English and Hindi national dailies. EVANS (Harold). The fourth estate. Week. 26 (5). 30 December 2007; 64, 66, 68. Discusses the role of the free and responsible press in an era of violence in the light of terrorist attack on 11 September in New York and Washington, 13 December in Delhi and 7 July in London. PRESS, REPORTING (Chhattisgarh) SUNIL KUMAR. Naxalvad, salva-judum aur media. Vidura (Hindi) 44 (2); April-June 2007; 28-31. Comments on the working of media especially the press in the naxallite area-Bastar in Chhattisgarh. PRESS, TABLOID GHOSH (Subir). Tabloid culture in India. Vidura. 44 (2); April-June 2007; 23. Focuses on the growth of tabloid press in India and its impact on the society.®

Index

413

INDEX

A Advertising and Visual Publicity, Directorate of, 59-64 All India Radio, 98-114, 325-53 Andaman and Nicobar, 281-83 Andhra Pradesh, 199-201 Appendices, 300-71 Arunachal Pradesh, 201-03 Assam, 203-06 Awards, Films Fifty Fourth National Film, 306-16 Best Artists and Technicians, 308-10 Best Feature Film, 304-05 Regional Languages, 310-12 B Bibliography, 372-412 Bihar, 206-09 Broadcast Engineering Consultants India Limited (BECIL), 130-36 C Censor Board See Central Board of Film Certification Central Board of Film Certification, 16465, 300-02 Chandigarh, 283-86 Chhattisgarh, 209-11 Children's Film Festival (15 tional), 323-24

th

Defamation, 17 Delhi, 289-93 Doordarshan, Indian Television, 115-30 Channels, Cable, 356-71 Transmitters, 354-55 See also Prasar Bharati E Electronic Media Monitoring Centre, 9497 F Field Publicity, Directorate of, 67-70 Film and Television Institute of India, 17986 Film Archive of India, National, 165-71 Film Festivals, directorate of, 171-79 Films' Certification, 164-65 Films Division, 137-64 Freedom of Speech and Expression, 1-3 G Goa, 211-13 Gujarat, 213-15 H Haryana, 216-17 Himachal Pradesh, 217-19 J InternaJammu and Kashmir, 219-24 Jharkhand, 224-27 K Karnataka, 227-30 State Film Awards, 318-19 Kerala, 230-33 State Film Awards, 320

Children's Film Society, India 193-94 D Dadasaheb Phalke Awards See Phalke Dadra and Nagar Haveli, 286-87 Daman and Diu, 288-89

414

L Lakshadweep, 293-94 M Madhya Pradesh, 233-36 Maharashtra, 236-39 State Film Awards, 321-22 Manipur, 239-41 Mass Communication, Indian Institute of, 91-94 Media and Criminal Justice, 1-12 Media and Human Development 38-39 Media, Guidelines, 42 Media, Laws, 22-34 Media Organisations, Central Government, 44-198 States and UTs, 199-296 Media, Trial by, 13-21, 35-43 Meghalaya, 241-42 Mizoram, 242-45 N Nagaland, 245-47 National Documentation Centre on Mass Communication, 76-77 National Film Development Corporation of India (NFDC), 195-98 News, Crime, 1 O Orissa, 247-56 P Phalke, Dadasaheb Awards, 303 Photo Division, 82-86 Prasar Bharati, 97-130 Press Council, 86-91 Press Information Bureau, 45-58

Mass Media in India Press Trust of India (PTI), 297-98 Publications Division, 70-75 Puducherry, 295-96 Punjab, 256-58 R Radio, All India (AIR), 98-114, 325-53 FM, Stations, 337-53 Staff Training Institute (Programme), 111-13 Staff Training Institute (Technical), 11314 State wise coverage, 325-36 Rajasthan, 258-61 Registrar of Newspapers of India (RNI), 64-67 Research Reference and Training Division, 75-77 S Satyajit Ray Film and Television Institute, 186-93 Sikkim, 261-63 Song and Drama Division, 77-82 Sting Operation, 13-21 Swarna Kamal Awards, 304-05 T Tamilnadu, 263-65 Television, Cable Channels, 356-71 Trial by Media, 13-21 Tripura, 265-68 U United News of India (UNI), 298-99 Uttar Pradesh (UP), 268-71 Uttarakhand, 271-73 W West Bengal, 273-81

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Mass Media in India 2009 - Prelims

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