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Preteens: The Safest Generation

IntroductIon Today's 11- and 12-year-old preteens have learned about and used more vehicle safety products than any previous generation. Born in the mid to late 1990s, this generation was the first to consistently ride in car seats; to graduate to booster seats; and to be kept away from the front seat to prevent air bag injuries. As preteens, they know the safest way to ride in a car is to be buckled up in a back seat. Despite their strong knowledge about safety, kids in their preteen years become less likely to use a seat belt. Data from 2007 show that children ages 8 to 14 ride unrestrained in cars nearly one-third of the time, compared with 24% for children ages 4 to 7,and 15% for children ages 1 to 3, according to the national Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for preteens, and those who don't wear seat belts are more likely to be killed or suffer incapacitating or disfiguring injuries in a crash. the SolutIon Safe Kids Buckle Up has created a one hour vehicle-safety program, "The Safest Generation," designed for preteens ages 11 and 12. The goal of the program is to increase the number of preteens who buckle up in a back seat and give them the tools to encourage peers and family members to do likewise. Preteens know that is the safest way to ride. This program will motivate them to act on that knowledge by: · Appealing to them as members of the Safest Generation · Celebrating the norm that most preteens do buckle up · Bolstering their competence as role models for younger kids · Providing helpful tips for preteens and their parents · Developing communication skills so they can teach others This Safest Generation event builds on the 2007 Safe Kids Buckle Up "Spot the Tot" program, which was successfully hosted by Safe Kids coalitions across the country. Like Spot the Tot, which targeted children ages 7-10, the Safest Generation program will include short, interactive activities designed with the preteen's interests and attention span in mind.

Click with your Preteen

Help your preteen buckle up. For life.

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The Safest Generation: Event Planning Guide

This step-by-step guide shows how to plan and set up a Safe Kids Buckle Up (SKBU) Safest Generation Event. Step 1: revIew the 2 mandatory tech check actIvItIeS · OnStar and RED Emergency Button; · Airbags and Trunk Entrapment Step 2: chooSe at leaSt two optIonal actIvItIeS · Seat Belt and Safety Relay · Myth Slammers · What's Right or Wrong In this Vehicle · Scrambled Eggs/Shaken Brain · What's Missing in This Picture? Step 3: Select your audIence Target organizations or schools that serve 11 and 12 year old kids. Many groups have been pulled from Boys and Girls Clubs, afterschool programs, summer camps, etc. Established groups work best! Step 4: determIne an event date, tIme, locatIon, and raIn planS If you are working with a school or preteen organization, ask them about the best time and location. For community-wide events, choose a parking lot that can be vacated for your use. In case of rain, reserve a school gym or find a location with an outdoor overhang (such as a church, hotel, office building or funeral parlor). Plan for and promote an alternative date or location in advance. If you are planning your event in a grassy area, check the mowing and maintenance schedule to make sure it doesn't interfere with the event. Step 5: Select your locatIon Find a location with enough space for your event. Make sure it is safe for preteens, families and volunteers and can accommodate the demonstration cars that will be needed. Have a backup location or plan in case of inclement weather. Use your GM dealer as a partner to provide vehicles for the various technology and seat belt demonstrations.

Click with your Preteen

Help your preteen buckle up. For life.

2009 EVENT PLANNING GUIDE PAGE 1

Step 6: InvIte chIld paSSenger Safety (cpS) technIcIanS to Serve aS StatIon leaderS and volunteerS Research shows that preteens respect police officers' and firefighters' views on safety, and are more likely to listen to information presented by them. Be sure to invite them. Use other members of your coalition too! Step 7: Seek In-kInd SponSorS to provIde IncentIveS, refreShmentS and entertaInment Local businesses often like to be involved in community activities. There are many in-kind donations you can seek for this event. Some examples include: · In keeping with the Safest Generation theme, local electronics stores may donate technology items that can entertain a preteen riding in a car's back seat, such as an iPod or a portable DVD player. Kids who complete the program can enter a drawing to win the donated items. · A local grocery store can provide drinks and snacks for kids and volunteers. · A radio station can provide music and live coverage. · Local restaurants can provide coupons for those who complete the program. Step 8: promote the event We have provided ideas for you to use in the media section of this guide to promote your event locally. Promoting the event is critical to your success of this event because your promotion will determine how many people participate. Step 9: provIde StatIon leaderS and volunteerS wIth the program ScrIpt to prepare them prIor to the event. Download all materials from the Moderator's Guide to share as needed with volunteers. Step 10: coordInate the event · Gather the materials (Look under "Downloads" to pull off all handouts, worksheets, etc) · Arrange for GM vehicles. You will need a vehicle for the following activities. Two are mandatory and you might choose activities that do not require a third vehicle. This is your call! · Mandatory OnStar/RED Emergency Button · Mandatory airbags and glow in the dark trunk release · Optional Seat Belt and Safety Relay Race · Optional What's Right or Wrong In this Vehicle? · Make sure you have enough qualified volunteers to staff four stations (2 volunteers per station highly recommended). · Limit the program to one hour if possible. Each station should last about 15 minutes. · Gather the kids in one group in the beginning and tell them what will happen in the next hour. · Prepare them to move from station to station in 10-15 minute intervals. · Introduce the volunteers.

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Step 11: Set up the actual event · Prepare ahead of time for each station so you can provide Station Leader Message cards to volunteers and leaders when they arrive. These cards should tell the station leader what your station objective is and what you want them to say. Make sure your station leader is on the same page as you are! · do thIS fIrSt wIth the kIdS -- preteSt: Before the activities begin, have each preteen fill in their first name and other information on the questionnaire. Ask them to answer ALL the questions on the questionnaire. Have a station leader collect them. You will keep these and tabulate them for your event evaluation that you complete on www.safekidsweb.org · If present, invite parents or other supervising adults to accompany the preteens at each station. They will learn, too, and will enjoy seeing their kids interact with the Station Leaders. Step 12: complete the event Complete the post test once you have finished your activities. You will keep the pre test and post test for your records. Step 13: Breakdown and clean up When using space at a school or in a neighborhood, be sure you clean the area so that it is in better condition than when you arrived. If necessary, schedule a shift of volunteers exclusively for this task, as many of the event volunteers will be tired. Step 14: Say "thank you" Following the event, be sure to thank anyone who contributed ideas, time or products.

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The Safest Generation: Event Activities Guide

tech check part 1: onStar and the red emergency Button (mandatory)

This station requires one CPS technician leader and a GM dealer who knows how to demonstrate the OnStar car safety system. The leader will have to be familiar with air bag symbols and locations in the vehicle. In several pilots, the Chevy dealer ran the station and the technician served as an assistant. Call OnStar first from the vehicle to be sure the satellite can read the vehicle location. Be prepared to provide the vehicle VIN number. emergency Button (red): The goal of this activity is to show kids how to use the RED button on the rear view mirror to call for emergency help. This functions just like a 911 call. The people at the Emergency call center are waiting and prepared to tell the kids about how the RED button works. (The dealer can activate this lesson with OnStar. Call OnStar from the event location to be sure they are ready for your multiple calls.) onStar demonStratIon: The goal of this activity is to teach children how to call for help when they are in a car equipped with OnStar. Note: OnStar does NOT function if the car is turned off. key messages

1. OnStar technicians find you in an emergency -- after a crash where the airbags deploy. 2. You can contact the OnStar technician for non emergency situations by pushing the BLUE button. 3. Push the RED emergency button to call 911; this is for all emergencies. 4. Do not play with the buttons but know how to use them in an emergency.

Click with your Preteen

Help your preteen buckle up. For life.

2009 EVENT ACTIVITIES GUIDE PAGE 1

gettIng Started: The station leader will begin by explaining that car safety technology has evolved dramatically over the past 40 years, and continues to evolve today. The leader will tell the kids they are going to give their technology knowledge a check up with a demonstration of the OnStar safety system and a Spot the Air Bag activity. Tell the station leader/dealer who will run this station that OnStar representives will have a script.

tech check part 2: airbags and trunk entrapment (mandatory)

Spot the aIr Bag: The goal of this activity is to teach preteens how to tell if, and where, there is an air bag in the car. They will have to find the air bags, air bag symbols and read air bag warnings. Let them know that labels are on the sun visor, on the seat, sometimes on the door and in many other places in the vehicle. Every car can have a different number of air bags. Be sure to tell kids that air bags will still deploy, even if you don't have a seatbelt on. We will reinforce the message that a back seat is the safest spot to sit until kids reach age 13 and are over 4'9" tall. They will probably weigh between 80-100 pounds. Start by dividing the preteens into groups (based on the number of clipboards you have) of no more than three kids each. Give one child in each group a handout, clipboard and pencil. Point out that the handouts contain the various symbols that vehicle manufacturers use for air bags. Tell the preteens to mark their findings on the handout. When the preteens have finished, have them raise their hand if they found 1 air bag, 2, 3 and on up to as many air bags as the car has. Do the same for the warnings. Did anyone find the warning on the visor, seat belt or owner's manual in the glove compartment? Make a big deal of the kids who really searched for the labels or instructions. trunk entrapment: Every vehicle made since 2001 has a trunk "glow in the dark" release handle. Preteens learn how to find the handle and to know to tell an adult if small kids are playing in and around vehicle trunks. .

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paSS It on: tech check partS 1 and 2 Use the Spot the Air Bag activity as a jumping off point for Pass It On. Ask kids to take their worksheet home, and test their parents and siblings in their family car. This is a perfect time to remind the preteens that "all kids should ride in a back seat until they are 13 years old. QueStIonS to aSk preteenS · Did they learn anything new about car safety technology? · Were there air bags in places they did not know about before? · When are you big enough to sit up front if your car has an air bag? · Why is it safer to sit in a back seat? · How can you pass on what you've learned today? · What did they learn about the OnStar emergency system? · What about the trunk release pull? · What do you do if you see kids playing in a trunk?

key messages

1. A back seat is the safest spot to sit until kids are 13. 2. Air bags must be used with seat belts. 3. Air bags can be anywhere in the car. 4. Air bags are called many different names. 5. Trunks have a glow in the dark release handle. Learn where it is but do not play in trunks. 6. Cars after 2001 have release handles in every trunk.

StatIon tIp: tech check partS 1 and 2 Preteens can sound like know-it-alls. That's because they are information sponges -- they love to acquire and pass on knowledge. Use this to your advantage. Ask questions to find out what they know. If they're misinformed, try not to tell them so directly. Instead, ask other children until one answers correctly. If none of the children know the correct answer, say something like "a lot of people used to think that, but now experts know differently." Then present the correct information.

materIalS needed for tech check partS 1 and 2 · Vehicle with multiple front seat air bags and OnStar system · Vehicle with a trunk and a trunk release pull tab. (MY 2001 and beyond) · Vehicle Owner's Manual · Spot the Air Bag handout (download at SafestGeneration.com) · Pencils · Clipboards

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Seat Belt and Safety relay race (optIonal)

This station requires two leaders. Kids will learn to scan for toys, pets and children that may be under or near a vehicle. They will learn to secure all loose objects in the car. They will learn about proper seat belt use. gettIng Started Before the preteens arrive, the station leaders should mark two lines about 20 feet in front of the car. This is will be the starting point for the relay race. A Station Leader on each side of the vehicle will place a stuffed animal or toy near the car for the preteens to spot and pick up prior to entering the vehicle. Try to use stuffed animals or toys that are appealing to preteens and won't seem "babyish." All belt fit activities should take place in a back seat, to reinforce the "buckle up in a back seat" message to preteens. The station leader should begin the activity by talking about the importance of scanning for objects, toys or pets, entering the vehicle, securing backpacks, buckling up correctly and sitting in a back seat. The leader or a teen volunteer will then sit in a back seat and buckle up. The leader will explain the proper placement of the shoulder and lap belts. The leader will then choose a preteen and have them buckle up. The leader will talk about how seat belts fit adults and children differently, and demonstrate the Safety Belt Fit Test: 1. The preteen should be able to sit all the way back on the vehicle seat, with his or her knees bending naturally at the seat edge. 2. The lap portion of the seat belt should lie on the upper legs or hips. 3. The shoulder belt should lie on the shoulder or collarbone. The station leader also should talk about the dangers of slouching, lying down with a seat belt on, putting the shoulder belt under the arm or behind the back, and sharing seat belts. Be sure to remember to ask questions about what preteens may already know as you provide this information. Talk about the importance of securing backpacks and helping the driver scan for kids, toys and pets around or near the vehicle. Seat Belt relay race: After proper seat belt fit has been demonstrated, the station leaders will hold a seat belt relay between 2 teams. They will place the toy in a different location outside the vehicle each time. Each preteen must pick up the toy found near the vehicle and hand it to the CPS technician, enter the vehicle at the back door, properly stow the backpack on the floor and buckle up properly as quickly as they can. Once cleared, they put the backpack back on and return to tag the next person in line. (this has been a popular game and many kids want to repeat it to see if they can win the next time. If time allows, let them do the race again.) Divide the group into two (if there is an odd number, ask an adult to step in). The teams will line up behind the starting line. The station leader will then explain the rules of the race. key messages

1. All kids should ride in a back seat until they are 13. 2. Seat belts must be properly worn to be effective. 3. Everyone needs to be buckled in a vehicle. 4. Everyone needs to look for kids, toys and pets around a vehicle 5. Store all loose objects.

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relay ruleS · Backpack. Everyone wears a backpack for the relay. · walk. If you run you have to go back to the starting line and begin again (power walking is OK). · Scan. Look for things that should not be near the vehicle. Pick them up and hand off to the CPS technician. · Secure the backpack. Put the backpack on the floor. · Buckle the seat belt. Do it right the first time. You must buckle up properly in a back seat or you have to unbuckle and rebuckle. · return to the line, transfer the backpack and tag the next team member so they can head to the car. · wait your turn. You can't go until your returning teammate has stepped over the start line. Keep the race lively by encouraging preteens to cheer for their teammates. Encourage volunteers and parents to keep up the enthusiasm, too. paSS It on When the relay race is over, gather the kids and ask if they learned anything new. Before today, were they wearing their seat belt correctly, or not? Have they ever worn a shoulder belt behind their back, or know someone who does? Do they ever slouch so the seat belt hits their neck? Did they know about scanning for safety? Now that they know the proper way to wear a seat belt, ask how they might pass their safety knowledge on to other people. Talk about how preteens are role models for children who are younger than them. Do they have little brothers or sisters, parents or friends they can tell about buckling up? StatIon tIp If you need to redirect a preteen's behavior, physical proximity will help. Walk over next to the child, and comment first on something they are doing right. "You have lots of energy! That's really going to help your team. Let's stand behind the line so everyone gets their turn." What can they do to influence other people to wear their seat belts properly? How does scanning for toys and pets make people safer? Spend a few seconds to reinforce the message of "all kids should ride in a back seat until they are 13 years old. StatIon tIp When you want preteens to listen, use a quiet, conversational tone. The louder you talk, the louder the kids will talk. materIalS needed · Vehicle with two back-seat shoulder harness seat belts · Chalk or tape to mark the relay line · Two toys, stuffed animals or skateboards, etc. to place near the vehicle on each side for competing participants to find while moving into the vehicle. This teaches them to scan for kids, toys and pets around or near the vehicle every time they enter a vehicle. · Two backpacks: one for each participant to put on at the START line and properly secure on the floor when they get in the vehicle. Once cleared, they will put it back on at the car, return to the START position and give it to the next participant to put on before they start out towards the vehicle. · Two teams

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myth Slammers game (optIonal)

This station requires one technician leader. The leader should be someone who is enthusiastic and is comfortable acting like a game show host in front of the kids. IntroductIon Here is a possible script to get the game started: key messages Only 40 years ago, many cars didn't even have lap and shoulder seatbelts. Air bags didn't exist. Seat belts, air bags, GPS and other car-safety technology were something for the future. Today, you kids sitting here are that future. You're smarter about safety than any generation before you. You are the Safest Generation.

1. Having good information might save a life. 2. Knowledgeable preteens can be good information sources.

But because a lot of car safety devices are still relatively "new" for adults who grew up without them, there are still some old ideas about car safety floating around. So we're going to do a quick game. gettIng Started The leader of this station will begin by going over the timeline on the Safest Generation poster. The leader then will introduce the Myth Slammers Game. The goal of the introduction is to reinforce the concept of the Safest Generation and to set up the Myth Slammers game. This is a great opportunity to hand out prizes or goody bags, if you plan to have incentives for kids at the event. After the introduction, the leader will read each Myth Slammer statement. Ask kids to raise their hands if they agree. Repeat for those who disagree. Then read the correct answer. myth Slammer Statements 1. Most 11- and 12-year-olds use seat belts. They think it's smart to buckle up. Is that a fact or a myth? THAT'S A TRUE FACT. You are part of the Safest Generation. Studies show most kids your age buckle up all the time and sit in a back seat. 2. If there aren't enough seat belts in the car, the two smallest kids in the car should buckle up together. THAT'S A MYTH! Each seat belt is meant for only one person. Sharing a seat belt puts it in the wrong place on both people and could injure you in a crash. If there aren't enough seat belts for everyone, you shouldn't ride in that car. 3. Most people are driving at a high rate of speed when they get into a wreck. Is that true? THAT'S A MYTH! Most people who get into a wreck are driving less than 40 miles per hour. That's why you should always wear your seat belt and sit in a back seat, even when you know you are with a safe driver. 4. If your car goes off the road into a river or lake, you'll be safer if you're not wearing your seatbelt. Is that a fact or a myth? THAT'S A MYTH! These types of crashes are very, very rare ­ they occur less than one-half of one percent of the time. But when they do happen, do you know what protects you most? Your seat belt. Buckling up protects you during a crash so you can stay conscious and alert, and get out of the car quickly. It keeps you in place so you can find the door or a window even if the car is upside down.

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5. You should wear your seat belt even when you're just on short trips in your neighborhood. Is that true? THAT'S A TRUE FACT. Half of all crashes occur just 5 to 10 minutes from home. You should always buckle up, even on short trips. 6. If I do get into a crash, I'd rather be thrown clear of the car. I have a better chance of surviving that way. Is that true? THAT'S A MYTH! Three out of four people who get thrown from the car die. It's as simple as that. 7. Adults don't need to wear a seatbelt if a car has an air bag. Is that true? THAT'S A MYTH! When air bags were first invented, people thought they could be used instead of seat belts. But then they found out that air bags used without seat belts could hurt and even kill people. And you should never sit in a seat that has an air bag unless you meet the height and weight requirements ­ usually after you are 13 years old. StatIon tIp Kids will enjoy the game more ­ and remember the information better ­ if you can get them to participate. Be enthusiastic. Act like a game-show host. You may want to call on individual kids. Be patient if a child is too shy to speak at first. But don't wait so long they feel put on the spot. StatIon tIp One trick veteran teachers use to keep kids' attention: Repeat, and repeat again. Don't hesitate to repeat the Myth Slammer statements as you call on individual kids. Sometimes preteens are so busy trying to get called on that they forget the question they want to answer! paSS It on After the Myth Slammers Game, ask the children if they learned anything new. How might they pass on that information to others? Listen to their ideas. Then let the kids know they have a great way to Pass It On ­ by creating their own ads about car safety. materIalS needed · Safest Generation poster, downloadable at www.SafestGeneration.org · If you have prizes for the preteens, they can be handed out at this station.

Scrambled eggs/Shaken Brains (optIonal)

This station requires one CPS technician leader. The leader should have a dozen (more or less based on the number of times the activity is repeated) jumbo eggs, each wrapped in a small amount of plastic wrap. The station leader places the unrestrained egg in the passenger seat of an "open" car (we used a Barbie jeep from Target) and races the car down a ramp quickly. To build a ramp, place a board on the back of a car or truck bumper. Have a hard object at the base of the ramp. We used a table placed on its' side. At the end of the activity, you or one of the kids, will break the eggs to show they were not hard boiled and just like people, can be easily injured or killed. They mostly break all by themselves. This is a big hit with the kids. They love to watch eggs get smashed.

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gettIng Started Purpose of the exercise: · Show kids how an unrestrained occupant in a crash has less protection than a restrained occupant · Have an opportunity to explain how certain parts of the body are more fragile than others · Explain how important it is to protect all parts of the body- especially the head and spine How to run the exercise: · Gather kids around the board · Use the Sharpie to customize the eggs if you want · Place one egg in the passenger seat with no restraint. · Set up the ramp- building as high as the kids urge you to go- generally they will want it really high. · Set up the barrier at the base of the ramps · Load the car with the unrestrained egg · Generally, the unrestrained egg will come out of the car · Repeat as often as time allows. paSS It on Ask the kids if they could explain to their parents or other kids the benefit of having a seat belt on in a crash? What could they do to be sure a younger child is using a car seat or booster seat if they are too small for a seat belt (under 4'9" and less than 80-100 pounds)? How should a seat belt be worn to gain the best protection? Can restrained people be hurt by unrestrained people in a car? Absolutely! StatIon tIp Be sure to allow several kids to be involved in the activities at each station. Be sure the same and more assertive kids do not keep quieter and more shy kids from participating. materIalS needed · Eggs (NOT hard boiled) · Plastic wrap (prevents a HUGE mess) · Sharpies (4)- you can draw faces on the eggs if you are so inclined · An open toy car big enough to hold an egg in the front seat (available at Target, Toys R Us or K-Mart) · A wide board wide enough to allow the car to travel down the ramp · A vehicle bumper or several bricks, books, etc. to place under the board to make a ramp · A "wall" at the bottom of the ramp for the cars to crash into key messages

1. Unrestrained occupants do not always stay in a vehicle in a crash. 2. Three out of four people who are ejected from a car do not live to talk about that crash. 3. You do not have to be going fast to be ejected from a car. 4. Seat belts prevent ejection. Wear your seat belt on every ride in every car. 5. Seat belts protect very frail people like old people and children in car seats.

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what's right or wrong In this vehicle? (optIonal)

In this activity, a car is set up with an adult driver, preteen front seat passenger, a child (doll) in a booster seat, and one child (doll) in a car seat rear-facing in a back seat. Each preteen participant gets a checklist and gets to mark which occupants are properly restrained and which are not. gettIng Started The station leader will enlist a "family" to be the picture for the preteens to examine. They will observe the occupants. Have clipboards preloaded with a checklist for each preteen to find the misuses and chart them. Provide a pencil and checklist for each preteen. Clipboards make it easier to write! Tell preteens that they cannot correct any misuse that they find. They should just record it on the checklist. One of the station leaders can begin the activity by highlighting the importance of: · scanning for kids, toys or pets before entering the vehicle · securing loose objects · buckling up correctly and sitting in a back seat · proper placement of the shoulder and lap belts Before the actual activity starts, the leader will review how seat belts fit adults and children, how a booster seat works and how infants must ride in a car seat facing the rear of the car. Specifically, the leader should go over the following:

key messages

1. If your eye is trained to know what to look for, it can be easy to spot when someone is using their seat belt or car seat incorrectly. 2. People who know the right way to wear seat belts and car seats can help others do it right. 3. Everyone (drivers, passengers) needs to look for kids, toys and pets around a vehicle. 4. ALL loose objects must be secured or placed in a secure location for EVERY trip.

1. The preteen should be able to sit all the way back on the vehicle seat, with his or her knees bending naturally at the seat edge. 2. The lap portion of the belt should lie on the upper legs or hips. 3. The shoulder belt should lie on the shoulder or collarbone. 4. The child in the booster seat should wear both a lap and shoulder seat belt correctly -- just like the adults and preteens. 5. Infants ride rear-facing in a car seat in a back seat. 6. Loose objects should be secured. The station leader also should review about the dangers of slouching, lying down with a seat belt on, putting the shoulder belt under the arm or behind the back, and sharing seat belts.

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Using the checklist, the preteen must identify the 4 incorrect and 2 correct things with the scenario. A team leader will be at the vehicle so kids do not share answers. Preteens look into the vehicle at each seating position and note whether what they see is right or wrong, based on what they have learned. REMINDER: The preteen will have to understand restraint issues and note correct responses. At the conclusion after everyone has had a chance to view the vehicle and the occupants, bring the group together so everyone gets to grade their own paper. ruleS · walk. Small groups of kids should approach the vehicle and look around the vehicle and in the doors. · Scan. Look for things around the vehicle that pose a danger. · wait your turn. Approach the vehicle when the leader tells you it is ok to do so. · look at each occupant in the vehicle. Check off the RIGHTS and WRONGS. Using your chart, mark off who is wearing their restraint right and who is doing it wrong. paSS It on · Have a preteen volunteer talk about how to correct an incorrectly worn seat belt. · Have a preteen know how to get the attention of a driver to tell them about an object or person that is near a vehicle. Explain why that is dangerous and how they can be helpful. · Have the preteen talk about why they will wear a seat belt even if no one else is wearing one. · Ask how they will tell others about the importance of helping the driver scan for kids, toys and pets around or near the vehicle. · Ask about loose items. · Review booster seat, child restraint and other occupant protection use for ALL occupants. StatIon tIp Make sure you allow people time to get out of their "seating" position and stretch their legs before they go back to sitting either correctly or incorrectly in the vehicle when the next group comes through. materIalS needed · Vehicle with one backseat shoulder harness seat belt and frontal passenger airbags · A stuffed animal or toy to place near the vehicle for the preteens to find while moving close to the vehicle. (Incorrect: something too near the vehicle) · Infant child restraint with doll and a sign saying 6 months old, 16 pounds (Correct: set up in rear facing car seat correctly) · "Adult" driver, can be an adult volunteer (Incorrect: set up wearing shoulder belt under arm) · Front seat passenger, a preteen volunteer (incorrect: should be in back seat) · A 4-7 year old doll in a booster seat with a sign stating age and weight (7 years old, 54lbs.)(Correct: wearing seat belt right) · Loose backpack on back shelf: (Incorrect: should be on the floor)

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what's the difference Between these two pictures? (optIonal)

This quiet activity has two pictures that look very similar. The preteen must look very closely to identify all the differences between a "Safe Car Ride" and an "Unsafe Car Ride". The differences they should find are: · unsafe: child distracting the driver (Safe: child not distracting the driver) · unsafe: driver wearing earphones (Safe: driver not wearing earphones) · unsafe: driver not wearing seat belt (Safe: driver wearing seat belt) · unsafe: child leaning on window (Safe: child sitting up correctly) · unsafe: child shoulder strap under the arm (Safe: child wearing shoulder strap properly) · unsafe: child laying down (Safe: child sitting properly) · unsafe: child with no shoulder strap on (Safe: child with shoulder strap on) · unsafe: backpack on seat (Safe: backpack on floor) · unsafe: child playing with ball (Safe: no ball) gettIng Started Pass out the activity sheets to each preteen. Provide pencils. Have the kids circle the differences between the two pictures. Be sure that preteens can tell others when it is appropriate to sit in the front seat. Can they tell others where to place the shoulder belt. Can they tell others where to place the lap belt. Can the preteen tell others about loose objects in the vehicle and how to prevent that. StatIon tIp Use the wrap up to let everyone offer something about what they learned. Make sure adults contribute too so kids see that adults can learn new things too! materIalS needed · Download the handout from www.safestgeneration.org (What's The Difference.pdf)

key messages

1. If your eye is trained to know what to look for it can be easy to spot when someone is using their seat belt incorrectly. 2. People who know the right way to wear a seat belt or use a car seat can help other people do it right. 3. All objects must be secured or placed in a secure location for every trip.

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take home actIvIty: make your own ad (optIonal)

get Started Tell the preteens they will get an activity packet to create their own ad about car safety. Repeat the key messages in an ad about car safety. It might contain: · You should always wear your seat belt. If the car is moving, everyone's seat belt should be buckled. · A back seat is the safest place to sit for kids under 13. · Studies show most preteens sit where it's safest ­ buckled up in a back seat. · Then share the following contest tips: · Try this at home. Kids can finish their ad at home with the packet provided or create an ad online at SafestGeneration.com. · At school, can the art teacher make this an assignment? paSS It on Where can they display the ad they create? In the car? At school? On their bedroom door? If they create their ads online, they can also email them to friends or family or post them on social networking websites. Let them know if your local community is also sponsoring a contest and tell them how to participate.

wrap up (8 minutes)

materIalS needed Parent handout (Click With Your Preteen) End the safety event with three final actions, if they are available: · Door prizes: If you are holding a drawing for door prizes, announce the winners. · Takeaways: Pass out the Safest Generation handout for parents and activity materials for preteens. · Set off the air bag. If your coalition has access to a dealer who can set off an air bag ­ this might be a good time to use that and reinforce the message that preteens are safest buckled up in a back seat of the car.

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helpful hIntS for your event

· Car dealers often have extra, un-deployed air bags. Approach dealers to bring one to your event to show kids how powerful an air bag can be. One coalition used a shopping cart to place over the air bag, to prevent it from going airborne. BIG SURPRISE: The airbag shot the shopping cart up into the air! The kids and adults loved it and asked for a repeat. The dealer was happy to oblige. · "Be sure to have a manageable number of kids. When working with a GM dealership, be sure toselect a day for the event that works well with customer flow". -Tareka Wheeler, Austin, TX · Enlarging the posters at your local print shop or school (rather than simply on legal sized paper) is a great way to make a bigger impact. You can have this done for just a few extra bucks. · If you're partnered with your school district, you can request your poster be printed through their resources as well, often for no charge. Schools may also be able to laminate the posters. · "Be organized! Schedule people who are good with kids. Remember preteens love t-shirts and giveaways". - Jo Sitton, Newton County, MO · Preteens tend to get distracted with a lot of interaction and may lose their goody bags or prizes. Keep this in mind, especially when you are rotating groups through the different stations. · "I believe a big plus for us was having uniformed police officers there to help with the activities. I believe the kids understood the importance of the message since it was coming from Police officers". -Kyril Monts, Broward County, FL on the tech check StatIon · "Everything worked well!! The Chevy dealer did an excellent job. He brought a car with many different air bags. Students enjoyed finding the air bags and were surprised by how many there were". - Jo Sitton, Newton County, MO · "On the handout, advise kids to place an "X" at every spot where they found an air bag. The kids liked learning about the curtain air bag and how it worked". - Gina Duchossois, Philadelphia, PA on the myth SlammerS game · "I found it helpful to have a 14 year-old teenage volunteer to help with the activity to hand out goody bags, hold up the timeline poster, give out prizes and act as a role model. The students were wonderful as were their teachers." - Debra Samaha, Jo-Ellen Courtney, New Hampshire · "We had two game show hosts and that worked great! We utilized pool noodles for the kids to wave when they knew the right answer". -Tareka Wheeler, Austin, TX · "Be sure to ask all the questions. Have small groups of kids at each station, pick a great location (the dealer deployed an air bag and that kept everyone's attention)". - Debra Samaha and Jo-Ellen Courtney

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