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Non-Violence Curriculum

Activities Book Grades K-6

Compiled by: Nancy Kelley Specialist: Dee Dee Lunsford June 2006

Shelby County Schools offers educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, gender, or disability.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Introduction The Non-Violence Curriculum was created for counselors and teachers to use with students. The purpose of this document was to provide a number of activities for educators to use that will teach students respect, getting along with others, differences, and ways to problem solve in a peaceful way. The activities are correlated to Character Education, School Counselor National Standards #7, #8, #9, and other school subjects. Included in this document are the following: School Counselor Standards #7, #8, and #9 Activities Grade K Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Helpful Resources

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Tennessee School Counseling And Career Guidance Standards Grade Level K-2 Personal and Social Development Standard 7: Self Knowledge and Interpersonal Skills Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect self and others. K-2 Learning Expectations The student will 7.1 demonstrate a positive attitude toward self as a unique person. 7.2 identify and express feelings. 7.3 distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behaviors. 7.4 develop appropriate communication skills. 7.5 develop healthy friendships. 7.6 describe responsibilities in the family, school and community. 7.7 describe individual differences. K-2 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * describe some physical and personal traits. * illustrate activities one can do well. * recognize the vocabulary associated with feelings. * identify persons important to them. * care for personal possessions. * state likenesses and differences between themselves and others. At level 2, the student will be able to * display positive, respectful attitudes toward self and others. * recognize likenesses and differences in self and others. * describe feelings they have in various situations. * share examples of growth and change. * demonstrate cooperation during group time as well as one-on-one with peers and staff. * demonstrate ways to make and keep friends. * use behaviors which demonstrate respect for the feelings, property and interests of others. * exhibit cooperation and sharing. * learn to follow rules, directions and complete tasks. at Level 3, the student will be able to * demonstrate the ability to respect boundaries and personal privacy. * recognize talents in self and others. * explore character traits important in building friendships.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Grade Level K-2 Personal and Social Development Standard 8: Self Knowledge Applications Students will make decisions, set goals, and take necessary action to achieve goals. K-2 Learning Expectations The student will 8.1 describe the steps in a planning, decision making and goal setting process. 8.2 identify possible consequences of decisions and choices. 8.3 identify a goal and an action plan. K-2 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to develop plans for specific activities. describe decisions one may make. At Level 2, the student will be able to * discuss consequences of choices. * discuss how behavioral choices affect the actions of others. * identify ways to contribute to class-room goals. * state personal goals. At Level 3, the student will be able to * state a decision making model. * recognize personal qualities needed to achieve goals. Grade Level K-2 Personal and Social Development Standard 9: Acquire Personal Safety Skills Students will understand safety and survival skills. K-2 Learning Expectations The student will 9.1 practice appropriate coping skills. 9.2 identify community helpers. 9.3 identify safe and healthy choices. 9.4 identify threats to personal safety. K-2 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * discuss safety rules and laws. * recite emergency contact information. * recognize differences between appropriate and inappropriate physical contact. * name helpers in the school and community. At Level 2, the student will be able to * demonstrate the ability to respect boundaries, rights, and personal privacy. * identify resources in the home, school, community. * know when, where, and how to seek help. * discuss how rules and laws keep us safe. * demonstrate the differences in appropriate and inappropriate methods of expressing anger. * recognize situations that should be reported to trusted adults. * discuss substances that can be hazardous.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

At Level 3, the student will be able to * express the ability to say no to peer pressure. * recognize outward indicators of emotion. * describe bullying and teasing. * discuss consequences of both healthy and harmful choices. Grade Level 3-5 Personal and Social Development Standard 7: Self Knowledge and Interpersonal Skills Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect self and others 3-5 Learning Expectations The student will 7.1 demonstrate a positive attitude toward self as a worthy person. 7.2 identify and express feelings in an appropriate manner. 7.3 monitor behavior and demonstrate self-control. 7.4 recognize change as a part of growth. 7.5 demonstrate appropriate communication skills. 7.6 recognize meaningful relationships. 7.7 demonstrate an appreciation for individual and cultural differences. 3-5 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * list things he/she like to do and do well. * list characteristics about self. * demonstrate the reciprocal nature of speaking and listening. * describe cooperation. At Level 2, the student will be able to * exhibit respect when interacting with others. * articulate positive ways to respond to negative comments and feelings. * identify feelings associated with significant experiences. * demonstrate ability to share and work cooperatively on group tasks. * demonstrate effective verbal and nonverbal communication. At Level 3, the student will be able to * describe changes that occur in the physical, emotional, and social development over time. * prioritize interests and responsibilities. * explore differences in cultures. * analyze how teams utilize each member's talents. Grade Level 3-5 Personal/Social Development Standard 8: Self-Knowledge Applications Students will make decisions, set goals, and take necessary action to achieve goals. 3-5 Learning Expectations The student will 8.1 use a decision making and problem solving model. 8.2 recognize the connection between ones choices and consequences. 8.3 create long- and short-term goals. 8.4 develop and implement a plan for an individual goal.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

3-5 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * identify the benefits of setting personal goals. * develop an action plan to solve a problem. * describe the relationship between choices and consequences. At Level 2, the student will be able to * demonstrate a decision-making model. * define a problem and create a plan to reach a solution. identify short- and long-term goals. At Level 3, the student will be able to * discuss how preferences and abilities can affect life goals. * relate goals to social, personal, academic, and career areas. Grade Level 3-5 Personal and Social Development Standard 9: Acquire Personal Safety Skills Students will understand safety and survival skills. 3-5 Learning Expectations The student will 9.1 choose coping skills to manage stress. 9.2 identify resource people in the school and community and know how and when to seek help. 9.3 develop problem-solving and decision-making skills to make safe and healthy choices. 9.4 recognize threats to personal safety. 3-5 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * utilize effective ways to deal with a wide variety of feelings. * describe how gathering information helps to ensure safer choices. * state ways to obtain help in emergency situations. * explain how following rules ensures safety of self and others. At Level 2, the student will be able to * recognize signs of stress and state techniques for stress relief. * differentiate between situations requiring peer support and adult help. * explain how conflict resolution skills help to ensure the safety of self and others. * recognize the emotional and physical effects of substance use. * demonstrate effective ways of dealing with peer pressure. * state the ways in which school and community resource personnel assist students. * describe consequences of bullying and harassment. * recognize physical and sexual abuse. * use self-protection skills to maximize personal safety. * respect personal boundaries, rights, and privacy. * identify refusal skills.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

At Level 3, the student will be able to * explore appropriate skills for dealing with stressful situations. * identify threats to personal safety as well as the safety of the school community. Grade Level 6-8 Personal and Social Development Standard 7: Self Knowledge and Interpersonal Skills Students will acquire the attitudes, knowledge, and interpersonal skills to help them understand and respect self and others 6-8 Learning Expectations The student will 7.1 discover personal interests, abilities, and skills. 7.2 identify and express feelings in an appropriate manner. 7.3 examine behavior and exhibit self-control. 7.4 explore change as a part of growth. 7.5 develop effective communication skills. 7.6 establish meaningful relationships. 7.7 recognize and respect differences in various family configurations. 7.8 recognize, respect, and appreciate individual and cultural diversity . 6-8 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * identify interests, likes, dislikes, and personal traits. * correctly interpret non-verbal expressions of feelings. * use effective listening skills. * identify positive and negative peer pressure. * demonstrate appropriate methods of communicating feelings. At Level 2, the student will be able to * deal with relationships in a positive, respectful manner. * examine appropriate ways to deal with conflicts, pressures, and emotions. * describe situations in which one's actions and behaviors affect others. * recognize the physical and emotional impact of change and transition. * value individual differences in self and others. * discuss techniques used to mediate or resolve problems. * explore methods families use to work cooperatively. * design and follow classroom and school rules. * demonstrate effective strategies for coping with family and school changes. * discuss the importance's of valuing gender differences. * respond appropriately to pressure from peers and others. At Level 3, the student will be able to * analyze how abilities develop over time. * appreciate the perspective of others. * analyze the differences in healthy and harmful friendships.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Grade Level 6-8 Personal/Social Development Standard 8: Self Knowledge Application Students will make decisions, set goals, and take necessary action to achieve goals. 6-8 Learning Expectations The student will 8.1 modify and apply decision-making and problem solving models for personal use. 8.2 set goals relative to one's interests and abilities. 8.3 develop a plan to achieve realistic short and long term goals. 6-8 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * practice a decision-making model. * develop a plan of action to reach a goal. At Level 2, the student will be able to * practice efficient time and task management. * solve conflicts in a non-aggressive way. * apply knowledge of self in setting goals. * examine the cyclical nature of setting and attaining goals. At Level 3, the student will be able to * demonstrate problem-solving skills for anger and stress management. Grade Level 6-8 Personal and Social Development Standard 9: Acquire Personal Safety Skills Students will understand safety and survival skills. 6-8 Learning Expectations The student will 9.1 implement techniques for resolving conflict and reducing stress within a school setting. 9.2 investigate school and community resources for assistance with personal concerns. 9.3 apply effective problem-solving and decision-making models to make safe and healthy choices. 9.4 utilize skills to recognize, report, and protect against threats to personal safety. 6-8 Performance Indicators At Level 1, the student will be able to * list appropriate techniques for handling bullying and harassment. At Level 2, the student will be able to * describe ways to reduce anxiety in stressful situations. * demonstrate techniques for managing stress, conflict, and anger. * practice appropriate actions for ensuring the safety of self and others. * assess personal risk factors such as weight gain, poor nutritional habits, substance use. * recognize that use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs contributes to crime, accidents suicide and physical impairment. * distinguish types of abuse and evaluate appropriate resources for help * practice refusal skills. At Level 3, the student will be able to · practice peer leadership skills by creating healthy alternatives to drug use. · recognize indicators of depression and suicidal and homicidal tendencies. · discuss the possible emotional effects of abuse.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity List Kindergarten

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity One Objective: Students will be able to recognize feelings in themselves and others. Materials: 1. Pictures of different faces with the feelings, sad, happy, angry, and scared. (Second Step cards or pictures from magazines.) 2. A mirror 3. Paper 4. Crayons or markers Procedure: The teacher will introduce the word feelings to students. The teacher will then say that all feelings are normal and that there are no bad feelings. The teacher will show students pictures of a different feeling face and talk about each. Students should show examples of body language for each feeling and practice looking in a mirror while making the face. This will help students identify others when they are feeling a certain way. The teacher will ask students to think about times when they have experienced that feeling and share with the group. Then the teacher will read the following situations and ask students to say how it would make them feel... 1. You get ice cream for a treat. 2. Your friend hits you. 3. Your pet dog gets sick. 4. You watch a scary cartoon on TV. 5. You hit a homerun in baseball. 6. Your friend has to move to a different school. 7. Your mom tells you to clean your room. Please note that not all students will agree with a feeling word for each situation. Explain to students that everyone reacts differently to situations. The students will then draw a picture of themselves with a feeling word. (select from the basic four feelings-sad, happy, angry, and scared. The students will share the drawing with classmates and teacher. Activity Two Objective: Students will discuss the feeling angry, name some things that make them angry, and talk about ways to express anger in a positive way. Materials: Book- When I Feel Angry by Cornelia Maude Spelman Procedure: The teacher will define what angry is and state that everybody feels angry. The teacher will ask students to think of some things that make them feel angry. The teacher will allow for volunteers to share their examples. The teacher will then ask students what they usually do when they are angry and if these are good decisions or not good decisions. Some examples include the following: Hit Scream Damage property Name calling The teacher will then introduce the book When I Feel Angry and read to the class. The teacher will review ways to handle anger in a positive way, as suggested by the book. Some examples include the following: Take deep breaths. Count to ten (or higher).

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Take a time out. Walk away. Do a fun activity to get your mind off your anger. Talk it out with someone. Students will then draw a picture of themselves in a situation where they are angry and how they can calm themselves down. Activity Three Objective: Students will see examples of bullying behavior. The teacher will share how to overcome a bullying situation by believing in yourself. Materials: Book- Stand Tall Molly Lou Melon by Patty Lovell Procedure: Teacher will introduce the word "Bully" to the class. TTW explain that a bully is someone who teases others by words that they say or things that they do. TTW state some teasing behaviors, such as the following: Hitting Pushing Calling names Teasing about one's looks (short, skinny, freckles, glasses, etc.) TTW then read the book, Stand Tall Molly Lou Melon and discuss with the class. TTW state how Molly ignored the bullying, stood up for herself, and did not let the bully affect her. TTW then review some things that students can do about bullying at school, such as the following: Ignore the bully Ask the bully to stop Tell an adult Activity Four Objective: Students will experience how to make good choices. Materials: Book- The Poky Little Puppy Procedure: TTW introduce the word "choice" by giving examples of decisions that kids make everyday. Examples include the following: Clothes that we wear- blue shirt or red shirt Foods that we eat- hot dog or hamburger Things that we do- ride our bike or play basketball TTW say that these are choices that don't have a negative consequence, but that sometimes we have to make choices that have consequences, which can be negative. Examples include the following: Taking a toy away from someone. Calling someone a name. Hitting someone. TTW tell students that it is important to think about consequences BEFORE making a choice. TTW then read the book, The Poky Little Puppy by Janette Sebring Lowrey. TTW talk about all the choices the puppy made and how these got him into trouble and made him lose his privileges. TTW then share examples of choices and brainstorm what some good choices and bad choices would be and consequences that would follow each. Examples of choices can include:

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Running in the hallway. Saying something mean to a friend. Helping a friend clean up a mess. Not sharing a toy. Cleaning your room at home. Eating too much junk food. Activity Five Objective: Students will discuss how to handle a conflict by using a decision making process. Materials: Poster board with all decision making steps on it. Procedure: The teacher will introduce the word, conflict. TTW say that conflict is when two or more people don't agree on an idea or both want the same thing. TTW ask the students where conflicts can happen and take responses. TTW say that many times conflicts happen at school and will read the following: Maggie loved to go to school every day. Her teacher, Mrs. Jones, let the children play at centers every day. Maggie's favorite center activity was playing with the blocks. One day Maggie was playing blocks and her friend Jamie started to play with her. Jamie wanted to build a big house, so she needed many blocks. She began to take all the blocks from Maggie's pile. Maggie really liked being Jamie's friend, but she really wanted to build something with the blocks. TTW stop and say that at this point Maggie has a decision to make about the situation. Before Maggie makes a decision, she should think about it. TTW then show the class a decision making chart that includes the following: Decision making 1. Stop and think. 2. What is the problem? 3. What are my choices? 4. What will happen if I choose this solution? 5. What is the best choice for me? TTW ready the chart and explain to the class each step. Then TTW refer back to the Maggie story and ask students to brainstorm through the decision making process. The teacher will read different situations to the class and students will brainstorm ways to solve the conflict in a peaceful way. Situation one Mary doesn't have any crayons. The teacher has given the class a color page. Other people at Mary's table have their crayons. Situation two A classmate is teasing Joey everyday in the cafeteria. Situation three Ashley's sister always hits her when she is angry.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity List 1 grade

st

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity One Objective: Students will define what anger is, name some things that make them angry, and share how to handle this emotion in a positive way. Materials: Book, The Grouchy Ladybug, by Eric Carle Poster paper or chalkboard, paper, crayons Procedure: TTW ask students what it means to be angry and gather responses. TTW say that anger is a normal emotion that everyone experiences and that it is our choices when we get angry that sometimes get us into trouble. TTW ask students if they have ever been grouchy and talk about some things that make students feel grouchy. TTW read the book, The Grouchy Ladybug, and discuss with students why they think the ladybug was grouchy and what made her feel that way in the beginning of the story. TTW ask students if there was anything the ladybug could have done differently to deal with her anger. TTW ask students to name things that bug them and write these on poster paper, chalkboard, etc...under the title, "Things that Bug Us." Then TTW ask students what kinds of things they do when they are angry and elicit responses. TTW discuss with students if these are good responses or bad responses. TTW list all positive choices under the title, "Things that We Can Do." Students will then draw a picture of what bugs them and what they can do to help themselves make a positive choice and share these with the class. Activity Two Objective: Students will discuss why it is important to be a friend and help others. Materials: Book, Manana Iguana by Ann Whitford Paul Procedure: TTW ask students what a friend is, why it is important to help your friends, and gather responses from students. TTW read the book, Manana Iguana, and talk about the animals not helping Iguana. TTW ask how Iguana felt about the situation at the beginning of the story and at the end when the animals did help her. Students will then draw a picture of themselves helping a friend and share these with the class. Activity Three Objective: Students will define what a bully is and name some ways to handle bullying. Materials: Book, Stop Picking on Me, by Pat Thomas Procedure: TTW ask students if they have ever heard of the word, bully. TTW gather responses/definitions from students and discuss the definition with the class. A bully is someone who says or does mean things to others on purpose. TTW read the book, Stop Picking on Me, to the class and discuss. Some points that can be discussed are the following: What do bullies look like? How can a bully hurt you? What kinds of things do bullies do? Why do bullies act this way? How do bullies make you feel? What are some ways to handle bullying? TTW review some things that are bullying such as the following: Name calling Hitting Pushing/Tripping Leaving someone out of a group Saying mean things to someone

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TTW add some additional ways of handling bullying such as the following: Ignoring Telling the bully to stop Telling an adult Students will draw a picture of themselves in a bullying situation and what they are doing to help themselves. These should be shared with the class. Activity Four Objective: Students will recognize empathy for others in a story and discuss the importance of being kind to people. Materials: Book, Horton Hears A Who, by Dr. Seuss, paper and crayons Procedure: TTW ask students what it means to be kind to others and elicit responses. TTW read the book, Horton Hears A Who and discuss how Horton showed kindness to the Who's by taking care of them. TTW promote a discussion about ways we can be kind to others and introduce students to the idea of performing random acts of kindness. TTW then ask students to name some ways that people can be kind to others at school or at home and list these on the chalkboard or poster paper. Students can then draw a picture of themselves doing a kind act to a classmate and share these with the class. As a follow up, the teacher can catch students performing random acts of kindness in the classroom and reward them by a token, a star, or a positive stroke. The teacher could also start a "kindness tree" on a bare bulletin board and let students have a leaf with their name on it every time a kind act is observed by the teacher. Activity Five Objective: Students will become aware of the steps to problem-solving. Procedure: TTW say that today we are going to talk about solving problems. TTW lead a discussion on problems that people might have at school. Some examples include the following: Getting along with a classmate Two classmates want to read the same book during reading time Peer pressure to talk during worktime Two friends wanting you to play with them at the same time TTW list the problem solving steps on the chalkboard or poster paper and discuss each step with the students. Problem Solving Steps 1. What is the problem? 2. What are some possible solutions? (Students should be encouraged to list all solutions, good or bad, so that they can see consequences of their choices) 3. Choose one of the solutions. 4. What would happen as a consequence of this choice? 5. What is the best choice for me? The teacher should describe a problem for the class and generate responses through the steps. A possible problem could be one of the following: Jean has a friend that has called her a name. Your best friend says that she/he doesn't want to be your friend anymore. Your lunch is missing. After the class has gone through the steps and situation, then the teacher should cover up the chart and see if students can help the teacher through a situation without looking at the steps. Then, the teacher can ask for volunteers to name each step and discuss with the class solutions for the problem.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity List

2 grade

nd

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity One Objective: Students will define anger and be able to discuss some ways to handle their anger in a positive way. Materials: Book, Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad, Day, by Judith Viorst Procedure: TTW ask students if they have ever had a "bad" day and what they feel like because of that. TTW read the book, Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad, Day and discuss Alexander's mood throughout the day because of his bad day. TTW state that sometimes people have bad days or get angry and try to get rid of their anger by taking it out on somebody else. TTW ask students if they have ever had a bad day at school and then came home and got in a fight with their brother or sister, friend, or said something mean to their parents. This is an example of taking out anger on somebody else. TTW ask students to name some ways that they get rid of their anger and take all responses. TT should list these on the chalkboard or on poster paper. Then the teacher should ask students to rate their responses as a positive choice or negative choice. Some examples might be the following: Hitting Negative Pushing Negative Talking it out Positive Walking away Positive TTW then ask students to think about something that they could do that would be a positive choice when they are angry. The students should draw/write about a time when they are angry or having a bad day and what they could do in the situation that would be a positive choice. Students can share pictures with the teacher and class. Activity Two Objective: The students define what bullying is and discuss the importance of reporting bullying situations to an adult. Materials: Book, Nobody Knew What To Do by Becky Ray McCain Procedure: TTW ask students what a bully is and elicit responses. TTW then ask students if bullying is a good friend behavior? Why or why not? TTW ask students how people feel when they are bullied? TTW define bullying as hurting a person with words or the way we behave. TTW ask students if they have ever seen someone get bullied before? Do you think some people see bullying and don't do anything about it? Why or why not? TTW explain that sometimes people are afraid to report the bullying because they think the bully will find out and hurt them worse. TTW explain that the only way to stop bullying is to tell an adult. TTW then read the book, Nobody Knew What To Do. TTW discuss what Ray must feel like in the story at the beginning when he is being bullied. TTW discuss how it is important for a witness to report bullying or if they hear someone talk about what they are going to do to someone if it is harmful or considered bullying. Activity Three Objective: Students will identify the four steps used when solving minor problems with other students. Materials: The following task sheet and something to write with. TTW ask students if other people ever "bug" them. TTW ask students to answer yes or no (if they are bugged) by giving a thumbs up or down in response to the following situations: 1. Your little brother goes in your room without permission. 2. Your mom reminds you to clean your room. 3. Your dad asks you to help him outside. 4. Your friend tries to make silly jokes at the lunch table.

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5. Your friend tries to talk to you during work time. TTW say that not everyone got the same answers and that is because different things "bug" different people. For example, some people don't mind cleaning their room, while others get "bugged" by it. TTW ask students to tell some of the things they do when others "bug" them and list these on the chalkboard or poster paper. TTW then say that today we will learn a way to help ourselves when others "bug" us at school. TTW brainstorm some ways that others could bug us at school. Some examples may include the following: Talking at work time Name calling Teasing Physical teasing Trying to skip in line TTW introduce four steps to solve minor problems with students: 1. 2. 3. 4. Ignore them Ask them to stop, please Move away from them Tell an adult

TTW then role play with students different situations to practice the steps. (You can use puppets if you like) The teacher should have the four steps posted for students to see during the role plays. The teacher should play the role that is doing the "bugging" and let the students move through the steps. The teacher should discuss each step with the class. For example: One situation could be talking at work time. The teacher should try to "bug" the student. The student should first ignore. The teacher should say," What is (student's name) doing in this step? The teacher can stop at any point with students during the four steps. However, there should be enough situations to go through all the steps. Some examples of situations could be the following: Talking at worktime, trying to skip in line, name calling, teasing someone, etc... The teacher should review the steps at the end of the class. Activity Four Objective: Students will be able to identify and communicate feelings and needs to self and others. Students will also learn to use I-Messages Procedure: TTW begin with the following statements ( can be written up on the board for a visual cue to the word "You") : You're a bully; You cut me in line; You're pushing me; Everyone is excluding me; You're mean to me; You're making it hard to like you... Begin a discussion: Have any of you heard someone say something like those statements? Or actually have said something like that? What word do you hear over and over again in those statements? (You're/You/You are). Think of a sentence that begins the same way. Give/Take examples. TTW discuss: When another person does something that upsets you, it helps to be able to talk to him/her about the problem, as opposed to accusing or blaming them. An "IMessage" is a way to tell the other person what upset you without blaming or name-calling. It is also a way to help you see what's bothering you in a calm way. An "I-Message" has 3 parts to it. The 3 parts (I feel...when you...and I want), plus a brief explanation of each will be up on the board as a visual. First you tell the other person how you feel. Then say what the person did to upset you. Last say what you want and need to make the situation better. Today we are going to learn how to identify and write "I-Messages". · We're going to look at some situations, decide how each person feels, how you might feel, and what would make the situation better. · Next we'll work together to come up with an "I-Message" for each situation. · Last you'll construct an "I-Message" on your own.

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Let's try one as a practice. The teacher will say that the first situation is a person cutting in line, the teacher will tell his/her opinion of how each person is feeling, and how I would feel if this happened to me. Then develop an "I-Message" for the situation and write it on the board. Ask for questions. Now I'm going to show you some other examples, and I want you to come up with what's happening, how each person is feeling, how you would feel, and what is needed to make the situation better. Then you'll create an "I-Message". The first few situations will be done as a class. The last situation will be on your own. Discuss several situation pictures (bullying, excluding, pushing), go through each question, and develop "I-Messages", writing each on the board. Have students do last situation by themselves, writing responses on paper. Have students share their individual statements with class. Collect statements. Write the following statement on the board: I feel happy when you finish a lesson, and I'd like you to continue learning and working as hard as you have been. What is this an example of? Am "I-Message". Let's read it together as a class. Read the statement together. Activity Five Objective: Students will discover that there is more than one way to resolving conflicts and will discover ways that are comfortable to resolve a conflict. Materials: Book, Goldilocks and The Three Bears, by Procedure: TTW ask students "Where do you most often hear this statement: and they all lived happily ever after...?" Yes, in fairy tales. What does it mean to live happily ever after? Perhaps only in fairy tales can one live without conflict. How could we apply the statement happily ever after in real life? Direct that perhaps we cannot live without conflict, but we don't always have to be in conflict and that it is possible to resolve conflict to live happily in the moment(s). In this lesson we are going to see that we really can resolve conflict and that it can be resolved in a variety of ways. I am going to read to you the story of the Three Bears, but I'm not going to read the ending. You and a partner will finish this story with Goldilocks and the Bears living happily ever after as friends. TTW read the story to the class stopping just short of the ending. TTW suggest how the story ends: Goldilocks and the Bears go out for a walk in the woods together to discuss their differences in a nice, peaceful setting. They listen carefully to each other and see how much they all really do have in common. Mama and Papa Bear then realize Goldilocks isn't so bad after all and ask her to baby sit for Baby Bear, so they can go out for the evening. And they all lived happily ever after.... You will have about 15 minutes to write the ending. If you finish early, you may draw a picture to go along with the ending of the story. Share different endings to the story. End with this question: How did everyone live? Happily ever after. Collect stories to be displayed in the class.

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Activity List Grade 3

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity One Objective: Students will be able to name ways of working out conflicts without always using an adult. Students will help other children in the class by giving suggestions to problems. Materials: Posters with these three words on each with the definition of each. Negotiations- Two interested parties figuring out a problem together. Mediation: Neutral third party facilitates the conversation and sets the ground rules. Arbitration: Neutral third party tries to help work it out. Gives suggestions to help solve the problem. Procedure: Talk to your class about what it means to have a conflict. It means that two or more people do not agree. Ask your students if anyone has ever had a conflict and have them share it with the class if they want. Talk to the class about how sometimes conflicts are hard to work out. There might not be an easy answer and you might need someone else to help solve the problem. Talk to the kids about working problems out with each other and not having to always ask an adult for help. Talk to the students about the posters and what each word means. Then hang them up in the classroom. You might want to chose students to be each one of the descriptions and keep track of who has been what. Let them know that everyone will have a chance to be all the different roles during the year! Then pick students to be each of the three components of the posters. You might want to have some time with these students and give them some ideas on how to deal with a problem. At first you might want to be involved until all the students understand what it is they are supposed to be doing. Activity Two Objective: The students will experience how spreading rumors can hurt others and how to handle gossiping from others. Materials: Book, Mr. Peabody's Apples, by Madonna Procedure: TTW play the game Telephone with students. To play the game, the teacher will whisper a sentence to one of the students and then the students will whisper the statement by round robin method, until it gets to the last person. This person will tell the class what the sentence is. The teacher will say that this game is an example of how rumors can get started and how they can get exaggerated by others. TTW ask students what a rumor is and elicit responses. TTW give an example of another way a rumor can get started by people. One day the teacher asks you to take some field trip money to the office. You go by principal's door and see one of your classmates doing work at the principal's table. What would you think had happened? TTW elicit responses and say that most people would ASSUME that the classmate was in trouble. Now, say that you come back to class and tell everybody in the class that you saw your classmate doing work and that they are in trouble. That is spreading a rumor. Spreading rumors can be dangerous. They can damage a person's reputation (or what others think about them) They also can be false. What if your classmate was working in the principal's office because they were waiting for their mom to check them out of school for a doctor's appointment? TTW say that in today's story, we are going to see an example of how rumors can hurt people. TTW read the book, Mr. Peabody's Apples. TTW discuss how the rumor got started and how it effected Mr. Peabody. TTW discuss how spreading rumors about a person can impact what others think about him or her, as was shown in the story. TTW ask students what they can do if someone tells them something about another person. Some examples could be the following: Ignore them. Confront the person. Tell an adult. If time permits, students can play the telephone game again.

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Activity Three Objective: The students will list ways that people are different, and see that it is wrong to bully others because of these differences because of hurt feelings. Materials: Book, Crickwing, by Janell Cannon Procedure: TTW ask students to think of one thing about themselves that makes them different or special from everybody else. TTW say that we will share these things at the end of the lesson today. TTW read the book, Crickwing to the class. TTW discuss how in the story, Crickwing was picked on by others because he was different. TTW ask students if they think other people are picked on because of their differences. TTW ask students to name some of these differences. Some examples might include the following: Gender, Skin color, economic status, clothes that people wear, activities that people participate in, wearing glasses, or a physical handicap TTW say that it is bullying to tease others because of these differences. TTW also ask students how it must feel to have a difference. The students will write a paragraph about one thing that makes them different or special and share these with the class. Activity Four Objective: Students will identify things that make them angry and ways to help express this emotion that won't hurt themselves or others. Materials: none Procedure: TTW tell students a short tale about what always makes him/her angry and why (example: being late for an appointment because of traffic). TTW explain to students that this situation always makes him/her angry. Also, TTW tell students that he/she plays music in the car to help calm down. In this particular situation, the teacher has no control, so she/he has to cope with it. Tell students that sometimes they will also be in different situations where they have no control and will have to cope with it as well. Ask students to share what makes them angry, record these on the board. Talk about how they deal with their anger. Have any of them used the techniques we learnt in class? TTW draw an anger flow chart on the board, such as the following: Anger Chart Reason Late for appointment Trigger Heavy traffic Level of anger (you can use 1-5, with 5 being the most angry) 4 (really angry) Inappropriate response (road rage ­ accident, ticket from police) Appropriate response (deep breathing & playing relaxing music)

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TTW Ask students to get into groups of 2-3 and discuss what their `triggers' are and how they deal with them. Groups can share with class. TTW then have students think about situations that make them angry, pick one of these, and make their own anger flow chart. TTW ask students to share their posters, explaining what makes them angry and in what situation. Ask them to explain how they deal with their anger in these settings. Is it an appropriate way or could it be changed by using a more appropriate technique? Remind students that being aware of situations that make us angry help us prepare for them.

Activity Five Objective: The students will define the words "strong," "mean," and "giving in" to describe the choices they have in conflict situations, apply those ideas to clarify the choices faced by characters in a story, and practice predicting the results or consequences of certain choices. Materials: Paper and pencil. Poster paper with definitions. Procedure: The teacher will introduce the words "mean," "strong," and "giving in." The students will probably have a good idea of the usual meanings of these words. Elicit their understandings. Then summarize the discussion by putting forth the following definitions: (you can post these on poster board) Mean = doing something to hurt another person (their body or their feelings) or using force or threats to make somebody do something they don't want to do. Giving in = going along with what someone wants you to do even though you'd rather do something else; and Strong = being nice and respecting the other person while standing up firmly for yourself (your rights, your interests) For each of the three definitions, elicit examples from students. (Depending on the age and maturity of your students, you may also want to introduce them to the "adult" words: assertive, aggressive, and submissive.) TTW read the following scenario. Justin and Landon are on the same baseball team for the summer league. They play together on weekends after the games and have a great friendship. When school starts, Justin is excited to learn that Landon will be in his class at school. Landon is really popular and all the kids think he is cool, funny, and smart. At recess one day, Justin notices that Landon, who is always team captain for kickball, really picks on Mark. Mark is in the science club and collects different kinds of rocks. Mark really doesn't play sports much. Justin feels sorry for Landon, as most of the other boys in the class also tease Mark about his lack of athletic ability. After school one day while at Landon's house, Justin asks Landon why he always teases Mark and that he thinks it is wrong. Landon says that he is just kidding around and he doesn't think it really bothers Mark. Justin tells Landon that he was once teased by an older kid and that it really bothered him, but that he never said anything or told anyone. TTW discuss with students which characters are being mean, giving in, and being strong. TTW discuss why people tend to give in to others when they are teasing and how hard it is to be strong. The teacher will then share the following situations with students and propose options that could be done and have students select the best option. This can be done in a group activity. Each group can have one or two questions, depending on your classroom size. * You want to be alone, but a friend wants to be with you. What do you do? * A classmate teases you or calls you a name. How do you respond? * You're walking along a busy city street with your mom and decide you want an ice cream cone. You know your mom won't be enthusiastic about the idea. How do you ask?

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* Your family is having a conversation around the dinner table, and you have an opinion you'd like to state, but everyone is talking so fast. How do you get people to listen to what you have to say? * An older kid says you have to give him the cake from your lunch or he'll beat you up. * Two close friends ask you to join them in stealing money from another kid's backpack. * Your younger brother keeps bothering you when you're trying to do your homework. After groups have worked through their situations, each group can share answers with the class.

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Activity List 4 grade

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Activity One Objective: Students will work on the concept of "fairness" through a group activity, discussion, and written responses with conflicts/resolutions from a short story, and then produce a page either on paper or on the computer. Materials: none Book. Great White Man-Eating Shark by Margaret Mahy, 20 objects such as little toys, coins, food, Large chart paper and markers, Paper, pencil, markers or crayons (for all students), OPTIONAL: Kid Pix or similar computer program with capability to print Procedure: 1. Have twelve students stand in front of the class or sit in the front row by the teacher facing the rest of the class. 2. Show students the 20 items (i.e. toys, food, books, etc) you have gathered. 3. Tell students you will pass out all 20 items to the twelve students until the items are gone. 4. Pass out all 20 items. Discuss if it is fair (why or why not) to the twelve students concerning how many items they each received. Classify student responses into two categories: negative and positive comments. This will help students justify their answers/responses. 5. Tell students you will read a book which deals with the topic of fairness and responsibility (ie. taking responsibility for one's actions in this story). 6. Read the trade book, The Great White Man-Eating Shark. Pause at different spots in the book to ask, "Is it fair how Norvan is behaving?" "Why do you think it is fair or not fair?" 7. Discuss the different conflicts and resolutions found in the story. Write student responses on chart paper (conflicts on left side and resolutions on the right side). Samples of conflicts/resolutions are as follows. Conflict: Norvin had to share the beach with other swimmers which made him cross and resentful. Resolution: Norvin dressed up like a shark to scare swimmers away. Conflict: Mrs. Scorpio yelled that there was a real shark swimming next to her. Resolution: Everyone got out of the water. Conflict: Norvin dressed up again like a shark to scare swimmers away so he could have the beach to himself. Resolution: Norvin saw a real shark and couldn't swim anyway. He learned his lesson, which was to not be so greedy. 8. Have students fold a piece of paper in half and label the word "conflict" on left side and "resolution" on the right side. 9. Have students write/illustrate one of the conflicts and resolutions to the story on paper. 10. OPTIONAL Students will then use the Kid Pix computer program to input data from step #9 (pictures/sentences of the conflict and resolution). The Kid Pix design on the computer will look like the paper from step #9 (conflict on one side and the resolution on the other side). 11. Students then print out their Kid Pix page (one page per student). 12. Share the booklet with the class and discuss "peaceful" ways to solve conflicts as a culmination activity. This lesson was taken from the following web cite: http://www.beaconlearningcenter.com/Lessons/1012.htm

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Activity Two

Objective: The students will observe a role play in which two friends are having a conflict, describe the problem and how the characters are feeling, and identify the choices the characters have in the situation. Procedure: Here's the situation. Jamie is different from the other kids in the class in several ways: she always wears dresses (rather than the jeans and t-shirts the other kids wear); the dresses often seem out of style and a bit big on her; she's shy; and whether in the classroom, the lunchroom or the school yard, she always carries a notebook around with her for her favorite activity, writing. Ashley is the most popular girl in the class, a leader. She decides she wants to have some fun by getting several other girls to join her in a plan to get Jamie's notebook away from her and hide it. Ashley approaches Laura, one of several girls in the class who like to hang out with her, and tells her of the plan. "The only time she isn't holding that stupid notebook is when she works at the computer," says Ashley. "Watch her closely and when you get your chance, take the notebook and give it to me. I'll find a good place for it." Laura admires Ashley and enjoys being her friend. Being friends with Ashley gives her status in the class. However, she doesn't like this idea. First, she's pretty sure that if she takes part in the scheme, she'll get in trouble. But she also has nothing against Jamie. Sure, she's a little strange, but Jamie has always been nice to her; in fact, Jamie gave her half of her sandwich when she'd forgotten her lunch one day. So Laura doesn't want to take part in Ashley's plan. In fact, she doesn't want Ashley to do anything to hurt Jamie. But it's also important for her to remain Ashley's friend. And she doesn't want the other kids in the class to look down on her, as they do Jamie. The teacher will ask for three volunteers: Ashley, Laura, and one to be the narrator (who will fill in necessary background). Brief your actors on their roles. Make name tags for them with the names they will have in the role play. You are ready to start the role play. * Freeze the action while Ashley is still trying to convince Laura to help her carry out her plan. * Ask, what is happening? Encourage the students to describe what is going on as objectively as possible. Then ask, how do you think the characters are feeling? * Ask, what are Laura's choices? What are the different ways she might deal with the situation? * Elicit the student's ideas and write them on the board. Push them to come up with a wide range of possibilities. * Discuss: What do you think is the right thing for Laura to do in this situation? Why? Do you think that will be easy or hard for her? What would you do? Why? The teacher will say that one way to make a good choice is to think ahead about what is likely to happen as a result of your choice. Ask the class to think of some choices that Laura could make in this conflict. Select student volunteers to replay the skit as before, except this time they will act out one of the ideas the class proposed as choices for Laura. Confer with the student playing Laura and ask her to decide which course of action she'll follow. It can be any of the choices; it doesn't have to be the one the student thinks is best. The students will run the skit with the change. The teacher will then freeze the action after the two characters have had some dialogue back and forth. Ask the students to describe what has happened in the role play. What choice did the character Laura make? How has Ashley responded? What do they think will happen next? Have student actors act out several of Laura's choices and discuss as above. The aim is not to arrive at a definitive answer about what will happen in any given situation, but to show the children that it's possible -and important -- to anticipate consequences.

This lesson, somewhat modified, was taken from: http://www.teachablemoment.org/elementary/strong_mean_giving_in.html

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Activity Three Objective: The students will understand differences that people have are what make them special and that it is bullying behavior to tease someone because they are different. Materials: Book, The Sneeches, by Dr. Seuss. Procedure: TTW say that today we will talk about respecting people for their differences. The teacher will divide students into groups of two. Each group will receive a piece of paper with a list of characteristics/interests that they will complete together. (Worksheet at the end of this lesson) The teacher should give students time to complete the page. TTW then read the book, The Sneeches, by Dr. Seuss. TTW discuss how people sometimes judge others because of differences they have and ask students to talk about why it is important for people to have differences. TTW say that every person is special because of their differences. Some of the differences may include the following: Hair color, skin color, eye color, athletic ability, intelligence, what clothes a person wears, clubs that a person belongs to, activities that a person does, material objects that a person has or doesn't have, height, weight, nationality. Students will then share their pages and talk about things that they have in common with their partner and things that are different. Worksheet for Group Work Activity Three 4th grade My Name My partner's name

_______________________________________________ Hair color Eye color Favorite sport Favorite TV show Favorite music Favorite sports team Favorite food Favorite color Favorite school subject _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________

Things that my partner and I have that are the same __________________________________________________________________ Things that my partner and I have that are different __________________________________________________________________

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Activity Four Objective: Students will use problem solving steps to define problems, list alternatives, state criteria to consider, and evaluate alternatives in terms of chosen criteria, through a chart, then interpret the chart to arrive at a decision. Materials: A copy of Scott's Birthday for each student. Paper and pencil. Procedure: TTW pose a question to the students, "If you had to chose between a million dollars, a life time supply of ice cream, or one wish, which would you chose?" Allow the students time to think about this question, then ask a few students to share what they would pick and why. Then discuss how they arrived at that answer, what things did they consider when making their decision, etc. Explain that what they just did was called decision making and that they are now going to do an activity that involves their decision making skills. TTW then do the following: 1. Have each child read Scott's Birthday (independently). Scott's Birthday Scott woke up feeling very excited. He hadn't slept well because he knew today, Tuesday, April 13, would be a big day in his life. How could anyone sleep when something wonderful was going to happen? Today, April 13, is Scott's birthday. He had waited 365 days for this day! What presents would he be getting? Would he get all the things he wanted? The one thing he wanted more than anything else was a pet. They told him having a pet is a lot of work. They didn't think he could handle the responsibility. But Scott had asked for a pet each year anyway. And each year his parents had said, " You're not old enough yet, Scott." Well, perhaps all the other presents would make up for not getting a pet. When Scott's mom, dad, and grandmother woke up on Tuesday morning, they wished him a happy birthday. But there were no presents waiting for him on the kitchen table. There was only a white envelope. He knew it was a birthday card. He tried hard not to act disappointed. He opened the envelope. Just as he had expected, it was a birthday card. He read the card and the note his mother had written at the bottom. Dear Scott, There are no presents wrapped for you this year. Your dad, grandmother, and I have not bought you any presents. Instead, we decided to ask you what kind of pet you would most like to have. That will be your present this year. Scott couldn't believe it! At last he was old enough to have a pet. What kind of pet should he get? A puppy? A kitten? A bird? A turtle? A rabbit? He wanted all of them. How would he ever decide? Luckily, Scott was smart for his age. He remembered to keep some important things in mind. He wanted a quiet pet because his grandmother was older and would prefer a quiet pet. He also wanted a pet that would be easy to care for. Last, but not least, Scott wanted a pet that would be fun to play with and become his friend. Now that you know all of the things that are important to Scott , help him make a wise choice. TTW introduce students to steps in problem solving and explain each step. Problem Solving Steps 1. Define the problem. 2. List all alternatives or choices. 3. Consider all the possibilities of your choices. 4. Make a decision. TTW discuss with students the problem in Scott's birthday and talk about the steps in problem solving to make a decision. Some of the things to consider might be the following:

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-Scott needs a quiet pet. -Scott needs a pet that is easy to care for. -Scott needs a puppy that is playful and would be like a friend. This activity can be done as a class or a group activity with 3 or 4 students in a group. After the class or groups have finished, review the choices chosen by the class or group. The teacher should then have children share some big decisions they have made and if they followed the five steps to make the decision. Ask for volunteers to share. Students will then pick a decision they need to make, write down each step of their decision, and share the process they went through with the class. The teacher can again review with students the five steps in the decision making model. The students could also be urged to use the five step process in everyday classroom situations to practice personal and social decision making. This lesson, modified somewhat, was taken from the following: http://www.lessonplanspage.com/SSDecisionMaking23.htm Activity Five Objective: Students will name the three types of people involved in a bullying situation- aggressor, victim, and bystander and experience the importance of a bystander role in stopping or controlling conflict situations. Materials: Paper and pencil Procedure: TTW ask students to think about a situation where they have been bullied or seen someone else bullied, either personally or on a movie or TV. TTW ask students how many people are involved in a bullying situation and elicit responses. TTW state that there are three types of people involved in bullying and show these definitions on the chalkboard or poster paper. Aggressors- the person or people who are teasing others either mentally, physically, or both Victims- the person or people who are teased by others either mentally, physically, or both Bystanders- the person or people who witness the teasing TTW say that bystanders can help or hurt the bullying situation. Some bystanders support the violence by passively watching it, ignoring it, or by actively encouraging it. TTW ask students why they think this happens? TTW say that many times a bystander is afraid that if they intervene or tell an adult, the bully will tease them. However, a bystander can be a nonviolent problem-solver, help themselves and others solve problems, and maintain personal safety. TTW read the following scenario. Tom and Mark are in the same class and have assigned seats beside each other in the cafeteria. Every day Tom teases Mark about his glasses and clothes calling him names like "four eyes, nerd, geek, stupid, brainy, and teacher's pet." The boys sit at a table with 5 other boys and Greg sits right beside Mark. It is obvious that the teasing really upset Mark. TTW discuss with students the following questions: Who is the aggressor? Who is the victim? Are there any bystanders? What kinds of things could Greg and the other bystanders say or do to help the situation? TTW help students to understand that there is always a peaceful way to help a situation. TTW divide the class into groups of 4 or 5. Each group will have a copy of a scenario and will work together to get the following information: Who is the aggressor? Who is the victim?

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Are there any bystanders? What kinds of things could the bystanders do to say or do to help the situation? After each group is finished, they will share their answers with the class. The teacher will discuss as necessary and remind students again about the importance of being a bystander.

Situations/Scenarios for Group Activity

The Lunch Line The Scene: Students are in line at the cafeteria waiting to pay for their lunches. One boy cuts in front of the other students who are waiting in line. Sam: "Hey, what are you doing?" Larry: "I'm paying for my lunch. What's it to you?" The Bus The Scene: Louis and Maria are sitting in the back of the school bus. Louis puts his backpack on the empty seat across the aisle. Martin gets on the bus and puts Louis' backpack on the floor and sits in the seat. Louis leans over in Martin's face. Louis: "Who do you think you are moving my backpack?" Martin: "You don't get two seat. I need a place to sit." Louis: "You jerk, we'll see about that!" The Playground The Scene: Sarah and Julie are playing jump rope. Madeline comes over and asks to play. The girls refuse and Madeline gets angry. The other girls in the class are sitting on the sidewalk watching the situation. Madeline: "Hey guys, can I play with you?" Sarah: "No way, go do something else." Madeline: "No, I want to jump rope." Julie: "Go away, loser." Madeline: "You better let me have the rope or else." The Classroom The Scene: Jeremy is taking a test in math class. Rick leans over and asks Jeremy for answers on the test. When Jeremy tells him no, Rick threatens Jeremy. Joan is sitting beside Jeremy and hears the situation. Rick: "Hey Jeremy, move your paper so that I can copy your answers." Jeremy: "No, we could get in trouble." Rick: "If you don't, I am going to hurt you at recess." Parts of this lesson were modified from "Aggressors, Victims, and Bystanders from Palm Beach County School District in Florida.

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Activity List 5 grade

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Activity One Objective: Students will review anger, learn ways that people react to anger, and learn more positive choices when they are angry. Materials: Paper and pencil Procedure: TTW read the following situation:

John had a terrible day at school. Then he came home and there was nothing to eat. His sister began teasing him and said that he was a big dummy. His dad came home about that time and began yelling at John because he had left his bike in the driveway again. Situation A John lost it. He began to feel his body tense up. He threw his backpack on the ground slinging papers all over the kitchen. He then kicked the garbage can and yelled at his father. He then stopped and looked around at the mess he had made. Situation B John began to feel his body tense up. He said "Yes sir" to his father and went to his room. There he sat quietly until he was called for dinner. He did not discuss the incident with his father anymore. The next morning, his sister began teasing him at breakfast. John just finished quickly and left for school. On the way, a younger kid yelled some rude comment and John hit him. TTW ask students if they have ever had a day like John and if they reacted like him in Situation A or B and elicit responses. TTW explain that these are two unhealthy ways to handle anger. Situation A is called exploding. Situation B is called hiding/piling. TTW review definitions of each with the class. Exploding You explode in a rage without thinking of the consequences by yelling, hitting, or destroying property. Hiding/Piling You hide your anger inside without saying anything. You pile up so many incidents, that eventually you explode on someone, usually not the person who first caused the anger.

TTW review anger- a normal emotion that we all feel from time to time. Anger is not bad; it is our reaction to it. Different things make people angry. It is not the same for everyone. TTW ask the class what kinds of things make you angry? Examples may include the following: Feeling sad, frustration, hurt, lonely TTW ask how many of you have ever gotten angry at a friend and what did you do in that situation? Some examples may include the following: Hit Yell Argue Work it out Ignore Stop being friends TTW ask the class, "Have you ever done something that made your friend angry and they wouldn't talk with you about it? This is called the "silent treatment". TTW ask the class, "Wouldn't it be easier for you if your friend had just said that they were mad or hurt?" TTW discuss with the class. TTW say that sometimes kids are afraid to tell their friends when they're angry about something because they don't want to hurt their friends' feelings. They are also afraid that their friends will get angry at them, and they don't want to start a big fight and lose their friends.

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You can't hide anger. It is best to talk about it. TTW review some Steps to Take When You Are Angry ONE: Stop and Calm down Deep Breaths Think positive thoughts -I'd like to have this, but I will live without it. -It's not worth getting all upset over. -It's not the end of the world. -I can handle this. -I would have liked this, but it's not a disaster. -I can't always get my way. -I'll start over. -I'll try again later. -I can't always get people to do what I want. TWO: Think Think about what will happen if you lose your temper THREE: Talk Talk to the person you are angry at. How to talk with the person. One: Choose a good time and place Two: Think about what you are going to say Three: Talk in a non threatening way. Use "I" statements. Four: Say what is bugging you and what you want the person to do instead. Five: Positive comments. I like ___about you. FOUR: Feel Good Again Do something active, something you enjoy, relax Make a card for your friend. Go for a walk. Listen to music. Play with your pet. Play a computer game. Shoot some hoops. Ride your bike. Think of all the good reasons to be that person's friend. TTW ask students to think of a time when they were angry when they made a negative choice and write down what they can do next time, including information from the lesson, to make the situation more positive.

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Activity Two Objective: Students will define what a put down is, why people put others down, and name some things they can do when others put them down. Materials: Paper and pencil Procedure: TTW ask students if they know what a put down is and generate responses. TTW ask students Why do you think kids do it and elicit responses? Some reasons may include the following: Make themselves look cool in front of others. Kids don't understand differences and realize that it is okay to be different. TTW then ask "How do you react when someone puts you down?" TTW say that most people react in two different ways. These are by insulting the person back or ignoring the person. TTW ask if either of these ways is really positive and to tell what is the usual consequence for using either of these techniques. (Some kids may say hitting is a reaction. This can be considered an insult to a person) TTW say that the best way to react is to say something that isn't mean but shows that the put-downer didn't upset you and that you are not accepting the comment they gave you. Some examples are the following: 1. Making a joke of the comment. TTW give this example. Put down: What are those brown things on your face? Response: They're freckles. I can use them to play connect the dots. 2. Cutting the person off with a quick response and then leave. Some examples of this might include the following: Really? No kidding. Amazing, but true. Wow, thanks for the tip. That is one way of looking at it. Appreciate the information. I know, isn't that funny? Other choices might include the following: I feel bad when you say things like that to me. That really hurts my feelings. You are right, but I am working really hard. I am trying my best. I can do it, just give me a chance to show you. 3. Ask for support from your friends. The teacher should say that sometimes having friends around in the situation will deter others from saying mean comments. Also, by telling a friend about the situation, your friend could help stick up for you. 4. Tell an adult. The teacher should say that if someone hurts you physically or mentally, it is not tattling or being a snitch. If you have tried the other choices and the person is still making comments, then you should report it to your teacher, your parents, or another adult at school. TTW then give students a page that has put downs on it and students will write a response or give a suggestion as to how to handle the situation. See page following this lesson. The teacher can go over the sheet with the class for responses. Students can role play their pages with a buddy for practice. The teacher should go over one with the class. For example: A put down could be You are such a pain. The response could be Well, thanks for the tip.

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Activity Two Work page for Put Downs You never do things right. _______________________________________________________ You are so ugly. ________________________________________________________ You are such a looser. _________________________________________________________ You are such a big chicken. ________________________________________________________ You sure do talk funny. _______________________________________________________ You are a horrible kickball player. ______________________________________________________ Look at your new haircut. What a joke! _______________________________________________________ I heard that you still sleep with your teddy bear. ________________________________________________________ You must have got those shoes at the junk yard; they are so ugly. _______________________________________________________ Your family is so weird. ________________________________________________________ You are such a teacher's pet. ________________________________________________________

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Activity Three Objective: Students will be able to define a conflict and name ways that conflicts are escalated and list some ways that conflicts can be de escalated. Materials: Paper and pencil Procedure: TTW ask for three volunteers in the class to do a role play. Narrator: It is after school and two sisters are looking for a snack. Both sisters reach for the last box of cookies at the same time. #1: #2: #1: #2: #1: #2: #1: Hey, give me those cookies. No, they are mine. You are being a pig. Oink! You can be such a jerk. Loser! I'm gonna pound your face in if you don't quit. Oh yeah, I would like to see you try.

Narrator: Both sisters begin hitting and end up pounding each other. Meanwhile their mom comes in and both girls get in trouble. TTW ask students how many of them have ever had a situation with a brother, sister, or friend like this before? TTW say that this is an example of a conflict. TTW define a conflict as a problem between people with at least two sides. Most conflicts start out as small disagreements. When a conlict gets worse, it escalates. TTW share some things that make conflicts escalate. Blaming Refusing to Listen Name calling Yelling Demanding Threatening TTW then say that not all conflicts have to escalate and that a person can turn the conflict around at any point by doing one of the following things: Listening to the other person and their feelings Take turns talking it out Identify the problem without blaming the other person Using a calm voice Showing respect for others TTW then ask students to tell if these sentences would escalate a conflict or de escalate a conflict. This can be done as a whole class activity. What I say goes, Do it my way. I feel hurt when you call me names. Idiot, I can't believe you did that. I don't agree with you, but I do respect your feelings. Do you want this fist in your face? Who cares if you are upset? TTW then give the students different examples of conflicts and ask them to come up with a response so that the conflict does not escalate. After the class is finished, you can role play each situation with volunteers and discuss their responses.

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Situation One Joan heard that Sharon had been talking about her. Joan: Fat-mouth Sharon: What do you mean fat-mouth? I'm not fat, you are! Joan: You have been talking about me behind me back. Sharon: (Yelling) You are going to be sorry! I didn't do anything! What could Joan say to turn this around? Situation Two Bill grabs a ball away from Bob. Bob: Hey, I had the ball first. Bill: No you didn't, I did. Bob: Oh yeah, I bet I get it back. (Bob starts to pull the ball out of Bill's hands) Bill: (Yelling) Leave me alone!! What could Bob say or do to turn this around? Situation Three Mark is playing a computer game and a classmate tries to change the game. Mark: Hey, what are you doing? Jerry: It is my turn to play. Mark: I have only been here a minute, jerk. Jerry: Back off before I lose my temper. What could Mark say or do to turn this around? Activity Four Objective: Students will name steps to use in problem solving for different situations. Materials: Paper and pencil Procedure: TTW read the following story to the class: John's Decisions for the Day John got up early on Friday morning because he had to help mom straighten up the house before school. Mom gave John and extra big hug as he readily helped her with the dishes. On the way out the door, John grabbed his backpack, but decided not to take the lunch his mom had made for him, because he thought that he still had some money on his lunch account. When John got to school, he began working on his early bird work. David, the student beside him, starting throwing pieces of paper at other boys and girls. John began laughing at David, because he thought it was funny. Mr. Jones saw the boys and made them sign the conduct folder. John began working again. Right before lunch, Mr. Jones read off the account balances for lunch. John heard his name, John Mills $.05. John knew that five cents would not buy his lunch. He should have taken the lunch mom made him this morning. He was so embarrassed about the money, John decided to not tell anyone about the lunch. Later that afternoon, John's class was at recess. It was John's turn to kick the ball. John felt sick and had to sit out of the game. Mr. Jones asked john what was wrong. John said that he wasn't sure, but that he was feeling a little hungry. Mr. Jones asked John what he ate for lunch. Quietly, John told him that

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

he didn't have any lunch and explained what had happened to Mr. Jones. That afternoon during class, John was really interested in the social studies story. David started kicking John under the table to get him to laugh again. This time, John ignored David, and David left him alone. John knew that he had made a good choice when Mr. Jones made David sign the conduct folder again. TTW ask students the following questions as a class discussion: What were some good decisions that John made? What were some bad decisions that John made? What could John have done differently? TTW explain that a decision is when you have to make a choice between two or more things, which can include objects and ways of behavior (or things that you do). TTW say that when people make decisions without thinking about them, sometimes there are negative consequences. TTW then introduce a decision making process for students. Decision Making Process 1. What is the problem? 2. What are some choices? 3. What will happen to me if I chose this option? (consequence) 4. Decide. You can chose more than one option or combine them. TTW then give students different situations and ask them to complete a decision making process work page for each. This can be done in small groups. Each group can read their situation and share their choice with the class. The class can vote if they think it is a solution that could really work. Decision Making Scenarios You are walking home with some of your friends after school. You mom told you to come straight home after school. Your friend has got a new game for her birthday and wants you to come over and play right then. You know that your mom has said to come home, but you really want to go... Your brother got a new CD for a gift. He has told you not to ply it unless he turns it on for you. You play the CD anyway, when your brother goes to the store. You hear your brother coming back, and quickly try to put the CD back in it's case. You accidentally stratch the CD. What do you do... You find a soccer ball in the street and take it home. The next day you hear that one of your classmates lost his/her soccer ball right where you found this one. What do you do... You and a friend are playing catch in the front yard. Your parents have told you many times not to play catch in the front yard. Your friend misses the ball and it goes through the basement window. Nobody is home at the time. What do you do... Your teacher has told the class not to talk. You and a friend are talking during class. The teacher stops the lesson and tells anyone that has been talking to come to the front of the class. What do you do...

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Decision Making Process Work Page Name_______________________________________________ 1. What is the problem?

2. What are some choices? Choice 1 ______________________________________________________________ Choice 2______________________________________________________________ Choice 3______________________________________________________________ 3. What will happen to me if I chose this option? Choice 1 ______________________________________________________________ Choice 2______________________________________________________________ Choice 3______________________________________________________________

4. Decide on an option. You can chose more than one or combine two together.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity Five Objective: Students will talk about respecting differences and be able to define stereotype, prejudice, and discrimination. Materials: Overhead transparencies. Paper and pencil. Procedure: TTW put the following statements on an overhead and ask students to read them. Only boys are good at math. Girls are more mature than boys. All old people are slow. All smart people are nerds. Blondes are dumb. All teachers are mean. TTW ask students if they have ever heard any of these statements? Where did they hear them? Are they really true? TTW say that these statements are examples of stereotypes. A stereotype is a fixed idea about a whole group of people. TTW say that while stereotypes are ideas, they can lead to different terms. TTW define prejudice and discrimination. Prejudice An attitude you have against a whole group of people based on your beliefs. Discrimination When you treat someone differently based on your belief or idea about that person. People can discriminate on many characteristics, including the following: Physical (height, weight, appearance) Age Class Religion Racial Gender TTW use the overhead to place the following statements and let students decide in what way the person is being discriminated against by others. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. The kids laughed at the old man who was trying to cross the street. She was too embarrassed to swim because of her weight. My dad helps my sister with her homework because he says that girls aren't good at math. He was embarrassed to talk because of his accent. I was disappointed because there wasn't a wheelchair ramp at the museum. His mom said that he was just a handful because all boys were full of energy. I had a hard time making friends because I didn't say the Pledge of Allegience. He didn't like playing with those kids because they always called him shorty.

TTW ask students what they could do if they were a witness to discrimination. Some possibilities could include the following: Talk to an adult. Be an ally to the person that is discriminated against by others. Try to talk to the people that are discriminating others. TTW review definitions again with students.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity List 6 grade

th

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity One Objective: Students will name a range of possible conflict resolution techniques and be able to define some of the technical terms of conflict resolution. Materials: Vocabulary handout, worksheet page Procedure: TTW Explain that there are many ways people resolve conflicts, some of which have names. TTW pass out the resolution vocabulary page and discuss each term with the class. Let students see if they can think of examples of each kind of conflict resolution. TTW hand out the name the resolution handout and read the situations to the class, having students identify what type of conflict resolution is being used in the situation. Conclude this activity by having a class discussion using the following questions: a. Have you used one of these conflict resolution approaches? If so, describe the situation. b. What are some other ways of resolving conflicts that are not on this handout? (compromise, problem solving, competing, using chance) Situations and Answers A. Roger and Kindra were arguing over who would get to use the box of markers. They realized that arguing was getting them nowhere, so they figured out several ways they could both use the markers. Then they chose the way they liked best. (NEGOTIATE) B. Jerome, Ted, and Alfredo are supposed to put up a bulletin board display together, but they can't agree on what the theme should be. They finally went to their teacher Mr. Nunez and asked him to choose the bulletin board theme. (ARBITRATE) C. Juanita was upset because her best friend Sara walked by her this morning without saying a word. She didn't speak to Sara all day. Finally Sara got Luanita to say what was wrong. "I didn't even see you," Sara cried. "I would never walk by without saying something to you." It was all a misunderstanding. (COMMUNICATE) D. Ricardo and Diana were playing on the same softball team, but they both wanted to pitch. They were shouting at each other. Finally Monty came up and helped them work out a solution to the problem. (MEDIATE) E. Marla was being teased and called names by some kids in the class. She hated being called names. Every morning the class had a class meeting to discuss things. Marla suggested that there be a class rule against name-calling and teasing. (LEGISLATE) F. Carmen has accused Reba of stealing things out of her locker. They have taken their problem to the student court. The court is made up of a high school girl, who is the judge, and a jury of eighth- and ninth-graders. They will present evidence to the court. The jury will decide if Reba is guilty. If she is, the judge will decide her punishment (LITIGATE) Excerpted from Elementary Perspectives: Teaching Concepts of Peace and Conflict by William J. Kreidler.

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Resolution Vocabulary COMMUNICATE Some conflicts start because people misunderstand each other. Talking things out and explaining might take care of it. NEGOTIATE When two or more people decide to work out a conflict themselves, they might follow a set of steps. The steps help them work out the conflict or negotiate. MEDIATE Sometimes people want to work out a problem but have trouble negotiating. They might ask someone to help them. That person is called a mediator. He or she mediates the conflict by helping the people work it out. The mediator does not tell the people what to do; he or she helps them decide for themselves. ARBITRATE Sometimes a mediator does solve people's problems. Then he or she isn't called a mediator. He or she is called an arbitrator. When people ask an arbitrator to help them, they must agree to do whatever the arbitrator suggests. LITIGATE When people can't work out their conflict themselves, they may go to a court and have a trial. They hire lawyers and go before a judge. A judge is like an arbitrator. The lawyers try to convince the judge that their client is right. The judge decides who is right according to the law and decides what solution there should be. LEGISLATE To legislate is to make something the law or a rule. Some kinds of conflicts cause people to try to change laws or rules so the problem won't happen again. Excerpted from Elementary Perspectives: Teaching Concepts of Peace and Conflict by William J. Kreidler More Conflict Resolution Lessons

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Name the Resolution Directions: Read the situations and identify what type of conflict resolution is being used: A. Type:____________ Roger and Kindra were arguing over who would get to use the box of markers. They realized that arguing was getting them nowhere, so they figured out several ways they could both use the markers. Then they chose the way they liked best. B. Type:____________ Jerome, Ted, and Alfredo are supposed to put up a bulletin board display together, but they can't agree on what the theme should be. They finally went to their teacher Mr. Nunez and asked him to choose the bulletin board theme.

C. Type:____________ Juanita was upset because her best friend Sara walked by her this morning without saying a word. She didn't speak to Sara all day. Finally Sara got Luanita to say what was wrong. "I didn't even see you," Sara cried. "I would never walk by without saying something to you." It was all a misunderstanding. D. Type:____________ Ricardo and Diana were playing on the same softball team, but they both wanted to pitch. They were shouting at each other. Finally Monty came up and helped them work out a solution to the problem. E. Type:____________ Marla was being teased and called names by some kids in the class. She hated being called names. Every morning the class had a class meeting to discuss things. Marla suggested that there be a class rule against name-calling and teasing. F. Type:____________ Carmen has accused Reba of stealing things out of her locker. They have taken their problem to the student court. The court is made up of a high school girl, who is the judge, and a jury of eighth- and ninth-graders. They will present evidence to the court. The jury will decide if Reba is guilty. If she is, the judge will decide her punishment. This lesson was modified somewhat from the following: Adapted from Elementary Perspectives: Teaching Concepts of Peace and Conflict by William J. Kreidler. http://www.teachervision.fen.com/conflict-resolution/lesson-plan/3026.html?detoured=1

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity Two Objective: Students will experience how to consider alternatives before reacting to a conflict. Materials: A copy of Conflicts for each group, paper, and colored markers in conflict situations often results in impulsive, hurtful words or actions that are regretted later. A valuable conflict resolution skill, therefore, is the ability to step back from a tense situation, brainstorm a wide variety of possible alternatives, and thoughtfully select the most appropriate response. TTW divide the class into groups of 4 or 5 and each group will receive a copy of the Conflicts page to read and discuss Have each group choose one conflict they would like to solve, and then brainstorm at least 10 possible approaches to resolving that conflict. When the brainstorming is completed, have students select or combine the approaches that they feel will be most useful in resolving the conflict. Have students read their situations and share their proposed solutions to the class, or have students role-play the conflict and their solution. Conflict Situations 1. You and your best friend have always played soccer together on town and recreational teams. You both try out for the school's travel team. You make it and your friend doesn't. At first your friend claims not to care, but you soon realize your friend is very angry. Your friend doesn't want to spend as much time together as you used to, and, of course, you have daily practices and games your friend doesn't attend. What do you do? 2. Your friend tells you a secret in absolute confidence. You don't really mean to, but you tell another friend. Soon the whole school seems to know what your friend's secret is. Your friend is really mad at you. Your other friends are also upset that you revealed the secret. What do you do? 3. Your parents have a strict rule that all homework must be done before you can go out after school with your friends. All your friends go down to the basketball courts after school to play basketball. By the time you get there, teams are already set and games have already been played, so it's really too late to join in. What can you do? 4. Your little sister (or brother) can be a real pain. Whenever you have friends over, she wants to do everything with you. She annoys you by following you around, interrupting when you're talking, and demanding a turn in everything you do. It is very hard to find some privacy with your friends when she is around. What do you do? 5. You are invited to go to the mall with a new group of friends from school. You don't know them that well, but are excited that they included you in their plans. When you go into a crowded music store, you think you see one of them slip a CD into a pocket without paying. What do you do? 6. Your teacher asks you to stay after class. The teacher shows you two tests that are identical in every answer: yours and the student's who sits next to you. You have the feeling that the other student has been copying your work, but don't know for sure. What do you do? 7. Your middle school is much bigger than your elementary school. There you saw your best friend all the time. Now you don't have any classes together and you hardly see each other at school, except at lunch. Your friend seems to be making a whole new group of friends that you don't know. Today at lunch, for the first time, your friend is sitting with some new friends. When you walk by with your lunch, your friend doesn't ask you to sit down as usual. What do you do?

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Activity Three Objective: Students will identify the potential positive and negative consequences of using violence to resolve conflicts. Materials: Chalkboard or poster paper Procedure: Facilitate a class discussion by asking students how they would define violence. Why do they think people sometimes use violence to handle conflicts? After the students have offered a few suggestions, ask them to name everything positive they can think of about fighting or using violence to resolve conflicts. If they have trouble naming any, ask them to think about a fight they won. What feelings did they have? What positive things did the fight accomplish? List their contributions on the board. Continue the brainstorm for five to ten minutes. Next ask students to name all the potential negative consequences of fighting or using violence to deal with conflicts. Repeat the brainstorming process. If necessary, ask about specific areas of students' lives: What might be the consequences of fighting at home? At school? On the playground? The negative list will probably be significantly longer. As a way to end the activity discuss the following questions with your students: Which list is longer? Why? Which of these negative things is a short term consequence? Which is long term? What are some ways you could get the positive effects of fighting without fighting? If there are so many reasons not to fight, why do people fight? Where do we get our ideas about fighting? http://www.teachervision.fen.com/conflict-resolution/lesson-plan/2962.html?detoured=1 Excerpted from Elementary Perspectives: Teaching Concepts of Peace and Conflict by William J. Kreidler. Activity Four Objective: Students will identify the problem, the choices and the consequences both negative and positive. The students will work together to make a group decision. Procedure: A TTW distribute copies of the worksheet, "Decision Mountain". Inform students that they are going to make a decision by climbing the "Decision Mountain." By climbing the mountain they will learn the steps involved in decision making, while examining in further detail the problem presented in their story. Have students break into groups of five or six. B Ask students to read the story to their group and identify the problem. At the foot of the mountain, write the problem. 1 Ask students to identify possible options for resolving the problem. List negative and positive options. 2 Next, have the class identify the consequence (positive or negative) for the specific option. List the consequences with the corresponding option number. 3 Review and discuss information. Ask students to decide which options and corresponding consequences are best. Have students write their group decision at the top of the mountain. C TTW ask students to share their story with the class. Discuss problems and decisions. Discuss how decisions were made and why it solves the problem.

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

Stories 1 Catherine is not doing very well in her English class. Whether she passes or not depends on her final written project. Even though she has always tried hard, she hasn't been able to get very good grades. She finds the paper that her brother did on the topic three years ago and this paper received an "A." 2 You forgot your social studies assignment. Today is the day when everyone is supposed to bring some object to show to the class. The object should be something that has to do with American History. As you start out the door of the house, you remember your sister's arrowhead collection. Great idea-- you could take the collection to school for social studies class. Suddenly, you remember how your sister feels about the collection. She always says, "I'll never take this collection to school because I don't want to lose or damage it." Since she is already on her way to school, you can't ask permission to take the collection. But the collection is the perfect thing for the assignment. The children in Mrs. Dunn's sixth grade class were having a special treat. A collector of Indian artifacts was visiting and he brought with him some Indian weapons, clothing and beads. He was going to teach the children some Indian words and songs. But before he could start his program, Mrs. Dunn had to take him down the meet the principal. The collector asked that no one touch his belongings, and he put a student, Jane in charge, saying that if anyone touched his things, he would call off his visit. Shortly after Mrs. Dunn and the collector left, a few children couldn't resist touching the clothing and trying on some of the beads. When the collector and Mrs. Dunn returned, Jane did not know what to do. The Smith's new neighbors are coming unexpectedly to visit the Smith's in two hours. The Smith children, Bob and Sally, are at home watching their favorite television show with their best friends. Mr. Smith, wanting to make a good impression on the soon to arrive guests and feeling anxious about meeting new people, immediately turned off the television and told the children to clean the house. When Bob began to question his father, Mr. Smith got even angrier, and Sally, embarrassed by her father's tone of voice, ran to her room crying. Mike brought a walkman radio to school that he had just received as a birthday gift the night before. All of his friends wanted to have a turn playing the walkman. When it was James' turn, he accidentally broke off one of the knobs. Mike saw this happen and got really mad at James.

3

4

5

This lesson was taken directly from the following: http://www.eduref.org/Virtual/Lessons/Social_Studies/Psychology/PSY0004.html Activity Five Objective: Student will identify the three people involved in a bullying situation, aggressors, victims, and bystanders. Students will talk about being an "ally" to those that are bullied and examine the positive and negative consequences of supporting the victim. Materials: Paper and pencil, overhead transparency Procedure: TTW ask students how many people are involved in a bullying situation and elicit responses. TTW state that there are three types of people involved in bullying and show these definitions on the chalkboard or poster paper. Aggressors- the person or people who are teasing others either mentally, physically, or both Victims- the person or people who are teased by others either mentally, physically, or both Bystanders- the person or people who witness the teasing TTW say that bystanders can help or hurt the bullying situation. Some bystanders support the violence by passively watching it, ignoring it, or by actively encouraging it. TTW ask students why they think this

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

happens? TTW say that many times a bystander is afraid that if they intervene or tell an adult, the bully will tease them. However, a bystander can be a nonviolent problem-solver, help themselves and others solve problems, and maintain personal safety. This is called being an "ally." The teacher can link this to wars and how other countries can be allies with the country at war. TTW then read students the following scenario called "The New Girl." It would have more impact if the teacher put in on an overhead transparency so that the entire class could see it. The New Girl Jane was new to the school; her family had only recently moved into the area. Because Jane and her family moved a lot, she was used to starting over in new places, but even so it was always hard to meet new friends and get used to new teachers. It was also difficult for Jane to keep up with her studies because she had to care for her brothers and sisters when she came home from school while her parents worked. As Mr. Borden introduced Jane to the class, some students in the back of the room began to giggle. One student whispered loud enough for others to hear, "Look at that outfit! Does this girl get her clothes from charity, or what?" Others joined in the laughter. Jane knew the laughter because she had heard it many times before. She knew the kids laughed at her clothes because they weren't the latest style, and when they found out that her parents were farm workers, she would be nicknamed "lettuce picker." It had all happened before. Mr. Borden paused for a moment while the giggling stopped and then continued by saying, "Let's all make Jane feel welcome." As the day continued, Jane felt anything but welcomed. There was a group of girls who giggled every time they looked her way, and when it was time to divide into small groups to work on an assignment, no one in the group even talked to her; in fact, everyone acted as if she was invisible. When lunchtime came, everyone began running to the cafeteria. A few of the girls who had been laughing at Jane all morning, brushed by her and one of them said, as if to no one in particular, "Hope she knows there's no free lunch program at this school." This seemed to be the funniest thing the other girls had ever heard, but as they laughed and continued walking, one of the girls, named Stephanie said, "C'mon, leave her alone, she hasn't done anything to us." This story came from the following source: ©2005 Anti-Defamation League http://www.adl.org/education/curriculum_connections/winter_2005/The_New_Girl.asp The teacher can use these questions as a discussion for the class or copy them to a work page and have students complete them individually or in small groups. If done individually or in groups, then the class should compare answers in a class discussion. Questions for the story, "The New Girl" Who were the aggressors? Who was the victim? What do you think Jane felt like all day? Who were the bystanders? Compare and contract the role of the victim and the bystander. Was anyone an ally? Do you think it takes courage to be an ally? How? Why do you think some kids won't be allies? Make a list of risks and benefits to being an ally. Have you ever had a situation where you were an ally? What happened as a result?

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Non violence curriculum book list When I Feel Angry Stand Tall Molly Lou Melon The Poky Little Puppy The Grouchy Ladybug Manana Iguana Stop Picking on Me Horton Hears A Who The Sneeches Nobody Knew What To Do Goldilocks and The Three Bears Mr. Peabody's Apples Crickwing Great White Man-Eating Shark Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad, Day Cornelia Maude Spelman Patty Lovell Janette Sebring Lowrey Eric Carle Ann Whitford Paul Pat Thomas Dr. Seuss Dr. Seuss Becky Ray McCain Jan Brett Madonna Janell Cannon Margaret Mahy Judith Viorst

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Non -Violence Curriculum K-6 June 2006

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