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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

One World, One University

UNIVERSITY CATALOG 2010-2011

Main Campus, Largo, Florida USA

SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. Overview Mission .................................................................................... Goals ....................................................................................... History .................................................................................... Statement of Accreditation and Licensure .......................................... Governance, Organization, and Administration ..................................... The American System of Education: The Credit Hour ............................ The Campuses: Largo, Florida, USA ..................................................................... Heidelberg, Germany ..................................................................... London, United Kingdom ............................................................... Madrid, Spain ............................................................................. Paris, France .............................................................................. Distance Learning, Florida ............................................................. Admissions Requirements, Policies, and Procedures ............................................. Tests Requirements ..................................................................... Advanced Standing, Transfer Students ............................................. Student Services Statement of Services ..................................................................... Career Counseling ........................................................................ Alumni ....................................................................................... Library ....................................................................................... Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid ............................................................ Refund Policy ............................................................................... Course Programs and Descriptions Course Overview of Degree Programs ................................................... Undergraduate Programs .................................................................. Graduate Programs ......................................................................... Course Descriptions ........................................................................ Academic Regulations Undergraduate: Grades, Satisfactory Academic Standing and Progress ........... Graduate: Grades, Satisfactory Academic Standing and Progress ................. Honors and Awards ......................................................................... General Regulations: Non Discrimination, Disclosure of Records ................. Standards of Conduct, Attendance, Honesty Policy, Appeal, FERPA, Transcripts Grievance Policy ........................................................................... Campus Contact Information ............................................................... 3 3 3 3 4 6

II.

7 8 9 10 11 12

III.

13 13 14

IV.

15 15 15 15 15 18

V.

VI.

20 21 32 39

VII.

55 57 58 60 61 62 63

VIII.

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OVERVIEW

MISSION OF THE UNIVERSITY The educational mission of Schiller International University (SIU) is to prepare students, personally and professionally, for future leadership roles in an international setting. In its undergraduate and graduate degree programs, SIU provides students with the competencies they need for professional careers as well as for further academic study. The educational process puts particular emphasis on developing international and cross-cultural competencies through foreign language training, intercampus transfer, or other international academic opportunities, and intense interaction among backgrounds. GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY · Promote student learning through excellence in teaching, support services, and instructional delivery both online and in traditional settings · Promote an institutional culture that values the individual, fosters diversity, and engenders international and cross-cultural competencies · Identify the unique academic and cultural resources available at each of the five global campuses and develop a means of sharing campus resources university-wide · Promote student and faculty mobility among campuses to capitalize on the unique place SIU occupies on the higher education landscape HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY Schiller International University was founded in 1964 by Dr. Walter Leibrecht for the purpose of providing American students with an educational experience in Europe while continuing their studies within the American educational model. In time, this original concept was broadened to include students from all over the world seeking an American study program in an international setting. Thus, the first semester abroad program evolved into full undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Geographically, campuses expanded into Europe and America. Demographically, over 100 different nationalities experienced Dr. Leibrecht's vision of education. Presently, Schiller International University has campuses in Heidelberg, London, Madrid, Paris, and Largo, Florida. Since its founding, the mission of the college has remained focused on the value of a globalized educational environment, recognizing that international perspectives are crucial to solving contemporary problems and developing a globally literate, interculturally competent citizenry. The short history of the 21st Century confirms the imperative of the Schiller International University Mission: "...developing international and cross cultural competencies" via education. Schiller International University has continually evolved through decades, reflecting the growing diversity of the student body and its needs. STATEMENT OF ACCREDITATION AND LICENSURE Schiller International University has been accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) since 1983. SIU is accredited by ACICS to award Associate, Bachelor's, and Master's Degrees. The address of ACICS is 750 First Street, NE., Suite 980, Washington, DC 20002-4241. Telephone: (202) 3366780. The University is licensed by the Florida State Commission for Independent Education (CIE) to award Associate, Bachelor's, and Master's Degrees. The address of the CIE is Commission for Independent Education, 325 West Gained Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee, Florida 32399. Telephone: (850) 245-3200. Toll Free (US) (888) 2446684. Schiller International University Madrid Campus is recognized by the Consejeria de Educacion y Cultura in Madrid (Local Higher Education Authorities.

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GOVERNANCE, ORGANIZATION, AND ADMINISTRATION Statement of Legal Control The owner of Schiller International University is Salem Education, LLC, owned by a group of investors organized by The Palmer Group, a private investment firm located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mr. Russell E. Palmer is the Chief Executive Officer. The Board of Directors Mr. John R. Torrell III, Chair Mr. Jack D. Bunce Mr. Harald Leibrecht Mr. Douglas Mellinger Mr. Russell E. Palmer Dr. R. John Reynolds Central Administration Faculty for all campuses are noted in the Catalog Supplement enclosed. For contact information please visit our website: http://www.schiller.edu/ Philip Krebs Michele Geigle Victoria Hodges Alexis Scher Kathleen McCabe Victoria Steinberg Sunshine Termine Vasil Hadzi-Jordanov Linda Riordan Leah Ziermann Sandy Howard President Provost Main Registrar / PDSO Assistant Main Registrar / DSO Director of Admissions Controller Staff Accountant Director of IT Executive Assistant Director of Financial Aid Financial Aid Counselor

Largo, Florida and Distance Learning Nina Jackel Campus Registrar Carlos Tasso Dean of Business Alisa Carmichael Librarian Stephanie Hagen Bursar Helen LaFever Director of Student Services / Career Services John Llauget Counselor Kathy McCabe Vice President of Admissions Jan-Michael Norman Admissions Representative Kara Shields Receptionist John Llauget Counselor / Psychologist Heidelberg, Germany Campus Thomas Leibrecht Andreas Heinemann Heidi Harrison Dr. Nicolle Macho Michael Reynon Valerie Rouse Dr. Robert Scott

Campus Director Librarian Bursar, Student Services Officer Chair, Graduate Programs, Academic Advisor Business Manager, Accountant Assistant Director, Marketing & Admissions Director of Studies, Registrar

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Ben Timmons Monika Weuster London, UK Campus Steven Davis Dr. Nick Kyritsis Lisa Harries Graham Bell, Ph.D. Kirit Parjiea Maria Bergmann Maria Watson Alex Alexandrov Dr. Vladamir Petlenko Tracey Forshaw Gbemisola Oteju-Akinlade Sonja Aracic Entela Maliqi Katazyna Predka Philip Scott Madrid, Spain Campus Lynn Bergunde María Luisa López-Ruiz Alexandre Chernavin Stephen Hunter Jones Paloma Mesonero Ana Rojas Duncan Shaw Jane Strei Paris, France Campus Souha Akiki Alison Benoit Christiane Lord Anna Marcikic Cyril Nehmé, Fabrizio Veneziano

Assistant Director, Marketing & Admissions Administrative Assistant, Career Officer

Campus Director Principal of London City College Associate Campus Director Professor of Faculty & Research Finance Officer Bursar Assistant Bursar IT Co-Manager IT Co-Manager Admissions Representative Student Services Assistant Campus Registrar Office Manager Secretary Librarian

Campus Director Librarian Placement Officer / Bursar Systems Administrator Campus Secretary/Student Housing Coordinator Assistant Director of Admissions Registrar/Head of Studies Deputy Director

Campus Director, Programs Advisor Registrar, Financial Aid Assistant Registrar, Bookstore Manager, Dean of Students Assistant to the Director Bursar / Career Counselor Librarian, Computer Lab

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THE AMERICAN SYSTEM OF EDUCATION Many students who are from countries other than the United States have questions about the American educational system. Schiller International University's study programs conform to the academic system used throughout the United States. Schiller International University offers programs via the semester format. However, courses are now provided on a monthly basis with classes meeting 4 days per week for 3 hours per session for one month. This intense focus per class or subject allows more breadth and depth of topics. Four courses are still required per semester: 12 credits for full time undergraduate and 12 credits for full time graduate students. Classes simply change monthly. The national accrediting association, ACICS, The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, require institutions offering AS and BS degrees to provide breadth and depth in the curricular area offered. Depth is represented in Schiller Intentional University's curriculum through various academic major programs. Breadth is represented through the General Education core courses. Specifically, the General Education courses include Communication, Humanities, Fine Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Natural Science, Mathematics and Computer Competence. This component of an undergraduate degree should include approximately 25% of the course work and is usually concentrated in the first two years of study in the Associate and Baccalaureate degrees. The American system also assesses its students continuously from the beginning of the educational process. Grades are assigned at regular intervals through class work and examinations given by the instructors, who know each student's strengths and weaknesses, rather than by impersonal external boards of examiners as in other systems. Thus, students are aware of their progress throughout the term. The American system measures this progress in credit hours. The student must earn 60 credits for an Associate's degree and 120 credit hours for a Bachelor's degree. Depending on the program, a Master's degree is earned with 36 or 45 credit hours. One credit equals 15 hours of classroom instruction. One academic hour is 50 minutes in length. One course provides 3 credits or 45 hours of classroom instruction.

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II.

THE CAMPUSES

LARGO, FLORIDA, USA

SIU's Main Campus, Largo, Florida

SIU's Main Entrance

SIU's Lobby Entrance

The City SIU'S Main Campus is located in Largo, Florida, in the Greater Tampa Bay Region with a population of approximately 4 million. The campus fronts Ulmerton Road, which serves as a primary artery connecting Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico. It is a ten minute drive to one of the most beautiful coastal regions in America. Famous for its mild semi-tropical climate, the area has a thriving Hotel and Tourism industry. Both Tampa and St. Petersburg are growing centers of High-Tech industry, and Tampa, a major American port, is home to the enterprises of finance, pharmaceuticals, and film-making. Museums of Art and Culture, State Parks with unique nature preserves, and the unparalleled fishing, sailing and swimming on Florida's Gulf Coast have drawn a cosmopolitan mixture of inhabitants to the area from all over the United States and the world. Major league baseball and football teams are centered in the area. The Campus Schiller International University has moved to a new location: 8560 Ulmerton Road, Largo, FL. 33771. The new facility is a two story campus with approximately 30,000 Sf. State of the art technology has been installed in 12 classrooms and 2 computer labs, inclusive of smart-board technology. There is a well designed library, two student lounges, a student break area, a bookstore, and various spacious administrative and faculty offices. This campus is accessible to all major highways and public transportation. Two parking lots provide ample space for vehicles. Further neighboring facilities include public swimming pools, tennis courts, and shopping centers. Tampa International Airport is 20 minutes east of the campus and a bus system links the area's population centers. Programs of Study The Florida campus offers AS degrees in International Business, and in International Hospitality and Tourism Management; AA degrees in General Studies; BS degrees in International Business, and in International Hospitality and Tourism Management; BA degrees in International Relations and Diplomacy and in Interdepartmental Studies; and MBA degrees in International Business, in Business Administration, in Management of Information Technology, in International Hospitality and Tourism Management, in Financial Planning (a cooperative program with Kaplan College) and a Master of International Management (MIM) degree. English as a Foreign Language classes are available for those wishing to improve their English language skills during study at SIU. The MBA is offered in residential, online, and combined formats to serve the needs of working professionals as well as part-time students.

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HEIDELBERG, GERMANY

Palais Friedrich, SIU's Heidelberg Campus

Heidelberg, situated on the banks of the River Neckar

The City An hour train ride from Frankfurt, the financial center of Germany; Heidelberg is the home of Germany's oldest university. Situated in the valley of the Neckar River between forested mountains and the Rhine plain, Heidelberg's beauty is matched by its significance as a center of scientific research and modern high-tech industrial firms. The Campus The Heidelberg Campus occupies an Art Nouveau villa located at the edge of a forest, less than 20 minute walk from the center of Old Heidelberg. The beautiful building, listed as a historical monument, houses administrative offices, a library, computer facilities, classrooms and two wings of dormitory rooms. The GermanAmerican Institute, with its library, lectures, films and cultural events is nearby. With the assistance of the campus staff, SIU students are housed individually or with fellow students in rooms and apartments throughout the town, or in student rooms within the campus building or nearby. Programs of Study The Heidelberg campus offers AS degrees in International Business; BS degrees in International Business; AA degrees in General Studies; BA degrees in International Economics, in Interdepartmental Studies and in International Relations and Diplomacy; MBA degrees in International Business, Business Administration, and in Management of Information Technology; and Master of International Management degrees. The language of instruction is English. Intensive German language courses are available at the Heidelberg Campus.

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LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM

Royal Waterloo House, SIU's Central London

The Houses of Parliament, Westminster

The City London is one of the leading centers of world commerce, but it is much more than a business metropolis: it is the heart of the British Commonwealth, a political and diplomatic capital, and a city which has been influential for centuries. London is one of the foremost cultural centers of the world. Its offerings in theater, music, opera, ballet, art, and film are unrivaled, and it is rich in architecture and literary and historical associations. Its many institutions of commercial, cultural and historic importance offer students an understanding of life on an international scale. Students are encouraged to make full educational use of this cosmopolitan city's vast resources. The Campus Schiller's residential campus provides excellent facilities for study in London. The London campus is located at Royal Waterloo House, a few hundred yards from Waterloo Station. Royal Waterloo House is a spacious and imposing Edwardian building housing administrative offices, lecture and seminar rooms, a library, a computer center, and residential accommodation. Its position on the South Bank by the River Thames is ideal, and it is very close to the National Theatre, the Royal Festival Hall, the National Film Theatre, the Museum of the Moving Image, the British Film Institute's IMAX cinema, the London Television Centre and the London News Network, as well as the London headquarters of IBM and Shell. The campus is within a mile of the Houses of Parliament. There is direct access to all parts of the city across Waterloo Bridge and within walking distance of Covent Garden, Leicester Square, Trafalgar Square and Piccadilly Circus. Programs of Study The London campus offers AS degrees in International Business; AA degree in General Studies; BA degrees in Interdepartmental Studies, in International Economics, and in International Relations and Diplomacy; BS degrees in International Business; MBA degrees in Business Administration, in International Business, and in International Hospitality & Tourism Management; MA degree in International Relations & Diplomacy. A Master of International Management (MIM) degree is also offered.

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MADRID, SPAIN

Madrid Campus

Madrid Night Life

Madrid Campus

The City The city of Madrid is made up of many cities: the cultural, with its museums, concert halls and theaters; the traditional, with its popular festivities, and neighborhoods; the gastronomical with its typical restaurants; the historical, with its monuments, churches and palaces; the modern, with its multinational enterprises, banks, hotels, shops and international convention centers. Madrid, the vibrant capital of the Spanish-speaking world is historic, monumental and contemporary at the same time, overflowing with cutting edge design and cuisine. It is a vibrant metropolis that immediately adopts you, making you feel like you belong there. In Madrid you can find large avenues and elegant boulevards alongside narrow cobblestone streets; tall and modern buildings next to old churches and plazas. Madrid is a city to discover: you can stop and enjoy its lively cafes at almost every corner, and its legendary nightlife. Madrid is bustling with life day and night - a city that never sleeps. The Campus Schiller's Madrid campus building, a beautiful neoclassical building that was formerly the residence of a member of the Spanish royal family, is situated on Serrano Street - considered one of the most elegant areas of Madrid - on the Plaza de la República Argentina. It is surrounded by restaurants, embassies, international schools and cultural centers. In the neighborhood, you'll also find everything from boutiques to the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium (home of the Real Madrid soccer team). The campus offers a full range of facilities, including computer labs, study and lounge areas, a library, and a career counseling and placement office. SIU provides administration and staff who can assist students in finding their way in the city and locating accommodations. Programs of Study The Madrid campus offers the following degrees: AS in International Business; AA in General Studies; BS in International Business; BA in International Economics; BA in International Relations and Diplomacy; BA in Interdepartmental Studies; and MBA in Business Administration and in International Business. A Master of International Management (MIM) degree is also offered. The language of instruction is English.

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PARIS, FRANCE

Paris, one of Europe's great capitals, has been the site of a Schiller campus for over 40 years. The City Paris needs no introduction. The capital city of the sixth world economy is also the fifth most populated city in Europe. It is the economic and commercial capital of France, its leading financial and stock market. Although the Paris economy is largely dominated by services, it still remains an important manufacturing powerhouse of Europe, especially in industrial sectors such as Automobiles, Aeronautics, and Electronics. Over recent decades, the local economy has moved towards high-value-added activities, in particular business services. Several international organizations have their headquarters in Paris. They include UNESCO, the OECD, the International Chamber of Commerce, and the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). A destination visited annually by some 26 million tourists, the city offers over 150 museums including the Louvre, and exceptional sites, such as the Champs-Elysees or the Eiffel Tower. The World Capital of exhibitions and conferences, fashion, luxury, and gastronomy, Paris offers superior entertainment, including theaters, operas, and films from around the world. The main areas for nightlife are the Avenue des Champs-Élysées, Place de la Concorde to the Arc de Triomphe, Bastille, Pigalle, Rue Mouffetard, Rue Oberkampf, famous for its bars, the Marais, la Butte aux Cailles, the Canal Saint-Martin, the Latin Quarter, the district of Les Halles, Montparnasse and the Rue de Lappe. Studying in Paris is a great opportunity for SIU students to be immersed in one of the most important political, diplomatic, economic and cultural capitals in the world. The Campus The campus is centrally located, in one of the liveliest areas in Paris. The campus is also close to the main landmarks of Paris. Students may have access to the American Library of Paris and other relevant resources. As an independent international and American University in Paris, SIU offers students a multicultural environment with faculty that encourages diversity, leadership and global understanding.

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Programs of Study The Paris campus offers AS degrees in International Business; BS degrees in International Business; AA degrees in General Studies; BA degrees in Interdepartmental Studies and International Relations and Diplomacy; MBA degrees in International Business and Business Administration; MA degrees in International Relations and Diplomacy; and Master of International Management degrees. The language of instruction is English. Students with an adequate command of French may, at their own expense, take courses at the Sorbonne, the arts facility of the University of Paris, for which they may receive up to nine credits from Schiller towards the fulfillment of their language requirements. DISTANCE LEARNING PROGRAM IS PART OF THE FLORIDA CAMPUS Schiller International University offers its undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a completely flexible online format. Founded in 1964, with over 20,000 alumni all over the world, Schiller International University is often referred to as "The International University". Now, via the Internet, this university is accessible from anywhere in the world. These online programs are designed for students who work full-time, manage a family, or are otherwise unable to attend classes at one of our five campuses on a regular basis. Unlike any university, you can easily shift from online to on-campus and accelerate your degree in exciting places like London, Paris, Madrid, Heidelberg, and Largo, Florida. Many Schiller International University students travel their way through college. Not ready to travel? Start online and transfer when you're ready. The courses offered online have the same admissions requirement as residential programming and contain the same course content and learning objectives as those offered in a traditional format. The textbooks are the same as are the syllabi. Student learning outcomes for this program are measured by grade comparisons, and students' comprehensive exam results. See the Overview of Degree Programs in Section V of this catalog, Course Descriptions, for a complete list of courses offered online (page 19) Visit the SIU online website at http://www.schiller.edu/siu-online for a complete list of the Technology Requirements including required hardware, software, internet access, and access to library / college for monitoring examinations. In addition, please take the student evaluation survey to assess online readiness. Note that there is an additional $100 technology fee for all online classes.

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ADMISSIONS TO THE UNIVERSITY Requirements for Undergraduate Admission Schiller International University receives applications from almost every country in the world, representing a variety of educational systems. For entrance into the university, applicants must have completed the secondary level of education, generally 12 years, or have 5 GCE O - Levels at Grade C or above. Applications are handled individually. Schiller International University does not discriminate when reviewing and admitting applicants (see Non Discrimination Policy). Before registration all new students whose native language is not English are required to take the English Language Placement Test. On the basis of test results, students may be required to take courses in EFL (English as a Foreign Language). Students who are placed in Advanced English, i.e. those with advanced EFL scores, will be awarded 3 to 6 credits for their knowledge. Those who are exempted from further English language instruction will receive 9 credits (for exceptional scores) to 12 credits (perfect score). All qualified students will receive University credits for their English language courses taken at SIU. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in English prior to enrollment in SIU courses. This requirement can also be satisfied by a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of at least 500 (written version) or 173 (computer version) or an IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of 6 or better taken within the previous two years. Please also note that students must have had their official TOEFL or IELTS scores sent directly to SIU's U.S. Admissions Office from the Educational Testing Service prior to registration. SIU's TOEFL number is 0835. Requirements for Graduate Admission For more detailed information and specific requirement on this subject please refer to the Graduate Requirements Handbook. Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent with a major in the graduate area for which they are applying. Students with undergraduate degrees in another field may be required to complete preparatory courses. For entry into the MIM and the MBA in International Hospitality and Tourism Management programs, the applicant may hold a Bachelor's degree in any field. Applicants must have maintained a good academic record in their undergraduate studies. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in English prior to enrollment in SIU courses. This requirement can be satisfied by a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of at least 550 (written version) or 213 (computer version) or an IELTS (International English Language Testing System) score of 6 or better taken within the previous two years. Please note that students must have had their official TOEFL or IELTS scores sent directly to SIU's U.S. Admissions Office from the Educational Testing Service prior to registration. SIU's TOEFL number is 0835 Admissions Policy Since Schiller International University operates on a monthly rolling admissions system, it is possible to advise applicants of their acceptance or rejection soon after receipt of all application materials (including official transcripts). A non refundable $20 application fee is required of all applicants. Although there is no application deadline, SIU strongly advises applicants who require visas to apply at least four (4) months before the beginning of the term for which they wish to enroll. International students are also subject to a $60.00 courier fee if that service is required. Terms of Enrollment Students must enroll for at least four consecutive months (one semester) and may begin their studies at the beginning of any term or month, which usually coincides with the first day of the month. (See Academic Calendar in the catalog supplement). Application Procedure Please refer to the Admissions' Office of the campus of interest. Contact information for each campus is on the website.

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Advanced Standing All of SIU's degree programs are open to full-time or part-time students who wish to resume their education. In many cases, the returning student is entitled to advanced standing, by virtue of prior training, experience and standardized examinations as follows: · Military service training. SIU recognizes learning gained from specialized training and experiences in the military service. · College-Level Examination (CLEP). Under prescribed conditions, SIU will grant credit for the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) subject examinations which are administered by CEEB. Transfer Students/Transfer Credits Undergraduate Students may transfer to Schiller in any semester of their undergraduate studies. Some transfer students, particularly those in their third and fourth years, may find it necessary to take additional courses in order to fulfill degree requirements. Credit is granted for undergraduate work completed with a grade of C or above, provided it is applicable to Schiller degree programs. The total number of transfer credits from other colleges and universities is listed on the student's permanent record. However, only grades in courses taken at Schiller are used to compute the grade point average. Bachelor's degree candidates may transfer in a maximum of 60 credits or 90 for students participating under interinstitutional agreements (not including credits from the English Placement test). Associate degree candidates may transfer in a maximum of 30 credits (not including credits from the English Placement test). Credit and/or advanced placement may be awarded to students who receive appropriate scores on ACT Proficiency Examinations (PEP), CLEP subject Examinations, USAFI and DANTES College Level Examinations, as well as on the College Board Advanced Placement Exams, providing they are applicable to the student's degree program. Graduate Up to 12 semester credits toward a 36-credit Master's program and up to 18 semester credits toward an MBA degree may be accepted for transfer to Schiller International University if the graduate course has been completed with a grade of B or above and is applicable to the Master's degree program in which the student is enrolled. In transferring from one Schiller graduate program to another, the student may transfer up to one-third of the credits previously earned to the second program if they are applicable to the specific course requirements. Up to 15 credits toward a 45-credit degree and 12 credits toward a 36-credit degree may be granted in internal transfer from one SIU graduate program to another. Timing of Transfer Students Transfer students who intend to become candidates for a Schiller degree will have their credits evaluated in time for registration provided all admissions procedures have been completed at least 6 weeks before the date of registration. Please note: all documents ­ original transcripts, copies of diplomas and certificates ­ must have been received by the admissions office before credits can be evaluated. Official transcripts from all previously attended postsecondary institutions must be sent directly to the University Registrar's office. Transfer of credit from Schiller is determined by the established policy of the college or university at which the student is taking his degree. It is up to the student to check with the institution to make sure that credits earned at SIU will be accepted in transfer. Upon written request, Schiller will mail a transcript of the student's work to his or her college or university. Insurance Students are required to carry health and accident insurance. This insurance is issued either through the University or through an independent provider. Coverage must be similar and is required from the date of departure from the Residence country until the day they return home. Medical waivers for student under 18 must be signed upon registration so that emergency treatment may be given. Schiller International University is not responsible for students' lost / stolen personal property. Students are encouraged to take out insurance to cover loss of personal belongings.

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Intercampus Transfer Students wishing to transfer to another campus must complete an Intercampus Transfer Form by the middle of the preceding semester (four months). Transfers are normally approved if the program and course are offered at the location of interest. The student must be in good academic standing and have no outstanding debts. Transfers cannot occur in the middle of a student's term (their particular 4 month semester). III. STUDENT SERVICES

Services The Schiller International University Student Services Department is committed to ensuring student success at every level of your education. The department provides a variety of services including Academic Orientation, assistance in locating housing, health insurance programs, transportation, communication, calendars of events, healthy student living tips, student organizations, volunteerism, career counseling and much more. Student Services works closely with our Student Activities Department and Student Government and together, providing the best possible service to our students. Career Counseling On each campus, faculty, advisors, and career counselors advise students on career planning issues and job opportunities. Individual campuses establish a variety of programs from Career Days with speakers on various areas of interest, to workshops on resume writing and job interview techniques. Counselors are knowledgeable about the legal requirements of the host country with regard to employment. They assist qualified SIU students with information concerning internships and forming the links between academia and business life. SIU's main office maintains a database of SIU alumni and their employers, assisting both counselors and students in locating employment opportunities in business, government and the private sector in many nations. Alumni Association Schiller International University has an active and growing Alumni Association, established to recognize and applaud alumni around the world as well as support current students. Please refer to the Schiller website for updates, announcements, and networking. Libraries The library plays a central role in the American Higher Education model. All SIU campuses house their own libraries where professional librarians are available to guide students through its on-ground and online catalog. All libraries house both regional and international publications representing titles of all subject areas with special emphasis on material which will support academic work in current degree programs. Globally, Schiller International University has partnered with some of the world's most prestigious libraries to provide a rich resource for student research. Please visit our website for links and contact information regarding specific campus and country offerings. IV. TUITION, FEES, AND FINANCIAL AID

Please refer to the 2010 ­ 2011 Schiller International University Supplemental Catalog, enclosed in this catalog, for the current Tuition and Fee schedule. Housing and Meals The costs students may expect to incur for housing and meals vary greatly with individual students as well as with each campus. Each Campus should be contacted individually for further and update information on this subject.

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FINANCIAL AID Schiller International University is an independent institution with limited funds for scholarships and grants. Students are encouraged to seek assistance through private or governmental loans to meet their tuition costs. Financial Aid Office -Largo, Florida Students applying for The U.S. Department of Education aid or students interested in private loans may direct inquiries to this Financial Aid Office by calling or sending an email to financial [email protected] Financial aid available is indicated below. International, Alternative or Private Loans Both U.S. and international students may apply for private funding. SIU has several lenders who provide private loans, please see our website for the listing of lenders. U.S. Federal and Florida State Funds. Veteran's Training Program SIU participates in the following Title IV programs, available only to U.S. citizens or eligible non-citizens: Pell Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG), Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal WorkStudy, and the Federal Direct Loans. In addition to these federal funding sources, SIU participates with the Office of Financial Assistance (OSFA) in Bright Futures, Florida Student Assistance Grant, and is approved for the U.S. Veterans Training Program. All sources of U.S. financial aid are based upon maintaining satisfactory academic progress towards degree completion. The U.S. Department of Education authorizes students to use their federal financial aid at all SIU campuses. U.S. Federal Title IV Funds - School Code: 023141 Federal Direct Loan U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens may apply for both subsidized and unsubsidized Federal Direct loans. Parents of dependent undergraduate students are required to apply for a Parent Plus Loan to Undergraduate Students (PLUS) before eligibility for an unsubsidized Stafford loan can be confirmed. Both students and parents of students are encouraged to apply directly on-line and can also continue to submit a paper Master Promissory Note. Students must be accepted for admission into a degree program before funds can be released. Pell Grant U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens may apply for the Pell Grant by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA). Students are strongly encouraged to complete the FASFA on the Internet by visiting http://www fasfa.ed.gov. The results of the information submitted on this report will determine if a student is eligible to receive a Pell Grant. Students enrolled for less than half-time status (fewer than 6 credit hours) may qualify for a portion of Pell Grant funds. Graduate students and students who have earned their first bachelor's degree are not eligible. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens accepted to SIU's degree programs may qualify for the FSEOG. The FSEOG is a need-based award. Remaining funds will continue to be offered to the neediest students for subsequent enrollment periods or students who demonstrate need based on information submitted on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The university will award between $400 -$4000 to all qualified students for the academic year. Students who receive the SEOG must maintain satisfactory academic progress. This award is only available to undergraduate students who have not earned their first bachelors degree or professional certificate. U.S. Federal Work-Study Program (FWS) The U.S. Federal Work-Study Program is a need based program that allows U.S. citizens and eligible non-citizens, at the graduate and undergraduate level, to work on campus while earning their degree. Students will be paid on a monthly basis. Students may use the funds toward any educational expenses while enrolled as a student. However, all students who participate in the Federal Work-Study Program must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. SIU participates with the Pinellas County Schools in America Reads/America Counts Program. This program provides a tremendous opportunity for students to work off-site as an educational aid, tutoring underprivileged children. Students will attend

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three training sessions and will be assigned to a school of choice. Students are required to attend the Florida campus to participate in the program. Interested students should contact the Florida Office of Financial Aid. Florida State Aid The university is recognized by the State of Florida as an eligible institution to participate in the Florida Student Assistance Grant Program (FSAG) and the Florida's Bright Futures Scholarship Program, (The Florida Academic Scholars Award, The Florida Merit Scholars Award and The Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars Award). The FSAG is a grant program that allows Florida undergraduate residents who never received a prior bachelor's degree state assistance. Eligible students must be classified as an undergraduate student in a degree program, Florida resident, and full-time student. The applicant must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The Florida Academic Scholars Award, The Florida Merit and the Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars Awards are for eligible high school graduates from the state of Florida. High School seniors must obtain their application from their High School Guidance Office. Applications must be mailed to the Florida Department of Education, Office of Student Financial Assistance State Programs, 325 W. Gains St., Collins Building #255, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400 by April 1st (postmark). For further information about these programs contact the Florida campus Financial Aid Office. Veterans Training Program Benefits The University is recognized by the State of Florida as an eligible institution to participate in the Veterans Training Program under the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act. Any U.S. Veteran who intends to enroll in one of these degree programs should apply to the Veterans Administration for educational benefits. Veterans who are applying for benefits for the first time must complete the VA form 22-1990. Delayed entry program Veterans who began active duty after 12/31/76; Selected Reserved Veterans who were in a Reserve Unit; and Transfer Students Veterans who have received VA benefits from another college or university and are transferring to SIU may need to submit additional forms to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. All VA students must adhere to the institutional attendance policy. If a VA student receives three or more unexcused absences, he/she may find his/her benefits reduced for that semester. University Service Grants may be awarded to students who possess a good academic record (either from a secondary or postsecondary institution) and who exhibit useful skills and financial need. Recipients serve part-time as library assistants, office assistants, building and grounds assistants, etc. Compensation is given for hours worked and will be applied to tuition owed. Positions are limited. Positions may be revoked if the student breaches the Standard of Conduct, Academic Honesty, or Attendance Policies. PAYMENT INFORMATION: All Payments by check or bank transfer must always include student name, term of study and campus attended. Only Tuition and Fees as scheduled in the Supplemental Catalog will be accepted. Excess funds for living expenses and or housing should not be transferred to the college. PAYMENT BY CHECK: Please make check payable to: Schiller International University Mail check to: Schiller International University Office of the Bursar (U.S. Dollar checks) 8560 Ulmerton Road Largo, FL 33771 U SA It is the responsibility of the student or parent to send payments promptly according to the Schedule of Payment dates (see supplemental catalog for the schedule). Checks should note the name of the student and the Campus he or she will be attending. All fees must have been paid one week prior to the start of classes in order for the student to register on Registration day. The Late Fee applies for all students who do not pay the full semester tuition by this due date. Delayed payment of fees is possible only after a promissory note has been signed and authorized by the Campus Bursar prior to Registration Day. Should such an agreement not be honored on time, a monthly compound interest will be

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raised on outstanding fees (see Interest, page19). Students should also consider incidental costs for books, personal laundry service, independent travel, clothing and other items that vary according to individual tastes. PAYMENT BY BANK TRANSFER: Please make payment to: KREISSPARKASSE LUDWIGSBURG P.O. Box 620 D-71606 Ludwigsburg, Germany Bank Code: 604 500 50 U.S. Dollars to account no.: British Pounds to account no.: Euros to account no.:

USD 0 220 260 682 GBP 0 220 260 981 78221/IBAN DE22 6045 0050 0000 0782 21 SWIFT/BIC: SOLA DE S1 LBG

Please make payment to: FIFTH THIRD BANK 201 East Kennedy Blvd, 1800 Tampa, Florida 33602 Account Name: Schiller International University Wire ABA # 042000314 SWIFT CODE: FTBCUS3C Account # 7420757903 Bank charges incurred from sending transfers must be paid by student. Payment of tuition and fees can also be arranged through credit cards (Eurocard / MasterCard, VISA and American Express). A Credit Card Mail Charge Authorization form can be requested at each campus or downloaded on the university's website. Besides handling these charges by mail, students can also present their credit cards to the Campus Bursars. Charges assessed by banks on foreign checks or on bank transfers will be charged to the students' accounts. All payments must have identification REFUND POLICY Withdrawal: It is the responsibility of the student to inform the Campus Registrar in writing that he/she wishes to withdraw from the University. Any refunds which may be due to a student will be made within fourteen (14) calendar days of the student's official withdrawal date, which is the date on which the student notifies the Campus Registrar. Refunds to students who fail to notify the University of their Withdrawal will be processed within the earliest of fourteen (14) calendar days from the day the University determines that the student has withdrawn or fourteen (14) days from the end of the term during which the student withdrew. Any refund due to Title IV funds will be made within thirty (30) calendar days of the student's withdrawal date either official or non official. Adjustment of Charges: In accordance with school policy, if a student withdraws from school, the school will earn tuition and fees as follows based on the week in which the student withdraws: If the student is not accepted, all advanced money shall be returned. If the student is accepted and then cancels before classes begin, all tuition paid in advance shall be refunded. Any student who begins classes and then withdraws prior to the end of the semester will be obligated on the following basis. The last date of attendance during the: · Within three days after signing the enrollment agreement 100% will be refunded · From the first day of classes through 20% of the term pro rata will apply. (through the 16th day of classes) · After the above time period 100% will be retained by the University. Refunds are issued through the Financial Aid Office when a student withdraws from all courses. The student's last date of attendance (LDA "or date of determination" is used to determine the refund due. Refund provisions apply

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only to complete withdrawal from the University. Students who withdraw form the University should contact the Financial Aid Office for advising information concerning loan repayment. During a refund procedure, the Registrar reports withdrawals to the Financial Aid Office and the Bursar's office. The Financial Aid Department calculates refunds as appropriate to policy. The School will first calculate how much needs to be returned under the Federal Return of Title IV aid policy. The amount will then be subtracted from the amount that was paid for the semester of withdrawal to get the adjusted amount paid. The school will then calculate how much of the charges can be retained based on the school policy. The amount that can be retained will be subtracted from the adjusted amount paid. If there is additional money to be refunded from Title IV funds, the refund will be made to the student or with the student's written authorization, to Federal Loan from which funds were received, in this order: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Perkins Loan, PLUS Loan, Return of Federal Title IV Aid: A percentage of Federal Title IV aid will be returned if the student withdraws during the first 60% of the semester. The amount retained will be based on the percentage of days remaining in the semester. The school will determine the calendar days completed in the semester divided by the total number of calendar days in the semester. If the amount is less than or equal to 60 % then that percent of the Federal Title IVF Aid received is the amount that can be retained. The difference will be returned to the Federal Title IV Aid programs from which funds were received in this order: Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Perkins Loan, PLUS Loan, Pell Grant, ACG, National Smart Grant, SEOG, other. If Federal Title IV funds have been given to the student, and if the student withdraws during the 60% of the semester, the student may need to return some of those funds. If the student needs to return funds, the school will notify the student regarding how much is owed, and how it is to be returned. Interest According to the payment instructions explained above, all fees must be paid one week prior to the start of classes. Should there be any delay in the payment of fees, a promissory note has to be signed. If payment is not made on time, compound interest at the rate of 1% per calendar month will be charged on the outstanding balance. In general, compound interest of 1% will be charged retroactive to the whole semester in case of any debts at the end of the semester.

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

OVERVIEW OF DEGREE PROGRAMS Programs by Campus PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE DEGREES General Studies International Business International Hospitality and Tourism Mgt. BACHELOR DEGREES Interdepartmental Studies International Business International Economics International Hospitality & Tourism Mgt. International Relations & Diplomacy MASTERS DEGREES Business Administration Financial Planning* International Business International Hospitality & Tourism Mgt International Management International Relations & Diplomacy Management of Information

. *MBA in Financial Planning is in cooperation with Kaplan University

DEGREE

CREDIT HOURS 60 60 60 120 120 120 120 120 36 45 45 45 36 36 45 FL X X X X X X X X X X X X X H X X L X X M X X P X X DL X

AA AS AS BA BS BA BS BA MBA MBA MBA MBA MIM MA MBA

X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X X X

X X

X X X X X X X X X X

X X X X X

FL: Florida; H: Heidelberg; L: London; M: Madrid; P: Paris; DL: Distance Learning

The Associate Degrees The AA and AS degrees offer the general education core courses which provide a wide range of skills and knowledge. General education augments the specialized training students receive in their majors. Students take courses in English, History, Mathematics, Science, Sociology, Psychology, and Cross Cultural Communication. These skills can be applied to any personal, educational, or professional endeavors. Degrees can lead to entry level positions in industry or to advanced educational degrees. Students who successfully complete a two-year program of study will earn the Associate of Arts degree. Students may follow the AA degree program at SIU's campuses in Florida, London, Heidelberg, Paris, Madrid, or Distance Learning. General Requirements · Students must earn a minimum of 60 semester credits, composed of General Education and International Business Courses (described below) and 12 (twelve) credits in Foreign Languages Courses (at both beginning and intermediate levels). · A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above must be earned. · The final 30 credits must be completed at Schiller International University.

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The Undergraduate Programs The SIU international business curriculum is designed to give students a firm foundation in both the practical and theoretical aspects of globalized business in the 21st century. Students study a wide range of subjects which can be tailored to the individual interests of the student. Acquisition of the Bachelor's degree can lead to management level positions in the specialized discipline studied or continued education on the graduate level. General Requirements · Students must earn a minimum of 120 semester credits including all required courses. · A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above must be earned. · Thirty (30) credits must be completed at Schiller International University. · Completion of 2 (two) beginning level and 2 (two) intermediate level courses of one foreign language is required The Graduate Programs The Master's Degrees are offered throughout the global Schiller campuses providing access to regional and world headquarters of numerous multinational corporations and international organizations. These advanced degrees provide the detail and depth for graduates to enter into mid to upper level management positions in industry, government, and educational institutions. General Requirements · Admission requires completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in a related field. Pre requisites may be required · Students must earn a minimum of 36 or 45 credits, depending on the chosen discipline composed of the courses outlined in subsequent sections of this catalog · A final oral comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Dean or Campus Director, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the credit hour requirement. Distance Learning students may petition to take their comprehensive examination online.

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AA

GENERAL STUDIES

Students who successfully complete a two-year program of study will earn the Associate of Arts degree. Candidates for the AA degree take courses in all the General Education Core as noted below. Students may follow the AA degree program at any of the five SIU campuses. General Requirements include Core Course Requirement AR 222 ECO 2013 ECO 2023 EN 111 EN 112 BA/EN 200 EN 373 HI 225 HI 226 IR 221 MA 172 MGF1107 PS 221 PSY 1021 SO 137 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 60

Art History Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics English Composition: Expository Writing English Composition: Persuasive Writing Cross-Cultural Communication Public Speaking European History to 1815 European History: 1815 to Present Introduction to International Relations Applied Mathematics College Math Introduction to Political Science General Psychology Science and Society

Required International Business Courses IT 103 Application of Computers Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 Beginning 1 FL 102 Beginning 2 FL 201 Intermediate 1 FL 202 Intermediate 2 Total Credits Required:

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AS

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

The rapidly increasing volume and complexity of international business offers a wide range of opportunities for those trained in business administration in an international context. The SIU business curriculum is designed to give students a firm foundation in both the practical and theoretical aspects of the main areas of business administration. Business administration studies are offered at all SIU campuses. SIU offers programs in business administration leading in two years to an Associate of Science (AS) degree or in three to four years to a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. Required International Business Courses IT 103 ACG 2001 ACG 2011 BA 261 BA 322 BA 370 GEB 1350 MAR 2011 Applications of Computers Accounting I Accounting II Principles of Business Law International Marketing Business Communication Introduction to International Business Principles of Marketing Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 60

Required General Education Courses ECO 2013 ECO 2023 EN 111 EN 112 HI 225 HI 226 MA 172 MGF1107 Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics English Composition: Expository Writing English Composition: Persuasive Writing European History to 1815 European History: 1815 to Present Applied Mathematics College Math

Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 FL 102 FL 201 FL 202 Total Credits Required: Beginning 1 Beginning 2 Intermediate 1 Intermediate 2

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AS

INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

Students in this two-year program, offered at SIU's Florida campus have to take a combination of required General Education and specific Hospitality and Tourism Management courses and participate in SIU's internship program which gives them valuable practical training. Courses include language instruction and practical experience in food service, kitchen operations and computerized front desk service. Required International Business Courses IT 103 ACG 2001 ACG 2011 GEB 1350 Applications of Computers Accounting I Accounting II Introduction to International Business Credits 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 60

Required International Hospitality &Tourism Courses HM 103 HM 187 HM 210 HM 291 Introduction to Tourism & Hospitality Front Office Management Food & Beverage Management Internship

Required General Education Courses ECO 2013 ECO 2023 EN 111 EN 112 HI 225 HI 226 MA 172 MGF1107 Principles of Microeconomics Principles of Macroeconomics English Composition: Expository Writing English Composition: Persuasive Writing European History to 1815 European History: 1815 to Present Applied Mathematics College Math

Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 FL 102 FL 201 FL 202 Total Credits Required: Beginning 1 Beginning 2 Intermediate 1 Intermediate 2

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BA

INTERDEPARTMENTAL STUDIES Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 120

Required International Business Courses IT 103 Applications of Computers BA 369 Introduction to Sustainable Development BA 370 Business Communication BA 374 Statistics BA 384 Behavioral Aspects BA 401 Human Resources Management BA 437 Multinational Enterprise BA 469 Entrepreneurship EC 352 Economic Geography EC 455 International Trade & Finance GEB 1350 Introduction to International Business PY 376 Industrial Psychology Required International Relations & Diplomacy Courses EC 452 Resources & the Environment EC 457 Economy of Developing Countries IR 331 Modern Diplomacy IR 335 American Foreign Policy IR 341 Concepts of International Relations IR 370 Writing for Foreign Affairs IR 450 Practical Diplomacy PS 370 American Political System Required General Education Courses AR 222 Art History ECO 2013 Principles of Microeconomics ECO 2023 Principles of Macroeconomics EN 111 English Composition: Expository Writing EN 112 English Composition: Persuasive Writing BA/EN 200 Cross-Cultural Communication EN 373 Public Speaking EN 490 Intercultural Communication HI 225 European History to 1815 HI 226 European History: 1815 to Present IR 221 Introduction to International Relations MA 172 Applied Mathematics MGF1107 College Math PS 221 Introduction to Political Science PSY 1021 General Psychology SO 137 Science and Society Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 Beginning 1 FL 102 Beginning 2 FL 201 Intermediate 1 FL 202 Intermediate 2 Total Credits Required:

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BS

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 120

Required International Business Courses IT 103 Applications of Computers ACG 2001 Accounting I ACG 2011 Accounting II BA 261 Principles of Business Law BA 322 International Marketing BA 341 Business Finance BA 369 Introduction to Sustainable Development BA 370 Business Communication BA 374 Statistics BA 384 Behavioral Aspects BA 401 Human Resources Management BA 427 Marketing Management BA 437 Multinational Enterprise BA 439 International Business Policy BA 469 Entrepreneurship EC 352 Economic Geography EC 455 International Trade & Finance GEB 1350 Introduction to International Business MAR 2011 Principles of Marketing PY 376 Industrial Psychology Required General Education Courses AR 222 Art History ECO 2013 Principles of Microeconomics ECO 2023 Principles of Macroeconomics EN 111 English Composition: Expository Writing EN 112 English Composition: Persuasive Writing BA/EN 200 Cross-Cultural Communication EN 373 Public Speaking EN 490 Intercultural Communication HI 225 European History to 1815 HI 226 European History: 1815 to Present IR 221 Introduction to International Relations MA 172 Applied Mathematics MGF1107 College Math PS 221 Introduction to Political Science PSY 1021 General Psychology SO 137 Science and Society Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 Beginning 1 FL 102 Beginning 2 FL 201 Intermediate 1 FL 202 Intermediate 2 Total Credits Required:

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BA

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

The major in International Economics provides thorough training in economic theory and policy. While these studies examine the insights of economics from the individual and firm level, to the national, and then the international level, there is an emphasis throughout on maintaining a focus on the impact and role of international economic relations and on maintaining an internationally comparative perspective. In addition, the major includes courses in international business administration, international relations, and political science. Students completing this major often go on to careers in economic or political economic analysis within the international worlds of business, finance, or government. Others continue on to graduate studies in economics, business, international relations or law. Required International Business Courses IT 103 Applications of Computers BA 322 International Marketing BA 369 Introduction to Sustainable Development BA 370 Business Communication BA 374 Statistics BA 384 Behavioral Aspects BA 401 Human Resources Management BA 437 Multinational Enterprise EC 352 Economic Geography EC 455 International Trade & Finance GEB 1350 Introduction to International Business IR 470 International Economic Policies & Institutions MAR 2011 Principles of Marketing PY 376 Industrial Psychology Required International Relations & Diplomacy Courses EC 452 Resources & the Environment EC 457 Economy of Developing Countries IR 331 Modern Diplomacy IR 335 American Foreign Policy IR 341 Concepts of International Relations IR 353 The Political Economy of North-South Relations Required General Education Courses AR 222 Art History ECO 2013 Principles of Microeconomics ECO 2023 Principles of Macroeconomics EN 111 English Composition: Expository Writing EN 112 English Composition: Persuasive Writing BA/EN 200 Cross-Cultural Communication EN 373 Public Speaking EN 490 Intercultural Communication HI 225 European History to 1815 HI 226 European History: 1815 to Present IR 221 Introduction to International Relations MA 172 Applied Mathematics MGF1107 College Math PS 221 Introduction to Political Science PSY 1021 General Psychology SO 137 Science and Society Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 Beginning 1 FL 102 Beginning 2 FL 201 Intermediate 1 FL 202 Intermediate 2 Total Credits Required:

Credits 3 3 3 3 120

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BS

INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

Students studying towards a BS must complete the Associate of Science (AS) course requirements (see requirements noted in preceding section) (60 credits) plus the following courses: Required International Business Courses BA 261 BA 322 BA 341 BA 369 BA 370 BA 374 BA 384 BA 401 BA 427 MAR 2011 Principles of Business Law International Marketing Business Finance Introduction to Sustainable Development Business Communication Statistics Behavioral Aspects Human Resources Management Marketing Management Principles of Marketing Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 60 120

Required International Hospitality &Tourism Courses HM 423 HM 451 Convention & Event Management Leadership & Management in Hospitality & Tourism

Required General Education Courses AR 222 BA/EN 200 EN 373 EN 490 IR 221 PS 221 PSY 1021 SO 137 Art History Cross-Cultural Communication Public Speaking Intercultural Communication Introduction to International Relations Introduction to Political Science General Psychology Science and Society

AS DEGREE IN HOSPITALITY & TOURISM Total Credits Required:

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BA

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DIPLOMACY

Students must earn a minimum of 120 semester credits. All students must complete the Basic Courses and Area Courses as previously described under the AA degree in the Liberal Arts Program. A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (C) or above must be earned. The final 30 credits must be completed in residence at Schiller International University. Completion of 2 (two) beginning level and 2 (two) intermediate level courses of one foreign language is required. Required International Relations & Diplomacy Courses EC 452 Resources & the Environment EC 457 Economy of Developing Countries IR 331 Modern Diplomacy IR 335 American Foreign Policy IR 341 Concepts of International Relations IR 353 The Political Economy of North-South Relations IR 370 Writing for Foreign Affairs IR 450 Practical Diplomacy IR 481 Selected Topics in International Relations PS 370 American Political System Required International Business Courses IT 103 Applications of Computers BA 369 Introduction to Sustainable Development BA 370 Business Communication BA 374 Statistics BA 384 Behavioral Aspects BA 401 Human Resources Management BA 437 Multinational Enterprise EC 352 Economic Geography EC 455 International Trade & Finance GEB 1350 Introduction to International Business IR 470 International Economic Policies & Institutions Required General Education Courses AR 222 Art History ECO 2013 Principles of Microeconomics ECO 2023 Principles of Macroeconomics EN 111 English Composition: Expository Writing EN 112 English Composition: Persuasive Writing BA/EN 200 Cross-Cultural Communication EN 373 Public Speaking EN 490 Intercultural Communication HI 225 European History to 1815 HI 226 European History: 1815 to Present IR 221 Introduction to International Relations MA 172 Applied Mathematics MGF1107 College Math PS 221 Introduction to Political Science PSY 1021 General Psychology SO 137 Science and Society Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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Required Foreign Language Courses FL 101 Beginning 1 FL 102 Beginning 2 FL 201 Intermediate 1 FL 202 Intermediate 2 Total Credits Required:

Credits 3 3 3 3 120

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GRADUATE PROGRAMS

The MBA Preparatory Courses: These courses are for those candidates who have completed Bachelor's degrees or the equivalent in fields other than the one in which they want to pursue their MBA. This is applicable to MBA in International Business and MBA in Business Administration. Required Preparatory Courses BA 513 BA 575 Managerial & Financial Accounting Statistics Credits 3 3

MBA

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

This 36-credit MBA program is offered at Schiller's Florida, London, Paris, Madrid, and Heidelberg campuses, and online. Coursework concentrates on managerial aspects of finance and accounting, marketing, and management.

Admission

Completion of a bachelor's degree or equivalent in business administration or completion of a bachelor's degree or equivalent in a related field such as economics, including Microeconomics, Statistics, Business Law, Marketing, Management, and Accounting. Note: Students who have not completed required prerequisite courses will take MBA Preparatory Courses. See the requirements for the MBA in International Business for more detailed information on this.

Graduation Requirements:

A minimum of 36 semester credits at the graduate level composed of courses listed as follows with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. A final oral comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Advisor, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the 36 credit requirement. Distance learning students may petition to take their comprehensive exam in written form. Required Business Core Courses BA 501 BA 510 BA 512 BA 515 BA 529 BA 537 BA 542 BA 589 IT 576 Organizational Behavior Business Economics Managerial Accounting Managerial Finance Multinational Business Management Production and Operations Management Comprehensive Business Management Seminar Methods of Research & Analysis IT Applications in Business Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3

Required International Business Courses BA 522 BA 544 BA 560 Total Credits Required: International Marketing Human Resources Management International Business Law

36

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MBA

FINANCIAL PLANNING

The MBA with a concentration in Financial Planning includes five online courses with Kaplan College which are part of Kaplan's Certificate in Financial Planning program. Five designated and successfully completed Kaplan courses (15 credits) will be accepted in transfer. Students take all other required MBA courses (10 courses, 30 credits) from Schiller. These courses are offered online in a web-based format. Students also have the option of taking them in a traditional classroom setting on any SIU campus offering an MBA program. Students who complete this program will have an MBA in Financial Planning from Schiller International University as well as the designation, Registered Financial Consultant (RFC) upon completion of the Kaplan portion of the program. The Kaplan Certification in Financial Planning program prepares for the prestigious CFP® Certification Examination. With this impressive combination of credentials students will have an edge in finding positions in the financial services industry. NOTE: Students must apply separately to Kaplan. Admission: 1. Completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in business administration. 2. Completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in related fields, such as Economics, including completion of the following courses: Microeconomics, Statistics, Business Law, Marketing, Management and Accounting. Note: Students who have not completed required prerequisite courses will take MBA Preparatory Courses. See the requirements for the MBA in International Business for more detailed information on this.

Graduation Requirements:

Students must successfully complete the courses listed as follows (a minimum of 45 credits) with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. · Students must take an oral final comprehensive exam. Distance learning students may petition to take the exam in written form. · Students must have completed the Kaplan College Certificate in Financial Planning program. Required Business Core Courses Credits BA 501 Organizational Behavior BA 512 Managerial Accounting BA 515 Managerial Finance BA 529 Multinational Business Management BA 537 Production and Operations Management BA 542 Comprehensive Business Management Seminar BA 589 Methods of Research & Analysis IT 576 IT Applications in Business Required International Business Courses BA 522 International Marketing BA 541 International Corporate Finance Required Financial Planning Courses (Kaplan) FP 102 FP 103 FP 104 FP 105 FP 106 Total Credits Required: Insurance and Employee Benefits Investment Planning Income Tax Planning Planning for Retirement Estate Planning 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 ·

45

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MBA INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

The 45-semester-credit program leading to the MBA degree in International Business may be completed in a minimum of one year and a half. Students may transfer from one campus to the other and complete their degree requirements. Students with bachelor's degrees in other fields may complete MBA preparatory courses. This program may also be completed online. Admission 1. Completion of one of the following: a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BS) degree or its equivalent or a Bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, with a major in business studies or economics, provided that core courses in the following areas have been completed: Economics, Statistics, Business Law, Marketing, Management, and Accounting 2. or a Bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, in a non-business field, followed by a postgraduate diploma in business, which fulfils the requirements of the MBA preparatory program at Schiller or its equivalent elsewhere, or by undergraduate or graduate core courses in the above listed areas. Required Business Core Courses BA 501 BA 510 BA 512 BA 515 BA 523 BA 529 BA 537 BA 542 BA 589 IT 576 Organizational Behavior Business Economics 3 Managerial Accounting Managerial Finance Marketing Management Multinational Business Management Production and Operations Management Comprehensive Business Management Seminar Methods of Research & Analysis IT Applications in Business Credits 3 3 3 3 3 45 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Required International Business Courses BA 522 BA 541 BA 544 BA 560 BA 570 Total Credits Required: International Marketing International Corporate Finance Human Resources Management International Business Law Managerial Communications for International Bus

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

MBA INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

This program is offered at SIU's London and Florida campuses, and also online, for those in the fields of business, hospitality management, and tourism or related areas who wish to earn an advanced business degree. The 45-semester-credit program leading to the MBA degree in International Hospitality and Tourism Management may be completed in a minimum of one year and a half. Students may transfer from one campus to the other and complete their degree requirements. Students with bachelor's degrees in other fields may complete MBA preparatory courses. This program may also be completed online. Admission: 1. Completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in business administration, hospitality, or hotel and restaurant management, provided that the courses listed in paragraph 2 below have been completed. 2. Completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in related fields, such as economics, including completion of the following core courses: Microeconomics, Statistics, Business Law, Marketing, Management and Accounting. Note: Students who have not completed required prerequisite courses will take MBA Preparatory Courses. See the requirements for the MBA in International Business for more detailed information on this. Graduation Requirements: In addition to the graduation requirements for all graduate students (see "Graduate Academic Regulations" in Appendix), candidates for the MBA in International Hospitality and Tourism Management degree must complete the following requirements: A minimum of 45 semester credits at the graduate level composed of the courses listed as follows with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. A final oral comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Advisor, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the 45 credit hour requirement. Distance learning students may petition to take their comprehensive exam online. Required Business Core Courses BA 501 BA 512 BA 515 BA 523 BA 529 BA 589 IT 576 Organizational Behavior Managerial Accounting Managerial Finance Marketing Management Multinational Business Management Methods of Research & Analysis IT Applications in Business Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Required International Business Courses BA 522 BA 544 BA 560 Required IHTM Courses HM 510 HM 531 HM 541 HM 572 HM 582 Total Credits Required: International Marketing Human Resources Management International Business Law

Credits 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 45

Food & Beverage Control International Travel & Tourism Tourism Planning & Marketing Hotel & Restaurant Accounting Systems Case Studies in IHTM

Information

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

MIM INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT

The MIM program has been designed to prepare students who have already completed a course of study in a nonbusiness field specifically for positions in international management. The 36-semester-credit program leading to the MIM degree may be completed at the Heidelberg, London, Madrid, or Florida campuses, or online. The course work spans a variety of topics relating to business administration, including management, marketing, accounting communications, business law, and economics. Upon successful completion of the program students will have the solid basis of knowledge which will qualify them to enter managerial positions in a broad range of careers in international business. Admission: The Master of International Management program is open to qualified applicants who have earned a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent. No particular field of undergraduate specialization is required for admission to the program, but a year of undergraduate mathematics is strongly advised. Graduation Requirements: In addition to the graduation requirements for all graduate students (see "Graduate Academic Regulations" in Appendix), candidates for the Master of International Management degree must complete the following requirements: A minimum of 36 semester credits (12 courses) at the graduate level composed of the courses listed as follows, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. A final oral comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Advisor, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the 36 credit requirement. Distance learning students may petition to take their comprehensive exam in written form. Required Business Core Courses BA 501 BA 510 BA 515 BA 529 BA 589 IT 576 Organizational Behavior Business Economics Managerial Finance Multinational Business Management Methods of Research & Analysis IT Applications in Business Credits 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 3 3 3 3

Required International Business Courses BA 522 BA 544 BA 560 BA 570 International Marketing Human Resources Management International Business Law Managerial Communications for Business

International

Required MIM Courses BA 513 BA 575 Managerial & Financial Accounting Statistics

Credits 3 3

Total Credits Required:

36

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

MA INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND DIPLOMACY

SIU's graduate program in International Relations and Diplomacy, offered at its London and Paris campuses, is a professional program which prepares students for careers in foreign affairs, with their own governments or with international organizations, in journalism or in business. It combines a traditional theoretical approach to the study of international relations with practical training in the mechanics of contemporary diplomacy and international negotiations. Central to the program is a two-semester laboratory course in diplomacy which introduces students to the structure and functions of diplomatic missions and trains them in the skills of diplomacy. The MA program may be completed at either the London or Paris campus. Students may transfer from one campus to the other, affording them maximum access to the diplomatic agencies in both capitals. Admission: The Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent, with a major concentration in either political science or international relations and diplomacy, and with one year of undergraduate economics and at least the intermediate level of one foreign language. Students lacking economics, international relations or political science courses will be required to complete these courses at SIU. Students who do not have the requisite proficiency in a foreign language must complete this requirement before graduation from the MA program. Note: Students lacking courses in Economics, Politics, International Relations, or Foreign Language may have to take extra courses to complete all graduation requirements. Graduation Requirements: In addition to the graduation requirements for all graduate students (see "Graduate Academic Regulations" in Appendix), candidates for the Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy must complete the following: A minimum of 36 semester credits (12 courses) at the graduate level composed of the courses listed as follows, with a GPA of 3.0 or higher; a basic one-year undergraduate course in economics for undergraduate credit or BA 510 Business Economics (only for those who have not already completed such a course); The intermediate level of a foreign language.; A final oral comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Advisor, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the 36 credit requirement. Required Business Core Courses Credits BA 589 Methods of Research & Analysis 3 Credits 3 Credits Workshop on Diplomacy: Practical & Historical Workshop on Diplomacy: International Negotiation Current Issues in IR: Theories Current Issues in IR: Historical Context International Organizations Conflict & Peace Strategies International Economic Problems International Law International Management of Resources International Human Rights 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Required International Business Courses BA 544 Required IRD Courses IR 501 IR 502 IR 511 IR 512 IR 542 IR 544 IR 545 IR 546 IR 567 IR 571 Human Resources Management

Total Credits Required:

36

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

MBA MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY This specialized MBA program is designed to meet the emerging market demand for IT management professionals. The MBA concentration in Management of Information Technology is offered at SIU's Heidelberg and Florida campuses, and online. Students must complete a total of 15 courses including five concentrated IT courses. The 45-semester-credit program leading to the MBA degree in Management of Information Technology may be completed in a minimum of one year and a half. Students may transfer from one campus to the other and complete their degree requirements. Students with bachelor's degrees in other fields may complete MBA preparatory courses. This program may also be completed online Admission: Admission required completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in business administration. Completion of a Bachelor's degree or equivalent in related fields, such as economics, including completion of the following courses: Microeconomics, Statistics, Business Law, Marketing, Management and Accounting. Notes: Students who have not completed required prerequisite courses will take MBA Preparatory Courses. See the requirements for the MBA in International Business for more detailed information on this. Students without sufficient computer literacy and IT background may be required to take one or more basic computer courses over and above the 45 credit requirement. Graduation Requirements: In addition to the graduation requirements for all graduate students (see "Graduate Academic Regulations" in Appendix), candidates for the MBA in Management of Information Technology degree must complete the following requirements: A minimum of 45 semester credits at the graduate level, composed of the courses listed as follows with a GPA of 3.0 or higher, a final comprehensive examination or, subject to the decision of the Program Advisor, a thesis requiring a formal oral defense in lieu of the comprehensive examination. The thesis is in addition to the 45 credit hour requirement. Distance learning students may petition to take their comprehensive exam in written form. Required Business Core Courses Credits BA 501 BA 512 BA 515 BA 529 BA 537 BA 542 BA 589 IT 576 Organizational Behavior Managerial Accounting Managerial Finance Multinational Business Management Production and Operations Management Comprehensive Business Management Seminar Methods of Research & Analysis IT Applications in Business 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Credits 3 3 Credits Management of Information Systems Database Management Management of Networks Information Technology Project Management Systems Analysis, Design & Implementation 3 3 3 3 3 45

Required International Business Courses BA 522 BA 544 Required IHTM Courses IT 500 IT 510 IT 520 IT 530 IT 540 Total Credits Required: International Marketing Human Resources Management

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG Undergraduate Courses

Art (AR)

113 Drawing (3) Development of basic drawing skills. The main emphasis on understanding and implementing techniques. Themes range from traditional (still-life, portraiture, drapery, architectural) to experimental (creation and rendering of innovative object, fax and multimedia renditions). 222 History of Art: Renaissance to 19th Century (3) Survey of European painting, sculpture and architecture of the Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, and of the Romantic, Realist and Impressionist periods.

Business Administration (BA) (GEB) (ACG) (MAR)

GEB 1350 Introduction to International Business (3) Patterns of international trade, multinational business operations, analysis of financial structures and financing. Emphasis also on an elementary familiarization with a basic outline of international organizational administration and marketing. Aspects of the relationship between the international business organization and its environment. BA 200 Cross-Cultural Communication (3) Prerequisite: Intermediate level of English The different cultural norms at play when people interact. An introduction to the various factors which affect communication, particularly in an international context. Emphasis on understanding oral and non-verbal cultural differences. (Same as EN 200 Cross-Cultural Communication) ACG 2001 Accounting I (3) Introduction to accounting theory and practice for business students and others. Basic accounting principles and procedures, financial statements. ACG 2011 Accounting II (3) Prerequisite: ACG 2001 Introduction to accounting theory and practice for business students and others. In-depth discussion of long-lived assets, bonds, stockholders equity, etc. Introduction to cost accounting concepts, analysis of financial statements, income taxes. BA 322 International Marketing (3) Prerequisite: MAR 2011 Entire range of international marketing, beginning with start-up operations, continuing with new market entry considerations, and concluding with the international issues confronting giant global marketers. Addresses the reality of the interchange between business and government by analyzing international marketing issues from both the business and policy perspective. Integration of the societal dimensions of diversity, environmental concerns, ethics and economic transformation. MAR 2011 Principles of Marketing (3) Introduction to concepts and techniques of marketing including role of advertising, marketing functions, marketing plan and marketing mix. Practical examples and applications showing major decisions marketing managers face in balancing the organizations' objectives and resources against needs and opportunities in the marketplace. BA 261 Principles of Business Law (3) General coverage of the fundamental principles of the important areas of business law. Designed to thoroughly acquaint the student with areas of legal sensitivity engendered in professional undertakings of personal business ventures. Laws covering the business organization.

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BA 341 Business Finance I (3) Prerequisite: ACG 2001 Introduces students to the basics of financial management within the medium and large-sized organization. Emphasis on current problems of finance and the development of basic principles. BA 369 Sustainable Development (3) This course is concerned with the challenges and opportunities of finding sustainable patterns and processes of development within the international community for the future BA 370 Business Communication (3) Prerequisites: EN 111 or 112 Aims to improve the student's ability to write concise, well-organized, effective business messages, including letters, resumes, memorandums and reports. Strategies and techniques will be analyzed for communicating in a range of typical business situations. Writing practice. (Same as EN 370 Business Communication) BA 373 Public Speaking (3) Prerequisites: EN 111 or 112 Fundamentals of effective business and professional speaking in English. Focus on importance of communication and public speaking for careers. (Same as EN 373 Public Speaking) BA 374 Statistics (3) Prerequisite: MGF 1107 or MA 172 The population; frequency distribution; data; graphical displays; descriptive analysis; relative and cumulative frequency distributions; population parameters; arithmetic mean, median, mode, variability, variance and standard deviation; basic definitions of probability, the addition law, conditional probability, joint probability table; the multiplication law; statistical independence, counting techniques, the factorial permutations and combinations; random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling distributions and theory. (Same as MA 374 Statistics) BA 384 Behavioral Aspects (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350 or PSY 1021 Focuses on group behavior and leadership necessary to transform human resources into effective organizational entities. Emphasizes the theory and practice that relate to individuals interacting in the work environment. Case studies, films and guest speakers. (Same as PY 384 Behavioral Aspects) BA 401 Human Resources Management (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350 and at least one upper-level BA course Familiarizes students with the activities of a human resources (HR) manager and the specific problems of managing a workforce. Cases and simulation exercises, HR planning, training and development of employees. Problems of industrial relations. BA 427 Marketing Management (3) Prerequisite: MAR 2011 and one upper-level Marketing course Strategic marketing management concepts and their application. Includes the critical role of marketing in organizational performance, market-oriented strategic planning, the application of online marketing and the development of marketing programs. BA 437 Multinational Enterprise (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350 and one upper-level BA course Comparative study of organizing and managing the multinational enterprise. Topics include: organization structure; management policy; comparative industrial relations; legal, political, and social-cultural challenges. BA 439 International Business Policy (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350, ECO 2023 or ECO 2013c and 4th year standing In-depth look at the multinational corporation as it operates and competes in the international business environment. The emphasis on organizational and administrative policies of the multinational company and their development and importance of structuring these aspects of the corporation to suit the international environment in which it operates. Examines the development of the

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

functional skills of planning, financing, marketing and personnel management unique to the international company. The analysis of major international organizations provides current information on how these companies operate and relate theory to actual practices. BA 469 Entrepreneurship and New Ventures (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350, ACG 2001-2011, MAR 2011 Disciplined and practical look at the entrepreneur and small business enterprise. Characteristics of the entrepreneur; rewards and pitfalls of new businesses; basic planning techniques for new business ventures.

Economics (EC) (ECO)

ECO 2013 Principles of Microeconomics (3) Production; specialization and the move-from the barter economy; concept of cost; organization of industry; private and public sector; economies of scale; consumption vs. capital goods; location of industry. Supply and demand: function of the price mechanism in a market economy (comparison with centrally planned economies); price, income and cross elasticity. Theory of the firm: price determination in perfect and monopoly markets: other forms of imperfect competition. ECO 2023 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) Money and financial institutions: nature and functions of money; value of money and its measurement; inflation and deflation (introduction); savings and investment; use of credit; the capital market. National income and expenditure: national income, its measurements; flow of money income between households, firms and government; aggregate supply and demand; savings and investment; the multiplier and the accelerator; productivity; economic growth and economic indicators. Public finance: the budget; main sources of central government income and types of expenditure; monetary and fiscal policy. EC 352 Economic Geography (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2023c-2013c Examines economic activity and production as a function of geographical location. Economic models to explain how economic activities are located, primary, secondary and tertiary production; services; a comparative analysis of global demography; rise and roles of the city and the metropolis; effects of technology; national, regional and strategic political and commercial alignments and realignments; natural resources; less developed, more developed, and developing countries, core and periphery, multinational cooperation and the global village. EC 353 The Political Economy of North-South Relations (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 The profound and increasing economic divide between north and south is examined within the historical, political and social perspective. Particular attention is given to investment and trade conditions, population, urbanization and social and political instability. A special ecological study is included. (same as IR 353) EC 455 International Trade and Finance (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and 2023 The course covers major theories seeking to explain international trade patterns, mechanisms for international payments, systems for determining and influencing exchange rates, major international institutions influencing trade are discussed, as well as the role of international investment and multinational corporations. EC 457 Economics of Developing Countries (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and 2023 Provides students with a first understanding both of the economic development and actual problems of Third World countries. Theories that try to explain the economic mal-development and discussions of practical attempts to escape from its vicious circles. Specific problem areas are analyzed more in depth, among them: questions of population growth, capital demand, foreign trade imbalance, foreign investment, and the agrarian sector. (Same as IR 457 Economics of Developing Countries)

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

English (EN)

111 English Composition: Expository Writing (3) Prerequisites: EL 131-132 or appropriate score on English exam or native English speaker Review of grammatical and syntactical elements, paragraph and theme development. Expository writing aimed to enhance students' capacity to formulate, organize, and express thoughts logically, clearly and effectively. Students write short essays and read selected prose models. 112 English Composition: Persuasive Writing (3) Prerequisites: EL 131-132 or appropriate score on English exam or native English speaker Emphasizes persuasive writing. Designed to enhance students' capacity to formulate, organize and express their thoughts cogently, as well as logically and clearly. Students evaluate, and revise short persuasive essays, and read selected practical prose models. Introduction to standard research and bibliographical techniques. Short research paper. Class discussion of both model texts and student writing. 200 Cross-Cultural Communication (3) Prerequisite: Intermediate level of English. This course reviews the different cultural norms at play when people interact. An introduction to the various factors which affect communication, particularly in an international context. Emphases is on understanding verbal and non-verbal cultural differences (Same as BA 200 Cross-Cultural Communication) 370 Business Communication (3) Prerequisites: EN 111 or 112 Aims to improve the student's ability to write concise, well-organized, effective business messages, including letters, resumes, memorandums and reports. Strategies and techniques will be analyzed for communicating in a range of typical business situations. Writing practice. (Same as BA 370 Business Communication) 373 Public Speaking (3) Prerequisites: EN 111 or 112 Fundamentals of effective business and professional speaking in English. Focus on importance of communication and public speaking for careers. (Same as BA 373 Public Speaking)

490 Intercultural Communication (3) Prerequisite: EL 132, appropriate score on English Exam, or nature speaker. Intercultural communication is the study of the ways in which social structuring, social assumptions, and intercultural language usage bears on interactions between members of different cultures. This course is the culmination of foundational principals presented in the core General Education coursework expressed in terms of intercultural contexts. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary activities in the fields of communication, sociology, psychology, technology, and research. Students employ critical thinks and analytical skills to evaluate and integrate diverse ideas within various cultural backgrounds. Foreign Languages English as a Foreign Language (EL)

121 Intermediate English: Grammar and Usage (3) Prerequisites: appropriate score on English exam Consolidates knowledge of basic English grammar and usage with further intensive instruction in tenses, grammatical structures, and vocabulary. For students for whom English is a foreign language only. 122 Intermediate English: Reading and Listening (3)

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

Prerequisites: EL 010 or EL 011-012 or appropriate score on English exam Further intensive instruction in tenses and vocabulary with an emphasis on reading and listening comprehension. For students for whom English is a foreign language only. 131 Advanced English: Grammar and Structure (3) Prerequisites: EL 120 or EL 121-122 or appropriate score on English exam for non-native speakers of English only. Students learn and practice grammar and structures of English in a communicative framework. Reinforces students' prior studies of English, extends grasp of new structures and function. 132 Advanced English: Writing Skills (3) Develops students' writing skills, improving ability to write coherently. Encourages creative use of English express students' own ideas.

French (FR) French Language

101 Elementary French I (3) Gives students a sound introduction to the basics of spoken and written French. Basic grammar and vocabulary, reinforced with the use of audio and video. 102 Elementary French II (3) Prerequisite: FR 101 Using the same French method as FR 101, the course continues to develop the students' ability to understand, speak and write in French. 201 Intermediate French I (3) Prerequisite: FR 102 or equivalent. This course intensifies the study of grammar and syntax in order to improve writing and speaking in French. Emphasis in reading and comprehension of spoken French as well as on pronunciation. 202 Intermediate French II (3) Prerequisite: FR 201 Continues to intensify the study of grammar and syntax in order to improve writing and speaking in French. Emphasis on reading and comprehension of spoken French, as well as on pronunciation. 301 Advanced French I (3) Prerequisite: FR 202 or equivalent Introduction to the art and techniques of written French. Well- rehearsed structures in straightforward exercises. A choice of texts ranging in register from the literary to the conversational or journalese. 302 Advanced French II (3) Prerequisite: FR 301 Part II of the introduction to the art and techniques of written French. How to compose a summary, a commentary, and an essay in French.

German (GE) German Language

101 Elementary German I (3) Basic vocabulary, pronunciation and elementary grammar (genders, cases, negative and interrogative sentences, pronominal structures, prepositions, conjugation of present tense verbs, word order of main and subordinate clauses). Practice of different structures using various pattern drills. 102 Elementary German II (3) Prerequisite: GE 101 Continues basic vocabulary, pronunciation and elementary grammar. Practice of different structures using various pattern drills. Language of communication is German.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

201 Intermediate German I (3) Prerequisite: GE 102 or equivalent. Enhances the students' capacity to formulate, organize and express their thoughts in German. Also, using various pattern drills, systematic discussion of selected grammatical difficulties is stressed (declension of nouns, article words and adjectives, use of prepositions, sentence structure, etc.) Intermediate composition, readings of simple prose and verse and modern topics. 202 Intermediate German II (3) Prerequisite: GE 201 This intermediate course consolidates the students' knowledge of basic German structures and usage. Grammar patterns discussed are, in particular, verb forms, sequence of tenses, active and passive voice, conditionals and "wish", direct and indirect question, reported speech by using various pattern drills and exercises, intermediate composition, readings in German literature and modern \topics. 301 Advanced German I (3) Prerequisite: GE 202 or equivalent this course has a strong oral bias. By reading and discussing a variety of texts concerning very different subjects and with different style and idiom, oral proficiency is developed. Writing skills are extended by composing short essays, and correctness and fluidity of written and oral expression are perfected by the accompanying grammar review. 302 Advanced German II (3) Prerequisite: GE 301 or equivalent Provides practice in the recognition and use of German at a very advanced level, in sophisticated and complex oral and written forms. Classroom practice will emphasize discussions accompanied by open-completion and transformation exercises to develop active control over the language, and directed writing exercises to develop the ability to interpret and present information.

Spanish (SP) Spanish Language and Literature

101 Elementary Spanish I (3) Introduction to basic grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, and writing. By the end of the course students will be able to manage everyday situations, maintain a simple conversation and read simple texts. 102 Elementary Spanish I (3) Prerequisite: SP 101 Focuses on oral language, basic grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, and writing. By the end of the course students will be able to manage everyday situations, maintain conversations, read non-complex texts and write short compositions. 201 Intermediate Spanish I (3) Prerequisite: SP 102 or equivalent Consolidates students' knowledge and use of basic Spanish structures. Provides further instruction and practice in grammar and vocabulary. 202 Intermediate Spanish II (3) Prerequisite: SP 201 Emphasizes practice of the most complicated grammar structures and vocabulary acquisition. The focus is on written language Syntactic approach. Mastery of subjunctives. 301 Advanced Spanish I (3) Prerequisite: SP 202 or equivalent Emphasizes practice of more advanced structures and vocabulary acquisition. Aims to improve students' ability to understand and to express themselves in Spanish through writing exercises as well as speaking and listening comprehension. Reading of short literary texts and newspaper articles.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

302 Advanced Spanish II (3) Prerequisite: SP 301 or equivalent emphasizes the practice of more advanced structures as well as idiomatic expressions. Students develop their academic writing and oral skills through weekly compositions, discussions and presentations.

History (HI)

225 European History to 1815 (3) Survey of European History from the medieval era to 1815. Familiarizes students with the mainline political, socioeconomic and cultural developments in this time period; to show students how Europe evolved from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Early Modern Era. 226 European History: Napoleonic Period to the Present (3) Survey of European History from the Napoleonic Wars to the Post-World War II Era. It deals with significant new institutions and trends arising during the climax of Europe's development and importance in the world.

Hospitality Management (HM)

103 Hospitality Management (3) This introductory course provided an in-depth overview of the lodging and food service industry by tracing the industry's development and growth, management, and operations systems, and trends and career opportunities. Course content focuses on the industry's multiple linked divisions inclusive of convention management, clubs, theme parks, and gaming. Effective leadership policies and practices are highlighted. 141 Introduction to Tourism (3) Imparts basic understanding of the nature, segmentation, historical development, and economic and social aspects of the tourism industry. (Same as TM 141 Introduction to Tourism) 145 Housekeeping Management (3) Surveys the fundamentals of supervisory housekeeping: institutional housekeeping responsibility; management functions; staffing; supplies; interdependence with other departments. 173 Technology Management in the Hospitality Industry (3) Provides an overview of the information needs of lodging properties and food service establishments; addresses essential aspects of computer systems such as hardware, software, and generic applications; focuses on computer based property management systems for both front office and back office functions; examines features of computerized restaurant management systems; describes hotel sales, computer applications, revenue management strategies, and accounting applications; addresses the selection and implementation of computer systems. Focuses on managing information systems and examines the impact of the internet and private intranets on the industry. 187 Front Office Management (3) This course covers organization of front office. It stresses the techniques used in maximizing the profitability of the Room Division by achieving the highest possible occupancy at the highest possible average rate. It develops front office computer skills and examines the roles of interpersonal skills needed in proving outstanding customer service and Internet in maximizing revenues. Other topics covered include security, accounting, human resources, and revenue management. 210 Food and Beverage Control (3) Principles and practice of cost control. Food and beverage cost standards, budgeting, and product control. Forecasting labor cost controls. Development and application of standards. Calculation of actual cost. Application of computers in this area.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

215 Food and Beverage Management (3) This comprehensive course covers all areas of food and beverage management to provide a detailed description of the functions of individual departments within. From developing the concept to designing, menu engineering, managing the operations, establishing controls, and marketing the student is exposed to the processes and procedures involved in the high revenue generating, a most important division of the hospitality industry, while acquiring the skills. 291 Internship: (3) Basic hotel housekeeping tasks in theory and practice including maintenance. Emphasis on correct use of supplies and equipment and cleaning and storing procedures. Students work in hotel rooms, public areas and in the laundry.

423 Convention and Event Management (3) Prerequisite: HM 103 or GEB 1350 Group and meetings business as it applies to the hospitality industry. Convention sales, planning and post-convention evaluation. (Same as TM 329 Convention Management Services) 446 Hospitality Facilities Management (3) Prerequisite: HM 103 The course outlines essential elements of management as they apply to hotel engineering problems. It provides an introduction to technical requirements established by law and need. Structural maintenance and energy conservation are also emphasized. 451 Leadership & Management in Hospitality and Tourism (3) Prerequisite: HM 103 This course is designed to acquaint students with the changing nature of leadership, management, and quality issues facing today's hospitality industry. In-depth coverage of topics such as the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, power and empowerment, communication skills, goal setting, high-performance teams, challenges of diversity, managing organizational change, and strategic career planning, will provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to lead a hospitality organization in the challenging and demanding environment. 499 Internship (3) Prerequisite: Permission of advisor Internship in hotel management field. Supervision and written project required. Certain work restrictions may apply.

Information Technology (IT)

103 Applications of Computers (3) Acquaints students with the four major applications of computers in business: word processing, databases, spreadsheets and presentation software, using Microsoft Office. Concentrates on fundamentals. "Hands-on" computer-based course. A basic review of the operational software, Windows, and introduction to the Internet Explorer and the creation of a web page document.

International Relations and Diplomacy (IR)

221 Introduction to International Relations (3) Introduces the vocabulary, concepts and theories of contemporary international relations analysis, including historical study of alliance systems, political and economic integration, international organizations, balances of power, and causes of war. Investigation of 20th century nationalism, imperialism, industrialization, modernization and revolution as they influence current international relations. Domestic policy and foreign affairs; influence of ideology on policy. 331 Modern Diplomacy (3) Prerequisites: IR 221 or PS 221 Introduces students to the history and practice of diplomacy, including negotiation and conflict resolution theories.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

335 American Foreign Policy (3) Prerequisites: IR 221 or PS 221 Traces the history and application of American foreign policy with great emphasis on the period since World War II. American ideas of exceptionalism are discussed in the context of alternating isolationism and interventionism. The paradigms of realism and idealism are used to explain policies pursued by various American presidents and to suggest predictability for the future. 341 Concepts in International Relations and Diplomacy (3) Prerequisite: IR 221 (can be taken simultaneously) The purpose of this course is to demonstrate that there is an intricate relationship between international relations theory and practice. Behind every foreign policy decision there lies a theory (or several theories). 353 The Political Economy of North-South Relations (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2023c-2013c The profound and increasing economic divide between north and south is examined within the historical, political and social perspective. Particular attention is given to investment and trade conditions, population, urbanization and social and political instability. A special ecological study is included. (Same as EC 353 The Political Economy of North-South Relations) 370 Writing for Foreign Affairs (3) Prerequisites: EN 111-112 Various types of political writing, including political analysis papers, position papers, press releases, and reaction papers. Surveys of persuasive writings. Research and composition. 450 Practical Diplomacy (3) Prerequisite: IR 341 (may be taken concurrently) Examines the roles of ambassadors and other embassy officials including their responsibilities towards their own governments as well as their relationship with the government of the country to which they have been posted. Summit diplomacy; shuttle diplomacy. Case studies. 457 Economics of Developing Countries (3) Prerequisites: ECO 2013 and 2023 Provides students with a first understanding both of the economic development and actual problems of Third World countries. Theories that try to explain the economic mal-development and discussions of practical attempts to escape from its vicious circles. Specific problem areas are analyzed more in depth, among them: questions of population growth, capital demand, foreign trade imbalance, foreign investment, and the agrarian sector. (Same as EC 457 Economics of Developing Countries) IR481 Selected Topics in International Relations (3) Prerequisites: IR 221 and PS 221 Student research, discussion and reports on problems in international relations. (May be repeated for credit as topic varies.)

Mathematics (MA)

1107 College Mathematics (3) Review of math fundamentals. Review of real numbers. Methodology to solve linear equations and functional linear applications. Maximization and minimization techniques and sensitivity techniques using linear programming methods. Basic concepts of probability and statistics and basic concepts of geometry in relation to characteristics of polygons and calculation of perimeters and volumes. 172 Applied Mathematics (3) Prerequisites: MGF 1107 Functions: definitions, limits, economic, graphical, continuity. Differentiation: interpretation, basic rules, higher order derivatives, business applications, economic applications, marginal analysis. Optimization:

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

determining maximums and minimums, graphing, applications, constrained and unconstrained optimizations. Integrations: rules of logs and exponents applications. Introduction to Integral Calculus and its applications.

374 Statistics (3) Prerequisite: MGF 1107 or MA 172 The population; frequency distribution; data; graphical displays; descriptive analysis; relative and cumulative frequency distributions; population parameters; arithmetic mean, median, mode, variability, variance and standard deviation; basic definitions of probability, the addition law, conditional probability, joint probability table; the multiplication law; statistical independence, counting techniques, the factorial permutations and combinations; random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling distributions and theory. (Same as BA 374 Statistics)

Physical Sciences (SC)

137 Science and Society (3) Science and its effects on society as a whole. Introduces energy requirements, production, conservation, population growth, disease prevention, world food shortage, conservation of resources, information technology and changing lifestyles, genetic engineering, radiation, chaos theory etc. (Same as SO 137 Science and Society)

Political Science (PS)

221 Introduction to Political Science (3) Scope and methods of political science; political behavior; process and machinery of government, including elections, parties and pressure groups; types of political systems and governments in the 20th century; classical theories of politics. 370 The U.S. Political System (3) Introduction to modern American politics. Topics include sources of American political culture, the political theory underlying the Constitution, the evolution of national political institutions such as the Presidency, Congress and the Supreme Court, the role of political parties, the role of interest groups, and the theories of critical realignment and political power.

Psychology (PY)

1021 General Psychology (3) Introduction to the scientific study of motivation, perception, meaning, learning, emotions, feeling and the psychological basis of behavior. Examinations of Freudian and post-Freudian theories of personality. 376 Industrial Psychology (3) Prerequisite: PSY 1021 or BA 384 Introduction to the main concepts in psychology applicable to "industry" and "employment". Emphasized are psychological principles as they relate to management, labor and public relations as well as perspectives for technology, education and leisure time. 384 Behavioral Aspects (3) Prerequisites: GEB 1350 or PSY 1021 Focuses on group behavior and leadership necessary to transform human resources into effective organizational entities. Emphasizes the theory and practice that relate to individuals interacting in the work environment. Case studies, films and guest speakers. (Same as BA 384 Behavioral Aspects)

Sociology (SO)

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137 Science and Society (3) Science and its effects on society as a whole. Introduces energy requirements, production, conservation, population growth, disease prevention, world food shortage, conservation of resources, information technology and changing lifestyles, genetic engineering, radiation, chaos theory etc. (Same as SC 137 Science and Society)

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Graduate Courses Business Administration (BA)

501 Organizational Behavior (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Impact that individuals, groups, and structure have on the behavior within organizations. Practical examples. Methods related to problem-solving within organizations. 510 Business Economics (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Emphasis on applicability of economic theory to both the business/internal dynamics of business and the external circumstances under which businesses operate. Course provides necessary knowledge, tools, and understanding of economic discourse as a basis for the study of business as well as a background of the basic economic principles relevant to business. (Same as EC 510 Business Economics) 512`Managerial Accounting (3) Prerequisite: Two undergraduate accounting courses or BA 513 Builds upon the student's basic understanding of financial and managerial accounting by exploring in more depth the essential concepts of managerial accounting, including ratio analysis, budgeting and cost measurement. 513 Financial and Managerial Accounting (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing This course is designed for the MIM and MBA prep student who has little or no previous background in accounting. The course consists of two parts: financial accounting and managerial (Management) accounting, to include cost accounting and budgeting. 515 Managerial Finance (3) Prerequisite: Two undergraduate accounting courses or BA 513 Function of managing business funds, mobilizing cash and credit and planning their use to further the objectives of the firm. 522 International Marketing (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Developing international strategies in planning market research and control with regard to legal, cultural and economic factors involved in crossing borders. 523 Marketing Management (3) Prerequisites: One course in both marketing and management Provides students with a basic understanding of the marketing concept and the strategic aspects of marketing management. Special attention is focused on the techniques and tools for effective decision making, with practical case examples. 529 Multinational Business Management (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Emphasizes specific techniques utilized by a multinational firm; its strategy, marketing, finances, decision-making, organization, communication, planning and control. 537 Production and Operations Management (3) Prerequisite: One 300-400 level management course or BA 529 or BA531 or BA 535 Basic methods and models of production management and operations research. Inventory control and demand forecasting. Emphasis on analytical techniques of POM and modern topics such as lean production involving just-intime systems, computer-integrated manufacturing, etc.

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541 International Corporate Finance (3) Prerequisite: One course in finance Basic issues arising out of the financial needs and techniques of business operating in the international environment. Alternative policies for international financial control. Different systems for organizing and controlling transitional operations. Case studies. 542 Comprehensive Business Management Seminar (3) Prerequisites: At least 18 credits of graduate level business courses including one 500-level management course. Focuses on how managerial thinking influences strategy formation and implementation. Importance of change and the need for managerial dynamic thinking and the importance of organizational learning. Case study approach integrates the various disciplines associated with management such as accounting, finance, human resource utilization, and organization behavior. Capstone course. 544 Human Resources Management (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing familiarizes the student with the role and function of human resource professionals and their impact on organizations. Practical examples. Methods related to problem-solving as it relates to human resource management within organizations, changing role and enlarged functions of human resource management. Emphasis on international business. 560 International Business Law (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course aims at providing a general understanding of the legal problems arising from transnational business transactions. 570 Management Communication for International Business (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing reflects the vital importance of effective communication skills to success in management. Exposition of basic business communications principles, focusing on communicating economically, accurately, and cogently. Communications strategies to meet business situations that managers encounter. Students analyze cases and compose appropriate business communications. 575 Statistics for Business (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Intensive introduction to statistical methodology in business and economics. Use of computers in conducting statistical analysis. Topics include probability concepts, hypothesis testing, correlation analysis, and quantitative business forecasting. Economics (EC) 510 Business Economics (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Emphasis on applicability of business/ economic theory to both the internal dynamics of business and the external circumstances under which businesses operate. Course provides necessary knowledge, tools, and understanding of economic discourse as a basis for the study of business as well as a background of the basic economic principle relevant to business. (Same as BA 510 Business Economics) 545 International Economic Problems (3) Prerequisite: One economics course Introduces students to the international economy with emphasis on post-war developments. Classical theories of trade; new trade theory; globalization; finance and currency regimes; and models of economic growth. (Same as IR 545 International Economic Problems) Information Technology (IT) 500 Management Information Systems (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing A comprehensive overview of information systems and the management of these functions. Emphasis on introducing computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, and human resources. The course includes discussions and readings on conceptual and practical foundations of information processing systems

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support for management. Topics include decision-making functions, computer system project management, economic, ethical, and legal considerations of management information systems, system implementation, and evaluation. 510 Database Management (3) Prerequisite: IT 500 A comprehensive overview of database systems and database management. Emphasis on advanced concepts of database administration, models depicting various forms of database organization, and planning for disasters involving database files. The course includes discussions and readings on conceptual and practical foundations of database administration and support for management. Topics include relationship models, SQL, data modeling, data storage, data integrity, and data administration. 520 Management of Networks (3) Prerequisite: IT 500 (may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor) The course includes discussions and readings on conceptual and practical foundations providing a comprehensive overview of network software and hardware selection considerations including routers, hubs, and couplers from a conceptual, needs-oriented perspective. Also included is an extensive discussion of network design concentrating on the physical environment and influences on design of applications goals. The focus is on PC networks within the wider context of mainframe connectivity, local-area and wide-area networking. 530 Information Technology Project Management (3) Prerequisite: IT: IT 500 (may be taken concurrently with permission of instructor) CE: CE 510, CE 530, and CE 540 (CE 530 and CE 540 maybe taken concurrently) This course presents an examination of the impact of information technology (IT) upon organization structure and strategy, along with concepts on how to manage IT projects. It discusses the pertinent issues of effective management of IT activities and focuses on the application areas of greatest promise for IT. The course is organized as a management audit of information services activities. This audit identifies the questions that should be raised in determining if a firm is properly using and managing IT. The CE version concentrates on the management and execution of a project from the engineering perspective. The class is organized as a team effort involving project planning and sizing, task assignments, design, resource requirements and allocation, and engineering design reviews needed to drive the project to a successful and market timely conclusion. 540 System Analysis, Design and Implementation (3) Prerequisite: IT 500 (may be taken concurrently) This course presents an introduction to systems analysis and design with an in-depth presentation of the most up-todate tools of structured analysis while at the same time presenting traditional techniques such as interviewing and forms design. 576 Information Technology (IT) Applications in Business (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Introduces students to electronic data processing systems and techniques in the context of organizational management information systems. Types of hardware and software for information needs and problem solving, source-document preparation, flow-charting and system design. 589 Methods of Research and Analysis (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Gives students experience in the whole range of methodological and fieldwork activities involved in an actual piece of research. Main stages in historical, social science and business research. Empirical program of research involving the formulation of a research problem, theoretical background reading, research design, data collection and fieldwork and, finally, the construction and writing of a project. (Same as BA 589 Methods of Research and Analysis).

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International Hospitality and Tourism Management (HM) 510 Food and Beverage Control (3) An advanced and thorough treatment of the principles of food and beverage control. Dynamics of food and beverage operations, relevant control techniques, major areas of profit improvement. 531 International Travel and Tourism (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Provides an overview and introduction to the broad subject of international travel and tourism. Aspects covered include: an overview of the travel industry, government roles and policy, tourism development, selling travel, transportation, and hospitality-related services. 541 Tourism Planning and Marketing (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Develops the interrelation and interdependence of tourism planning and marketing. The course provides an understanding of the importance of planning and management in tourism development and the vital role of marketing in both public and commercial sector tourism. 544 Human Resource Management (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Aims to develop students' understanding of the role of Human Resources Management in developing and sustaining hospitality organizations. (Same as BA 544 Human Resources Management) 572 Hotel and Restaurant Accounting Information Systems (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Familiarizes students with property management systems, POS restaurant systems, menu management systems, inventory systems, and the accompanying hardware and software used within the hospitality industry. A project involving the complete analysis of an in-use system and field trips. 582 Case Studies in Hospitality and Tourism Management (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Through the use of case studies students are exposed to real problems in a variety of scenarios. They will develop their analytical skills, their flexibility of thinking, and their ability to apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations. 589 Methods of Research and Analysis (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Gives students experience in the whole range of methodological and fieldwork activities involved in an actual piece of research. Main stages in historical, social science and business research. Empirical program of research involving the formulation of a research problem, theoretical background reading, research design, data collection and fieldwork and, finally, the construction and writing of a project. (Same as BA 589 Methods of Research and Analysis) International Relations and Diplomacy (IR) 501 Workshop in Diplomacy: Practical and Historical Aspects (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing 501: Practical aspects of diplomacy, including policy formulation, reporting and analysis, persuasion, consular protection and services, public affairs and administration. Approach historical and practical. 502 Workshop in Diplomacy: International Negotiation (3) Concentrates on international negotiation in theory and practice. Readings, case studies, position and scope papers. Negotiation exercises. 511 Current Issues in International Relations: Theories (3) Two semester seminar focusing on current issues in the news put into the context of history and international relations theory.

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512 Current Issues in International Relations in Historical Context (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Two semester seminar focusing on current issues in the news put into context of history and international relations theory. Student oral presentations. Written weekly reports, term paper. Students required to stay current with news. 542 International Organizations (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Origins, development, structure, organization, administration and aims of selected international organizations, with particular emphasis on the United Nations. Particular attention is paid to the peacekeeping role of the UN and the reform program. The changed role of international organizations within the context of the post Cold War era, with special emphasis on NATO and the European Union. 544 Conflict and Peace Strategies (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing Examines conflict from ancient times to the era of total war, with emphasis on the theoretical concepts of warfare, from classical to current strategic thought. The nuclear age and mutually assured destruction are also studied, along with superpower confrontation and the strategic situation in the post Cold War era. Specific studies of proliferation, technology and computer warfare, as well as limited struggle and civil breakdown. Examination of peace strategies in an unstable political environment, both internationally and within the state. 545 International Economic Problems (3) Prerequisite: One economics course Introduces students to the international economy with emphasis on post-war developments. Classical theories of trade; new trade theory; globalization; finance and currency regimes; and models of economic growth. (Same as EC 545 International Economic Problems) 567 International Management of Resources (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing Basic concepts and issues that company managers will deal with. Theoretical and political background of environmental concerns, specific problems now current, and strategic approaches that can be taken by businesses and society. The basic issues of scarcity, abundance, depletion, stocking, technological change and substitution, private vs. state ownership as well as equity principles vs. efficiency arguments in the allocation of the benefits of resource exploitation are considered within the context of the historical evolution of the resource markets. 571 International Human Rights (3) Prerequisites: Six 300-400 level PS or IR courses or IR 500 Meaning, scope and utilization of human rights in international relations and diplomacy. The historical and ideological background of human rights, the content and interpretations of internationally recognized human rights, principles and norms, institutions and procedures, the protection of human rights and specific human rights issues in our contemporary world. 589 Methods of Research & Analysis (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing Gives students experience in the whole range of methodological and fieldwork activities involved in an actual piece of research. Main stages in historical, social science and business research. Empirical program of research involving the formulation of a research problem, theoretical background reading, research design, data collection and fieldwork and, finally, the construction and writing of a project. (Same as BA 589 Methods of Research and Analysis)

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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Undergraduate Regulations

Hour Load Regular students must enroll for at least 12 and no more than 19 credit hours per semester. Students who have maintained satisfactory records may apply to the Study Center Academics Committee for permission to enroll for more than 19 credit hours. Change of Registration Students wishing to make a change in registration must complete and submit to the Registrar's office a Change of Registration form. In all cases, students wishing to register for a course after the beginning of the semester must obtain the course instructor or program advisor's written permission. Students are permitted to drop or add during the first three days of the course. U.S. students utilizing Financial Aid must meet with the Financial Aid Administer to assess the consequences of their change. International students will not be reimbursed (See Refund Policy) Majors and Minors Students wishing a double major must complete all course and other requirements for both majors. At least 18 credits of course work which will not be used to satisfy requirements for the second major must be completed for each major. Courses cannot fulfill requirements for both a major concentration and a minor. Double Degrees Students wishing to earn two bachelor's degrees must complete all requirements for both degrees. General Education coursework is transferable to the second degree. Course Auditing Full-time students wishing to audit a course must obtain the permission of the course instructor and the campus Registrar. Independent Study Independent study projects must be discussed with the Registrar, who assists in selecting an appropriate supervising instructor. The student and supervising instructor jointly determine a reading list and/or work program for the independent study. The independent study petition (obtained from the campus Registrar) and the reading list and/or work program must be submitted to the campus Provost for approval. Only full-time students who have completed at least 30 semester credits with a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or above are permitted to pursue independent study. An additional fee is charged for each independent study project, details of which can be found in the Costs and Fees section of the appendix.

Qualified students may enroll for no more than one independent study per semester or 4 month term. Up to 3 credits

can be awarded for each course conducted as an independent study. An additional fee is charged for each independent study project, details of which can be found in the Costs and Fees section of the appendix. Examinations Midterm and Final examinations are scheduled during regular class periods by each instructor. Grades (Undergraduate) Course work is graded A (outstanding), A- (excellent), B+ (very good), B (good), B-(above average), C+ (quite satisfactory), C (satisfactory), C- (barely satisfactory), D (poor). The lowest acceptable grade for which credit is granted is D. Students who, for any reason, have not completed the requirements for a course receive the notation NC (No Credit) for that course.

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The notation I (incomplete) is granted only when students have an official excuse. Students must get approval from their instructor in order to receive an incomplete for a course. An incomplete must be made up within eight weeks after the end of the semester in which the course was taken. When the work is completed, the instructor reports the semester grade. If the work is not completed, the notation I is automatically changed to NC. The notation NC is considered final. Under no circumstances are students permitted to do additional work in order to receive credit and a grade for a course in which NC has been earned. In order to receive credit in an NC course, students must re-take the course in a subsequent semester and receive a satisfactory grade. Both the NC and grade received for the repeated course appear on the official transcript, but only the second grade will be used in computing the grade point average. Once a course grade has been submitted to the campus Registrar, it becomes a part of the student's permanent record. Letter Grade A AB BC+ C CD Quality Points = 4.00 = 3.75 = 3.00 = 2.75 = 2.25 = 2.00 = 1.75 = 1.00 Description Outstanding Excellent Good Above Average Quite Satisfactory Satisfactory Barely Satisfactory Poor

Satisfactory Academic Standing and Progress Undergraduate SAP Policy There are two measures of student academic standing and progress. The first deals with courses taken and completed (academic progress), and the second deals with grades earned in courses attempted (academic standing). The following section describes how SIU deals with these two measures of progress. SIU students are expected to make reasonable progress toward the goal of graduation. Students pursuing a bachelor's degree must meet all academic requirements within 180 attempted credits. Students pursuing an associate's degree must meet all academic requirements within 90 attempted credits. Attempted credits include all course work taken by the student at SIU and all accepted credits from other colleges or universities. Students must earn an overall University curriculum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 in order to be eligible to graduate. Good Academic Standing At the undergraduate level, the minimum cumulative grade point average required for good academic standing will vary according to class level. Class level is based on the number of credit hours earned. Students in good academic standing must earn or exceed the grade point average equal to or in excess of cumulative grade point minimum for their respective class levels. Cumulative grade point average determination will include grades of: A, B, C, D, and NC. If a student is not in Good Standing, the student will be placed on Academic Probation or suspended. Academic Probation Students whose University cumulative grade point average is below the GPA cut-off for Good Standing, but above the cumulative GPA for Suspension (see below) will be placed on academic probation. Students who remain on probation for two consecutive terms of full-time enrollment may be suspended.

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Academic Suspension All suspensions are for one term (four months). Students wishing to re-enroll at the end of the period of suspension must apply to the Provost. Students may appeal suspension to the Provost. A written letter of appeal must be delivered along with documentation to support the appeal. Exceptions may be granted under extraordinary circumstances. Full-time undergraduate students who earn less than 50% of their total credits attempted in a term and who do not meet the following cumulative grade point averages may be suspended without being placed on probation. Class Level Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Hours Earned Below 30 30-59 60-89 90 or more Cumulative GPA Cut-Off 1.60 1.80 2.00 2.00

Students with a cumulative GPA less than the cut-off score (above) may be suspended without a period of probation. Graduation Requirements Students are responsible for satisfying the requirements for graduation in their specific program and for observing the academic regulations of Schiller International University. Petitions for graduation should be submitted at least one term before the proposed graduation date. The Main Registrar's Office will approve these petitions if all degree requirements will have been met and if all required documents have been submitted. Petitions for graduation will be approved by the Main Registrar's Office if all degree requirements will have been completed before the proposed graduation date and if all required documents have been submitted. A student may be dropped from candidacy for serious academic or personal misbehavior by decision of the Graduate Committee. The student may appeal this decision by written application to the Graduate Committee within two weeks of the termination. Graduate Regulations Please see the University's publication, Graduate Regulations and Guidelines, which is binding for all graduate students at SIU. The Academic Regulations articulated in the Undergraduate apply to Graduates including: Attendance, Conduct, and Honesty Policy. Grades Graduate The following grading system is used for graduate classes. Please note that it is different from undergraduate grading. Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CQuality Points = 4.00 Excellent = 3.75 Very Good = 3.25 Good = 3.00 Standard Letter Grade NC W R I = = = = = = = = Quality Points 0.00 No Credit Withdrawal Repeat Incomplete Pass Audit Thesis in Progress In Progress

= 2.75 Below Standard CR = 2.25 Adequate = 2.00 Pass AU T

= 1.75 Minimum Pass IP

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Satisfactory Academic Standing and Progress Graduate SAP Policy There are two measures of student academic standing and progress. The first deals with courses taken and completed (academic progress), and the second deals with grades earned in courses attempted (academic standing). SIU students are expected to make reasonable progress toward the goal of graduation. Students attempting master's degree must meet all academic requirements within 54 attempted credits. Attempted credits include all course work taken by the student at SIU and all accepted credits from other colleges or universities. Students must earn an overall University curriculum cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in order to be eligible to graduate. Good Academic Standing Graduate students are required to maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Academic Probation Students whose University cumulative grade point average is below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and will have the following semester to achieve a 3.0 overall grade-point average. Students whose overall grade-point average remains below 3.0 after this term will be placed on academic suspension. Exceptions may be granted under extraordinary circumstances. Academic Suspension All academic suspensions are for one term (four months). Students wishing to re-enroll at the end of the period of suspension must apply in writing to the Provost. If re-admitted, these students, working with their mentor, will develop a learning contract for course work to assist them in establishing acceptable academic performance. Students may appeal suspension to the Provost. A written letter of appeal must be delivered along with documentation to support the appeal. Exceptions may be granted under extraordinary circumstances. Comprehensive Examinations and Master's Thesis All Master's degree candidates at SIU must pass a final comprehensive examination. The examination for students pursuing a program of study with a thesis option will consist of the oral defense of the thesis. Uniform Comprehensive Examinations for students in a program of study without a thesis shall be given and shall be administered and graded Pass or Fail by the Graduate Committee of each campus. Students must complete their comprehensive examinations at least two weeks before the end of the final semester in residence. Any student who fails to pass this examination may request a re-examination during the following semester by written application to the campus Registrar. It may be repeated only once. A second failure requires a review by the Campus Director and Provost in determining if the option of a thesis will be granted. The Master's thesis is to consist of a preliminary design, the thesis itself of between 10,000 and 15,000 words and an abstract. The completed thesis may be presented to the Graduate Committee at any time during the academic year, but in order to graduate in any given semester, the thesis must be submitted at least 6 weeks before the end of the semester. The thesis must be defended in person. The oral defense, which serves as a comprehensive examination for the thesis author, will take place on a date specified by the Graduate Committee after approval of the thesis. The Graduate Committee and the Thesis Advisor will approve the thesis and pass or fail the oral defense. For detailed information, please refer to SIU's Graduate Regulations Brochure.

Honors Dean's List

Students named on this list have displayed a high level of academic performance during the preceding semester. Undergraduate students are eligible for the Dean's List if they have earned a grade point average of at least 3.5 and have successfully completed all courses for which they have registered. Also eligible for the Dean's List are graduate students who have successfully completed all courses for which they have registered, and have earned a grade point average of at least 3.8.

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Graduation with Honors Bachelor degree candidates may qualify for honors distinction on their diploma if they have completed three consecutive terms at SIU prior to receiving their degree and have successfully completed all courses for which they have registered with the following grade point averages: · at least 3.50 Cum Laude · at least 3.70 Magna Cum Laude · at least 3.85 Summa Cum Laude Master degree candidates may also qualify for honors distinction on their diploma if they have completed two consecutive terms at SIU prior to receiving their degree and have successfully completed all courses for which they have registered with the following grade point averages: · at least 3.70 Cum Laude · at least 3.85 Magna Cum Laude · 4.00 Summa Cum Laude

Awards Florida John F. Kennedy Award: presented to an undergraduate student who has shown outstanding leadership ability and rendered service to the University and its students. Neil Armstrong Award: presented in recognition of outstanding academic achievement to an undergraduate and a graduate student. Hospitality Award: presented to a student who has excelled in hotel or tourism management studies. International Business Award: presented to an outstanding undergraduate and graduate international business student. Eleanor Roosevelt Award: presented to an international relations and diplomacy student for outstanding achievement. Heidelberg Valedictorian Award: presented to the undergraduate student with the highest grade point average in the graduating class. Friedrich Schiller Award: presented to the undergraduate student with the highest grade point average for the academic year, and named in honor of the German poet. International Business Awards: presented to the two graduating students who have excelled respectively in undergraduate and in graduate business administration studies. International Relations and Diplomacy Award: presented to the graduating international relations student who has excelled in undergraduate studies. Kurt Pinthus Award: presented to a student who has shown outstanding achievement in German language or literature. The award is named in honor of the late Dr. Kurt Pinthus, poet, eminent critic of modern German literature, and former member of the Board of Overseers. Paul Tillich Award: presented to a graduate or an undergraduate student who has demonstrated leadership, excellent character and rendered service to the University and its students. The award is named in honor of the late Paul Tillich, philosopher, theologian, friend and benefactor of Schiller International University. John Eggert Award: presented to a graduate student of excellent academic standing who has displayed outstanding leadership abilities and rendered service to the University. The award honors the late John G. Eggert IV, Academic Dean of the University until 1986. Sandra and Susan Russeff Award Russeff Award: presented to a graduating undergraduate student of high academic standing who has contributed significantly to the University. This award honors the late Sandra and Susan Russeff, officers of the University until 1988 and 2009. London John Locke Award: presented to the undergraduate and graduate student with the highest academic average for the year, and named in honor of the English philosopher-political scientist. Churchill Award: presented to the undergraduate student who has displayed outstanding leadership abilities, scholarship, and rendered service to the University, its students and cross-cultural understanding. The award is named in honor of the late Winston Churchill,

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statesman and former British Prime Minister. International Business Awards: presented to a graduate and undergraduate student who have excelled in the field of business administration. International Tourism and Hospitality Management Award: made to an outstanding undergraduate and graduate student in the field of hotel/tourism management. John Maynard Keynes Award: presented to an undergraduate student who has demonstrated superior academic ability in the field of international relations and/or economics. The award is named in honor of John Maynard Keynes, the eminent international economist. John Eggert Award: presented annually to a graduate student of excellent academic standing who has displayed outstanding leadership abilities and rendered service to the University. The award honors the late John G. Eggert IV, Academic Dean of the University until 1986. International Relations Award: presented to a graduate student who has shown outstanding ability in the field of international relations. Madrid Velázquez Award: presented to a student of high academic standing who has displayed outstanding leadership and rendered service to the University, its students and cross-cultural understanding. The award is named in honor of the great 17th-century Spanish painter, Diego Velázquez. Calderón Award: presented to the student who has shown outstanding achievement in Spanish language or literature, and named in honor of the famous Spanish dramatist. Francisco de Vittoria Award: presented to an outstanding undergraduate in International Relations and Diplomacy, named in honor of the renowned Spanish lawyer of international law. Ortega y Gasset Award: presented to the undergraduate student with the highest academic average for the year, and named in honor of the Spanish philosopher, writer and statesman. International Business Awards: presented to an undergraduate student and to a graduate student who have excelled in the field of business administration.

Paris

René Cassin Award: presented to the undergraduate or graduate student who has demonstrated superior academic ability in the field of international relations. The award is named in honor of René Cassin, recipient of the 1968 Nobel Peace Prize and former president of the United Nations Human Rights Commission. International Business Awards: presented to an undergraduate and a graduate student who have shown outstanding ability in International Business. Raymond Aron Award: presented to an outstanding graduate thesis (Not given every year). GENERAL REGULATIONS NON DISCRIMINATION Schiller International University will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, or ability/disability. Schiller International University admits students of any race, color, creed, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin or ability/disability to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. SIU does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, or ability/disability in the administration of its educational policies, admissions' policy, employment practices, scholarship and loan program, or any other University administered programs. Grievances should be directed in writing to the office of Campus Director or Provost, depending on the campus. DISCLOSURE OF STUDENT RECORDS SIU collects, processes, and maintains student information that is relevant to the institution and the students based on the following two criteria: enabling the University to better serve its objectives and strengthening the efforts to protect students from any damage that might result for a misuse of information. SIU complies fully with the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA; 20 U.S.C., 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) and regulations related thereto concerning disclosure and dissemination of student records. Students may examine their academic records by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar of their campus.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Students accepted at Schiller International University are considered mature enough to value the educational and cultural opportunities that study in a multicultural environment affords. SIU students are expected to behave responsibly, to exercise good judgment, to respect the rights and feelings of others, and to consider the customs and manners of the host country. Any kind of harassment including hazing will not be tolerated. Experience has demonstrated that such a basic attitude is essential to succeeding in, and enjoying, life and study in a foreign country. ATTENDANCE All students are expected to attend classes and official school events. In cases of personal or medical emergency, the Campus Director or Campus Registrar can issue permission for absence. All other acceptable reasons for absence are determined by the individual instructor. In all cases, students are responsible for making up missed course work. A student may be dropped from a course when, in the opinion of the instructor and the Academics Committee, repeated absence indicates that the fulfillment of course requirements is not being attempted. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY Honesty and integrity are essential to Schiller International University's academic standard to educate ethical, global citizens. A violation of the academic honesty policy undermines the fundamental values inherent in SIU's mission. Violations include but are not limited to the following: · · · · Cheating: Intentionally using unauthorized material. Infringing on academic rights of others. Fabrication: Intentional or unintentional invention or falsification. Plagiarism: Intentionally or unintentionally representing the words or ideas of another as one's own. Facilitation: Knowingly helping another to commit an act of academic dishonesty

The risk of plagiarism can be avoided by clearly indicating the source of any major or unique idea or wording that one did not arrive at on one's own. Sources must be given regardless of whether the material is directly quoted or paraphrased. Students who breach the policy will be subject to penalties: First offense: you will receive a zero for the assignment with NO opportunity for making it up. The Program Director and the Campus Registrar will be notified that you have cheated in the course. Second offense will result in receiving an N/C for the course. There will be absolutely NO EXCEPTIONS to this policy. APPEAL Students may appeal a determination of unsatisfactory academic progress by submitting a written petition to the Campus Academic Committee. If the student can demonstrate mitigating circumstances, an exception may be made. The decision of the Academics Committee may be appealed to the University Provost. That decision is final. FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA) SIU adheres to the provisions of the FERPA. Students have the right to review and to request amendment to their educational record, to approve in advance any disclosure of personally identifiable information, and to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education regarding any failure of the University to comply with this Act. Additionally, it should be noted that the University is not specially equipped for students with disabilities.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

TRANSCRIPTS Students are entitled to one free transcript of grades earned at Schiller International University. Transcripts must be requested in writing by the student. A fee (listed under Special Fees) is charged for each additional transcript. Upon request, transcripts will be shipped by express courier directly to the receiving party. Students requiring express transcript service with courier delivery will be charged the "Urgent Transcript" fee per delivery to a US or Canadian address. All other country addresses will incur a fee commensurate with the cost of delivery. All transcript requests should be addressed to the Office of the Main Registrar, Schiller International University, 300 East Bay Drive, Largo, FL 33770, USA. Nominal Registration ­ Retaining Fee (Thesis, Internship, etc.) Students completing requirements for a degree (i.e., Thesis, Internship, etc.) must re-register each semester of the project. There is a retaining fee (see "Special Fees"). For MA program students the Thesis option will be indicated by a T grade until the thesis is completed. A T grade will be given for each semester Thesis work is undertaken.

Graduating students must fulfill all financial obligations, including tuition charges, fees, and other expenses before the degree is granted. Degrees may be awarded in absentia only after Commencement Exercises are held.

GRIEVANCE POLICY

It is the policy of Schiller International University to provide appropriate grievance policy and procedures to every student. Every campus has an Academic Committee to deal with grievances and questions of misconduct in the academic area and a Rules Committee to deal with grievance questions of misconduct in the social area. Both Committees provide the student with a procedural due process. This includes adequate notice of the charges against him/her; the right to present his/her case and any supporting evidence; and an impartial decision by the respective committee. In the event that the remedy imposed by the respective committee is exclusion from the University, the student has the right to present his/her case personally to the University Provost, who may confirm the decision of the committee or return the case to the committee for further consideration. In all other grievance matters, the student may present his/her grievance to the Campus Director if it relates to a Campus issue, to the University Provost if it relates to an academic issue or to the University Provost if it relates to the Campus Director. The Campus Director or University Provost will provide the student with an opportunity to present his/her case, present any evidence, and shall, at the student's request, provide a decision in writing. Students may also contact the: Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools 750 First Street, NE, Suite 980 Washington, DC 20002-4241 Telephone: (202) 336-6780

This catalog was accurate at the time of its printing. It is subject to change. The University reserves the right to make whatever changes it deems necessary at the time. Changes will be published in the Catalog Supplement during the yearly review.

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SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY 2010 ­ 2011 CATALOG

SCHILLER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY CAMPUS LOCATIONS

FLORIDA CAMPUS 8560 Ulmerton Road Largo, Florida 33771 USA Toll Free in US: 1-800-261-9751 Outside of US: 1-727-474-4087 Fax: 727-734-0359 Toll Free: HEIDELBERG CAMPUS Bergstrasse 106 69121 Heidelberg Germany Phone: 49 6221 45810 Fax: 49 6221 402703 LONDON CAMPUS Royal Waterloo House 51-55 Waterloo Road London SE 1 8TX Phone: 44 20 7028 1372 Fax: 44 20 7620 1228 MADRID CAMPUS Calle Serrano 156 Plaza de la República Argentina 28002 Madrid Spain Phone: 34 91 448 2488 Fax: 34 91 445 2110 PARIS CAMPUS 5/11 RUE Yvart 75015 Paris France Phone: 33 0 145 38 5601 Fax: 33 0 145 38 5430

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