Read 7th Grade Online Edition text version

Shelby County Schools

Curriculum Guide for Social Studies

Grade 7

World Geography

Bobby Webb Ed. D., Superintendent July 2008

Board of Education

David Pickler, District 5, Chair Joe Clayton, District 4, Vice-Chair Teresa Price, District 1 Ron Lollar, District 2 Anne Edmiston, District 3 Fred Johnson, District 6 Ernest Chism, District 7 Bobby Webb Ed. D., Superintendent Patsy E. Smith, Deputy Superintendent Dr. Judy Ostner, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum & Accountability Maura Black Sullivan, Assistant Superintendent Lois Williams, Assistant Superintendent

Curriculum Guide 7th Grade

World Geography

Curriculum Committee Tina Stout, Arlington Middle Relzie Payton, Central Office

Department of Curriculum and Accountability Dr. Judy Ostner, Assistant Superintendent Karen Woodard, Director of Secondary Education Relzie Payton, Social Studies Specialist

Table of Contents

Instructional Goals (established by School Board) Important Points about Grades and Grading) Philosophy for the Study of Social Studies in 7th Grade) Course Overview for 7th Grade Social Studies) Purpose of Curriculum Guide) Content Standards and Definitions) Tennessee Academic Vocabulary for 7th Grade Social Studies) Essential Questions Curriculum Map for Pacing Planning and Delivery August September October November December January February March April May 12 Powerful Words for Improving Student Achievement (Larry Bell) 48 Page 5 6 11 11 12 14 15 16 17

Instructional Goals (Established by the Shelby County Board of Education) The goals of education shall be as follows: To create an atmosphere in which students may discover themselves as persons of dignity and be able to maintain positive selfimages. To evaluate, determine, and provide for the needs that affect the education of every student. To provide a safe environment which protects and encourages the student to use principles of safety and good health. To utilize teaching techniques which allow the students to experience success. To provide various opportunities that motivate the students to develop their intellectual potential. To provide opportunities which develop well-adjusted individuals with the highest principles of good character. To help develop an understanding of the function, needs, and care of the human body and provide activities to develop physical potential. To encourage an appreciation of cultural and aesthetic values. To provide opportunities for parents, students, and the professional staff to work cooperatively for better communication between school and community. To provide a total school program flexible enough to meet individual needs yet stable enough to provide a sense of security. To develop a proficiency in the basic reading, writing, listening, speaking and computational skills, and the ability to apply them effectively in communication and problem-solving. To encourage continual growth that produces informed, responsible citizens who contribute to the society in which they live and

who learn to profit from all their experiences within the environment.

Important Points about Grades and Grading (Mandatory Guide)

SCS Policies/State Rules & Regulations/Federal Guidelines · · · · · · · · · · · A minimum of eighteen (18) grades per nine-week term should be recorded for every student. (Policy 6307). Fifty percent (50%) of the eighteen (18) grades must be earned and recorded by the time of interim. (Policy 6307) Nine weeks should be determined by the average of daily work, oral and written assignments, and tests. (Policy 6307) Parents are to be notified anytime during the nine weeks period if a student is not doing acceptable work. (Policies 6304 & 6307) Parent-teacher conferences should be held for gaining parental support in an effort to improve student performance. (Policy 6307) In all schools, students' conduct is graded as excellent, satisfactory, needs improvement or unsatisfactory, and the initial letter "E", "S", "N", or "U" is used to report the conduct grade. It is to be reported at each grading period on the report card with each subject grade. (Policy 6307) The teacher will assess all student assignments and weigh the value of grades given for various assignments within the nineweek term in computing the term grade. This procedure will enable the teacher to allow for individual student differences in the grading process. (Policy 6307) Grades for homework assignments should be given with care, since homework may not always be completed by the student himself. (Policy 6307) Homework assignments are of value in affording students needed practice, and such assignments should be made within practicable limits. (Policy 6307) A student's academic grade is solely intended to reflect the student's acquired knowledge, ability, and/or skills in the designated subject. (Policy 6307) Special Note: Academic grades should never be adjusted because for conduct. Academic credit/points may not be awarded or deducted for any purpose that is not directly related to the student's academic performance. (Policy 6307) o Academic credit/points may not: (examples) be awarded as an incentive to participate or achieve a certain goal in a school fundraising event. be deducted for failure to purchase certain brands or types of school supplies. be awarded or deducted based on parent/guardian signature.

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A reasonable number of academic points may be deducted from a student's academic grade for failure to submit homework or other assigned academic work on the date specified by the teacher. (Policy 6307) Semester exams for Social Studies are not given in grades 6-8. (Policy 6307) Students assigned to in-school suspension (ISS) are responsible for all classroom work. Students will receive credit for all work completed. (Policy 6213) When a student is suspended out-of-school, the student will be required to complete all missed work within a specified time to be determined by the principal at the time of re-admittance. The student's conduct grade for that grading period will be "U" for the class the student was in at the time of the offense. (Policy 6209) Regular attendance should be necessary for passing grades. In the event of an excused absence, students are expected to make up work missed within a reasonable time. (Policy 6307) It is the procedure of the Shelby County Board of Education to give the same weight to grades awarded by a teacher of students on a hospital/homebound program as to the grades given by the regular teacher in the school. The grades reported by the hospital/homebound teacher (Report of Homebound Teacher to Regular School Principal, Form SPE-06-77-905) are to be averaged with the grades the student has received while attending school. This would also include any tests, including both mid-term and final examinations. In the event the child was on the homebound program for less than two weeks, individual grades will be given. Otherwise, weekly averages will be given for a student on a hospital/homebound program for an extended period of time. (Policy 6309) Special Caution to regular classroom teachers: Remember ­ the IEP is a binding legal document. Classroom accommodations/modifications identified by the IEP Team (see SPE-02-00-701C) must be implemented in regular classes for which modifications are identified. The 504 Student Accommodation Plan must be reviewed by all teachers who instruct students - eligible for services under Section 504. The accommodations must be followed and used when determining a student's grade. (Title II of the American Disabilities Act of 1990) Information recorded on Accumulative Records is confidential. Release of Information (or any part thereof) recorded shall be in accord with and pursuant to the laws of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, Public Laws of the General Education Provision Act of the U.S. Government, and Policies of the Shelby County Board of Education only. (Policy 6301)

District-wide Practices based on Policies Weighted value · The Social Studies department at each school should develop a weighted-value scale that will consistently be followed throughout the year for the following major areas: o Chapter/Unit Tests and Group or Individual Research-based Assignments (e.g., projects, research papers) o Class work, class participation, quizzes, and learning enhancement activities o Homework = (not more than) 10% The agreed upon weighted-value scale must be submitted to the principal, other school administrators, and Power School coordinator. The weighted-value scale must be communicated, in written form, to students and parents.

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Rubrics · · All Group or Individual Research-based Assignments must include a well-thought out, clearly articulated rubric. Rubrics can be designed for other activities.

Make-up work · · · For excused absences, students should have as many days as they were absent to make up academic work. For unexcused absences, teacher should check with the principal before denying a student the opportunity to make up work. Note: Teachers should keep a copy of the SCS Student ­ Parent Handbook and the Student Agenda handbook on file. Suggestions for managing make-up work: o Have a daily/weekly make-up sheet with assignments listed from which students can copy missed assignments o Assign student helpers to keep make-up work for absent students. o Use a Wall Chart for Missing Homework due to an Absence o Keep a make-up envelope with missed assignments to give to the student when he/she returns. o Use telephone buddies to call absent students with missed assignments. o Send make-up work to the office, upon parent request.

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o Update Lesson Line and/or your webpage regularly. A student should be enrolled for at least fifteen days to receive grades on the report card.

Confidentiality · Student data should be confidential and shared with the student and parent/guardian as indicated by correct records, and appropriate school personnel ONLY. Discussion of this information should always be for the benefit of the student and conducted in a positive manner. Teachers should not allow a student to check another student's work for any reason. Teachers may allow students to check their own work for the purpose of identifying problem areas. Teachers should not discuss a student's records with a third party (private tutors, tutoring agencies, attorneys, medical personnel, and others) unless advised to do so by the principal of the school. This includes both personal and phone conferences. If the principal directs you to discuss student records with a third party, it is recommended that an administrator be present.

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Homework · · Homework assignments should be checked cooperatively by the teacher and the student as a means of assessing the learning. Homework should not count more than 10% of a student's grade. Eight Tips (for teachers regarding homework) o Give immediate feedback on homework o Assign homework that will reinforce what students covered in class that day. o Assign homework for instructional purposes, not as punishment. o Give students a sense of ownership in the homework assignment. Students are more receptive to assignments that offer some selection. If there are 10 questions at the end of a chapter, let the students select 6 to answer. The process of selection may be of more learning benefit than answering the questions. o Assign homework that is challenging. Homework should give students a sense of pride or accomplishment when finished, not just a sense of relief. o Make the homework assignment proportionate. It should be the appropriate length and intensity. o Limit amount of "over the weekend" homework.

o Never view homework as needed documentation to prove to parents that work was done in class. Make the classroom learning relevant/meaningful/engaging and the students' excitement will be proof enough. Returning work to students · Guidelines: o Tests, daily work, and homework should be returned within two (2) days. o Projects, notebooks, compositions, and other extended assignments should be returned within five (5) days.

Philosophy

We believe that the purpose of Social Studies is to help young people develop the ability to make informed and reasoned decisions as citizens of a culturally diverse and democratic society. While focusing on the content standards of culture, economics, geography, governance and civics, history, and individuals, groups, and interactions, it is our belief that social studies allows students to understand their place in the world, the interrelationships between themselves and the world, and their responsibility to seek solutions to increasing global challenges.

Course Overview

The Seventh Grade Social Studies curriculum focuses on World Geography. World Geography is a yearlong study of the physical, cultural, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the world's regions. Students will use a cultural approach to study the world regions, connecting a culture to its location, climate, resources, history, government, and religion. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships that connect the regions of the world and the diverse global community. World Geography includes: · Maps and mapping skills · Location of major world landforms and rivers · Location of world continents and countries within · World climates · World cultures and population issues · World governments and economies · World religions · Global concerns and solutions · Environmental issues · Tennessee geography

Purpose of Curriculum Guide

From the first day of class to the last, from hands-on activities to critical thinking, this curriculum guide is designed to not only assist the classroom teacher with organization of the world geography curriculum, but to facilitate meaningful world connections for students. Every person, every day experiences geography. Those experiences are the effects of history, culture, resources, climate, and so much more. Use this guide to help students gain knowledge of the world and apply that knowledge to their relationship in the world. The following have been included: Month to month planning of chapters for effective time management Tennessee Content Standards are related to chapters. These standards are the major areas of learning within Social Studies. The Content Standards include: o 1.0 Culture o 2.0 Economics o 3.0 Geography o 4.0 Government and Civics o 5.0 History o 6.0 Individuals, Groups, and Interactions A focus statement is written for each unit of study to give a general overview of the content. Major instructional objectives are listed for each unit to help narrow the focus of the chapters. Use these to plan student objectives, relating to Tennessee wherever possible. Tennessee State Performance Indicators (SPI's) are indicated for every unit of study. These indicators are TCAP assessed items. Understanding the spi code: ex. 7.3.9 7 --indicates the grade 3 --indicates the content standard (see above) 9 --indicates the specific knowledge to be learned

Teach the indicators, but go beyond them! Instructional Strategies are listed as recommendations to enhance instruction and learning. Students learn best when engaged, so a few activities have been included to facilitate the objectives. An unbelievable number of support resources are available through Holt, Rinehart, and Winston Publishers. These resources provide differentiated instruction strategies, on-line tools, and printable materials for every chapter. Assessment tools recommended for evaluating student learning are listed at the end of each month.

Content Standards and Definitions

CULTURE (1.0): Culture encompasses similarities and differences among people, including their beliefs, knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students will explore these elements of society to develop an appreciation and respect for various human cultures. ECONOMICS (2.0): Globalization of the economy, the explosion of population growth, technological changes and international competition compel students to understand, both personally and globally, the production distribution, and consumption of goods. Students will examine and analyze economic concepts such as basic needs versus wants, using money versus saving money, and policy making versus decision making. GEOGRAPHY (3.0): Geography enables the students to see, understand and appreciate the web of relationships between people, places, and environments. Students will use the knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts within the six essential elements of geography: world in spatial terms, places and regions, physical systems, human systems, environment and society, and the uses of geography. GOVERNANCE and CIVICS (4.0): Governance establishes structures of power and authority in order to provide order and stability. Civic efficacy requires understanding rights and responsibilities, ethical behavior, and the role of citizens within their community, nation, and world. HISTORY (5.0): History involves people, events, and issues. Students will evaluate evidence to develop comparative and casual analysis, and to interpret primary sources. They will construct sound historical arguments and perspectives on which informed decisions in contemporary life could be based. INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, and INTERACTIONS (6.0): Personal development and identity are shaped by factors including culture, groups and institutions. Central to this development are exploration, identification, and analysis of how individuals and groups work independently and cooperatively.

Tennessee Academic Vocabulary

7th Grade

autocracy census colonization conservation contemporary deforestation demographics depression dictatorship economic system estuary fjord global warming growth rate immigration infant mortality inflation international lagoon NAFTA non-renewable oppression phenomena political system recession renewable resource allocation scarcity supply & demand tenets thematic topography trend

Create a word wall using these vocabulary words and others · Teach from it often - throughout the year. ·

Essential Questions

· How does culture affect a person's view of themselves, others, and the world? · What impact does economics have on people, governments, and global relations? · How do the physical systems of the world affect the human systems? · How does government affect people, economics, and global issues? · What can history teach people about themselves, their country, and the global community? · What is my role as a member of the global world?

Curriculum Map

for Pacing Instructional Planning and Delivery

August thru 1st wk. of Sept.

Content Standards Focus: Economics, Geography Geography is a study of the places on Earth, the people that inhabit those places and how the two are interdependent. Introduction to Geography (Chapters 1,2,3) 1. Apply elements of maps to all types of maps. 2. Compare and contrast Earth's physical processes and their affects on the continents (relate to TN.). 3. Analyze the climatic affects of the lines of latitude on the continents and their people (relate to TN.). 4. Recognize the affects of the time zones on the global community (relate to TN.). 5. Categorize resources as renewable and nonrenewable. State Performance Indicators 7.3.1 Identify and use the basic elements of maps and mapping 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction 7.3.14 Distinguish between types of maps (political, physical, climatic, land-use resource, contour, elevation, topographic) 7.3.11 Recognize specific physical processes that operate Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, and weathering) 7.3.2 Locate the Earth's major physical characteristics (7 continents, 4 oceans) 7.3.6 Locate on a map the specific lines of longitude and latitude (Prime Meridian, International Date Line, Equator, North and South Poles, Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circles) 7.3.17 Read and interpret a time zone map 7.2.2 Define renewable and nonrenewable resources Direct instruction/lecture Cooperative Groups Visual processing

Major Instructional Objectives

Instructional Strategies

Brainstorming Discussion Summarizing Technology Music/Rhythm · Design a map of the school or neighborhood indicating the elements of a map. · Create a flipbook of the types of maps. · Using specific lines of latitude, color climate zones on a world map; infer connections to the ecosystems and cultural aspects of people living in those zones. · Illustrate the physical processes. Have groups evaluate the affects of the processes on the earth and on people. · Generate a list of resources, then categorize as renewable or nonrenewable; explain their uses locally, regionally, and globally. · Holt Quiz Game--CD ROM · Create a foldable of the types of climates. · Design a PowerPoint presentation explaining the physical processes.

Support Resources

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts) Geography and map skills--textbook pages H1-H9 Holt Student Text--pages 4-77 and R 36/37 Holt World Atlas ­textbook pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 6-27 Holt Video Program: * See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Studying Geography" "Impact of Water on Earth" "Impact of Weather" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook (correlate to spi's) Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources--keyword SG7 TEACHER Online textbook World Atlas

Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o Online quizzes Rubrics Observation Graphic Organizers Written test/quiz

September

Content Standards Focus: Major Instructional Objectives Culture, Economics, Geography, Government and Civics, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions The world's cultures are made up of unique elements that differentiate people, yet connect the world. The World's People (Chapter 4) 1. Analyze how the physical environment affects a culture (relate to TN.). 2. Analyze where people live and why, how many live there, and what effects those people have on resources and the environment (relate to TN.). 3. Summarize the affects of governments and their economies on a local, regional, and global level (relate to TN.). 4. Evaluate the affects of the world's cultures on the global community (relate to TN.). State Performance Indicators 7.1.1 Recognize cultural definitions (language, religion, customs, political system, economic system) 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (language, political systems, religions, economic systems) 7.2.3/7.3.8 Define demographic concepts (population, population distribution, population density, growth rate, family size, infant mortality) 7.3.18 Examine reasons and patterns of human migration through the use of maps, charts, diagrams (famine, natural disasters, political and religious oppression, wars) 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, urban, and suburban communities. 7.5.1 Identify causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically 7.3.19 Predict the consequences of population changes on the Earth's physical and cultural environments. 7.3.20 Interpret a population pyramid. 7.4.1 Define the different types of governments (democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, monarchy, dictatorship) 7.6.3 Recognize the causes, consequences, and possible solutions applied by governing bodies to persistent global issues using a narrative (health, security, resource allocation, economic development, environment quality) 7.2.1 Recognize basic economic concepts (imports, exports, barter system, tariffs, closed market, emerging market, supply and demand, inflation, recession, depression). 7.1.3 Compare and contrast the tenets of the five major world religions.

Instructional Strategies

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· · · · · Support Resources

Role Playing Direct Instruction Discussion Comparing and Contrasting Visual Processing Cooperative Groups Draw an outline map of a country and show its population density and distribution by adhering beans to the map representing the population of the country. Each bean will need to represent a specified number of people (i.e., population=10 million; each bean could represent 100,000 people; therefore, students would use 100 beans to place in the appropriate locations on their map. Compare and contrast the types of governments by using a graphic organizer. Create a political cartoon depicting the types of world governments. Role-play the various types of government. Use cooperative groups to research the world religions; organize information on large paper; have each group present their religion to the class. Use a chart or graphic organizer to compare and contrast the tenets of the 5 major world religions.

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts) Holt Student Text--pages 78-101 Economic Handbook pages R32-35 Human World pages R38-39 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 30-33 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Culture" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook (correlate to spi's) Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics,

Support Resources

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts) Holt Student Text--pages 78-101 Economic Handbook pages R32-35 Human World pages R38-39 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 30-33 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Culture" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook (correlate to spi's) Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD o o o o o Rubrics Projects Observation Graphic Organizers Written/ On-line quiz/test

Assessment

October

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Economics, Geography, Government and Civics, History, Individuals, Groups, and Interactions The United States and Canada may differ in culture and government, but these North American neighbors share economic policies and common physical features. The United State and Canada (Chapters 5,6) 1. Compare and contrast the variety of landscapes, climates, and resources found in the United States and Canada; explain how these affect the culture of the countries. 2. Summarize the similarities and differences between the United States and Canada in relation to their history, government and economics. 3. Analyze the affects of Tennessee's physical features and resources on the United States and global community. 4. Evaluate the United States' influences on the global community. State Performance Indicators 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River)*Appalachian Mountains 7.3.3 Identify the major river systems of Tennessee. 7.3.12 Identify the 6 physical regions of Tennessee (Unaka Mountains, East Tennessee Valley and Ridge, Cumberland Plateau, Highland Rime, Central Basin, Gulf Coastal Plains) 7.3.11 Recognize the specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering) 7.2.2 Define renewable and nonrenewable resources 7.3.5 Select the natural resources found in the 3 grand divisions of Tennessee (coal, copper, timber, plants, animals) 7.2.5 Select the major resources, industrial, and agricultural products for the 3 grand divisions of Tennessee. 7.3.18 Examine reasons and patterns of human migration through the use of maps, charts, diagrams (famine, natural disasters, political and religious oppression, wars) 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically.

Major Instructional Objectives

7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.3.19 Predict the consequences of population changes on the Earth's physical and cultural environments 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, urban, and suburban communities. 7.3.7 Compare the 5 largest cities of Tennessee using a bar graph. 7.5.1 Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.4.4 Identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings (United States, India, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Russia, China) 7.6.2 Differentiate between the rights, roles, and the state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world Instructional Strategies Hands-On Visual Processing Summarizing Critical Thinking Strategies Discussion Create a Four-Corner Foldable to compare the physical features, climate, resources, and cultural aspects of the U.S and Canada. Have students use local or national newspapers to find articles relating to causes and consequences of urbanization. Create a bar graph comparing the 5 largest cities in Tennessee. Create a map of Tennessee labeling the 3 grand divisions, 6 physical regions, 3 rivers, 5 cities, and resources. Create a travel brochure of Canada, The United States, or Tennessee. Design a political cartoon for the U.S. or Canada based on its type of government and leader. Have students use the employment section of the newspapers to learn abbreviations for jobs. Students will create a want ad for the ideal president. Include requirements, roles, desirable traits, etc. One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts) Holt Student Text--pages 118-165 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 44-75

· · · · · · · · Support Resources

Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions " Impact of Immigration" " Impact of Regionalism" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Interactive Skills Tutor CD-ROM Holt Quiz Game CD-ROM--individual or whole class. Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o Rubrics Discussions Projects Observations Written/On-line quiz/test

November

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Economics, Geography, Government and Civics, History, Individuals, Groups, and Interactions From Mexico to Chile, from Panama to the Bahamas, the South American countries and their surrounding regions, have a multitude of physical features, cultures, and histories that combine to make this area unique within the global community. Mexico, Caribbean Islands, South America (Chapters 7,8,9,10,11) 1. Explain how the physical features, climates, and resources affect the culture of Latin and South America. 2. Evaluate the global affects from the types of governments in Latin and South America. 3. Evaluate the relationship between Mexico and the United States; discuss its impact on Tennessee. 4. Analyze the local, region, and global environmental affects resulting from the preservation of the rain forest as opposed to its destruction. 5. Summarize the interdependence between the countries of Latin and South America and the global world (relate to TN). State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction 7.3.11 Recognize specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering)*El Nino 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River) 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.2.1 Recognize basic economic concepts (imports, exports, barter system, tariffs, closed market, emerging markets, supply and demand, inflation, recession, depression) 7.2.4 Interpret economic issues as expressed with maps, tables, diagrams, and charts) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, urban, and suburban communities

Major Instructional Objectives

7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices 7.4.1 Define the different types of governments (democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, monarchy, dictatorship) 7.4.4 Identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings (United States, India, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Russia, China) 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.5.1 Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.3.13 Recognize the definitions of modifications on the physical environment (global warming, deforestation, desertification (results of), urbanization 7.3.18 Analyze the environmental consequences of humans changing their physical environment (air and water pollution, mining, deforestation, global warming) Instructional Strategies Peer Learning Visual Processing Comparing and Contrasting Reflecting Self-Instruction Create travel brochures for a variety of countries in Latin and South America; students present brochures to class. Compare imports and exports of countries by creating a bar graph. Create a rainforest book; focus on people, plants, animals, environmental issues, etc., or organize it in an ABC format, connecting the letters of the alphabet to the information to be researched. Expand this activity by having students give their opinions on environmental issues related to rainforests. Plan a Mexican fiesta and/or Latin American culture day. Allow students to bring food, objects, and music demonstrating the culture of the regions. Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts) Holt Student Text--pages 166-272 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 76-83 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for suggestions

· · · · Support Resources

Assessment o o o o

"Impact of Emigration" "Impact of Tourism" "Impact of Orinoco River" "Impact of Deforestation in the Amazon Basin" "Impact of the Andes Mountains" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Projects (present to class) Rubrics Discussion Observation

December

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Geography, Government and Civics, History, Individuals, Groups, and Interactions Europe and Russia have vast histories, cultures, and physical features that have influenced the world-- bringing democracy, religion, and unique ethnic traditions. Europe and Russia (Chapters 12,13,14,15,16) 1. Explain the global affects of Europe's culture, historically and currently. 2. Summarize the interdependence between the countries of Europe and the global world. 3. Infer how the physical regions of Italy affect the region's culture; compare those effects with the regional differences in Tennessee. 3. Analyze the affects of Europe's historical events regionally and globally. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.3.1 Identify and use the basic elements of maps and mapping 7.3.14 Distinguish between types of maps (political, physical, climatic, land-use resource, contour, elevation, topographic) 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River) 7.5.3 Map large civilizations to discover the impact of water as a main reason behind a society's founding. 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices 7.3.20 Interpret a population pyramid. 7.6.3 Recognize the causes, consequences, and possible solutions applied by governing bodies to persistent global issue using a narrative (health, security, resource allocation, economic development, environment quality)

Major Instructional Objectives

7.4.1 Define the different types of governments (democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, monarchy, dictatorship) 7.4.4 Identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings (United States, India, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Russia, China) 7.1.3 Compare and contrast the tenets of the five major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism) Instructional Strategies Cooperative Groups Hands-On Comparing and Contrasting Summarizing Critical Thinking Strategies Technology Create a Four-Corner Foldable, labeling each section a region of Europe. On the inside, summarize information learned about each region. Compare and contrast the foods that come from Europe with foods from South America and the Caribbean. Relate the differences to climate, latitudinal positions, and physical features. Research leaders in Europe or Russia. Design a political cartoon depicting a leader, the type of government, and any challenges facing the country. Have students create posters advertising a country in Europe or advertise Russia. Use a graphic organizer to compare the regions of Italy or the countries of southern Europe. Have students summarize the differences relating them to the climate, physical features, and resources of each region. Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts Holt Student Text--pages 273-400 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 84-89 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of the Olympics on Athens" "Impact of Living Below Sea Level" "Impact of Volcanoes in Iceland" "Impact of Ethic Conflict in Sarajevo" "Impact of Pollution"

· · · · · Support Resources

Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o Rubrics Observations Discussions Graphic Organizers Written/On-line quiz/test

January

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Geography, Government and Civics, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions Southwest and Central Asia's histories and cultures have had a lasting impact on the world; the continual conflict arising in these areas bring a variety of challenges to the global community. Southwest and Central Asia (Chapters 17,18,19) 1. Explain how history, climate, landforms, and resources have contributed to the cultures of the countries. 2. Generalize how the cultural beliefs affect the rights of women locally, regionally, and globally. 3. Compare the affects of the countries on the United States (including Tennessee), and the influences of the United States on the countries. 4. Explain the global challenges affected by the types of governments established in the countries. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction 7.3.11 Recognize the specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering) 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River) 7.5.3 Map large civilizations to discover the impact of water as a main reason behind a society's founding. 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, urban, and suburban communities 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices. 7.6.2 Differentiate between the rights, roles, and the state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world. 7.1.3 Compare and contrast the tenets of the five major world religions

Major Instructional Objectives

7.4.1 Define the different types of governments (democracy, autocracy, oligarchy, monarchy, dictatorship, theocracy). Instructional Strategies Shared Writing Hands-On Comparing and Contrasting Cooperative Learning Technology Create a collage--gather pictures from magazines or the internet depicting the culture of the countries, their physical features, etc. Have students write an essay describing what life might be like in this region. Research the rights of women in these countries. Compare these rights with those of the United States. Use a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the types of governments from this region with the United States government. Allow students to work in small groups to brainstorm solutions to the challenges/conflicts between this region, the United States, and the global community.

· · · · · Support Resources

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts Holt Student Text--pages 401-480 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 96-101 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Cooperation and Conflict in Jerusalem" "Impact of Oil" "Impact of Progress in Afghanistan" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources

Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o o Rubrics Projects Graphic Organizers Observation Discussion Written/On-line quiz/test

February

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Geography, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions Africa's five regions have a multitude of physical features and climates, as well as cultures, that uniquely impact the global community. Africa (Chapters 20, 21, 22, 23, 24) 1. Explain how the history, climate, physical features, and resources affect the cultures of Africa. 2. Infer the reasons why the life expectancy is lower in Africa than that of the United States. 3. Consider the personal, state (Tennessee), and national (United States) effects of Africa's challenges. 4. Explain how the challenges faced in Africa affect the global community. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically. 7.3.1 Identify and use the basic elements of maps and mapping. 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction 7.3.14 Distinguish between types of maps (political, physical, climatic, land-use, resource, contour, elevation, topographic) 7.3.2 Locate the Earth's major physical characteristics (continents, oceans) 7.3.11 Recognize the specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering) 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River) 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, suburban, and urban communities. 7.5.1 Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices.

Major Instructional Objectives

7.6.2 Differentiate between the rights, roles, and the state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world. Instructional Strategies Graphic Organizer K-W-L Cooperative Learning Self-Questioning Discussion Technology Create a C (Cool), G (Gross), and I (Interesting) chart. Research a country in Africa and complete the chart. Students need to relate the facts to the climate, history, physical features, etc. Have students work cooperatively to research a country in Africa; give them a choice to create a collage, an ABC book or travel brochure. Each choice should include cultural aspects, physical features, resources, as well as, a challenge facing that country. Allow students to critique the challenge and recommend a solution. Research the efforts made by other countries to help ease Africa's challenges.

· ·

· Support Resources

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts Holt Student Text--pages 481-600 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 90-95 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of the Nile River" "Impact of Desertification" "Impact of Climate Change in Mount Kilimanjaro" "Impact of Preserving Central Africa's Forests" "Impact of Apartheid" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook

World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o o Rubrics Projects Oral Report Graphic Organizer Observation and Discussion Written/On-line quiz/test

March

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Economics, Geography, Government and Civics, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions India and China have several elements that have contributed to their cultures, but the countries themselves have also had an impact on the global community with issues such as population growth and natural disasters. India (Chapter 25) China (Chapter 26) 1. Analyze how history, climate, landforms, and resources have contributed to the culture of each country. 2. Evaluate the local and global effects of India and China's growing populations. 3. Compare and contrast the housing situation in India with that of the United States and Tennessee. 4. Infer how natural disasters have affected the countries on a local, regional, and global level. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically. 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction 7.3.11 Recognize the specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering) 7.3.9 Identify the location of Earth's major land forms and bodies of water (Rockies, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Urals, Sahara Desert, Nile River Valley, Great Plains, Mississippi River, Amazon River, Thames River, Seine River, Rhine River, Danube River, Tigris River, Euphrates River, Ganges River, Volga River, Yellow River) 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions) 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources) 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, suburban, and urban communities. 7.5.1 Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.3.13 Recognize the definitions of modifications on the physical environment (global warming, deforestation, desertification (results of), and urbanization). 7.3.18 Analyze the environmental consequences of humans changing their physical environment (air and water pollution, mining, deforestation, global warming)

Major Instructional Objectives

7.2.1 Recognize the basic economic concepts (imports, exports, barter system, tariffs, closed market, emerging market, supply and demand, inflation, recessions, depression) 7.2.4 Interpret economic issues as expressed with maps, tables, diagrams, and charts. 7.1.3 Compare and contrast the tenets of the 5 major world religions. 7.4.4 Identify political leaders from selected contemporary settings (United States, India, Canada, Mexico, Great Britain, Russia, China) 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices. 7.6.2 Differentiate between the rights, roles, and the state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world. 7.6.3 Recognize the causes, consequences, and possible solutions applied by governing bodies to persistent global issue using a narrative (health, security, resource allocation, economic development, environment quality) Instructional Strategies Evaluating Arguments Writing Strategies Self-Questioning Comparing and Contrasting Technology Debate the current population issues and its global affects. Write an essay comparing the political system of China with that of the United States. Research the rights of children in these countries. Compare these rights with those of the United States; discuss how the rights are affected by the types of governments.

· · · Support Resources

Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer, Map Zone, Quick Facts Holt Student Text--pages 601-663 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 96-101 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Population Density" "Impact of the Three Gorges Dam" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com

Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o o Rubrics Projects Graphic Organizer Observation Discussion Written/On-line quiz/test

April

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Economics, Geography, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions While Japan and Korea, with their similar physical features and cultures, differ from tropical Southeast Asia's variety of countries and cultures, each share the common challenges of overcoming devastating natural disasters. Japan and the Koreas (Chapter 27) Southeast Asia (Chapter 28) 1. Analyze how natural disasters have affected the countries on a local, regional, and global level. 2. Infer the influences of Japan and Korea's history, physical features, and climate on their culture today. 3. Compare the natural disaster preparedness in these countries with those of Tennessee. 4. Analyze the affects of Japan's culture on the global community. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically. 7.3.1 Identify and use the basic elements of maps and mapping. 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction. 7.3.14 Distinguish between types of maps (political, physical, climatic, land-use resource, contour, elevation, topographic). 7.3.11 Recognize the specific physical processes that operate on the Earth's surface (erosion, volcanoes, earthquakes, wind and water currents, plate tectonics, weathering). 7.1.2 Locate cultural information on a thematic map (languages, political systems, economic systems, religions). 7.5.2 Identify reasons why people choose to settle in different places (occupations, family, climate, natural resources). 7.3.4 Distinguish the differences among rural, suburban, and urban communities. 7.5.1 Identify the causes and consequences of urbanization (industrial development, education, health care, cultural opportunities, poverty, overcrowding, disease, pollution, crime) 7.3.18 Analyze the environmental consequences of humans changing their physical environment (air and water pollution, mining, deforestation, global warming) 7.2.1 Recognize the basic economic concepts (imports, exports, barter system, tariffs, closed market, emerging

Major Instructional Objectives

market, supply and demand, inflation, recessions, depression) 7.2.4 Interpret economic issues as expressed with maps, tables, diagrams, and charts. 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices. 7.6.2 Differentiate between the rights, roles, and the state of the individual in relation to the general welfare in various regions of the world. Instructional Strategies Cooperative Learning Graphic Organizer Hands-On Direct Instruction Discussion · Design poster advertising one of the countries; include the cultural aspects, physical features, challenges, etc. · Create Japanese origami. Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM--(Daily Bellringer Holt Student Text--pages 664-715 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 96-101 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestions "Impact of Natural Hazards" "Impact of Biodiversity" Holt TCAP Test Prep Workbook Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD

Support Resources

Assessment

o o o o o o

Rubrics Reports Observation Discussion Direct Instruction Written/On-line quiz/test

May

Content Standards Focus: Culture, Economics, Geography, Government and Civics, History, and Individuals, Groups, and Interactions From deserts to glaciers to tropical paradises, the Pacific World holds a variety of physical features that have influenced its cultures and the global community. The Pacific World (Chapter 29) 1. Compare the plight of the Aborigines with that of Native Americans. 2. Analyze how history, climate, landforms, and resources have contributed to the culture of each country. 3. Differentiate the cultural aspects of the Pacific countries with that of the culture of Tennessee. State Performance Indicators 7.3.10 Identify the characteristics that define a region geographically. 7.3.15 Interpret a map indicating scale, distance, and direction. 7.3.13 Recognize the definitions of modifications on the physical environment (global warming, deforestation, desertification (results of), urbanization). 7.6.1 Identify ways family, groups, and community influence daily life and personal choices. Hands-On Critical Thinking Strategies Direct Instruction Comparing and Contrasting Cooperative Learning Holt One-Stop Planner Holt Transparencies or Transparencies CD-ROM Holt Student Text--pages 716-740 Holt World Atlas ­text pages R40-59 Holt Student World Atlas--pages 102-107 Holt Video Program *See Teacher's Guide for lesson suggestion "Impact of Nonnative Wildlife"

Major Instructional Objectives

Instructional Strategies

Support Resources

Holt Quiz Game CD ROM--individual or whole class Holt Online Learning--www.go.hrw.com Chapter Resources Online textbook World Atlas Tennessee Resources Online Resources--graphic organizers, foldnotes, rubrics, current events, etc. Holt Power Presentations with Video CD ROM Holt Music of the World CD Assessment o o o o o Rubrics Observation Discussion Graphic Organizer Written/On-line quiz/test

12 Powerful Words

Larry Bell - national presenter, educational consultant, and author

1. Trace ­ to follow from the beginning 2. Analyze ­ to break into parts and explain 3. Evaluate ­ to give it a grade ­ What do you think of it? 4. Infer ­ to conclude from evidence 5. Formulate ­ to create 6. Describe ­ to tell what you know 7. Support ­ to give reasons ­ to defend 8. Explain ­ to tell about it 9. Summarize ­ to put the important stuff in your words 10. Compare ­ to tell what things are alike 11. Contrast ­ to tell how they are different 12. Predict ­ to make a realistic guess

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7th Grade Online Edition

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