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Matteson School District 162

Long-Range MasteR PLan YeaR FouR (2006 -- 2007)

Moving from good to great! Four Consecutive Years of Progress!!

the best is yet to come

MATTESON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 BOARD OF EDUCATION Alicia Rodman McCray, President Scott Phillips, Vice President Kevin Murphy, Secretary Ron Bean Evelyn Green Karen McCray Darlene Walker MATTESON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 SCHOOLS

Arcadia School Patricia Ransford, Principal 20519 Arcadian Way Olympia Fields, IL 60461 (708) 747-3535 Matteson School Patricia Fears, Principal 21245 Main Street Matteson, IL 60443 (708) 748-0480 Illinois School Mogda Walker, Principal 210 Illinois Street Park Forest, IL 60466 (708) 747-0301

Indiana School Naomi Kilpatrick, Principal 165 Indiana Street Park Forest, IL 60466 (708) 747-5300 Sauk School Michael Bauer, Principal 4435 Churchill Drive Richton Park, IL 60471 (708) 747-2660

Richton Square School Maura Hall, Coordinator 22700 Richton Square Road Richton Park, IL 60471 (708) 283-2706

O. W. Huth Middle School Ron Jones, Principal 3718 West 213th Place Matteson, IL 60443 (708) 748-0470 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS Dr. Blondean Y. Davis ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENTS Muriel Cozzi Earnestine Foster Lee Stanton BUSINESS MANAGER Craig Englert

DIRECTOR OF PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES Yvonne Williams Director DIRECTOR OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY Roger Prietz MATTESON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 ADMINISTRATION OFFICE 3625 West 215th Street, Matteson, Illinois 60443 (708) 748-0100 Fax (708) 748-7302 www.sd162.org

District Information

Introduction

Four years ago we developed our school district's first comprehensive long- range plan. Much has happened since then and this year's longrange plan demonstrates the significant progress that has occurred throughout our school district. The vision we set for ourselves then, that being, that we intend to teach all of our children to read and read well by the end of 3rd grade is becoming a reality. Since 2001 our district's reading and math achievement on the Illinois Standard Achievement Tests (ISAT) has made significant, and in several instances, unprecedented gains. System-wide our students are performing at levels of achievement that is reflective of the quality instructional program available to every student in our school district. This year's long-range plan describes in detail the ISAT test results for all of our district schools. This school year marks the opening of the Richton Square Kindergarten & Early Childhood Center. This new facility will provide our little ones with the essential learning experiences and activities that early learners must have in their formative years of schooling. The Richton Square was designed specifically for young children with its bright and colorful classrooms, beautiful murals specifically designed for young children, outdoor areas with playground equipment, and a garden courtyard with flowers, plants and pathways that everyone will enjoy. Please visit the Richton Square and see for yourself what a wonderful school it is for young children. As our district enrollment increased in recent years we have built 90 new classrooms onto our schools. These new additions enable us to maintain class sizes and facilities that are essential for quality instruction. You can read more about our enrollment growth in the Facilities section of our long- range plan. As you read this year's long range plan please keep in mind that the primary goal of our school district is to provide every child with an educational program that recognizes the individual academic needs and creative talents that each one of them possesses. With the continued support of our teachers, parents and community we will fulfill the goal that we set for ourselves.

Dr. Blondean Y. Davis

Introduction by the Superintendent

Table of Contents

Demographics...................................................................................................5 Transportation..................................................................................................13 Food Service....................................................................................................16 Facilities..........................................................................................................19 Technology......................................................................................................25 Finance............................................................................................................34 Curriculum and Instruction.............................................................................40 Targeted Assistance/Reading Intervention......................................................43 Summer School Programming........................................................................44 Special Education............................................................................................46 District Gifted Program Expansion.................................................................54 Student Achievement/Assessment..................................................................60 Grading/Report Cards/Promotion/Retention..................................................65 Fine Arts Program...........................................................................................68 School Climate and Culture/Completing the Circle.......................................71 School Improvement.......................................................................................73 Huth Middle School Program.........................................................................74 Closing the Achievement Gap........................................................................77 Professional Development..............................................................................79 Parent Involvement Coordinator (PIC)...........................................................85 Parent/Community Involvement.....................................................................88 Renaissance of Richton Square School...........................................................93 Index................................................................................................................96

Table of Contents

Demographics

INTRODUCTION The extent of enrollment growth or decline is not a straightforward prediction to make. There are several factors that must be predicted accurately to make a good projection. Some of those are age of population, housing developments, number of students enrolling from private schools, birth rates, and the economy to name a few. Data and information from the following sources were utilized in compiling this report: - School District Historical Enrollment Files - Student Records Database software - United States Census Bureau - Illinois State Board of Education enrollment projections - Illinois Department of Public Health Statistics - Village Economic Planners, local developers and builders - Northeast Illinois Planning Commission The District utilized generally accepted formulas and procedures in preparing these projections. Before using an enrollment projection for the basis for any major decision, it is important for the reader to understand the methodology used and the assumptions made in the preparation of that projection. It is also important to understand that no matter how much data is studied or analyzed, projections are only an estimate and many factors can change at any time that could have a significant impact on the total enrollment projection. PROJECTION METHODOLOGY The Cohort Survival Method has been used in preparing these projections. This formula has proven to be highly reliable and is used extensively for enrollment projections for school districts throughout the country. Three sets of enrollment projections have been prepared: . Lower than anticipated . As anticipated or mid-range . Higher than anticipated Different assumptions about future residential development, housing turnover, mobility and family migration were used for each projection. The assumptions used will be detailed later in this report.

Predicting and planning for the future is an important exercise.

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The calculation of enrollment projections is based on the following data and procedures: . Historical actual district enrollment by grade . Calculation of the cohort survival ratios by grade level . Projection of kindergarten enrollment based on past enrollments The survival ratio expresses a relationship between the numerical size of a grade in a given year in comparison to the size of the next lower grade in the previous year. The number of students in a grade in a given year is divided by the number of students in the next lower grade in the previous year (i.e., grade five enrollment in 2000 divided by grade four enrollment in 1999). If the quotient is greater than 1.0, the number of students has increased; conversely, if the quotient is less than 1.0, the number of students has decreased. Actual survival ratios are calculated for each grade 1-8 and the five-year and ten-

Projections for the immediate future will be more reliable: therefore, projections should be updated annually.

year averages are determined. These averages are then applied by grade to determine the projected enrollments for each grade 1-8. The Cohort survival method does a good job of projecting current trends. It is not as good at predicting a change in trends. This is where the District applied reason to the assumptions. We will discuss later how the District addressed this change in trends. The reliability of any enrollment projection must be clearly understood. The time frame and subset of the projections play an important part in reliability. Projections for the immediate future will be more reliable than those in later years, for example. Projections for the total PreK-8 district enrollment will also be more reliable than those for any particular grade in any given year. Therefore, these projections should be updated annually to reflect the latest residential development and actual enrollment data. For the purposes of this study, data for the villages of Matteson, Olympia Fields,

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Park Forest, University Park and Richton Park have been researched. DEMOGRAPHIC DATA The end of World War II ushered in the "Baby Boom," which lasted through the early 1960s. The children of the Baby Boomers, the "Baby Boom Echo," are in our schools now and are a major reason the District is struggling with enrollment growth today. Although a ten-year lull in enrollment growth is imminent, by the end of this decade we will be faced with the "Millenni-Boom" and record enrollments. ENROLLMENT HISTORY:

This graphically presents the District's enrollment from 1978 to present day. The overall shape of the graph is somewhat similar to the graph of the enrollment history for the State of Illinois. Therefore, the District believes it is reasonable to expect District 162's enrollment future to follow the enrollment future of the State of Illinois. Although the District's residential growth in recent years has been comparatively greater than the state on average, and will likely continue to be greater in the near future, the District's enrollment trend (the shape of the curve) should be somewhat similar. Once the District reaches a point of being "built-out" the trends should mirror that of the State of Illinois enrollment even more closely. HOUSEHOLD CHARACTERISTICS Data from the 2000 and 1990 U.S. Censuses are presented for the four villages served by the District.

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Matteson School District 162 United States Census Data ­ Villages Served by District Comparison of 200 to 1990 2000 Census

Matteson Total Population Population ­ age 5 through 9 Population ­ age 10 through 14 12,928 993 1,078 Olympia Fields 4,732 305 342 Park Forest 23,533 1,845 1,764 Richton Park 12,533 31,015 1,060 Matteson 11,378 902 1,060

1990 Census

Olympia Fields 4,248 274 296 Park Forest 24,656 1,890 1,893 Richton Park 10,523 740 870

Family households Non-family households Average household size

3,553 1,008 2.81

1,381 315 2.75

6,186 2,952 2.52

3,198 1,380 2.68

3,109 5645 3.08

1,275 115 3.00

6,683 2,436 2.65

2,686 1,172 2.65

The total population, the median age, the number of school age children, and average household size are shown. With the exception of Park Forest, the populations have steadily increased throughout the District's communities from 1990 to 2000. Also, the average household size appears to have declined during the same period. This suggests that the increase in the population has come from more smaller family units moving into the community. MORTGAGE RATE HISTORY There appears to be a correlation between mortgage rates and residential growth (as measured by building permits). Although interest rates appear to be edging upward, they are still at historic lows. Some economists believe that we are in the midst of a housing "bubble" that will burst causing home sales to fall, particularly if mortgage rates continue to rise. However, many developments are still being planned within the District. RESIDENTIAL HOUSING UNITS A large part of the District's recent enrollment growth can be associated with new residential developments. District officials had discussions with the planners and/or village managers from each of the communities served by District 162 to determine the number and status of developments planned or in progress within the School District. There are a few significant development projects that are worth mentioning in relation to growth projections.

...the number of school age students in Richton Park increased by 465 over the ten-year period.

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· Butterfield Phase 4 has begun selling homes. The total estimated number of homes form this development is 76. · The ICD development in Olympia Fields is in the construct stage and will add 77 homes and 75 condos. · The Tolentine property is believed to have been sold again. The new plans call for 56 townhomes and 82 single family homes. Once the current developments are completed there will not be a significant amount of land left within the District on which to build residential property. At that time the District will likely be approaching a point where it is "built-out." Once that happens any future growth would only come from turnover of existing homes to younger or larger families or a shift of private school students back into the District's schools. IMPACT OF FUTURE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION The ratios typically calculated for the Cohort survival method include the change in enrollment from residential development, housing turnover and mobility. In order to account for future residential growth, we had to determine how the planned growth compares to growth from prior years. It appears that if the developments proceed as expected and if the estimates of when those new homes would produce students from the District are proven correct, the estimated amount of new students each year will be generally less than the growth trends of the past 4-5 years. In calculating the impact on future enrollments for the anticipated number of new homes from residential construction, the District used data from actual subdivisions and apartment complexes within the District to determine the potential number of additional students. That data indicate that each new single family home of the type and size that are planned will likely yield approximately .65 new students for the District. Townhomes are estimated to yield approximately .15 new students and apartments .42 new students.

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LIVE BIRTH DATA It is worth noting that most demographers use live birth data as a predictor of kindergarten enrollment 5 years later. The District did an analysis of live birth data for each of the five communities served by the district and compared the data to kindergarten enrollments 5 years later. However, the District was unable to find a good correlation between the two sets of variables. While the number of live births tended to fluctuate up and down each year, the number of students enrolled in kindergarten in the District 5 years later steadily increased each year. We believe the lack of correlation here is likely the result of the housing boom over the past several years as well as the fact that the District only covers portions of the 5 communities that it serves. Live birth data is data that pertains to the entire community including the portions served by other Districts. Because the District was not able to correlate the two sets of data the calculation of projected kindergarten enrollment is based on the analysis of kindergarten enrollments from previous years. SURVIVAL RATIOS The District's historical loss or gain of students from one grade level to the next grade level is reflected in the table below. These ratios reflect the number of students in a particular grade in one year as compared to the number of students in the next higher grade in the following year. A ratio higher than 1.0 indicates a gain in students. Conversely, a ratio of less than 1.0 reflects a loss of students. These ratios, by grade level, were calculated individually and the fiveyear average and ten-year average were determined.

Matteson School District 162 Cohort Survival Analysis Grade 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total Average 1997 1.130 1.025 1.056 1.102 1.036 1.047 1.060 1.068 8.524 1.066 1998 1.244 1.040 0.988 0.985 0.975 1.027 1.114 1.075 8.447 1.056 1999 1.214 0.996 1.076 1.070 1.065 1.082 1.038 0.993 8.534 1.067 2000 1.122 1.034 1.092 1.035 1.038 1.075 1.056 1.036 8.491 1.061 2001 1.152 0.989 1.056 1.050 0.973 1.133 1.057 1.008 8.416 1.052 2002 1.142 1.018 1.022 1.060 1.015 1.060 1.007 0.953 8.275 1.034 2003 1.060 1.049 1.074 1.040 1.066 1.209 1.096 1.061 8.655 1.082 2004 1.160 1.060 1.079 1.062 1.087 1.127 1.051 1.048 8.674 1.084 2005 1.164 1.072 1.067 1.103 1.108 1.064 1.063 1.011 8.653 1.082 2006 1.112 1.065 0.958 1.075 1.060 1.047 1.159 0.990 8.466 1.058 1.068 1.064

Many factors are involved to anticipate potential student enrollment.

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Average - last 5 years Average - last 10 years

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ASSUMPTIONS USED Lower than anticipated: The cohort used for the first two years was based on the lowest cohort over the past five years (2001-2002 school year). Thereafter, the estimated cohort from the Illinois State Board of Education enrollment projection was used. As anticipated: The cohort used for the first year was based on last year's cohort. Year two was based on the average cohort over the past five years. Year three ws based on the ten-year average. Years four and five are used to transition down to the Illinois State Board of Education enrollment projection. Higher than anticipated: The Cohort used for the first year was based on the average Cohort over the past five years. Years two and three are based on the highest Cohort over the past five years (2003-2004 school year). Year four is based on the average Cohort over the past five years. Year five is based on the average Cohort over the past ten years. The next two years are used to transition down to the Illinois State Board of Education enrollment projection.

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Matteson School District 162 Estimated Enrollment Projection As of June 30, High Range 2002 Cohort Factor K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SE Out ECH ES Total Mid-Range 2002 Cohort Factor K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SE Out ECH ES Total Low Range 2002 Cohort Factor K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SE Out ECH ES Total * 266 265 285 278 302 278 301 309 302 91 56 31 78 2842 288 282 278 306 289 322 336 330 328 98 60 31 77 3025 292 334 299 300 325 314 363 353 346 111 57 40 78 3212 294 340 358 319 331 360 334 386 357 151 68 40 76 3414 328 324 366 341 342 346 366 379 380 147 74 35 79 3507 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 1.0344 339 375 330 374 361 347 367 368 361 152 77 36 82 3569 2008 1.0344 351 387 382 337 396 366 368 369 351 157 80 37 85 3666 2009 0.9923 348 352 384 379 334 393 363 365 366 156 79 37 84 3640 2010 0.9989 348 351 352 384 379 334 393 363 365 156 79 37 84 3625 2011 1.0021 349 352 352 353 385 380 335 394 394 156 79 37 84 3620 2012 1.0025 350 353 353 353 354 386 381 336 395 156 79 37 84 3617 2013 1.0015 351 354 354 354 354 355 387 382 337 156 79 37 84 3584 266 265 285 278 302 278 301 309 302 91 56 31 78 2842 288 282 278 306 289 322 336 330 328 98 60 31 77 3025 292 334 299 300 325 314 363 353 346 111 57 40 78 3212 294 340 358 319 331 360 334 386 357 151 68 40 76 3414 328 324 366 341 342 346 366 379 380 147 74 35 79 3507 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 1.0480 344 361 349 366 366 357 352 392 373 154 78 37 83 3612 2008 1.0660 358 387 381 363 391 389 391 377 397 164 83 39 88 3608 2009 1.0632 372 411 401 399 384 407 422 417 386 174 88 41 94 3996 2010 1.0400 387 427 423 415 415 396 435 439 425 181 92 43 98 4176 2011 1.0200 395 402 436 431 423 423 404 444 443 185 94 44 100 4224 2012 1.0025 396 396 403 437 432 424 424 405 445 185 94 44 100 4185 2013 1.0015 397 697 697 404 438 433 425 425 406 185 94 44 100 4145 266 265 285 278 302 278 301 309 302 91 56 31 78 2842 288 282 278 306 289 322 336 330 328 98 60 31 77 3025 292 334 299 300 325 314 363 353 346 111 57 40 78 3212 294 340 358 319 331 360 334 386 357 151 68 40 76 3414 328 324 366 341 342 346 366 379 380 147 74 35 79 3507 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 1.0681 350 369 342 380 364 364 379 392 383 157 79 37 84 3680 2008 1.0843 379 406 391 369 404 395 410 398 411 170 86 40 91 3950 2009 1.084 411 440 430 422 392 439 445 431 417 184 93 43 99 4246 2010 1.0680 438 463 464 447 450 417 481 476 436 196 99 46 106 4519 2011 1.0642 466 503 480 485 473 468 452 514 487 209 105 49 113 4804 2012 1.0200 475 489 513 490 495 482 477 461 519 213 107 50 115 4886 2013 1.0100 480 480 494 518 495 500 487 482 466 215 108 51 116 4892

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*Estimated

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Transportation

MISSION The mission of School District 162's Transportation System is to provide safe, dependable and cost-effective transportation services. DISTRICT HISTORY The District purchased its first school bus in the 1940s. The transportation system continued to grow through the years in conjunction with enrollment growth. When contractual bus services became popular in the 1970s, District 162 remained one of the few districts in the south suburbs with its own in-house system. By the end of the 1980s the District owned 17 school buses and employed 15 drivers. In 1990, the Lay Citizens' Finance Review Committee recommended the District investigate contractual transportation. The District solicited bids in 1991. Kickert Bus Lines Inc. was the successful bidder, resulting in annual savings of $60,000. Congestion on streets around schools is always a concern. Mixing automobiles and buses on two-lane streets, where parking is also inadequate, leads to potentially unsafe practices by parents and motorists. The District upgraded the bus turnaround/apron for Matteson School in 1991 at a cost of $65,000, Indiana School in 1993 at a cost of $111,208 and Sauk School in 1996 at a cost of $223,806. Using monies from a state grant, traffic safety lights were installed at Matteson, Illinois and Indiana Schools. The village of Richton Park will be installing traffic safety lights at Sauk and Richton Square schools.

Safety is our primary focus

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Using a graphic based software program, bus routes were reevaluated and new routes were established in 1996. Bus stop locations were identified that took into consideration safety, hazardous traffic areas, efficiency, equity and cost.

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In 2001, five school districts jointly solicited bids for student transportation. A community forum was held on March 6, 2001, to discuss the possibility of changing our existing student arrival time (bell) schedule. On March 20, 2001, the Board awarded the bid/contract to Kickert Bus Lines, maintaining our existing bell schedule through June 2005. CURRENT STATUS Due to the District's "paired" school structure, the District transports approximately 83% of our school population. Today, the District contracts with Kickert Bus Lines, Alpha Bus Company and American School Bus Company to provide 61 morning routes, 61 afternoon routes and 5 mid-day routes, as well as numerous after-school activities and field trips. Buses transport our students over 350,000 miles per year. Students who live more than ¾ mile from their school or live in an area that is closer, but separated by a hazardous road crossing as defined by the Illinois Department of Transportation, are provided free transportation. Although the District uses a ¾ mile limit, state statutes only require the District to provide transportation for students living 1½ miles from the school. The District understands that day care is an important aspect of students' and parents' lives. Therefore, parents may request a waiver to change their children's assigned bus stop location as long as the day care provider is within the school's attendance boundaries. For Fiscal Year 2006, 637 waivers were granted. In March 2002, the District, in cooperation with Kickert Bus Lines, installed videotaping equipment on all buses. These cameras assist the District in monitoring all behaviors and accessing all situations that arise. Discipline statistics for the current year suggest that the cameras have been successful. FINANCE At the right is a summary of the Fiscal Year 2007 Transportation Fund Budget:

Matteson School District 162 Transportation Budget Fiscal Year 2007 Salaries Contractual services: Regular transportation Special Ed transportation Purchased Services (Bus Maintenance) Supplies Capital outlay Fees Total 2,000 1,000 20,120 150 $2,313,370 1,510,000 700,000 $80,100

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Student transportation is funded by a combination of state reimbursement and property tax revenues. In addition, the Board has allocated General State Aid funds each year to the Transportation Fund. RESEARCH The National School Transportation Association reports: School buses are nearly 2,000 times safer than the family car The school bus is the only mode of transportation that has reduced accidents, injuries and fatalities, while annually increasing the number of vehicles, miles, and passengers The school bus occupant fatality rate of 0.2 fatalities per 100,000,000 vehicle miles traveled is much lower than the rates for passenger cars (1.5) or light trucks and vans (1.3) Of all the vehicle occupant fatalities reported to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration between 1987 and 1996, a mere 0.04% were related to school bus transportation

CONCLUSION Due to our "paired" school structure, District 162 has one of the largest transportation systems in the south suburbs. Although we contract out these services to a transportation provider, we take full ownership in the system and focus on safety, dependability and cost effectiveness.

RECOMMENDATIONS Continue to place safety first Continue to monitor our current transportation system and make adjustments to maintain reasonable busloads and times Solicit bids for student transportation beginning with the 2007-2008 school year. Project the impact of enrollment growth Continue to monitor new residential developments and project route changes necessary to serve these areas Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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Food Service

MISSION The mission of the School District 162 Food Service Program is to provide nutritious meals to students at an affordable price in a sanitary environment. DISTRICT HISTORY For years, the District operated a kitchen at O.W. Huth Middle School. A hot lunch was provided for all Huth students and a bag lunch was delivered to the remaining District school buildings for students receiving free lunch. Due to potential budget deficits, the District eliminated the full lunch program in 1982 and began a "bag lunch" program. The District continued to make bag lunches for students who qualified for free lunch until the 1992-93 school year when the function was contracted out to Rich Township High School District 227. During the spring of 2001, the District solicited bids for a hot lunch program. Preferred Meal Systems Inc. was the successful bidder. The contract was rebid in June, 2006. Preferred Meal System was again the successful bidder. CURRENT STATUS The District is a member of the National School Lunch Program and offers free and reduced price meals to those students who are eligible. A bar coded meal card is provided to all students and is used as a debit card to purchase breakfast and lunch. Money is collected weekly and is recorded in the student's account for the purchase of breakfast and/or lunch. Money is deducted from the student's account only when the student swipes the card or the teacher marks a breakfast roster in the classroom. In order for a student to receive breakfast or a hot lunch, students must have money in their account. Hot lunch is now served in all buildings daily. Breakfast is served in all buildings except Illinois School. The food is in individually sealed containers. Breakfast is in a grab-n-go container that is taken back to the classroom to eat. Both breakfast and lunch are nutritionally balanced according to the guidelines prescribed by the National School Lunch Program and the Department of Agriculture. Entrée items, including the sausage for the pizza, do not contain any pork. Arcadia, Matteson, Indiana, and Huth have new kitchen/lunchroom facilities. Illinois will have a new facility for the 2007-2008 school year. Sauk will eventually have new facilities as well. Starting with the 2006-2007 school year Richton Square School has a new facility for the programs opening there.

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Fiscal Year 2006 Statistics: School Arcadia Huth Illinois Indiana Matteson Sauk FINANCES The contract with Preferred Meal Systems is renewable on an annual basis until June 30, 2011. Renegotiation of the price charged in subsequent years of the agreement must not exceed the "Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumer ­ Food Away from Home" annual rate for December of the current school year. The following is a financial summary of the Food Service Program for Fiscal Year 2007: Enrollment 611 509 402 649 497 711 Free 209 171 94 345 226 286 Reduced 38 32 28 69 65 58 %F/R 40% 40% 30% 64% 61% 48% Paid 364 306 280 235 188 367 Participation 69% 55% 59% 73% 68% 50%

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 Food Service Budget Summary Fiscal Year 2007 FY 2007 Budget Expenditures: Salary - food service staff Benefits Contractual - food service Supplies - milk Total expenditures 264,392 73,426 590,000 70,000 997,818

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CONCLUSION The breakfast and hot lunch program has been well received by students and parents. The District provides nutritious and well-balanced breakfast and lunch to children in accordance with provisions outlined in the National School Lunch Program and the Department of Agriculture. RECOMMENDATIONS Implement a breakfast program at Illinois School for the 20072008 school year. Implement a breakfast and lunch program at Richton Square School for the 2006-2007 school year. Plan for Illinois to have new kitchen/lunchroom facility for the 2007-2008 school year.

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Facilities

MISSION The District's facilities' mission is to provide a safe, clean and orderly environment conducive to student learning. DISTRICT HISTORY Jacob Reihl deeded one-quarter acre of land to Matteson on October 10, 1853, to be used as the site for a public schoolhouse. This is the current location of Huth Middle School. Reihl conveyed additional land to the school board in 1869. An August 18, 1865, election granted authority to build a schoolhouse at an estimated cost of $2,000. In 1916, brick replaced the wooden outside frame of the sole school building. The south central portion of the building was constructed and included three classrooms and a gymnasium to accommodate a two-year high school program. Additions to the school were built in 1952 and 1954. In 1950, the District began building other facilities: Arcadia School in 1958 Illinois School in 1959 Indiana School in 1961 Matteson School in 1964 Sauk School in 1971

Beginning in 1995, the Baby Boom Echo, children of the Baby Boomers, began entering our schools. The District built the following additions to address growing enrollments:

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 CLASSROOM ADDITIONS Summer 1995 to Present

Classroom additions at Huth and Sauk Classroom additions at Matteson Huth large room addition (Commons) Classroom addition at Arcadia/Media Center expansion Renovation of Huth co-rec room into 3 classrooms Purchase of Village Hall frees up 6 classrooms at Illinois Illinois 10 classroom additions Matteson 2 classroom additions Indiana 6 classroom additions Sauk 5 classrooms and media center addition Illinois 4 classroom additions Arcadia 6 classroom additions Matteson 6 classroom additions Indiana 2 classroom additions Arcadia 6 classroom additions and multi-purpose room Matteson 6 classroom additions and multi-purpose room Two classroom additions for the following schools: Matteson, Sauk, and Arcadia Renovation of Richton Square School Summer 95 Summer 97 Summer 98 Summer 99 Summer 00 Summer 01 Summer 01 Summer 01 Spg/Summer 02 Spg/Summer 02 Winter 2002-03 Summer 03 Summer 03 Summer 03 Spg/Summer 04 Spg/Summer 04 Spg/Summer 05 Spg/Summer 06 2 2 1 2 3 6 7 2 6 5 4 6 6 2 6 6 6 18 90

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These additions were built using a combination of District Funding Bonds and School Construction Grant monies. In 2000, the District purchased Matteson's old Village Hall, which became the District Office, thus freeing up six additional classrooms at Illinois School. This building is in need of a new roof and HVAC equipment. As the District continues to stay ahead of our growing enrollment, the Board of Education entered into an agreement with LaSalle Bank to lease/ purchase Richton Square School. The facility is an early childhood and kindergarten center. During Fiscal Year 2006 the building was upgraded and improvements made. Richton Square School opened in August 2006. During a time when many districts postpone maintenance projects to meet operational costs, District 162 has continually appropriated monies for repair and replacement. Over the past decade the District's focus has been on replacing roofs and boilers. Roofs - The District replaced all school roofs over the past decade. All these roofs are expected to last 20 or more years. 1993 Sauk School ­ ½ 1993-94 O. W. Huth Middle School 1995 Illinois and Indiana Schools 1997 Arcadia School 1999 Sauk School ­ ½ 2000 Matteson School 2006 Richton Square ­ ½ Boilers - Over the past thirteen years the District has replaced all school boilers. 1993 Sauk School 1998 O. W. Huth Middle School 2001 Illinois School 2001 Matteson School 2002 Indiana School 2003 Arcadia School 2006 Richton Square School Over the past fourteen years the District invested more than $26 million in our buildings. See Exhibit I (p. 21-22) for a summary of construction projects completed since 1990. CURRENT STATUS Starting in 1995, the District entered into an agreement with Aramark/ ServiceMaster to provide management services for the District's maintenance and custodial functions. These services were reevaluated in January 2006 and the demonstrated services and savings supported the additional costs. The contract was renegotiated for a five-year period ending June 30, 2011.

The District replaced all school roofs and boilers over the past decade.

Over the past fourteen years the District invested more than $22 million in our buildings.

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Building Security ­ After the Laurie Dann incident in Winnetka in 1988, the District began a three-year project to restructure the office areas at each school to require visitors to enter via the office rather than attain immediate access. Signs are posted at each school facility requiring visitors to announce themselves at the school office. All employees are to confront any visitor without the required visitor's badge. Every effort is made to keep the building entrances locked throughout the school day as the schedule permits.

Security and fire alarm systems were added to all schools in 1991 and 1992 at a cost of $168,500. Communication is always important in any security system. Over the past four years we added telephone systems in all our classrooms with 911 capabilities. During his routine buildings walk-through, our Director of Buildings & Grounds looks for any security concerns.

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 Summary of Facility/Construction Projects Summer 1990 to Present

Life Safety work: Separate bubblers from faucet New water system at Arcadia, $25,000 Removal of underground fuel tank at Illinois, $15,000 Ventilation and drop ceiling in Arcadia main office Lighting in gyms at Huth, $20,000 Huth gym doors, $30,000 Misc. Life Safety work Energy management system at Huth Renovation of Huth's media center to provide more available space Renovation of Indiana's media center to provide more available space Initial asbestos abatement - District wide Replacement of the plumbing system at Arcadia School Stage lighting at Huth Life Safety work: Install hood and exhaust fan over kilns Sauk and Arcadia hallway lights and drop ceiling Electric outlets added to classrooms Misc. boiler work Misc. doors recessed Fire rated doors added to storage areas Sill cocks replaced Misc. ventilation Covered clearstory with drywall Reduced door grill size Remodeling of office areas to monitor access to buildings Installation of burglar alarms Installation of updated fire alarm systems - all buildings Redesigned and enlarged bus turnaround at Matteson for safety reasons Addition of drop ceilings & upgrade lighting in Arcadia and Sauk hallways Asbestos abatement in Huth's tunnel Installation of window screens in all District classrooms Placement of two ceiling fans in classrooms throughout the District Install new boiler at Illinois Summer 91 Summer 91 Summer 92 Summer 92 Summer 92 Summer 92 65,000 30,000 25,743 12,000 70,000 40,000 Summer 90 Summer 90 Summer 90 Summer 90 Winter 91 Summer 91 35,000 15,000 234,174 25,000 28,508 310,000 Summer 90 245,204

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Facilities

(Continued on Next Page)

Exhibit 1

21

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 Summary of Facility/Construction Projects Summer 1990 to Present

(Continued from Previous Page)

Life Safety work: Replaced termite-ridden beams with steel beams-Huth New boiler at Illinois, $40,000 Huth main office relocation Huth burglar alarm New plumbing in Huth girls' shower room Drywall in clearstory Install posts and label gas meter Roof repairs Misc. ventilation Replaced shades in all buildings Replacement of 1/2 Huth's roof Ventilation and air conditioning of Huth's media center Illinois gym tile and misc. classroom tile Parking additions at Huth Replacement of Illinois' and Indiana's roofs Ventilation and air conditioning Huth North Gym Computer network/cabling at Huth, Indiana and Sauk Metal storage building Classroom additions at Huth and Sauk Electric upgrade at Huth Computer network/cabling at Arcadia & Matteson Sauk bus turnaround Sauk playground Computer network/cabling at Illinois Replacement of Arcadia's roof Classroom addition at Matteson Indiana playground Huth large room addition and boiler replacement Cabinets - Illinois School Replacement of 1/2 Sauk's roof Classroom addition at Arcadia/Media Center expansion Replacement of Matteson's roof Renovation of Huth co-rec room into 3 classrooms Illinois 10 classroom additions and boiler replacement Matteson 2 classroom addition and boiler replacement Indiana 6 classroom additions and boiler replacement and Sauk 3 classroom and media center additions Illinois 4 classroom additions Arcadia 6 classroom additions, Indiana 2 classroom additions and Matteson 6 classroom additions and multi-purpose room Arcadia 6 classroom additions and multi-purpose room, and Matteson 6 classroom additions and multi-purpose room Two classroom additions for the following schools: Matteson, Sauk, and Arcadia Richton Square Renovation

Summer 92

509,263

Summer 94 Summer 94 Summer 94 Summer 94 Summer 94 Summer 95 Summer 95 Summer 95 Summer 95 Summer 95 Spring 96 Summer 96 Summer 96 Summer 96 Winter 96 Summer 97 Summer 97 Fall 97 Summer 98 Summer 98 Summer 99 Summer 99 Summer 00 Summer 00 Summer 01 Summer 01

5,071 485,847 200,904 22,973 54,807 820,374 177,880 208,045 82,075 230,225 41,700 120,000 247,347 34,171 60,000 300,095 278,000 10,000 1,977,000 90,000 153,000 575,900 297,100 129,000 2,230,350 521,551

Spg/Summer 02 Winter 02-03

2,478,000 607,000

Spg/Summer 03

3,100,000

Spg/Summer 04 Spg/Summer 05 Spg/Summer 06

4,200,000 1,900,000 2,200,000

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Facilities

26,479,967

(Continued from Previous Page)

Exhibit 1

22

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162 Capital Replacement Plan

2007 Univents: Illinois Matteson Sauk O.W. Huth Window & wall replacement: Illinois Matteson Richton Square Bathroom fixture & floor replacement: Arcadia Illinois Indiana Matteson Sauk Bathroom partition replacement: Arcadia Illinois Matteson Tuck pointing: Cabinet & sink replacement: 75,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 14,000 5,000 6,000 30,000 50,000 50,000 30,000 50,000 100,000 250,000 250,000 250,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Classroom carpet replacement: Paving: Concrete replacement: Roof replacement: Locker replacement: 750,000 250,000 50,000 100,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

20,000 344,000 221,000

20,000 580,000

60,000 120,000 510,000

Exhibit II The District maintains a ten-year construction/maintenance plan (above). This plan projects replacement of such items as roofs, boilers, univents, cabinets, maintenance vehicles, etc. Now that the District has replaced all schools' roofs and boilers, the District's focus will shift to univents, cabinets and windows. As the District replaces univents, air conditioning will be added.

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Facilities

23

FINANCES The District maintains two "funds," which are individual accounting entities that relate to facilities. The Operations and Maintenance Fund accounts for the upkeep of our buildings, including utilities and custodial and maintenance functions. This is funded by a 37.5 cent levy and discretionary General State Aid. As the District added 90 classrooms and two multi-purpose rooms over the past nine years to address enrollment growth, expenditures in the Operations and Maintenance Fund have grown in the form of additional custodians, greater utility usage and supplies. Revenues have not kept pace with the growth in expenditures, creating a deficit in this fund. To address this deficit, the Board of Education moved General State Aid from the Education Fund into the Operations and Maintenance Fund. The Board of Education posed two referenda questions to the voters on April 5, 2005, which were designed to fix the deficit in the Operations & Maintenance Fund and to increase the District's bonding capacity to address future enrollment growth. Both referendum questions were successful. The12.5 cent increase in the Operations & Maintenance tax rate eliminated the deficit and allowed the District to maintain the buildings at a high level. Plans are in place to build a multi-purpose room at Illinois School to be completed by Fall 2007. We are awaiting funding for an approved School Construction Grant which will allow the District to build a multi-purose room at Sauk School. School facilities must be in compliance with the Life Safety Code of Illinois. The Life Safety Fund accounts for maintenance work that relates to compliance. This Fund is funded by a five cent levy. Univent replacement will be funded by this Fund. CONCLUSION Although the District has aggressively maintained its school facilities, the buildings are 30 to 40 years old and in need of additional work. Now that roofs and boilers have been addressed, it is time to address other items such as univents, cupboards, windows, etc. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Facilities

RECOMMENDATIONS Complete identified projects (Exhibit II p. 23) as finances allow

24

Technology

Technology will be aligned with the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) as well as integrated within the District curriculum, professional development and planning processes in order to support the District's overall mission. MISSION The mission of School District 162 is to inspire a desire for learning in collaboration with home, school and the community. Technology is a vital part of that mission and will serve as a catalyst to facilitate communication within the school community as well as to bring essential resources to every classroom. DISTRICT HISTORY The District began purchasing computer systems in the mid to late `70s. Over the years computer systems such as the TRS 80s, Apple IIEs, Macs and other PCs were installed in our schools. A nationwide movement to utilize technology in schools began in the early to mid `90s. This led to the District's first Technology Plan in February of 1995. The technology budget that was once $50,000 increased to over $1,000,000 by 1996. In 1998 and 2002, the Board updated its Technology Plan. As a nation we have been successful in "connecting every student to the Internet." Now, as a District, we need to take technology in education to the next level. Our vision is to utilize technology to enhance and support a higher level of instruction. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY Advances in technology and telecommunications create the potential for learning environments that produce dramatic new ways to communicate complex ideas. Students learn more when they are actively solving challenging problems and testing skills in meaningful contexts. New learning environments encourage teachers to become leaders in a community of engaged learners that includes students, parents, other educators, and community leaders working with a variety of information resources. Within the context of rapid technological change and shifting market conditions, the American education system is challenged with providing increased educational opportunities without increased budgets. District 162 is answering this challenge by developing programs that will provide classroom teachers with technologically rich lesson planning capability. Teachers will be trained in the effective use of the Marco Polo website and use that site to teach lessons aligned to the NETS standards in every subject area. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

Technology will be aligned with the National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) as well as integrated within the District curriculum, professional development and planning processes in order to support the District's overall mission.

25

Robust communication is an integral part of our strategy in District 162. We want parents, students, teachers and school administrators linked seamlessly to share information, grades, and calendar items. We began district-wide deployment of Edline during the 2004-2005 school year and found that more than 60% of our parents used Edline as their primary mode of communication with all of our schools. Our goal is to increase Edline usage over the next school year to 100%. Distance learning will be a part of the District 162 Technology Program. Students, staff, parents and the community will utilize emerging technology to participate in electronic field trips to the Smithsonian, the Louvre, and the White House among hundreds of other destinations available through now inexpensive, video conferencing technology. Our technology infrastructure has been upgraded with the latest fiber optic technology to support the goals and expectations that are essential to the current and future success of our Technology Program. TECHNOLOGY GOALS We must be able to use technology effectively to live, learn and work successfully in an increasingly complex and information-rich society. We intend to: · Ensure that teachers, administrators and students have the skills they need to function in tomorrow's society · Produce technology literate students · Train teachers to integrate technology into the content areas · Increase student access to technology in a laboratory setting · Increase Edline usage in every school · Improve our ability to maintain equipment and systems · Involve stakeholders in all our future plans TECHNOLOGY EXPECTATIONS Our teachers will learn and integrate best practice approaches for instructing their students into daily lessons and to manage the myriad of information that they must maintain. They will also communicate appropriate information to parents and students by using appropriate technologies. Our administrators and principals will access information more readily and see trends in our students' performances, which will allow us to make data driven decisions regarding our curriculum and student programming. Our Professional Development Committee, comprised of teachers and

Our technology infrastructure will be designed to support the technological goals and expectations that are essential to the success of our new Technology Program.

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

26

administrators from every school, as well as district office administrators, will review the results of students' achievement tests and make decisions regarding the technology- related professional development programs that should be provided to our teachers. Our communities will benefit from the technology workshops that we provide for them, and our parents will know that their children are receiving the computer and technology instruction that they require in order to be successful in school and in their future careers. Our Board of Education and Superintendent will have more accurate and reliable information regarding the educational decisions that they need to make for the students in our District. Within an effective educational setting, technology can enable students to become: · · · · · · Capable information technology users Information seekers, analyzers and evaluators Problem solvers and decision makers Creative and effective users of productivity tools Communicators, collaborators, publishers, and producers Informed, responsible, and contributing citizens

Our community will benefit from the technology workshops that we provide.

TECHNOLOGY PLAN Our Technology Plan proposes to: · Enable robust home and community involvement in our schools by utilizing the web portal, Edline. · Transform teaching and learning environments and enhance student learning through increased applications of engaged learning and technology. · Provide meaningful professional development offerings that support teachers as leaders to achieve innovative ways of teaching and learning for all students. · Provide a technology infrastructure that supports new ways of teaching and learning for all students. Everyone will benefit from the District 162 Technology Plan. Providing students with technology skills will enable them to utilize the resources available to them to expand their knowledge and methods for acquiring information. Our Technology Plan provides teachers with new methodologies to enrich

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

27

students' learning experiences. Matteson School District's Technology Plan focuses on teacher training and enhanced student achievement as its targets for technology use. While the District has a significant technological infrastructure and substantial number of computers in its schools, the goal of our Technology Plan is to seamlessly integrate technology into every classroom on a daily basis. THE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY TEAM Our Learning Technology Team is our entire school district. The Board of Education has set a high priority and annually appropriates sufficient money for the development of our District Technology Plan. Superintendent Blondean Y. Davis has provided the leadership and commitment necessary to design and maintain a technology program that will provide our staff with the resources and training necessary to increase their understanding of how to integrate technology into their instructional program. At the same time, we will seek new and innovative approaches for teaching our students and improving academic achievement. Four learning technology specialists currently provide computer instruction to all students. These teachers provide direct classroom instruction at Huth, Illinois, Sauk and Indiana. Students at Arcadia and Matteson benefit from technology assistance provided to their classroom teachers by these teacher technology specialists. STAFF DEVELOPMENT PLAN

It is imperative that we provide teachers with the tools they need to teach basic computer skills and advanced applications. The competent teacher will have, and continually develop, the knowledge and skills in learning technologies to be able to appropriately and responsibly use tools, resources, processes, and systems to retrieve, assess and evaluate information from various media. The competent teacher will use that knowledge, along with the necessary skills and information, to assist students in solving problems, communicating clearly, making informed decisions, and in constructing new knowledge, products, or systems in diverse, engaged learning environments. Technology integration in the classroom requires that our teachers understand how to use computers effectively in the classroom. Matteson School For teachers, technology integration is as District 162 challenging as developing lessons in the first years of teaching. The extent to which Long-Range computers and other technological equipment Master Plan will enhance student learning depends almost Technology entirely on how teachers decide to use them. Marco Polo will be aligned to state and district

While the District has a significant technological infrastructure and substantial number of computers in its schools, the goal of our Technology Plan is to incorporate and embed technology into the instructional program on a daily basis.

28

To make sound decisions To make sound decisions about how to use computers and other technology about how in the classroom, we will initiate a Technology Staff Development Program that to use guarantees that our staff knows when to use technology and how best to use it computers to maximize student potential. and other While the District has a significant technological infrastructure and substantial technology number of computers in its schools, the goal of our Technology Plan is to in the incorporate and embed technology into the instructional program on a daily classroom, we basis. must initiate a Technology To make sound decisions about how to use computers and other technology in the classroom, we must initiate a Technology Staff Development Program Staff that provides our staff with technical and instructional training utilizing the Development computer in the classroom. Program that provides our Technology Staff Training is on-going and will continue this school year. There staff with are currently a series of technology workshops provided for our staff. Some of technical and the workshops that will be provided this year are: instructional · GradeQuick training · Edline utilizing the · United Streaming Video Streaming Service computer · MS Office in the · Marco Polo for content area integration and alignment to state learning classroom. standards

learning standards in the foreseeable future. We are pursuing grant-related funding that will provide the impetus for that alignment to begin. · Smart Board use · Multi-Media Cart use

Our District's 2006 Summer Academy included a structured technology-training experience focused on Marco Polo, GradeQuick, Edline and United Streaming. Our goal was to make teachers comfortable with the technology and skilled in its use. This is the first step in training teachers and will be part of a long range plan to foster best practices in technology integration within our classrooms. Additional staff development will build upon this initial training and will take place throughout the school year. Teachers will provide input along the way and many of our future staff development experiences will focus on teacher-requested topics. Many content-area staff development experiences will incorporate material from the Annenberg Foundation's teacher training website, "Learner.org". Basic computer skills workshops and curricular software application workshops will continue to be provided. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

29

INCREASED ACCESS TO TECHNOLOGY Home/School Connection New web-based resources now allow us to provide students and parents with connections that will extend the concepts learned in the classroom to the home. Parents play an integral role in the learning process and we intend to provide them with programs that are available to them in the home. Using Edline, teachers can provide links for parents and students to web-based resources they can use to build upon what has been learned in the classroom. Programs like United Streaming can also bring technologically rich media content to the home. Podcasting and video production can provide parents and students with significant resources to facilitate educational discussion in the home. Technology Clubs A Technology Club provides a safe after-school learning environment where our students will work with adult mentors to explore their own ideas, develop skills, and build confidence in themselves through the use of technology. The Technology Club will help students develop the ability to: · · · · Express themselves with technology Collaborate and work in teams Solve complex problems Gain self-confidence

Some activities the club may provide include: · · · · Volunteers to assist other students or staff in the use of computers Create video content and podcast material Virtual field trips Visits to businesses that use computers

Access from Communities' Libraries Parents and students without internet access from home may use library resources provided by the community to connect with Edline and other instructional resources. Matteson School District 162 Website On our journey from good to great we need a vehicle to move us along the path. The District 162 website will be redesigned to accommodate the latest innovations web design to provide online access to District programs and services for community members and others considering relocating to our school district. The District 162 website address is: www.sd162.org. Parents, students and teachers will continue to use the Edline web portal for internal communication during the 2006-2007 School Year.

A Technology Club provides a safe afterschool learning environment where our students will work with adult mentors to explore their own ideas, develop skills, and build confidence in themselves through the use of technology

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

30

Technology Labs Clearly, we need a place to train students and staff on the use of technology. Currently, we have technology labs at Illinois, Huth, Indiana and Sauk. Each technology lab is equipped with: · · · · · A computer for each student A large screen presentation multi-media system A laser printer A scanner Video production and podcast production workstation

Visit us at the District 162 website www.sd162.org.

The technology labs are the responsibility of the new learning technology specialists, but classroom teachers may also reserve the room when not in use. It is our intention to maintain four computers per classroom and to embrace the `21st Century Classroom' model. These classrooms are equipped as follows: · Audio enhancement to make the teacher's voice audible to every student · Video Projector · Interactive Whiteboard · A laptop computer for every teacher and three desktop computers for the classroom Beginning with the coming school year, all new classrooms will be equipped as `21st Century Classrooms' and existing classrooms will be gradually brought to this configuration. An intermediate phase in this process will provide schools with multi-media carts to provide functionality until funding for a complete upgrade can be found. After School Open Technology Labs We know that not all our students have access to a computer system with Internet capability at home. By opening our labs after school, these students will now have an opportunity they would not have otherwise. The labs will be supervised and the students will be expected to follow a set of lab rules. Parents will be welcome, if accompanied by a student. We will schedule the lab times so that students can take the activity bus home. TECHNOLOGY FINANCES Although it is common to point at the initial cost of implementing a technology program, one must not overlook the cost of continuation, maintenance and replacement. The Board of Education has annually approved a budget that supports the program, including replacement. · Historically, funding for the District's technology program has primarily come from the following sources: Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

31

· Leasing of facilities levy. This five cent levy generates approximately $180,000 per year and has been used to fund the lease/purchase of desktop computers and other technology hardware. · The federal e-rate program supplements the cost of our telephone services as well as our Internet connections in the amount of approximately $30,000 per year. · We have received Technology Literacy Challenge Fund and Closing the Gap grant monies in the past. Unfortunately, the state's economic woes have eliminated these funds. · The bulk of the funding for technology in this District comes from general revenues. To generate additional revenue, it is our intention to aggressively pursue grants for technology. We have a goal of writing for grants from charitable and corporate organizations on a frequent basis. Most of these grant requests will include technology in some form or another. We also plan to partner with vendors to extend our finances. In order to reduce costs, we will streamline network operations to eliminate costly firewalls, switches and their maintenance contracts. We will scale back our unused Citrix capabilities to eliminate unused license fees and reduce maintenance costs. We will continue to search for quality web-based instructional resources in order to remove costly district maintenance of servers. RECOMMENDATIONS · Implement content area specific technology curriculum that is aligned with national and state learning standards for technology. · Initiate a technology staff development program that provides our staff with key technical and instructional training to utilize Edline, GradeQuick, United Streaming, and Marco Polo to impact classroom performance. · Host regular meetings and conduct electronic surveys to solicit input from parents, teachers and students to improve the delivery of services. · Bring the implementation of the Edline initiative at all schools to full capacity. · Create `21st Century Classrooms' in all new classrooms and provide teachers with multi-media carts in existing classrooms. · Begin the installation of Audio Enhanced classrooms throughout the District. Installation is to take place over the next several years. · Conduct a complete evaluation of all programs at the end of the coming school year to better serve our stakeholders. · Increase responsible access to the Internet through: 1. Introduction of the ISAFE curriculum in our schools 2. Mentoring in our Technology Clubs 3. Increased parental involvement with the help of Edline Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

32

CONCLUSION The Matteson School District Technology Plan focuses on teacher training, effective home/school communication and enhanced student achievement as its targets for technology use. While the District is developing a robust infrastructure and a substantial number of computers in its schools, the goal of our Technology Plan is to incorporate and infuse technology into the instructional program on a daily basis and produce tech literate students who: · Are prepared to compete in a fast paced, high-tech global society. · Are "life-long learners" that recognize the value of learning and have the ability to apply knowledge and skills to real world tasks beyond the school walls. · Have the technology skills and techniques that will empower them to use technology as a tool to analyze data, discover information, communicate and enhance learning to increase student motivation.

We will evaluate the feasibility of increasing our current configuration from four computers to six in each classroom.

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Technology

33

Finance

DISTRICT HISTORY Matteson School District 162 has a history of sound fiscal management and a conservative approach to finances. Exhibit 1 (p. 36-38) presents the Financial Highlights of the District from Fiscal Year 1977 to 2006. CURRENT STATUS The District currently has the second highest financial rating ("Financial Review") from the Illinois State Board of Education. Last year, the District received this rating because the District's operating fund balances were at least 25% of its expenditures. For Fiscal Year 2006, the District will likely receive the same rating. The District is currently operating at about a break-even point when the operating funds are combined together. All operating funds are projected to have a slight surplus. Many of the related revenues from enrollment growth come to the District one year after the students arrive in the District to be serviced. For example, Property Taxes, General State Aid, and State Transportation reimbursements are all submitted to the District one-year after the District has paid the related expenditures. One additional challenge for the District is the rising cost of fuel such as natural gas and gasoline for buses. The District will be adding a $2.2 Million addition to Illinois School funded through bonds. Once those bonds are issued it is estimated that the District's legal debt margin or the amount the District can legally still borrow in the future will be approximately $8,000,000. The legal debt margin, however, increases each year as the District's Equalized Assessed Valuation increases. One factor that remains constant is the Debt Service Extension Base, which is set at a fixed amount of $1,126,608. This is the amount the District can levy in taxes each year for the payment of debt that was not issued via referendum. The District is currently performing all of the investing and cash management functions of the District in-house and no longer uses the services of the Rich Township Treasurer whose office was abolished in 2005 by referendum. The District continues to be conservative in its approach to investing while still doing everything it can to yield good investment earnings and provide "just-intime" liquidity for cash requirements. THE FUTURE The District will identify efficiencies and cost savings in the operating funds to manage escalating costs such as insurance and fuel, which have been rising faster than the rate of inflation. The District currently has one of the lowest property tax rates in the area. At some point in the future, however, it may be necessary to suggest an increase in the property tax rate to offset some of the costs increases. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Finance

34

The District must be very careful not to spend more than is received in revenue each year so the District's cash reserves are not reduced. In addition, the District will focus on building a surplus each year that will increase the cash reserves of the District as the cash requirements of the District will continue to grow each year. The District is currently awaiting the funding of a $1,145,241 construction grant awarded to the District by the State in 2002. The District is cautiously optimistic that the General Assembly will finally fund this grant in the near future. This will Matteson School District #162 Operating Funds Projections

2007 Beginning Fund Balance Revenue Local State Federal Total Revenue Expenditures Salaries Benefits Purchased Services Supplies Capital Outlay Other Total Expenditures Revenue Over/(Under) Expenditures Other Financing Sources Other Financing (Uses) Ending Fund Balance $$16,659,352 $3,614,573 $5,708,811 $1,697,461 $434,710 $1,782,750 $29,897,657 $16,365,088 $11,823,199 $1,763,578 $29,951,865

2008

2009

2010

2011

$5,947,869

$9,002,077

$9,002,919

$9,161,768

$9,488,666

$17,195,000 $11,950,000 $1,800,000 $30,945,000

$18,050,000 $12,428,000 $1,836,000 $32,314,000

$18,950,000 $12,925,120 $1,872,720 $33,747,840

$19,708,000 $13,050,120 $1,910,174 $34,668,294

$17,242,429 $3,867,593 $5,880,075 $1,700,000 $400,000 $1,854,060 $30,944,158

$17,932,126 $4,138,325 $6,056,478 $1,700,000 $400,000 $1,928,222 $32,155,151

$18,649,412 $4,428,007 $6,238,172 $1,700,000 $400,000 $2,005,351 $33,420,942

$19,395,388 $4,737,968 $6,425,317 $1,700,000 $400,000 $2,085,565 $34,744,238

$54,208

$842

$158,849

$326,898

($75,944)

$3,000,000 $$-

$$-

$$-

$$-

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Finance

$9,002,077

$9,002,919

$9,161,768

$9,488,666

$9,412,722

35

MATTESON SCHOOL DISTRICT 162

Financial Highlights - FY77 to FY06

Financial History of the District

1977 1978 1979 1981 1983 1984 1985 Budget reduced, referendum for a $0.40 tax increase passed Staff reductions, enrollment declines, budget reduced $200,000 Oakwood and Richton Square Schools closed to save $250,000 annually Staff reductions Illinois School closed to save $150,000 annually, programs cut Oakwood School sold to Village of Matteson for a one-time revenue of $375,000 Paired schools implemented State lottery established. General revenues appropriated by the state for schools are reduced by the amount of lottery monies received Freeze on District Office hiring 10% reduction in spending Excessive costs charged to the District by outside entities, such as special education cooperatives and the Township Treasurer, questioned publicly Board established a criteria for spending Issued Working Cash Fund Bonds; citizens' review of 162's finances revealed sound fiscal management District 162's tax rate for the 1989 tax year decreased from $3.404 to $3.229 per $100 of assessed valuation The Board of Education abolished the Working Cash Fund as of June 30, 1989, and transferred the cash and investments into the Education Fund General State Aid for Fiscal Year 1989 dropped by $458,000 or 33% Reduced staff medical benefits Sold District buses and contracted transportation services for a $60,000 savings and to establish common school hours Reestablished the Working Cash Fund; issued Working Cash Fund Bonds in the amount of $3.3 million; transferred Working Cash Fund interest to the Education Fund Referendum defeated 2:1 $300,000 in reductions, referendum for a $0.60 tax increase passed 2:1 Sold Richton Square School for a one-time revenue of $370,000 The District's Equalized Assessed Valuation (EAV) decreased by $6,194,231 due to a new law increasing the general homestead exemption, which resulted in an annual loss of $230,000 Governor signed the Property Tax Extension Limitation Act EAV computation reduced District's revenue Set a goal for a "balanced" budget for Fiscal Year 1992; made $300,000 in reductions General State Aid was $145,000 less than the previous year due to the state's process of delaying one month's state aid until the next fiscal year Transferred Working Cash Fund interest to the Transportation Fund The District operates with a balanced budget for the first time

1986 1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Finance

Exhibit I

36

Financial Highlights - FY77 to FY06 (Cont.)

1993 The District began to receive revenue from the successful November 1991 referendum General State Aid for Fiscal Year 1993 drops by $411,051 as a result of the state equalization formula Employee health plan benefit costs decreased by $102,852 Working Cash Fund transfer delayed until the next fiscal year Transferred Working Cash Fund interest earned during Fiscal Years 1993 and 1994 to the Education Fund TRS mandated 5 + 5 Early Retirement Plan supports 25 District teachers retiring over two years Issued Tort Reserve Bonds; interest used to pay tort liability expenditures Reduction in salary expenditures as a result of 5 + 5. The total District contribution to TRS equals $1,150,000, payable over five years Levied for Working Cash and "abated" the taxes to the Education Fund Working Cash Fund interest transferred to the Operations and Maintenance Fund A Cook County property tax cap limits the increase in the District's property tax extension to 5% or the rate of inflation, whichever is less. The 1995 tax levy was capped at 2.7% Expended $368,045 for cabling/wiring buildings for technology $579,000 allocated for technology by Board Transferred accumulated interest from the Bond and Interest Fund to the Education Fund for technology Additional technology needs for District projected at $1.6 million Board approves use of up to $500,000 from the Working Cash Fund principal for technology and recognizes the action might restrict the District from presenting a balanced budget in 1997. Later, the Board decides to redirect the Working Cash Fund transfer to the Operations and Maintenance Fund for the construction of an addition to Matteson School Approved purchase of $1.1 million zero coupon bonds to fund technology The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the sixth consecutive year Sold $1.1 million zero coupon bonds Finished cabling buildings for technology and added four computers and a printer in every classroom The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the seventh consecutive year HB 452 reforms educational funding in Illinois and is expected to provide approximately $800,000 in 1998-99, $650,000 in 1999-2000, and $500,000 in 2000-01 in additional monies The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the eighth consecutive year The Board approves the issuance of Funding Bonds to finance the addition to O.W. Huth Middle School. These bonds will be amortized from Tort Immunity Funds on hand and will not increase the District's property tax rate Exhibit I

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Finance

37

Financial Highlights - FY77 to FY06 (Cont.)

1999 The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the ninth consecutive year The Board approves the issuance of Working Cash Fund Bonds to finance the twoclassroom addition and media expansion at Arcadia School and the purchase of a building to house the District Office. These bonds will be amortized from Tort Immunity Funds on hand and will not increase the District's property tax rate Implemented full-day kindergarten program Entered into a technology refreshment lease to purchase 215 computer systems to replace older classroom computer systems Implemented the "choice" school, and updated Illinois School for additional students Began construction of the addition to Illinois School that is partially financed by the state's School Construction Grant Program and Before and After School Enrichment Inc. (B.A.S.E.) Began construction of the additions to Indiana and Sauk Schools, partially financed by the state's School Construction Grant Program The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the tenth consecutive year. The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the eleventh consecutive year A weak economy, the need for additional classrooms and increasing labor costs begin to challenge the District's strong financial position Began construction of the additions to Arcadia, Indiana and Matteson Schools, financed by the issuance of $4 million in Funding Bonds The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the twelveth consecutive year Began construction of Phase II additions to Arcadia and Matteson Schools, financed by the issuance of $4.75 million in Funding Bonds The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the thirteenth consecutive year Voters approve three referenda questions: - Authorize increase in O&M Fund tax rate - Authorize issuance of Funding Bonds - Abolish the offices of Township Treasurer and Trustees of Schools The township treasurer's office is abolished and the District takes over control of all investment and cash management functions. The District purchases Richton Square School and begins renovation work to prepare for the August, 2006 opening. The District receives ASBO's Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the fourteenth consecutive year.

2000 2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

Exhibit I

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RECOMMENDATIONS · Determine a balanced budget for Fiscal Year 2006-2007. · Develop a long-term financial plan that addresses the needs of the District for the future. · Continue to review existing resources, such as programs, personnel, services, time, equipment and supplies, and make recommendations as to how these resources can be redirected in a more effective and productive way to support the District's goals. · Continue to apply for and receive the Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the Association of School Business Officials.

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Curriculum and Instruction

The Illinois Learning Standards drive the curriculum, instruction, and assessment programs for Matteson School District 162. Through the achievement of goals and standards designated in this document, students will gain proficiency basic to all learning, critical to success in the workplace and essential to life as productive citizens. The standards' framework is divided into seven sections representing each of the following fundamental areas of learning: · · · · English/Language Arts Mathematics Science Foreign Languages · Physical Development and Health · Fine Arts · Social Science

The following cross-disciplinary abilities, also fundamental to life-long learning, are embedded within the context of instruction as they apply to each learning area: · Solving problems · Communicating · Using technology · Working as teams · Making connections

All District 162 students receive a minimum of 90 minutes of reading instruction as well as a minimum of 90 minutes of mathematics instruction on a daily basis. One of our primary instructional goals is to provide our students with lessons in all content areas that focus on higher level thinking skills. Children must be taught how to think and analyze problems rather that just recall skills and concepts presented in their instructional lessons. The District will also continue to place emphasis on extended response questions in reading and mathematics on a daily basis in all district classrooms. Children will maintain extended response composition books and writing journals. As you read through our Long-Range Master Plan (School Improvement, Technology, Student Assessment and Professional Development Sections) you will note the specific steps that have been taken to improve our student's reading and mathematics achievement. Next school year our staff will continue to utilize more instructional and assessment software in their teaching. Utilizing this technology will enable our teachers to differentiate their instruction recognizing the various learning styles/modalities of our students. Another area of academic focus for the 2006-2007 year will be on writing, utilizing the writing rubric established by the Illinois State Board of Education. It's important for our parents and community to know that the Illinois Standards Achievement Test expanded the Illinois Standards Assessment Test (ISAT) this year and will continue in future years to include all students in grades 3 through 8 in the content areas of reading and mathematics.

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The academic program is based on the following beliefs:

We believe... A meaningful education balances academic, social and emotional needs and experiences Every person is a learner and a teacher Reflection is necessary for growth The entire world is a classroom Every person constructs meaning and understanding Learning takes place through competition and collaboration Self-respect is built upon achievement and integrity Adults share in the responsibility of shaping the leaders of tomorrow but the ultimate responsibility is that of the student(s) Technology enriches traditional paths to knowledge All must accept the challenge to share their gifts with others for the betterment of the world in which they live What one knows and how one learns are both important Interdisciplinary approaches that stress the connectedness of knowledge are powerful instruments of learning Collaboration and teamwork enhance the learning process Each individual has special gifts and talents

The following statements of educational philosophy shape the Matteson School District 162 program of study:

Content of Courses Learning is enhanced when content is placed in meaningful context that is connected to other subject areas and when students are given multiple opportunities to apply what they are studying in meaningful ways A complete and coherent curriculum must focus on the development of concepts, skills, and processes that enable all students to formulate, analyze, and solve problems proficiently The entire curriculum must focus on the development of communication skills The widespread impact of technology on nearly every aspect of our lives requires changes in the content and nature of educational programs High expectations lead to high achievement

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Teaching and Learning Subjects must be taught by teachers who not only have a sound knowledge of their content area, but who also possess a strong understanding of how students learn Learning is maximized when teachers focus on thinking and reasoning Teachers guide the learning process in their classrooms and manage the classroom environment through a variety of instructional approaches directly tied to the content and to the students' needs Learning is enriched through a collaborative effort Instructional approaches should be based on research about how students learn best Students use diverse strategies and different approaches to construct meaning; teachers recognize and take advantage of these alternative approaches to help students develop better understanding The assessment of understanding in subject areas must be aligned with the content taught and must incorporate multiple forms of assessment, including standardized tests, quizzes, research, performance tasks, investigations, and projects

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Targeted Assistance/Reading Intervention

INTRODUCTION Comprehensive reading and understanding are among the District's major student performance targets as defined by the Board of Education and Superintendent's Blueprint for Excellence. To achieve these goals, District 162 promotes best practices through a balanced literacy approach to instruction. All District 162 students will continue to receive a minimum of 90 minutes of reading during the 2006-07 school year. Students who need additional reading support are identified in several ways, including test scores, reading inventories, classroom performance, and parent or teacher referrals. Recognizing that research-based studies indicate that there is no one "silver bullet" method to ensure reading success, the District proactively addresses the needs of targeted students at all grade levels through a variety of programs and best practice methodologies designed to help students learn and apply appropriate reading strategies. Individual reading plans have been developed for participating students. Service is delivered in individual or small group instructional settings. Student progress is monitored on an ongoing basis. Pre and post-test data are utilized to measure year-end student performance. Each school has defined reading intervention programs for students reading below grade level. The following structures are in place:

School Arcadia Program Structure Grade Level Gr. 1 Gr. 2-3 Gr. 1 Gr. 2-3 Gr. 4-6 Gr. 4-6 Gr. K-8 Gr. 7-8 Staff 1.0 Rdg. Rec. .5 Rdg. Imp. 1.0 Aide 1.0 Rdg. Rec. 1.5 Rdg. Imp. 1.0 Rdg. Imp. 1.0 Aide 1.0 Rdg. Imp. 1.0 Aide 1.5 Rdg. Spec. 1.0 Aide .5 Rdg. Imp

Reading Recovery Reading Improvement Reading Recovery Reading Improvement Reading Improvement Reading Improvement Reading Improvement Reading Improvement

Matteson Indiana Sauk Illinois Huth

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Summer School Programming

Matteson School District 162 continually strives to provide quality education programs for all students. We believe that mastery of reading and math skills are essential to a child's future success in school. During the summer of 2001 the District initiated a four week Summer School Program for students in grades kindergarten through seventh grade who were in need of additional instruction in reading and mathematics. The program provided remediation for students in those content areas. The Summer School Programs from 2002 through 2005 allowed students to receive more individualized instruction in smaller classes than in previous years. Smaller class sizes gave teachers an opportunity to diagnose students' strengths and weaknesses and respond to individualized instruction. Teachers provided extra help to students who needed to improve their reading skills, which are very important to learning in all content areas. The 2006 Summer School Program was the largest summer program that has been offered in Matteson School District 162. Students who have not fulfilled the requirements of the District's Promotion/Retention Policy are required to attend Mandatory Summer School. Students identified by school staff who are not required to attend but would benefit from the additional summer instruction in reading and mathematics are recommended for participation. THE 2006 MANDATORY SUMMER SCHOOL PROGRAM Over the past several years our school district received funds from the Illinois State Board of Education to fund summer school for students in kindergarten through sixth grade. This year, however, as a result of our schools improved performance on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) we are no longer eligible for these funds. Nonetheless, we will continue to provide Summer School for students in grades kindergarten through eight who are in need of this additional instruction. A tuition fee for Summer School has been established to offset some of cost of the Summer School Program. The 2006 Mandatory Summer School will continue to focus on the content areas of reading and mathematics. Students not achieving at a satisfactory rate in kindergarten through second grade, and students in third through eighth grades whose grade point average is below 1.5 are required to attend Mandatory Summer School. Summer School class size is limited to a maximum of 15 students. This smaller class size provides each student with more individualized instruction and an opportunity for classroom teachers to interact more frequently with each student. Each student attending Summer School has an Individual Academic Plan that defines specifically those skills and concepts in the content areas of reading Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Summer School

Matteson School District 162 strives to provide quality education for every student.

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and mathematics that the Summer School Program needs to address. The main focus of Summer School is to target the instruction toward each student's academic needs. Frequent assessments are given to students to measure their progress and provide them with instructional lessons in those specific skill areas in need of support. The Summer School Program curriculum is based upon a balanced literacy framework that includes: word knowledge, reading fluency, reading comprehension, writing and literacy-rich experiences. In the area of mathematics the Summer School curriculum targets basic skills, problem solving, extended response, number sense, estimation, measurement, algebra, geometry, data analysis and probability. All students participating in the Summer School Program are pre- and posttested to determine the achievement gains made by each student. Students will also utilize the Study Island software assessment program in grades three through eight for additional targeted instruction in math and reading. Information about student growth during Summer School will be shared with the home school for grade placement as well as programming the following school year. Good behavior and regular attendance are required for all students attending Mandatory Summer School. Letters, brochures and packets of pertinent information about the Summer School Program were sent to the parents/ guardians of students required to attend Mandatory Summer School. An evening informational meeting for the parents/guardians of all students is scheduled on the first day of summer school. CONCLUSION Matteson School District 162 is committed to strengthening the Summer School Program for the 2006 summer session. New initiatives, including mandatory attendance, intensified and focused parent involvement, professional development, increased student assessment, data analysis and a structured instructional program, will provide the critical components to yield improved program performance.

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Special Education

INTRODUCTION/PHILOSOPHY Matteson School District 162 is committed to provide a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) with full educational opportunity to children with disabilities, between three and fourteen years-old, regardless of the severity of the disability. Special Education and related services are available to meet the unique needs of students and are specifically designed for each student. Special Education programs and related services are provided in each of the school buildings in the District. Inclusionary practices are fostered to provide most students with disabilities an opportunity to attend their neighborhood school, participate in regular education classes, and extracurricular activities. Alternative programs and setting are considered when the student's needs, as developed in the IEP, cannot be met within the general education setting. Matteson District 162 recognizes that parents are the primary teachers of their child, and that parent involvement is a vital component of the educational program. The success of a child's program depends on the participation and commitment of all persons responsible for the student. A strong partnership between the school and the parents is essential. HISTORY Matteson District 162 conducts screenings, when appropriate, to identify any student currently enrolled in its schools as well as preschoolers who may require specialized interventions due to a disability. A screening may be conducted to identify children birth through fourteen years of age who are in need of special services to maintain satisfactory educational performance. Students with disabilities are provided with a program, which is as much as possible like the general education program. Students with disabilities can participate in as many general education programs as appropriate, depending on the nature and degree of the disability. The goal of special education programs is to integrate students with disabilities into the general education setting as much as possible. The school district provides students with disabilities equal access to nonacademic and extracurricular activities. A child with a disability is placed in the school he/she would attend if not disabled, or another school within the district, unless the nature, severity, and/ or complexity of the disability is such that instruction in the local school district is not possible. Placement in an age-appropriate setting as close as possible to the child's home is always given consideration.

We believe that all students can learn!

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If the I.E.P. team members determine that the educational needs cannot be met through a district special education program, the school district will provide an appropriate placement in a separate specialized educational environment. The continuum of program options include: · regular education classroom with consultative services to staff · regular education classroom with speech and language services · regular education classroom with consultative services to staff and related services to students i.e., speech/language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, vision itinerant, hearing itinerant services, etc. · regular education classroom with special education resource program for less than 50% of the school day · regular education classroom with special education instructional class for more than 50% of the school day · full-time special education class in a regular school building · full-time special education class in a special public day school · residential school operated by a public school district · private day school or out-of-state public day school · private residential facility, in state · private residential facility, out-of-state · home-hospital instructional program TOTAL ENROLLMENT The District special education enrollment as of March 1, 2006 was 551 students. The total District enrollment as of March 1, 2006 was 3500. The percentage of students currently identified as special education is approximately 17% of the District total enrollment. The percent of minority students and non-minority students receiving special education services is proportionate to the total number of these students enrolled in our district. ENROLLMENT BY DISABILITY There are 39 students with the primary special education classification of mental retardation; 7 of these students are in out-of-district programs through the SPEED Special Education Cooperative. There are 70 students with the primary special education classification of Emotional Disturbance; 26 of these students are served in out-of-district programs. There are 26 students with a primary classification of Autism; 13 are served in out-of-district programs. There are 8 children with a primary classification of Hearing Impaired; 4 of these students are served in out-of-district programs. There are 17 children with a primary classification of developmental delay. There are 14 students with a primary classification of multiple disabilities and 12 of these students are enrolled in out-of-district programs. There are 5 students with a primary disability of Traumatic Brain Injury and three of these students are enrolled in out-of-district programs. One student with a primary disability of deafness is served in an out-of-district program. The remaining 484 students are served in

We offer a full continuum of special education services in the least restrictive environment.

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the following district programs: · · · · · · · · · · · · · Mental Retardation Orthopedic Impairment Specific Learning Disability Visual Impairment Hearing Impairment Speech/Language Impairment Emotional Disturbance Other Health Impairment Multiple Disabilities Developmental Delay Autism Traumatic Brain Injury Deafness 39 9 163 3 8 151 70 45 14 17 26 5 1 551

ENROLLMENT BY SCHOOLS Arcadia School has a total special education enrollment of 88. There is one student who is attending a private or parochial school receiving itinerant services and 9 students placed in out-of-district programs. Matteson is the home school of 8 students attending Arcadia. · · · · · Self-Contained Resource Speech/Language Only Speech/Language Itinerant Out-of-District Placement 24 24 30 1 9

Ninety (90) percent of our special education students receive services in District programs.

Illinois School has a total special education enrollment of 128 students. There is one student attending a private or parochial school receiving itinerant services and 2 students placed in out-of-district programs. · · · · · · Early Childhood Resource Instructional/Self Contained Speech/Language Only Speech/Language Itinerant Out-of-District Placement 36 32 11 46 1 2

Indiana School has a total special education enrollment of 87 students. There are 4 students attending a private or parochial school receiving itinerant services and 13 students placed in out-of-district programs. Sauk is the home school of 12 students who attend Indiana. · · · · Self-Contained Resource Speech/Language Only Speech/Language Itinerant 39 13 18 4

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· Out-of-District Placements

13

Matteson School has a total special education enrollment of 90 students. There are 15 students placed in out-of-district programs. Arcadia is the home school of 6 students who attend Matteson. · · · · · Self-Contained Resource Speech/Language Only Out-of-District Placements Speech/Language Itinerant 34 14 26 15 1

Sauk School has a total special education enrollment of 61 students. There are 8 students placed in out-of-district programs. · · · · Self-Contained Resource Speech/Language Only Out-of-District Placements 27 15 11 8

O.W. Huth Middle School has a total special education enrollment of 97 students. There are 14 students placed in out-of-district programs. · Instructional/Self-Contained · Resource · Speech/Language Only 53 17 13

OUT-OF-DISTRICT PLACEMENT

Park Forest Academy Speed Early Childhood Speed Program for Adaptive Learning Speed Therapeutic Easter Seals Therapeutic Day School ECHO Communication Disorders ECHO Hearing Impaired Program ECHO Visually Impaired Program ECHO Physically Health Impaired Program Lee School Hope School Willowglen Academy Phillip J. Rock Conyers Learning Academy Illinois School for The Deaf AAA Academy 3/06 12 3 31 10 1 1 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1/12/05 12 3 26 14 1 1 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 11/03/03 10 8 2 14 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 12/20/02 11 5 18 18 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 06/02 13 6 13 15 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

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FINANCIAL IMPACT: OUT-OF-DISTRICT PROGRAM COSTS SPEED COOPERATIVE PROGRAM COSTS As of 3/1/06 Early Childhood Program ­ Full Day $23,048.69 Early Childhood Program ­ Half-Day $16,778.87 Program for Adaptive Learning $22,878.00 Therapeutic Elementary School $20,735.19 Park Forest Academy ­ B.D. Park Forest Academy ­ E.D. ECHO COOPERATIVE Communication Development Disorders Hearing Impaired Program Visually/Physically Impaired Program Easter Seals Therapeutic Day School Alternative Academic Achievement Academy SPECIAL EDUCATION POPULATION TRENDS As enrollment in the district increases special education enrollment has been impacted. We have experienced a steady growth in the number of students requiring specialized interventions resulting in an increase in our out-of-district placements as well as impacting our district programs. Enrolled 551 609 565 523 480 486 514 Discontinued from Special Education Services 23 37 31 39 32 47 41 $17,882.00 $24,990.00 $27,849.00 $36,653.47 $19,439.20 $19,536.00 $19,888.00

March 2006 June 2005 June 2004 June 2003 June 2002 June 2001 June 2000

SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF Certified 03/01/06 54 01/14/05 53 34 11/03/03 51 32 10/24/02 50 34 06/02 50 37 06/01 44 37

Non-Certified 31

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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Certified staff consists of the following professionals: classroom teachers, resource teachers, Pupil Personnel Services Team, occupational therapists, physical therapist and speech/language therapists. Non-certified staff consists of the following: classroom aides, one-on-one aides and resource aides.

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PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES The Pupil Personnel Services Department consists of the following professionals who provide support services to students and school staff: psychologist, guidance counselor, social worker and nurse. Our district has increased our counseling services to students. We currently have four-and-one-half psychologist positions, one guidance counselor positions, five social worker positions and one school nurse. These individuals perform a variety of duties in each of our schools which include health services, counseling services, educational assessments, behavior interventions, and consultations to parents, teachers and administrators. Arcadia Illinois Indiana Matteson Sauk O.W. Huth Psychologist Guidance Counselor Social Worker 3 days 5 days 5 days 4 days 3 days 3.5 days 3 days 5 days 3 days 2.5 days 4 days 1 @ 5 days 4 days Nurse One full-time nurse assigned to service all schools.

Pupil Personnel Services staff offer a variety of support services to students, parents, teachers and administrators.

Projection: Social work services at Richton Square Psychological Services at Richton Square SPECIAL EDUCATION AND PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES ROOM ASSIGNMENTS BY SCHOOL Special Education guidelines limits the number of students assigned to special education classrooms and resource teachers' caseloads. Our district special education classrooms are cross-categorical which limits the number of students assigned to the classrooms to a maximum of 15 students per classroom and requires one certified teacher and one classroom aide. A special education resource teacher can be assigned a maximum caseload of 20 students. Arcadia: 1 ­ 2nd grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ 3rd grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ Resource /Speech and Language Room ­ grades K-3 1 ­ Counseling Room Illinois: 1 ­ 7/8th grade self-contained classroom 2 ­ Early Childhood self-contained classrooms 2 ­ Resource/Speech and Language Rooms ­ grades E.C.-8th 2 ­ Counseling Rooms 1 ­ OT/PT Room Projection: 1-3rd grade self-contained classroom (From Arcadia School)

Crosscategorical special education classrooms address a variety of disabilities.

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Indiana: 1 ­ 4th grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ 5th grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ 6th grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ Multi-age (4-6th grades) self-contained classroom 1 ­ Resource/Speech and Language Room ­ grades 4-6 1 ­ Counseling Room Matteson: 1 ­ Kindergarten grade self-contained classroom 1 ­1st grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ 3rd grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ Resource room ­ grades K-3 1 ­ Speech/Language therapy room ­ grades K-3 Projection: 1-2nd grade self-contained classroom (From Arcadia School) Additional 2nd grade teacher Sauk: 1 ­ 5th grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ 6th grade self-contained classroom 1 ­ Resource/Speech and Language room ­ grades 4-6 2 ­ Counseling Rooms ­ grades 4-6 O.W. Huth Middle School: 2 ­ 7th grade instructional class 2 ­ 8th grade instructional class 1 ­ 7th/8th grade self-contained classroom 2 ­ Resource rooms ­ grades 7-8 1 ­ Speech/Language therapy room ­ grades 7-8 2 ­ Counseling Rooms ­ grades 7-8 Projections for Richton Square: 1 ­ Early childhood self-contained classroom (from Illinois School) 1 ­ Resource/Speech and Language room 1 ­ Social work/psychologist room 1 ­ OT/PT Room CONCLUSION The Matteson School District 162 Special Education Program is committed to continuing a high quality of specialized educational services. As we evaluate the academic progress of special education students in each of our schools we continue to identify interventions to increase their academic success. Collaboration between special education and regular education staff has supported inclusionary practices and provided a free appropriate Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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public education (FAPE) to students with special needs in the least restrictive environment. It is important that we solicit feedback from parents and school staff regarding the effectiveness of our programs. As a district we will continue to offer the full continuum of special education services following federal and state guidelines outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. (IDEA 2004) RECOMMENDATIONS Gather information from parents/guardians and school staff through surveys and advisory meetings regarding the effectiveness of special education programs and recommended improvements. Utilize the local media and District communication channels to inform parents, school staff, and the community about the early identification and intervention services available through the District beginning at the preschool age. Implement inclusionary practices by increasing the percentage of special education student participation in general education classes with appropriate program supports and services. Offer summer school opportunities with a focus on reading. Offer after school tutorial services with a focus on skill deficits in reading and math. Utilize technology to increase the types of classroom accommodations that minimizes the impact of the student's disability and allows the student the opportunity to participate in general education classes with grade level instructional materials. Increase the number of special education certified teachers and aides to meet compliance requirements related to class size and caseload at the elementary schools. Consider implementation of the RTI (Response to Intervention) approach in identifying students with learning disabilities. Utilize the services of a special education consultant to coordinate staff development opportunities for teachers and assistants with an emphasis on curriculum alignment to the state standards.

Keeping lines of communication open among staff, parents, and students is critical to the success of our special education programs.

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District Gifted Program Expansion

Gifted education remains a priority in our school district even though the State of Illinois has eliminated funding for gifted programming. Our mission is to continue to provide resources enabling every student to receive instructional programming appropriate to his/her ability and achievement level. Our vision, as we move forward, is to share existing resources to maintain and expand programming in the area of gifted, accelerated and enrichment education. Our goal is to help every child achieve his or her potential in Matteson School District 162. The national definition of gifted is "children with outstanding talent who perform or show the potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared to others of their age, experience, and environment." These children exhibit high performance capability in intellectual, creative, artistic and specific academic areas. They require educational programming reflective of their achievement and ability levels. Gifted students achieve more in special programs than their gifted peers who do not participate in special programs (Delcourt, Loyd, Cornell, & Goldberg, 1994). Giftedness, as defined by Matteson School District 162, identifies that student who demonstrates evidence of learning differently from most, conceptualizes at a higher level, learns at a faster pace within the structured school setting, or who performs at an advanced level in the areas of academics and/or performing arts. Beginning with the opening of the 2006-2007 school year our school district will expand the comprehensive gifted program to include students in 4th, 5th and 6th grades. Students at Indiana and Sauk Schools will have a full day gifted classroom for each grade level in their school. Illinois School will enhance its gifted program for 4th, 5th, and 6th grades by increasing the part time gifted position to a full time position. Student selection for the 4th, 5th, and 6th grade gifted program is based upon report card grades, attendance, the Terra Nova Achievement Test results, and the Stanford 9 Achievement Test. A student entrance exam was administered to eligible students in grades 3, 4, and 5 in the spring. The parents/guardians of the students selected to participate in the gifted program were notified in May of their child's test results. A parent information meeting to learn more about the district gifted program was held in August, 2006.

The national definition of gifted is "children with outstanding talent who perform or show the potential for performing at remarkably high levels of accomplishment when compared to others of their age, experience, and environment."

During the 2006-2007 school year the primary grade component of the district's gifted program will be expanded. Third grade participants will be identified using report card grades and Terra Nova Achievement Test data. Students will be clustered in third grade classrooms being paired with teachers who have experience teaching gifted students. Curriculum and expectations will be differentiated and modified to address the needs of the gifted grouping Matteson School within the regular classroom. Each week, the identified third grade students will District 162 meet as a group to participate in gifted programming. Exploration Workshops focusing on Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences will continue to be Long-Range offered to kindergarten, first and second grade students who exhibit academic Master Plan strength in a specific content area. The intelligences include logicalGifted Program mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, intrapersonal and naturalistic. Student selection for the District 7th and 8th Grade Gifted Magnet Program

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at Huth Middle School was held in January, 2006. Students from 6th and 7th grade classes throughout the district who met the entrance exam criteria participated in the exam. Student selection for the 7th and 8th Grade Gifted Magnet Program is based upon report card grades, attendance, the Terra Nova Achievement Test results, and the Stanford Achievement Test. Parents/ guardians of students selected to participate in the 2006-2007 7th and 8th Gifted Magnet Program were notified in February of their child's participation in the program. During the 2007-2008 school year the gifted program will be expanded to include full day gifted classes for students in kindergarten, first, second and third grades at Arcadia and Matteson Schools. This will complete the gifted program expansion and provide students in District 162 with a fully articulated gifted program. PHILOSOPHY OF GIFTED/TALENTED EDUCATION Matteson School District 162 acknowledges that some students, by virtue of their abilities and talents, are capable of high performance. The District recognizes the need of these students to receive educational experiences that will more appropriately challenge their abilities. Therefore, differentiated programming and services will be provided to develop the affective and cognitive skills, and nurture the creative ability of the gifted student. CHARACTERISTICS OF GIFTED/TALENTED LEARNERS There are certain characteristics or behaviors that are indicators of giftedness. Not all gifted children will exhibit every characteristic and some gifted children will not exhibit any consistently. Some common characteristics of gifted students are: · · · · · · · · · · Superior reasoning powers Persistent intellectual curiosity Wide range of interests Markedly superior in quality or quantity of written and/or spoken vocabulary Reads avidly and absorbs books well beyond his or her years Learns quickly and easily and retains what is learned Shows insight to arithmetical problems that require careful reasoning and grasps mathematical concepts readily Has a keen sense of humor Sets high standards for self Gets excitement and pleasure from intellectual challenge (Giftedness, 1990) Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Gifted Program

All children may exhibit these traits. Gifted students possess these characteristics to a much greater extent than do other students of the same age, background, and experience. Gifted students also exhibit them in a more consistent manner and to a degree that they require modifications to their instructional program for further development to occur. GIFTED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

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Acceleration Acceleration is the practice of allowing a student to move through learning material in a content area, class or a grade level prior to the prescribed timeframe, based on early mastery. This can be achieved by pre- and posttesting and allowing students who demonstrate mastery at an accepted level to progress at their own pace to other material. Students can be accelerated in one or more content areas. Acceleration can take many forms in gifted programs. In elementary school programs, the type of acceleration depends on the goals and objectives of the program. If the curriculum mirrors that of the regular classroom, the students will demonstrate mastery of the prescribed material and then will study the topic in more depth and breadth. While each student will progress through levels of social and emotional development at different speeds, research has shown that acceleration results in higher levels of social development and participant satisfaction, as well as academic achievement (Clark, 1979; Swiatek, 1993; and Slavin, 1990). Curriculum Compacting Curriculum compacting is a teaching method used to complete a prescribed amount of content in a shorter period of time than usual. This entails pre- and post-testing students to determine current knowledge; enriching students coursework through independent study, alternative assignments, and higher level material (Curriculum Compacting, 1994). While gifted children still need to be with others of like abilities for some part of each day or week, this option allows school districts to provide additional services to their identified gifted students on a daily basis as well as encouraging teachers to modify the curriculum for all students, including other students with special needs. With adequate training and support, regular classroom teachers can prepare alternative assignments appropriate for the ability level of all of their students, as well as using varied grouping strategies and more engaging teaching practices (Reis et al., 1991). All children benefit greatly from curriculum compacting according to their individual needs. The gifted child is no different. Flexible Ability Grouping Flexible ability grouping is the grouping of students for instruction according to their ability level. This is different from tracking in that students are not in the same group for every subject and they can move in and out of groups as their skills increase. This is different from cooperative learning in that the grouping is for instructional purposes and the goal is not solely to improve social skills. The students are placed in a group of children with like abilities, the content is modified to be appropriate for the abilities of the group, and the students may or may not complete their assignments individually. Similar to curriculum compacting, this option is a good partner to other service options which allow gifted students interaction with other gifted children. The content taught to the group with the highest abilities in a given content area may be compacted, as well.

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A report from the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented shows that gifted students make "substantial" academic gains when grouped with other gifted students (Rogers). Karen Rogers found that gifted students benefit from regrouping for subject instruction. Rogers makes the following recommendations with regard to gifted education programming: · Gifted students should spend most of their day together to work with their intellectual peers on appropriately differentiated curriculum · Schools should group gifted students together for specific subject instruction (acceleration) and use multi-age grouping (more than one chronological grade level) according to children's ability · Heterogeneously mixed cooperative learning should be used sparingly, if only to improve social skills Independent Study Independent study allows students to pursue a topic of interest at their own level and pace. This may be done within the context of some of the other service options or separately. This option provides a maximum amount of flexibility because the student and the teacher establish the parameters of the assignment, the topic, process, product, and completion date in advance. Then the student is on his or her way, independent of the rest of the class. This option works well with students who are self-motivated and seek guidance from the teacher when problems arise, with students interested in research, and with students working on individual projects. Cooperative learning is based on the beliefs that all students are capable of understanding, learning, and performing leadership tasks; the most effective student groups are heterogeneous; students need to learn to recognize and value their dependence upon each other; the ability to work effectively in a group is determined by the acquisition of specific social skills; and student groups are more likely to attempt resolution of their problems if they are not "rescued" by their teacher (Dishon and O'Leary, 1984). All students need to learn to interact and work with other students of varying abilities and interests. Cooperative learning groups should emphasize not only content, but also social/group dynamic skills, group goals with individual accountability for mastery of material, and face-to-face interaction and involvement with other students (Coleman, 1994). Cooperative learning can be used effectively with gifted students if the following decisions are made thoughtfully: · Is the activity appropriate for cooperative groups? · Which activities are more appropriate for totally heterogeneous groups? · Which activities require gifted students to work in their own cooperative groups with appropriately challenging tasks (Fascilla, Hanninen, and Spritzer, 1991). Academic Competition Recently, there has been an increase in the popularity of academic Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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competitions that focus on inventiveness, creativity, ingenuity, and problem solving. Gifted students enjoy the challenge of these competitions and may work harder and be more resourceful than they have in past projects. The chance for students to work on a common goal with other students of like interests and abilities, and to be recognized for their efforts, is appealing to the students, and to their teachers and parents. Although academic competitions should not be a major part of the curriculum, they do offer yet another option to complete a comprehensive array of programming choices. BLOOM'S TAXONOMY In 1956, Benjamin Bloom headed a group of educational psychologists who developed a classification of levels of intellectual behavior important in learning. Bloom found that over 95% of the test questions students encounter require them to think only at the lowest possible level...the recall of information. Bloom identified six levels within the cognitive domain, from the simple recall or recognition of facts, as the lowest level, through increasingly more complex and abstract mental levels, to the highest order that is classified as evaluation. Verb examples that represent intellectual activity on each level are listed below. This taxonomy is used for categorizing different levels of abstraction of questions that commonly occur in educational settings. The taxonomy provides a useful structure that teachers of gifted students should utilize in the development of their instructional lessons and assessment instruments. KNOWLEDGE remembering memorizing recognizing recalling identification recalling information who, what, when, where, how ...? describe COMPREHENSION interpreting translating from one medium to another describing in one's own words organization and selection of facts and ideas retell... APPLICATION problem solving applying information to produce some result use of facts, rules and principles how is ... an example of ...? how is ... related to ...? why is... significant? ANALYSIS subdividing something to show how it is put together finding the underlying structure of a communication identifying motives

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separation of a whole into component parts what are the parts or features of ...? classify ... according to ... outline/diagram ... how does ... compare/contrast with ...? what evidence can you list for ...? SYNTHESIS creating a unique, original product that may be in verbal form or may be a physical object combination of ideas to form a new whole what would you predict/infer from ...? what ideas can you add to ...? how would you create/design a new ...? what might happen if you combined ...? what solutions would you suggest for ...? EVALUATION making value decisions about issues resolving controversies or differences of opinion development of opinions, judgements or decisions do you agree that ...? what do you think about ...? what is the most important ...? place the following in order of priority ... how would you decide about ...? what criteria would you use to assess ...? CONCLUSION A recent article in the Chicago Tribune entitled "Gifted Left Behind by School Reform; Funding Cuts, U.S. Law Hurt Brightest" points out that the recent changes in federal legislation and the elimination of gifted funding by the State of Illinois places gifted programming in jeopardy in many school districts. As stated in this article, "The demands of the federal No Child Left Behind law are forcing an increasing number of schools to pour their resources into bringing up the test scores of their lowest performing students even in affluent school districts that never had to worry about test scores before and long had viewed gifted programs as sacred cows." Furthermore, this article states, "Illinois lawmakers literally wiped out the concept of gifted education by eliminating $19 million in grants that helped fund (gifted) programs in 800 districts statewide and erasing any mention of gifted education as a mandate in the state school code." However, in Matteson School District 162 our resources will not be concentrated just on remedial programming, but rather shared with Matteson School programming that addresses the educational needs of all children, particularly District 162 those who are in need of an enriched, accelerated or gifted program. The expansion of the district gifted program is an opportunity for our school district to provide our students with an academic program that will enrich and challenge their cognitive skills and aptitudes. Expanding our district gifted program is another significant milestone as we move our district from "good to great". Long-Range Master Plan

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Student Achievement/Assessment

Matteson School District 162 promotes a philosophy that embraces diversity and recognizes individual cognitive, psychomotor, and affective differences. Multiple and varied assessment tools are utilized to measure individual and group performance. These include standardized tests, curriculum-based assessments, basal assessments, teacher-made tests and rubrics. Beginning with the 2004-2005 school year we began the administration of the Terra Nova Achievement Test in September and May. This pre and post testing provides our staff with achievement data that shows student growth during the school year. The fall testing results provides our staff with student achievement data that can be utilized as a diagnostic tool for developing instructional lessons/approaches and guiding student instruction. Spring test data enables our staff to better determine student academic needs for summer school programming and for the 2006-2007 school year. The results of the Spring, 2007 Terra Nova Achievement Tests will be sent home to parents in June. Beginning with the 2006-2007 school year students in 2nd and 3rd grades will be administered the Terra Nova Achievement Test in the Fall, 2006 and Spring, 2007. Students in 4th through 8th grades will be administered the spring Terra Nova Achievement Test. Additionally, the 4th through 8th grade students will be assessed utilizing Think Link beginning in September and then again at the end of the first and second quarters in preparation for the March, 2007 ISAT exams. The Think Link Predictive Series utilizes a unique scientific approach that matches diagnostic assessments to the Illinois Learning Standards. These assessment tests will provide our district staff with information regarding our students understanding of their reading and math skills based upon Illinois Learning Standard benchmark standards. This test data enables our teachers to design instructional lessons targeted to those reading and math skills requiring further instruction. New students to District 162 are given Curriculum Based Assessments (CBAs) to determine their current achievement levels and provide teachers and principals with information about the educational needs of these children. In conjunction with No Child Left Behind legislation, the Illinois State Board of Education has adopted the ISAT (Illinois Standards Achievement Test) as the assessment tool utilized to report state and local student performance to parents/guardians and the community. ISAT testing has expanded its testing to include all students at grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. The Matteson School District 162, 2006-2007 assessment schedule is as follows:

Grade Level ISAT - Illinois Standards Achievement Test Reading Math Science Writing X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X March 12-23 K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Dates

B T p s d le o

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The following charts represent student performance at the benchmark grades 3, 4, 5, and 6.

3rd Grade 2001-02

School

Illinois Indiana Sauk

3rd Grade 2002-03

Illinois Indiana Sauk

3rd Grade 2003-04

Illinois Indiana Sauk Illinois

3rd Grade 2004-05

Arcadia Matteson Illinois

3rd Grade 2005-06

Arcadia Matteson

Reading

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

63%

59%

43%

71%

62%

51%

70%

70%

62%

73%

74%

84%

88%

96%

76%

Math

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

78%

67%

59%

85%

71%

62%

86%

82%

79%

91%

84%

97%

94%

100%

94%

Writing

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

63%

67%

52%

67%

76%

65%

77%

91%

76%

No Test

No Test

4th Grade 2001-02 School

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

4th Grade 2002-03

Sauk Illinois Indiana Sauk

4th Grade 2003-04

Illinois Indiana Sauk Illinois

4th Grade 2004-05

Indiana Sauk Illinois

4th Grade 2005-06

Indiana Sauk

Illinois

Indiana

Reading

No Test No Test No Test No Test 86% 58% 84%

Math

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

No Test

No Test

No Test

No Test

94%

71%

95%

Science

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

76%

44%

61%

59%

56%

67%

83%

57%

75%

81%

60%

67%

85%

63%

89%

Social Science

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

54%

42%

49%

57%

48%

66%

70%

42%

64%

No Test

No Test

5th Grade 2001-02 School

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

5th Grade 2002-03

Sauk Illinois Indiana Sauk

5th Grade 2003-04

Illinois Indiana Sauk Illinois

5th Grade 2004-05

Indiana Sauk Illinois

5th Grade 2005-06

Indiana Sauk

Illinois

Indiana

Reading

72% 57% 54% 75% 53% 48% 63% 62% 48% 73% 51% 57% 77% 65% 59%

Math

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

79%

57%

57%

80%

59%

53%

71%

70%

64%

93%

63%

77%

89%

75%

77%

Writing

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

88%

70%

62%

91%

68%

60%

86%

78%

68%

No Test

No Test

6th Grade 2001-02 School

Illinois Indiana Sauk

6th Grade 2002-03

Illinois Indiana Sauk

6th Grade 2003-04

Illinois Indiana Sauk Illinois

6th Grade 2004-05

Indiana Sauk Illinois

6th Grade 2005-06

Indiana Sauk

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Student Achievement/ Assessment

Reading

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

No Test

No Test

No Test

No Test

87%

63%

75%

Math

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

No Test

No Test

No Test

No Test

89%

75%

91%

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The following charts represent student performance at the benchmark grades 7 and 8.

7th Grade 2001-02 School Huth 7th Grade 2002-03 Huth Illinois 7th Grade 2003-04 Huth Reading

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

7th Grade 2004-05 Huth Illinois

7th Grade 2005-06 Huth Illinois

Illinois

No Test

No Test No Test No Test No Test No Test No Test Math

63%

75%

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

No Test

No Test No Test No Test No Test No Test No Test Science

72%

83%

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

73%

67%

64%

64%

77%

60%

86%

84%

87%

Social Studies

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

53%

52%

44%

42%

64%

No Test No Test No Test No Test

8th Grade 2001-02 Huth

8th Grade 2002-03 Huth Illinois

8th Grade 2003-04 Huth Reading

8th Grade 2004-05 Huth Illinois

8th Grade 2004-05 Huth Illinois

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

65%

56%

N/A

59% Math

82%

60%

86%

60%

77%

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

37%

39%

N/A

36% Writing

41%

50%

89%

77%

94%

Percentage of students scoring within levels 3 and 4

63%

70%

N/A

65%

82%

No Test No Test No Test No Test

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From 1998 through 2001, District ISAT scores ranged slightly below the state average. Our overall 2002 ISAT scores reflected an increase of 3.8 percent over the previous year with 59.4 percent of District students meeting state standards, compared to the state average of 60.1 percent. The 2004 overall ISAT scores reflected a 3% gain compared to the previous year's scores. The 2005 overall ISAT scores showed a 3.6% gain compared to 2004. The 2006 ISAT scores were outstanding system-wide. Preliminary data indicates that our district composite of 73% is a 6% gain from the previous years. Since the 200001 school year our District ISAT composite scores have risen from 55% to 73%. A 32% increase!

80 60 40 20 0

District/State ISAT Comparison

59.4 60.1 59.8 63.9 63 65.9 67 65 District State

2002

2003

2004

2005

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ISAT Data Analysis · The District's Composite ISAT Scores have increased each year over the past five years. Since the 2000-2001 school year the composite scores have increased 32%. · The 2006 ISAT scores increased in all of the district schools. · All regular education classes tested achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) as mandated by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) federal mandates. · The District will continue to implement the School Improvement Plans and Targeted Goals defined by each school. · For the 2006-2007 school year the ISAT will test Reading and Mathematics in grades 3 through 8 and Science in grades 4 and 7. Writing will be tested at grades 5 and 8.

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Grading/Report Cards/Promotion/Retention

Maintaining communication between the home and school regarding achievement, performance and behavior is essential to help ensure student success in their schooling. The home/school partnership enables teachers and parents/guardians to discuss mutual concerns that impact the progress of our students. Parents/guardians are informed at regular intervals throughout the school year regarding the progress that their children are making towards meeting curricular goals and objectives. Report cards are submitted to parents at quarterly intervals and include achievement, effort, and behavior grades. Mid-quarter reports are issued at four-week intervals to communicate current academic progress. Parents/guardians are to be immediately contacted when their child's grades and/or academic performance begins to decline. Parents/guardians, in turn, should immediately contact their child's teacher(s) to discuss any concerns/issues regarding their child's achievement/ performance in school. The Edline Web Portal is the primary method of home-school communication. This computer based online program allows teachers and parents/guardians to communicate with each other regarding student progress, classroom news, and homework assignments. Another communicative tool is the Home/ School Connection Form. This form is developed at the first parent-teacher conference and is an opportunity for teachers and parents to set common goals that will have a positive impact on student achievement. Teachers provide parents with a copy of the goals that are mutually established during the November parent/teacher conference. The Student Promotion, Remediation and Retention Policy & Procedures Guide contains the protocol that District 162 staff should follow as they consider student promotion, remediation and/or retention. Specific timelines and procedures for informing parents/guardians regarding the progress of their children are detailed in this document. Student files must be maintained containing information relative to promotion, remediation and retention for every student under review. Principals annually review/explain to their staff the procedures for maintaining these files. These policies and procedures supersede all previous policies and procedures regarding student promotion, remediation and retention. GRADING, PROMOTION, RETENTION AND REMEDIATION Placement, promotion and retention shall be made in the best interests of the student after a careful evaluation of all the factors relating to the advantages and disadvantages of alternatives.

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GRADING Student academic achievement is assessed in terms of the attainment of measurable specific skills determined by the teaching staff to be their instructional goals and objectives. Student academic achievement is reported in terms of standardized criterion-referenced test scores, letter grades and/or other assigned numerical criteria. The District-wide numerical grading system is one measure of assessing academic achievement. The system is as follows: 93 ­ 100 87 ­ 92 78 ­ 86 70 ­ 77 Below 70 A B C D F

GRADE POINT SCALE FOR THE DISTRICT 7TH AND 8TH MAGNET GIFTED PROGRAM The District 7th and 8th Grade Gifted Program Grade Point Scale is weighted as follows: A = 5 points B = 4 points C = 3 points D = 1 point F = 0 points 7th Grade Algebra Language & Literature Social Studies Science Foreign Language PROMOTION For all students in kindergarten through eighth grade, promotion shall be based upon academic achievement. No later than the third quarter of each school year, notice shall be given to those parents/guardians whose student or students are not achieving at a satisfactory rate as recommended by the classroom teacher or at least maintaining a grade point average of 1.5 (grades 3-8). All recommendations shall be reviewed by the building principal. For those students who do not receive a grade point average of 1.5, mandatory summer school shall be recommended. In some cases, the successful completion of mandatory summer school shall be a prerequisite for promotion to the next grade. Successful completion shall be defined as earning a "C" grade or better in all academic subjects. 8th Grade Geometry Language & Literature Social Studies Science Foreign Language

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The decision regarding grade promotion or retention shall be made within 10 business days from the last day of the summer school term by an educational team including, but not limited to, the student's home school principal, summer school principal and summer school teacher. A separate 8th grade graduation ceremony will be conducted by the District for those students who have successfully completed mandatory summer school after the conclusion of Summer School. RETENTION If a student does not successfully complete mandatory summer school, he/she may be retained for the following school year. If the educational team makes that recommendation, the Superintendent shall be notified and have an opportunity for review. REMEDIATION For all students retained, fall placement will be in the same grade, but with a different classroom instructor than the previous year, unless otherwise requested by the parent and mutually agreed upon by the school and parent. A remediation plan shall be developed as a collaborative tool for the student, parents and educators. This plan shall outline those educational assessments, supports, strategies and methods for achieving educational success as well as individual student goals for improvement. Supports for success may include, but not be limited to, summer school, special homework, tutorial sessions, extended school day, modified assignments/materials and reduced class size. CONCLUSION In all cases, when a student has a quarter with an achievement and/or effort average of less than 1.5 grade point average, or "Needs to Improve," the student will continue to be monitored. The basic goal of this procedure is to eliminate the possibility of retention by assisting the parent/guardian and student to set goals for improvement. It should also provide the teacher with the opportunity to find more appropriate methods to assist the student if it appears that the student requires alternative approaches to learning.

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Fine Arts Program

Students in Matteson School District #162 actively participate in performing arts, fine arts and athletic programs. The fine arts curriculum includes visual arts, poetry, dance, chorus, drama, and band in most of the District schools. The athletic program, in grades seven and eight provide opportunities for students to participate in organized sports through the (SSJHSA) South Suburban Junior High School Association ). School District 162 is proud of its accomplishments in the area of fine arts. We believe strongly that fine arts education enhances academic instruction and helps prepare students to live a fulfilling life. The arts are a powerful means for allowing us to reach every learner, enhancing the process of learning for all of our students. Integrating sensory, cognitive, emotional, and motor capabilities into our fine arts program drives all other learning. During the 2006-2007 school year, all students will have the opportunity to participate in afterschool drama and modern dance programs. The Fine Arts Department participates in the following community and District activities: · · · · · · Festival of Fine Arts Display students' work in schools, libraries, and exhibitions Matteson Rotary Club Chorus and Band Concerts Community Events Expos

In a music class is the student who will revolutionize the world by creating a beautiful symphony.

If art is to nourish the roots of our culture, society must set the artist free to follow his vision wherever it takes him." ~ John Fitzgerald Kennedy BAND PHILOSOPHY It is the desire of District 162 students to always represent themselves well through excellence in performance. This excellence can only be attained through discipline, hard work, sacrifice, dedication and pride. Success as a group and as individuals is based upon willingness and determination to be the best. It is our hope that, among other values, a sense of responsibility will be realized. AN OVERVIEW OF THE DISTRICT 162 DEPARTMENT OF BANDS 5th Grade Elementary Beginning Band is the organization that lays the foundation for the entire band program and is composed of students in their first year of band. Initially, students are encouraged to make a commitment to the program for one school year. The basics of correct embouchure and technique are the focus of their ensemble. 6th Grade Elementary Intermediate Band is composed of students in their Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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second year of participation. A continuation of basic technique and preparation for Middle School Band is the focus. Students at this level will also have the opportunity to participate in the state Solo and Ensemble Contest. Percussion Ensemble is a class scheduled for percussionists only and consists of 7th and 8th grade students at the Middle School Level. Members of this group will focus on technique on all percussion instruments, which primarily include: Mallet instruments (Bells, Xylophone, Vibraphone, Marimba and Chimes), Marching Percussion (Snare, Tenors, Bass) and Timpani. Members will perform as part of the Winter Drum Line. Percussion ensemble will perform at winter and spring concerts, some athletic events and community performances and field trips combined with the Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble. Advanced Band is a more musically advanced group at the Middle School Level and is a combination of 7th and 8th grade members who have some previous instrumental musical experience (usually 5th & 6th grade) and who have successfully displayed a degree of proficiency required by the directors. The Advanced Band performs at the winter and spring concerts and may perform at organizational competition. Members may also participate in the state Solo and Ensemble Contest, perform at some athletic events and community performances, and attend field trips combined with the Wind Ensemble. All members of the Advanced Band are members of the Marching Band. Wind Ensemble is the most musically advanced instrumental organization at the Middle School Level, its members having successfully displayed an exceptionally high degree of proficiency and met the instrumentation requirements as mandated by the directors. These students also demonstrate a good attitude and willingness to work towards successfully conforming to the band department's philosophy. In addition to its winter and spring concert appearances, the membership participates in organizational competition, community appearances, performance field trips, and perform at some athletic events. All members of the Wind Ensemble are members of the Marching Band. PERFORMANCE ENSEMBLES Jazz Band is an ensemble offered by audition for any student in the Advanced Band, Wind Ensemble and Percussion Ensemble. Jazz Band will exist as an option to students only when there is enough interest and correct instrumentation to create a full stage band ensemble. Winter Drumline is required of all students in the Percussion Ensemble class. Students who play wind instruments from the Advanced Band and Wind Ensemble may participate as members during after school rehearsals and performances. Extra members will be chosen by audition. The competition season for Winter Drumline will start approximately in late January and culminate in March. Competitions will take place on weekends and require all members to travel by school bus.

"Music is the universal language of mankind." ~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Color Guard/Winter Guard is a visual performing ensemble open for audition to all students at the middle school level, not just band students. Color Guard will perform with the Marching Band in parades. Winter Guard is a separately auditioned ensemble for the purpose of competition. Members prepare a routine with dance, movement, flag and rifle skills coordinated to recorded music indoors on a basketball court. Auditions and practices for the Winter Guard will start in the fall. Competitions will take place on weekends and will start at the end of January and culminate in March. PRIVATE LESSONS Private lessons are strongly encouraged. We are reevaluating the private lesson program, and when a decision has been made parents and students will be informed. Private lessons are with a specialist teaching the instrument the child plays.

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School Climate and Culture / Completing the Circle

A positive and nurturing climate in a school is essential for optimum student achievement. Creating this environment requires the support and direct involvement of the entire school staff, parents, students and community partners. In order to achieve academic and social excellence, each of these partners must understand each other's role and be willing to work together as a team in order to reach the goal of student achievement. Everyone agrees that developing students with positive character, strong leadership ability and integrity must start in the home. Our goal for the 2006- 2007 school year is to help equip students with the necessary Life Management Skills (Character Education) that will inspire them to make a decision to be excellent and not bow down to negative peer pressure and other influences that may distract them from doing and being their very best. In an effort to help achieve this goal, Matteson SD 162 is partnering once again with Inner Vision International, Inc. During the 2006 ­ 2007 school year, Inner Vision's corporate mission is to motivate, educate and inspire individuals to achieve their maximum potential in their personal lives and the communities in which they live. During the 2006-2007 school year, Inner Vision will conduct a number of Character Education workshops with students from Huth Middle School, Indiana and Sauk Elementary schools. Workshop topics include, but will not be limited to: Time Management, Goal Setting, Conflict Resolution, Responsibility, The Power of Words, Self-Esteem, Hope, Communication, and Team Building. These workshops are designed to motivate students to take their education and their futures more seriously. Although there were many individual success stories during the 2005-2006 school year; Inner Vision's goal for the 2006 ­ 2007 school year is to help enhance the overall school climate at each participating school. Inner Vision's measurement for accomplishing this goal will be reflected in a decrease in the number of school suspensions as well as an increase in the level of students' academic performance i.e.: an increase in A's and B's and a decrease in F's and D's. This will inevitably help the overall school climate which will also have a direct impact on standardized test scores. In addition to motivational workshops, qualifying students also participated in various field trips and other incentives. These trips will serve as a reward for students who choose to perform academically as well as exemplify good character. During the 2005 ­ 2006 school year, Inner Vision's primary focus was motivating students to focus on appropriate behavior. Throughout the school year,

We know schools that set limits, enforce boundaries, teach high expectations and create habits of good conduct will cultivate a better society.

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Inner Vision discovered that there was a direct link between the challenging students and those students who were not performing academically. In an effort to address this issue and help enhance the overall school climate for the upcoming school year, Inner Vision's educational consultants will stress the importance of being prepared academically (completing homework assignments, sufficient study time, handing in assignments on time and personal academic responsibility) as well as character education. In addition, the Matteson SD 162 will implement a `Study Buddy' program in order to provide students with the necessary academic assistance they will need in order to ensure their academic success. Consistent with last year, additional incentives will be offered in the form of field trips and other individual awards throughout the school year. Unlike last year, each incentive will have a dual measurement: academics and behavior. In addition to working directly with students, Inner Vision will meet with parents early in the school year to inform them of some of the workshops their students will undergo throughout the school year. Parents will also be given direct feedback. This feedback will help parents gain a better understanding of some of the pressures facing their children and will offer solutions they could implement that could help their child academically as well as socially. If we are going to achieve our goal of enhancing the overall school climate, then partnering with parents is vital. In an effort to keep parents informed of the progress we are making throughout the school year, we will conduct quarterly or semi-annual `School Hall' meetings. These meetings will serve as a progress report or an open forum for parents to discuss concerns and gain a better understanding of how important their commitment and partnership is with the Matteson SD 162 team. The goal of our Character Education Program is to instill habits of respectfulness, responsibility and reliability that will encourage productive citizenship and lead students to a good life. Schools must help children and parents understand the core values, adopt or commit to them and act upon them in their own lives. Students must not only be academically successful in the classroom, but also demonstrate the values of courage and caring as well as the ability to resolve conflicts peacefully. An emphasis on character development is intended to provide students with the necessary tools to become contributing and productive members of society. Additionally, each school has its own Character Education Program. We will continue to gently guide our children in a positive direction.

Students must know what is expected of them if they are to practice appropriate behavior.

Critical to the success of students are parents and teachers working together to model and reinforce high ideals and proper conduct.

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

School Climate and Culture

"Intelligence plus character ­ that is the true goal of education." ~Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

72

School Improvement See Addendum to Long-Range Plan

NORTH CENTRAL ACCREDITATION Matteson School District 162 implements a continuous and coordinated school improvement process. During the 1998 ­ 1999 school year, all District schools applied to the North Central Association for school accreditation. Each of the District's six schools earned a North Central Endorsement and implements the process in compliance with the five-year cycle established by the North Central Association. The school improvement process includes the following: A. The Board of Education, in conjunction with the Superintendent of Schools, and through input from staff, parents, and the community, establishes a vision for education, identifies district-wide goals to advance that vision, and develop an accountability system to document and monitor achievement of each goal. B. Each school establishes a committee to oversee and coordinate school improvement efforts. C. Each school involves all teachers in developing improvement goals that align to district goals and address school, group, and individual student improvement needs. Each school develops a profile that includes aggregate and disaggregate student demographic and performance data. To ensure that all students are challenged, learning, and progressing toward meeting state standards, school improvement goals have been established for the 2006-2007 school year for each District school.

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Huth Middle School Program

VISION Huth Middle School developed a student-centered philosophy that will focus on efficient use of instructional time, character development, and high expectations for all members of the school community. Huth adopted a flexible block schedule that promotes the vision of a student-centered school within a school format. The scheduling model for 2006 ­ 2007 was designed to maximize instructional contact time while allowing for teachers and students to engage outside of the academic process in an effort to improve school climate. Encore classes have become quarterly exploratory classes designed to provide each student with a sound foundation for future educational choices. Special Education resource and instructional teachers will begin to departmentalize math and language arts instruction within their grade level and team assignments. Program of Studies Grade 7 / Grade 8

Mainstream Core:

Literature/Language Arts Mathematics Social Studies Science

Huth Middle School will become a model and effective middle school meting the challenges, changes and needs of the early adolescent learner

Grade 7 / Grade 8

Talented Core:

Literature/Language Arts Foreign Language Mathematics Social Studies Science

Mainstream Exploratory:

Art Music Spanish Technology

Talented Exploratory:

Art Music Jr. Great Books Technology

Required Year Course:

Physical Education Health

Required Year Course:

Physical Education Health

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Band:

Band "Zero Hour" Ensemble Sectional Lesson

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The mainstream core block remains the same as the current model. The 20062007 schedule allows for a flexible block schedule designed to maximize instructional contact time for all Huth students. Exploratory offering provides each student with a sound foundation for their future educational choices. TEAMING OPTIONS A student-centered approach to middle school education is accomplished through a flexible block schedule for all core area teams. Huth employs five academic teams during the 2006 ­ 2007 school year. The gifted-talented team will continue to offer outstanding educational experiences both on and off campus to students who seek an advanced level course of studies. Regular education teams are split into two teams per grade level. They operate as schools within a school following teacher created time blocks designed to allow for more productive use of instructional time. The only regularly scheduled times for students during the 2006 ­ 2007 school year are for physical education/health, exploratory offerings, and lunch. Each core area team meets on a regular basis to address the unique concerns of their individual team, student progress, and scheduling dynamics. Huth employs a homeroom and advisory period for the upcoming school year. These periods assist staff in navigating the day to day business of taking attendance and lunch orders while addressing student organization, and character development. It also allows time for teachers and students to address issues of individual or group concern. Exploratory and Physical education/ health teachers also have time built into the schedule to meet as a team. The flexible block schedule for 2006 ­ 2007 creates a more orderly transition to student passing time, allow for re-grouping of students in Math and Language Art/Reading, while insuring that students continue to receive 90 minutes per day instruction in these key core area subjects. The school within a school approach combined with a flexible block schedule makes it possible for core area staff to participate with students in the building wide initiatives designed to foster character development. Innervision, Junior Achievement and Study Buddy are three programs that will take place during the upcoming school year designed to develop character and responsibility in all students. Each of these programs will focus on one character trait at a time. Special Education resource and instructional students are distributed among the teaching sections of the teams. Encore classes include sufficient seats for Special Education students.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Administration and staff meet monthly to discuss to school improvement and building concerns. Teachers are encouraged to take advantage of professional development opportunities that support their individual growth plan. Huth expanded its Connected Math pilot program from gifted/talented to select mainstream education classes. Teachers participating attended workshops and training sessions designed to further their understanding and ability to create engaged learning opportunities for children. Technological initiatives begun during the 2005 ­ 2006 school year will come to fruition as teachers become more comfortable with Edline, Grade Quick, Study Island, United Streaming, Marco Polo, and Think Link. In response to our nation's physical fitness needs the physical education and health teachers will begin a new focus on fitness program that promotes aerobic fitness in a fun and challenging way. Exploratory teachers will adjust their curriculums to quarterly offering designed to insure that students experience technology, foreign language acquisition, and humanities. CONCLUSION A student-centered, school within a school concept combined with flexible block schedule allows Huth Middle School to continue to meet the diverse needs of adolescence students. Academic achievement and improved test scores will continue to grow under the new format and philosophy of education at Huth. The school climate will continue to improve through homeroom/advisory periods, and an engaged approach to character education that focuses all programs on common character traits. Huth recognizes that a strong commitment to excellence in all areas of education is the only acceptable standard for all stakeholders in the Huth community.

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Closing the Achievement Gap

Over the past four years many initiatives were implemented along with the development of new initiatives and future plans. The following initiatives were included: Implemented: · The expansion of the Gifted/Talented Program to include 4th, 5th and 6th grade classes at Illinois, Indiana and Sauk Schools. The gifted classes at these schools will be in place at the opening of the 2006-2007 school year. · The opening of the Richton Square Pre-Kindergarten & Kindergarten Center · The upgrading of new computers in the Computer Labs · The implementation of the Edline Web Portal Communication System in all District classrooms · The expansion of audio enhancement equipment in all district schools · Implementation of the Parent Advisory at each district school · The replacement of the wireless connection between buildings with a fiber-optic connection to enhance speed and reliability of data communications · Expansion of 2006 Summer School Program to include special education students · Expansion of student assessment software programs for primary, intermediate and upper grades · Implementation of Character Education Program with focus on decision-making, personal behavior and life skills · Expansion of District Fine Arts Program ·A new District website ·Lower class size at all grades ·Summer Professional Development Academy for District Staff ·On-going staff development workshops ·Fall and spring student achievement testing ·Great Books Program ·Junior Achievement Program ·90% reading goal established District-wide ·Targeted Assistance Reading Intervention Program at all schools ·Increased instructional time directed at the teaching of reading ·Word Of The Day Program designed to engage school and home in building language, vocabulary, skills and concepts ·Home/School Connection with designated improvement strategies developed at Parent - Teacher Conference in conjunction with parent input ·Developed individual reading plans for targeted students ·Incremental Assessment Program designed to monitor student performance at mid-year intervals in conjunction with ISAT format ·Grade level collaboration meetings focused on school improvement ·Classroom visitations by the Superintendent ·Quarterly school improvement meetings at each school ·A Gifted Magnet Program at Huth Middle School

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·Grade reorganization plan ·Restructuring Huth Middle School ·Parent Advocates/ Parent Involvement Coordinators Program ·Author Visits In Progress: ·Piloting of new student assessment software program during 2006 Summer School ·Gifted classes for kindergarten through 3rd grade will be in place at the beginning of the 2007-2008 school year. This will complete the implementation of gifted classes for all grades in Matteson School District 162. ·Continue to address student behavior at all grade levels ·Expansion of staff technological instructional software and websites ·Increased staff development for utilization of new instructional/assessment software · Expanded teacher mentoring/induction program

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Professional Development

INTRODUCTION Professional development is the process of improving staff skills and competencies needed to produce outstanding educational results for students. Over the past decade, Matteson School District 162 has been recognized by the staff and the community as a provider of quality professional development. The District's Professional Development Committee has aggressively planned and implemented a professional development program that promotes current innovations and best practices in teaching and learning. Teacher trainers facilitated after-school showcase presentations on topics that support current research in the field, such as multiple intelligences, authentic assessment, literature circles, and other best practices in education. Additionally, the District has supported full day training institutes presented by nationally recognized experts in the field, including Patricia Wolfe ­ Brain Theory, Gerald Duffy on Reading, Kim Sutton on Math, and Richard Curwin on Discipline with Dignity. During 1999 ­ 2002 the District provided Staff Development Programs that aligned with the Illinois State Certification Guidelines, specifically, literacy development, mathematics, assessment, technology and special education. After-school and Saturday workshops, out-of-district conferences, and the summer week-long, district sponsored Tech Stretch also supported professional development. An important component in our professional development program is the opportunity for teachers to receive follow-up support after implementing a new instructional practice. Teachers meet regularly with the staff developers and receive feedback for the successful implementation of a newly learned teaching strategy. Administrators and school principals are also participating in our professional development workshops. Their knowledge and understanding of the new reading and mathematics instructional models, that the teachers are learning, are essential for the successful implementation of these new teaching approaches in their schools. The District Professional Development Committee plays a key role in the development of our District's Professional Development Program. This committee is composed of representative teachers from all District schools. RESEARCH FINDINGS A summary of current research on professional development suggests: Student learning is unlikely to improve without improvements in teaching, namely knowledge, skills, practices and, eventually, teacher attitudes and beliefs (Guskey, 1986). Teacher effectiveness may be the single most significant influence on student achievement. Traditional knowledge-based professional development delivery systems do not prepare teachers to meet the

Professional development is the process of improving staff skills and competencies needed to produce outstanding educational results for students.

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needs of struggling readers. In addition to knowledge, effective teachers need the capacity to take charge of professional knowledge, manipulate it, and adapt it to changing instructional situations. As instructional situations change, teachers must be able to transform knowledge to fit the situation, often on a case-by-case basis. Teachers, therefore, need an eclectic approach to teaching reading that supports various models of best practice research (Duffy, 2002). Models with long-term, sustained effects are both collaborative and ongoing; adapting to the changing needs of the teaching environment, staff and individual teachers. Traditional "in-service-day" rarely influences long-term practice. When teachers are given no follow-up support, 90% of the investment in instruction is lost. It may take up to 20 follow-up and coaching sessions for teachers to successfully implement a new practice (Joyce and Showers, 1988). An important test of professional development is to assess its ability to respond to school wide problems such as disparities in performance between children of more affluent families and children of lower income families (Little, 1997).

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT BELIEF STATEMENTS Matteson School District 162 supports the following belief statements issued by the National Department of Education. High quality professional development: Focuses on teachers as central to learning, yet includes all members of the school community. Focuses on individual, collegial, and organizational improvement. Respects and nurtures the intellectual capacity of teachers, principals, and others of the school community. Reflects the best available research and practice in teaching, learning and leadership. Enables teachers to develop further expertise in subject content, strategies, use of technologies and other essential elements in teaching to high standards. Promotes continuous inquiry and improvement embedded in the daily life of schools. Is planned collaboratively by those who participate in and facilitate the development. Requires substantial time and resources. Is driven by a coherent long-term plan. Is evaluated on the basis of its impact on teacher effectiveness and student learning that guides subsequent professional development

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NEEDS ASSESSMENT/GAP ANALYSIS

Data sources utilized to identify the District's needs in the area of academics, curriculum and instruction, and professional development include the following:

· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Standardized tests ­ ISAT, Terra Nova, ThinkLink Curriculum-based Assessments Conference Approval Forms Workshop Attendance Logs Teacher Surveys Parent Surveys Grade Level Meetings Superintendent's Community Forums School Improvement Plans Student Surveys Institute Evaluations Principal-Facilitated Discussions Quarterly School Improvement Meetings New Teacher Evaluations/Meetings Teacher Evaluations Building and District-based Grade Level Meetings

Our district in partnership with Governors State University developed a Masters Degree in Mathematics Cohort for teachers in our district and nearby school districts. This Masters Degree Cohort began in January 2005 and is housed at Huth Middle School. Beginning with the 2005-2006 school year the cohort program was expanded providing masters degree cohort programs in mathematics and educational administration. Providing these masters degree programs for our staff will enhance their content knowledge and broaden their instructional skills in the areas of reading and mathematics. The Educational Administrative Cohort will provide aspiring administrators with the opportunity to learn the essentials necessary for becoming a school administrator. One of the goals of District 162 is to increase the number of teachers who hold Masters Degrees and create career ladder opportunities for staff who desire to become principals, assistant principals and district administrators. PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE Planning for the future professional development needs of the District requires a comprehensive and integrated analysis of student performance data in conjunction with staff professional development needs. The District's Blueprint for Excellence, increased student performance expectations, and rigorous standards for student achievement are driving future District professional development initiatives. Identified critical areas of need, namely in the areas of reading, mathematics, and technology, are being addressed with focus and intensity through an organized, systemic approach that supports the needs of all staff including administration, teachers, paraprofessionals and support staff.

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REFLECTIVE PRACTICE Through targeted professional development, teachers will facilitate learning in ways that transform classroom environments. Clearly defined professional goals, objectives, and strategies are critical for guiding the professional development design and implementation process. A process-orientated delivery system with ongoing follow-up will ensure long-term sustained effects for redefining classroom practice. Reflective Practice that includes research, training, discussion, development, and reflection will drive the process.

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2006 Summer New Staff Orientation Program Newly hired teachers were invited to attend a weeklong staff orientation workshop to learn about Matteson School District 162 ­ its instructional program, district policies, the curriculum and other pertinent information that will enable them to get off to a good start when school opens for the 2006-2007 school year. The topics and events that were covered during the Orientation Program are: Illinois Learning Standards The District Curriculum District Policies and Procedures Instructional Programs and Initiatives The District Technology Program The District Gifted Program Parental Involvement and Communication Student Behavior Guidelines and Classroom Management Tour of District Schools Meet Your Mentor Meet the Principals and District Administrators 25 teachers participated 2006-2007 Everyday Math Staff Development Training Program Everyday Mathematics is District 162's mathematics program for grades K-6. This mathematics program utilizes a manipulative based approach and engages students in many hands-on activities. Denise Porter, who is one of the authors of the Everyday Mathematics program, will continue to provide teachers with instructional strategies and approaches for enhancing their teaching skills utilizing this highly successful mathematics program.

2006-2007 ISAT Mathematics Staff Development Program Susan Kelly works with math teachers from Kindergarten through eighth grade. The teachers are looking at all aspects of mathematics instruction. In the process of preparing for the ISAT, teachers are focusing on curriculum, assessment and the extended response section of the mathematics test. This includes focusing on extended response problems and the explanation of how students arrive at an answer. The teachers will continue to work with Susan Kelly to develop and implement strategies to improve mathematics instruction.

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2006-2007 Reading Staff Development Program Language Arts staff development (reading, writing and communication skills) will continue to be a primary focus for the 2006-2007 school year. Teachers will learn effective instructional strategies for improving student reading comprehension and writing skills. Six Trait Writing and ISAT Writing Assessment Rubric workshops will be provided for all reading/language arts teachers.

2006 Summer Professional Development Academy The 2006 Summer Professional Development Academy provided our teaching staff with the following workshops: Science Workshops that provided teachers with strategies for integrating math, geography and science lessons. Another science workshop entitled, "Physics Phun" showed teachers how to use everyday materials to create fun and exciting science experiments. The ISAT Science Standards were presented and how to incorporate these standard in their lesson development. The Math Workshops provided teachers with innovative ideas and thoughts on extended response, measurement, decimals and more Primary teachers learned how to use Venn diagrams, charts and other make and take math materials for instructional purposes. Technology Workshops provided teachers with an opportunity to fine tune their understanding of Grade Quick, Edline, United Streaming and Study Island software. The Special Education staff learned strategies for differentiating instruction, teaching to state standards, modifying instructional lessons and co-teaching models. The Reading Workshop explored various reading strategies using a multidisciplinary approach. Participants used graphic organizers and writing frames to increase student performance in reading. . Collaborative/articulation workshops in art and music provided the fine arts staff with an opportunity to discuss grade level outcomes, district-wide fine art venues and strategies for enhancing our overall fine arts program.

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Parent Involvement Coordinator (PIC)

Introduction In keeping with District 162's continuous and progressive goal of moving from "Good to Great," District 162 schools had an outstanding year with its new parent involvement program. The program was designed to increase parent and community involvement in the schools. The Parent Involvement Coordinator plans and facilitates parent programs and workshops to support efforts to become more engaged and involved in their children's education. Mission The mission of the Parent Involvement Coordinator is to promote educational excellence through volunteer initiatives and parent education. Parent Involvement Coordinators (PICs) support families in their effort to assist their children and schools. Each school in School District 162 has its own PIC. PICs are parents who are responsible for advocating and coordinating parent involvement with the school and they are committed to strengthening the dirstict's home/school connection. District 162 is proactive in making sure parents and community are engaged and involved in the academic goals of its students. A strong home/school connection is imperative for our district to fulfill its vision and that the 90% reading goal becomes a reality. District 162 is committed to keeping pace with the nature of our community. We understand that working and nonvolunteering families need alternatives in order to honor their volunteer efforts. Research shows that schools with active parental involvement have higher academic success. Research also indicates that students whose parents are involved in their education are more successful. Students thrive in an atmosphere in which parents and educators value each other's contributions to student growth. Family/Parent involvement enriches the school community. There is an understanding that student achievement improves because parents, faculty and staff communicate often for the sake and growth of students. Despite the trend of decreasing parent involvement at the upper grade levels, it has been determined that students respond positively to their parents' participation and involvement at the middle school grades. PICs are charged with involving parents in their child's academic experience.

The Parent Involvement Coordinator will offer parents the programs and services that they need in order to become more engaged and an integral part of their children's education.

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Ensuring that students are academically prepared once they leave District 162 takes a strong home/school connection and PICs will assist the District in this endeavor. PICs will increase parental involvement in their school by working with parents, administrators and community members. They will build relationships and advocate support for their school and District 162 initiatives.

Goals for our District PICs

Some of the responsibilities of the Parent Involvement Coordinator include the following: 1. To coordinate and conduct outreach to non-volunteer families and maintain volunteer hours. 2. Show appreciation for parent participation, and value their contributions. 3. Facilitate and organize support groups and workshops for parents in their school. 4. Attend monthly PTO/PTL Meetings and School Board Meetings. 5. Communicate and encourage parental support of district oriented events via Edline. 6. Reach out to all families, not just those who attend meetings. 7. Welcome parent and community participation at all times. 8. Develop dynamic programs to improve student achievement through parental involvement. 9. Create Welcome Packets for new families and address parent inquiries regarding school/district programs, activities and events. The primary responsibility of our PICs is to work with the entire school community to support student learning and district goals. Parents are encouraged to contact their PIC for volunteer opportunities, workshops, and PTO/PTL programs.

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2005-2006 Parent Involvement Coordinator Activities

· · · · · · · · · · · · · Motivational Parent Workshops with Dwayne Bryant Being an Advocate for Your Student Workshop Men At School Day Lunch is on Me Second Grade Math Workshop Fellowship Breakfast for Parents Volunteer Appreciation Evening Edline Workshop for Parents Pennies from Heaven Drive Parent Workshop with Barbara G. Fox Women of Huth Workshop Volunteer Raffle Katrina Fundraiser (Lee Road School)

The PIC's are planning events and activities for the 2006-2007 school year with the building and District administrators.

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Parent/Community Involvement

There is strong research suggesting that students who are successful in school are supported by parents who are involved in their education, and that effective schools are a function of invested parents and community members. Matteson School District 162 has a strong commitment to promoting parent and community involvement through volunteer programs, at-home educational activities, and school/business partnerships. Beginning with the 2005-2006 school year parent programs were conducted focusing on topics that emphasize the importance of parental involvement in their child's schooling. There is a direct correlation between achievement and parental involvement in their child's education. One way that parents can participate in their child's schooling is by activating their new Edline Web Portal. During the 2004-2005 school year the district piloted the Edline Communications System. This system enabled teachers, parents, staff and students to participate fully in the education process via the Internet. Parents were able to access student grades, homework assignments, classroom/school news seven days a week, 24 hours a day from a PC. This communication system was available to all parents, students, and teachers for the 2005-2006 school year. Information as to how to use the Edline system was sent home to all parents and workshops were conducted in each building. For the past decade, the District has promoted activities to strengthen parent involvement and school/business partnerships. School-based Parent Teacher Organizations remain strong and provide ongoing support through special events, volunteerism, and fundraisers. Local banks, law offices, and other businesses have provided monetary support on an as needed basis for special projects. The District continues to maintain affiliations with community service organizations such as the Rotary Clubs of Matteson and Park Forest, the Matteson Historical Museum, local libraries and Irons Oaks Environmental Center. As the District moves forward, purposeful activities will be planned that engage parent and community members in meaningful ways to improve student achievement. Home/school connections and community/business partnerships will be strengthened in an effort to enhance the schools and the community. Our Parent Involvement Coordinators will continue to plan and promote activities and events that will support the parents in their efforts to assist their child and home school. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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Arcadia School believes that the success of students depends on the importance of students, staff and parents working together positively. Parents are encouraged to help at school and at home for the purpose of enriching the entire school community. Arcadia has a strong parent and community commitment to help our students read through the 1-1 Baggie Book Program and the Accelerated Reader Program. Whether it be a weekly, daily or "as possible" commitment, parents and community members read with all students within classrooms or help with the Everyday Mathematics Program. Parents provide positive role models and establish positive 1-1 adult-child learning relationships. Parents also attend field/study trips on a consistent basis. P.T.O. meetings are focusing on curriculum updates and insights. Parent support continues to enhance student achievement growth as assistance is provided at home and at school on a consistent basis. Matteson School is extremely fortunate to have parents who immerse themselves into their children's educational experience! The PTO is instrumental in sponsoring fundraisers. The funds are used to supply teachers and students with supplemental materials and activities necessary to provide a great education and love for learning. These materials and activities include additional educational equipment, nutritional snacks during ISAT week, stimulating assemblies, treats for class parties, organizing and sponsoring exciting evening activities that encourage fun filled family involvement, and so much more. Grandparents and parent volunteers consistently support teachers in a variety of ways. They read with the students on a daily basis, assist students with math activities, chaperone field trips, copy materials, assist with creative art projects, donate materials that support extra special educational activities for students, and help support activities in the areas of science and social studies. Matteson School is even fortunate enough to have our very own volunteer gardener, who keeps Matteson's landscape healthy and beautiful. The enthusiastic parental support at our music and art programs is awe-inspiring! The pride felt by the Matteson staff is greatly enhanced by the wonderful support provided by our parents. Parent involvement is vital to the success of our students. Because our enrollment has greatly increased, we are encouraging even more involvement from our parents. With this additional support from our parents, our school will certainly continue on its journey from great to greater! Parents are an integral component to the educational process at Illinois School. Illinois School uses Edline to increase information sharing among parents, teachers, and students. Parents mentor in the Junior Achievement program and the Service Learning project. Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

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Video production skills are being taught in our video production studio. Students have produced several videos during technology classes. Students have become familiar with audio editing as well. Illinois School students used these skills to create a "Podcast", an online radio broadcast that can be downloaded or listened to over the Internet by parents and community members. Illinois School continues to host a wide variety of special events to involve parents in the education of children. Special events such as Science Fair, Parent Education Night, Bed-time Story Night, Real Men Read, Black History Month Programs, Scarecrow Night, Taste of Pre-School Night, Sunflower Festival, Global Fest, and Art in the Park, to name a few: all are designed to increase community involvement in the school. Our School Improvement Plan calls for increased parental involvement in the area of career exploration and guest speakers. The incredible level of parental involvement helps to make Illinois School a solid learning community. Parent Involvement at the Indiana School is thriving and ongoing. The number of volunteers continues to grow each year. This is deeply appreciated for the majority of the volunteers work with struggling students with emphasis on reading improvement. At any time that you come to the Indiana School, you will most likely encounter parents working with students in the classrooms, in the hallways, and in every nook and cranny of the building. Parents may provide extra practice in skills ­ based reading lessons, provide extra reinforcement in math skills, and listen to readers as they practice fluency, all under the direction of a certified teacher. Parent volunteers also serve as mentors to encourage children in making good choices. In the 2006-2007 school year, Indiana School will develop "Lunch with a Leader" program with our 6th graders. Additionally, volunteers are happy to serve as presenters at assemblies and in classrooms to reinforce character development. In order to increase the number of volunteer hours at Indiana School, volunteers will be solicited at Open House; at parent/teacher conferences; and by holding frequent parents' evenings and family nights throughout the year. A family poetry reading slam event will be held to encourage parents to read with their children. Each November, the school celebrates Family Reading Night by hosting entire families. A Family Math Night is scheduled each winter; parents and students come together under the direction of certified staff to play math games and discover that math is fun. Notes and tips will be sent home on how to help children learn. At Indiana School the staff believes that when home and school work together, the students always benefit.

"A mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than can a field, however fertile, without cultivation." ~Cicero

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A continued goal at Sauk School has been to ensure that parents are involved in their children's education. Best practice supports the idea of more varied and cooperative roles for teachers, parents and administrators. Parental activities that are a part of the programming at Sauk School include: 1) Read at Home Logs: By and large, when children grow up in print-rich homes, where parents model reading and writing, where literacy is a tool of day-to-day family life, where stories and words are treasured, where reading aloud is a bedtime ritual, good readers usually emerge. Every Sauk student has a daily reading log that records the amount of time spent at home reading with a parent or other significant adult. 2) Breakfast and a Book: This annual event invites parents to come to school and not only share breakfast with the children but also to spend time reading with the children. 3) Award Assemblies celebrate the accomplishments of the children. Parents are encouraged to attend and special recognition is given to those parents who volunteer. 4) In preparing for the ISATs, parents and students complete "at-home" activities. In working with their children on the activities, the parents are provided with an up close and personal experience with what is required for success on the ISATs. 5) Edline: Edline will open new doors and facilitate home-school connections. Parents will enjoy immediate feed back on student performance as well as up to date information on up-coming events. Stakeholders will be able to communicate immediately via e-mail with other members of the learning community. 6) Parent Volunteers: One may find on most days, parents in the building assisting classroom teachers with a variety of activities. Parents may be found in the media center reading to children, outside the classroom door reviewing math facts, or in the classroom serving as an extra set of hands to the teacher during special projects. There are several parents who are not able to volunteer on a regular basis but will show up on a "day-off" to assist wherever needed. 7) Student-Led Conferences: To further ensure parent participation is student learning, Sauk School has adopted in many classrooms student-led conferences as the format for parent/teacher conferences. 8) Open House: The Sauk school family conducts an Open House at the beginning of the year to share the opportunities available to it's

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members. Teachers invite the parent members of the family personally and follow-up with those that are not able to attend. 9) Parent Workshops have been planned annually to assist parents with ideas for helping their students become more successful at school. Workshops have covered both reading and math assistance techniques. 10)Sauk Expo: This event replaced the annual science fair a few years ago. During our expo teachers display many of the projects that were completed throughout the year as well as those assigned specifically for this event. While each room may choose their own theme for the event, the children are asked to create artifacts to share on this evening. These artifacts are usually made at home and brought to school. Projects in the past have included a life-sized Conestoga wagon and its supplies, Indian homes, skyscrapers, science experiments, robots, state displays, plays, and musical demonstrations. The O.W. Huth Middle School PTO is an active and committed group of parents with the children and staff of Huth Middle School as their primary focus. The partnership of the Huth PTO and administration/staff of Huth benefit students in a variety of ways; The PTO is involved in volunteering, lecturing, organizing special events, etc. The Huth Band Boosters are also a very involved parent support organization. The band boosters consist of parents of students from Huth, Indiana, Sauk and Illinois Schools and is considered a critical component of the successes our band experiences. They are depended on to assist with fund raisers, contests and other essentials that contribute to making the program a success. In conjunction with these expectations, parents are strong role models for our students and are highly regarded for their commitment to the academic achievement and social development of our students. We are hopeful that this year the "Men of Huth" will become more actively engaged in our quest of going from "Good to Great". We realize the male role model is often missing in schools and sometimes families. We encourage all of our fathers to become active participants in this organization. We need you! Parent involvement at Huth is essential to the success of our educational program. We encourage all parents to join us in our very worthwhile and dedicated organizations.

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Renaissance of Richton Square School

Closed a number of years ago due to declining enrollment in the District, Richton Square School reopened as an Early Childhood Center for the 2006-2007 school year for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students who reside within District boundaries in Richton Park and University Park. Returning the former school to District 162 allows the District to continue its commitment to small class sizes and provide an Early Childhood Center for the growing number of young families in the Richton Park and University Park areas. The completely renovated building provides the nurturing atmosphere that allows pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children to flourish and ensure that they will be well prepared when they move on to first grade at Matteson School. The refurbished Richton Square School is air conditioned and houses bright classrooms, as well as a music, art and exploration room to offer materials, equipment, and technology that characterize a state of the art Early Childhood Center. The school also has a Literacy Center and gymnasium, as well as resource specialists including a speech and language pathologist. The benefits of a quality Early Childhood are astounding. The first years of a child's life are critical for developing the intellectual foundation for academic success. Early childhood programs influence intellectual and socio-emotional performance that lasts well into the school years. It has been proven through research that children who participated in quality early childhood programs were less likely to be identified for special education services, less likely to be retained and had a significantly higher graduation rate. Research indicates that the return of investment in early childhood education ranges from 7% to 12% return by reducing special education costs during the educational years and later reducing crime and welfare. Research even goes so far as to say that men who participated in early childhood programming as boys had significantly higher monthly earnings, more owned homes and were less likely to be arrested during the course of their lifetimes.

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High quality early childhood programs produce significant long term benefits because they engage children, parents and teachers collectively. Children are encouraged to initiate their own learning activities and actively participate rather than passively receive information. Parents are empowered by involving them as partners in supporting their children's development. Teachers are enhanced by providing them with extensive training and support focusing upon developmentally appropriate expectations, curriculum and the development of the whole child. No other usage for Richton Square School can provide benefits for our community and the school district that surpass an early childhood center. By designating this site as a facility to service the needs of our youngest students we have the opportunity to have short and long term effects that will benefit District 162 for years to come. The mission of the Richton Square Kindergarten/Early Childhood Center is to create an environment conducive to fulfilling the cognitive, social, emotional and physical needs of our young children from the communities of Richton Park and University Park through developmentally appropriate practices and services. Our newly renovated facility provides the nurturing atmosphere that allows pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children to flourish and ensure that they will be well prepared for their future educational years. A shared effort of home, school and community will offer a solid foundation as life long learners begin their journey through District 162's schools. A successful early childhood program provides for the development of the whole child. All aspects of learning are interrelated and the balanced program offered at Richton Square School will provide opportunities for our students to develop physically, emotionally and intellectually as they participate in activities correlated with Illinois State Standards and Matteson District 162's curriculum. Thriving in Richton Square School's nurturing and positive environment will create in each child a strong self concept and personal acceptance, enabling the development of a successful learner throughout the educational years. Two of Richton Square School's classrooms are devoted to Project Early Start and the Special Education Early Childhood Program. These preschool programs are designed for three to five year old children who meet placement criteria. A screening process that allows District personnel to evaluate children's sensory and cognitive development determines eligibility for the programs.

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Richton Park and University Park children who will be five years old prior or on September 1 are eligible to attend kindergarten at Richton Square School. The kindergarten curriculum takes advantage of the child's level of development, keen interests, natural curiosity and enthusiasm for learning. Programming is designed to develop a zest for learning and a healthy self esteem that inspires children to believe they are competent and will be successful in school. The curriculum is designed to stimulate children to think, analyze, predict and draw conclusions. Cooperative learning techniques are incorporated into the classroom to stimulate the development of oral language, reasoning, questioning skills and social skills.

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Index

Closing the Achievement Gap, 77-78 Curriculum and Instruction, 40-42 Demographics, 5-12 District Gifted Program Expansion, 54-59 Facilities, 19-24 Finance, 34-39 Fine Arts Program, 68-70 Food Service, 16-18 Grading/Report Cards/Promotion/Retention, 65-67 Huth Middle School Program, 74-76 Parent/Community Involvement , 88-92 Parent Involvement Coordinator (PIC), 85-87 Professional Development, 79-84 Renaissance of Richton Square School, 93-95 School Climate and Culture/Completing the Circle, 71-72 School Improvement, 73 Special Education, 46-53 Student Achievement/Assessment, 60-64 Summer School Programming, 44-45 Targeted Assistance/Reading Intervention, 43 Technology, 25-33 Transportation, 13-15

Matteson School District 162 Long-Range Master Plan

Index

96

Information

96 pages

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