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Garritan Personal Orchestra

Sibelius Edition

User Guide

Edition 1 November 2005 User Guide written by Daniel Spreadbury, with contributions by Gary Garritan, Tom Hopkins, Reuben Mitchell and David Harvey. Project Manager: Bill Marten Producer: Gary Garritan Director of Programming: Tom Hopkins Director of Software Development: Jeff Hurchalla Sibelius sound set programming: Reuben Mitchell and David Harvey Please email any suggestions you have for improvements to this User Guide to [email protected]

Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition User Guide copyright © Sibelius Software Ltd. 2005. Published by Sibelius Software Ltd., The Old Toy Factory, 20­22 City North, Fonthill Road, London N4 3HF, UK

All rights reserved. This User Guide may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means ­ electronic, recording, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise ­ in whole or in part, without the prior written consent of the publisher. Although every care has been taken in the preparation of this User Guide, neither the publisher nor the authors can take responsibility for any loss or damage arising from any errors or omissions it may contain. Sibelius, the Sibelius logo, Scorch, Flexi-time, Espressivo, Rubato, Rhythmic feel, Arrange, ManuScript, Virtual Manuscript Paper, House Style, SoundStage, Opus, Inkpen2, Helsinki, magnetic, multicopy, Optical, Dynamic parts, the blue notes and double helix logos, SibeliusMusic.com, SibeliusEducation.com, `The fastest, smartest, easiest way to write music' and `99% inspiration, 1% perspiration' are all trademarks or registered trademarks of Sibelius Software Ltd. in the USA, UK and other countries. All other trademarks are acknowledged as the property of their respective owners. Garritan Personal Orchestra® is a registered trademark of Garritan Corp. Use of the Garritan Personal Orchestra® library and the contents herein are subject to the terms and conditions of the license agreement distributed with the library. You should carefully read the license agreement before using this product. The sounds presented in Garritan Personal Orchestra® are protected by copyright and cannot be distributed or copied, whether modified or unmodified. KontaktTM is a trademark of Native Instruments GmbH. SteinwayTM is a trademark of Steinway & Sons and is used by permission. VSTTM is a trademark of Steinberg. The information contained herein may change without notice.

Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installation on Mac OS X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Technical help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting started GPO in five minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Choosing a sound set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Choosing instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Sibelius interprets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Basic percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5 6 7 9 10 12 15 19 23

Advanced use 27 Setting up Kontakt Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Garritan Personal Orchestra Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Fine-tuning your performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Strings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Woodwinds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Brass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Percussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Keyboards and harp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Appendices 47 Appendix A: List of instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 License Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition User Guide

Introduction

We have all cherished the sound of a symphony orchestra. Orchestral music is everywhere around us ­ in the movies, on television, in interactive games, live performances, radio and in public venues. It is hard to escape the power and influence that orchestral music has. What makes orchestral music so expressive and vibrant is its wide variety of instruments. Sometimes we might even wonder how it feels to conduct an orchestra or how our music would sound in the hands of a capable orchestra. New computing and sampling technology now makes this possible. We have put together a package that will allow you to realize your creative potential. The following presents some of the outstanding features of Personal Orchestra:

* A complete orchestra at your fingertips: Garritan Personal Orchestra is an afford-

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able, easy-to-use and thoroughly comprehensive orchestral library. It includes all the major instruments of the orchestra: strings, brass, woodwinds, percussion and keyboards. Highest-quality orchestral instruments: includes quality instruments such as a SteinwayTM piano, a Stradivarius violin, Guarneri and Gagliano Violins, Wurlitzer harp, Haynes flutes, Heckel bassoons and many other exquisite instruments. No sampler required: the entire orchestral library is integrated with the Native Instruments KontaktTM Player and works directly within Sibelius. No need to purchase a separate sampler. Notation integration: Sibelius can automatically realize great-sounding orchestral playback directly from the score. Suited for everybody: professional film composers can use this collection for quick orchestral sketches and capturing creative ideas. Hobbyists can use it for adding orchestrations to their tracks. Educators and students can use it for scoring projects or studying orchestration.

Garritan Personal Orchestra is a dynamic library with a very active community. Please check www.garritan.com or www.sibelius.com for the latest up-to-date information, FAQs, troubleshooting, helpful hints and tutorials.

4

Installation on Windows

Installation on Windows

System requirements Requires 2GB hard disk space (in addition to Sibelius 4); Windows XP (or some Windows 2000 configurations); DVD drive; Sibelius 4.1 or later. Additionally:

* Scores that use up to about 8 different sounds: 1.8GHz processor or faster, 1GB+

RAM (1.5GB+ recommended), preferably ASIO-compatible sound card.

* Scores that use up to about 20 different sounds: 2.5GHz processor or faster,

1.5GB RAM. ASIO-compatible sound card strongly recommended (not sound chip on motherboard), preferably separate graphics card. * Scores that use reverb or more than 20 different sounds will need a faster processor and more RAM. Before you install Before you install GPO Sibelius Edition, you should ensure you have already installed Kontakt Player Silver (and Kontakt Gold, if you have it), and have installed the latest updates from your Sibelius 4 CD-ROM. You should also ensure that you are running Sibelius 4.1 or later (check the version number in Help > About Sibelius). You can download the latest version by choosing Help > Check For Updates. Installing Garritan Personal Orchestra * Quit Sibelius, if it is running. * Insert your Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition DVD into your DVDROM drive, label side up. After a few moments, an installation program will start automatically. * Click Next, then I Accept. * You will be prompted for a serial number, which you will find on a label inside the DVD case that your GPO Sibelius Edition disc came in. * Installation will use the same location as your existing Kontakt Player Silver or Gold installation. Click Next. * Adjust the name/location of the Start menu icon group, if you can be bothered, then click Next. * A progress bar will appear as everything is installed to your hard drive. Beware that the time estimate given on the screen is normally wrong by an order of magnitude, and it may take several minutes to install everything. * You will be told that installation has completed successfully. Click Finish. * Now turn to GPO in five minutes on page 10 to get started. 5

Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition User Guide

Installation on Mac OS X

System requirements Requires 2GB hard disk space (in addition to Sibelius 4); Mac OS 10.3.9 or later; DVD drive; Sibelius 4.1 or later. Additionally:

* Scores that use up to about 8 different sounds: G4/G5, 1GB+ RAM (1.5GB+ rec-

ommended).

* Scores that use up to about 20 different sounds: 1.8GHz processor or faster,

1.5GB+ RAM.

* Scores that use reverb or more than 20 different sounds will need a faster proces-

sor and more RAM. Before you install Before you install GPO Sibelius Edition, you should ensure you have already installed Kontakt Player Silver (and Kontakt Gold, if you have it), and have installed the latest updates from your Sibelius 4 CD-ROM. You should also ensure that you are running Sibelius 4.1 or later (check the version number in Sibelius > About Sibelius). You can download the latest version by choosing Help > Check For Updates. Installing Garritan Personal Orchestra * Quit Sibelius, if it is running. * Insert your Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition DVD into your DVDROM drive, label side up. An icon will appear on your desktop; double-click it. * In the window that appears, double-click Install GPO Sibelius Edition. * You will be prompted to authenticate, so enter your password and click OK. * You will see a license agreement; click Continue, then Agree. * Click Install. * You will be prompted for a serial number, which you will find on a label inside the DVD case that your GPO Sibelius Edition disc came in. * A progress bar will appear as everything is installed to your hard drive. It may take several minutes to install everything, so be patient. * You will be told that installation has completed successfully. Click Quit. * Now turn to GPO in five minutes on page 10 to get started.

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Technical help

Technical help

Before seeking technical help, please ensure that your query is not answered by the Handbook, tutorial videos, Sibelius Reference or the online Help Center: choose Help > Help Center in Sibelius, or visit www.sibelius.com/helpcenter. You can also ask your question on the chat page in the online Help Center, where you can get help from other Sibelius users. We provide help on installing Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition and using it with Sibelius. If you have problems with your computer, printer, soundcard, MIDI equipment, scanner, web site, or other software, we will only be able to offer general advice and may not be able to help ­ your hardware/software or Internet provider is ultimately responsible for solving this kind of problem. How to get help Please use email, fax or mail rather than phoning if you do not need an immediate response. If you phone for help, have this User Guide and a pen and paper to hand when you call, and be in front of your computer if possible. Please contact the technical help center for the country where you bought Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition. Technical help may be limited or unavailable between 24 December and 1 January.

* Australia: Sibelius Australia Pty Ltd., 2/52 Weaver St, Edwardstown, SA 5039, tel: 08 82 771 722, fax: 08 82 771 799, email: [email protected] * Austria: Weiss & Kadlec GmbH, Triester Strasse 261, A-1230 Wien, tel: 01 667 45390, fax: 01 667 453921, email: [email protected] * Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg: Music Electronics, Klokkengieterijstraat

21, 9160 Lokeren, Belgium, tel: (+32) 09 348 5508 (Wednesday-Saturday 10.0012.30 & 14.00-18.00, Sunday 14.00-18.00), fax: (+32) 09 348 2386, email:

[email protected] * Czech Republic & Slovakia: Disk Multimedia s.r.o., Nam.9 Kvetna 2, Boskovice

680 01, Czech Republic, tel: 0501 454 769, fax: 0501 456 363, email:

[email protected] * Denmark: New Musik, Sindalsvej 48B, Risskov, DK-8240, tel: 0 87 32 87 00, fax: 0 87 32 87 01, email: [email protected] * Finland: Carbo'n Music Oy, Kauppatie 8, 04300 Tuusula, tel: 0207 411 370, email: [email protected] * France: Steinberg France, 17 rue Curie, 94270 Le Kremlin Bicêtre, tel: 01 46 77 42 40, fax: 01 46 77 42 41, email: [email protected]

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Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition User Guide

* Germany: M3C Systemtechnik GmbH, Grossbeerenstr. 51, 10965 Berlin, tel:

* * * * * * *

* * *

*

* * * *

030 789 0790 (Monday-Friday 13.00-17.00), fax: 030 785 6849, email: [email protected] Greece: Nakas Music House SA, 19km Leoforos Lavriou, Peania, 190 02, tel: 01 210 668 6000, fax: 01 210 668 6108, email: [email protected] Hungary: Midisoft Studio kft, Szuglo u.54, 1145 Budapest, tel: 1 467 3310 / 1 469 0699, fax: 1 467 3323, email: [email protected] Iceland: Tonastodin, Skipholt 50d, 105 Reykjavik, tel: 552 1185, fax: 562 8778, email: [email protected] Ireland: One Source Computer Services, Connect House, 115 Cork Street, Dublin 8, tel: 01 453 1233, fax: 01 454 5495, email: [email protected] Italy: Midiware, Via Cassia 1081, 00189 Rome, tel: 06 3036 3456 (Monday and Thursday afternoons), fax: 06 3036 3382, email: [email protected] New Zealand: Computer Music Systems, PO Box 8, Helensville, tel: 09 420 9952, fax: 09 420 9957, email: [email protected] North, Central & South America: Sibelius Technical Help, 1407 Oakland Blvd., Suite 103, Walnut Creek, CA 94596, USA. Email: [email protected], fax: 1-925-280-0008, tel: 1-925-280-2101, Monday to Friday 7:00am to 4:00pm PST, except holidays. Norway: Siv. Ing. Benum AS, PO Box 145, Vinderen, Oslo 0319, tel: 22 13 99 00, email: [email protected] Poland: Media Business Solutions, 21 Chelmska St. bud. 4 p. 41, 00-724 Warsaw, tel: 048 22 851 10 40, fax: 048 22 851 10 41, email: [email protected] Singapore & Malaysia: Graphic Edumedia, 61 Kaki Bukit Ave 1, #04-20 Shun Li Industrial Park, Singapore 417943, tel: 674 93656 / 674 95691, fax: 065 674 95691, email: [email protected] South Africa: Tuerk Music Technologies, Commercial City, Cnr. Tungsten & Hans, Strydom Park, PO Box 1016, Randburg 2125, tel: 011 792 8402, fax: 011 792 8465, email: [email protected] Spain: Microfusa, Sepulveda 134, Barcelona 08015, Spain. Fax: 93 347 19 16, tel: 93 435 36 82. Sweden: Fitzpatrick AB, Box 7292, 187 14 Taby, tel: 08 587 915 00, fax: 08 587 915 99 Switzerland: Giant Electronics Ltd., PO Box 142, Rue du Controle 15, 2501 Bienne, tel: 032 322 5274, fax: 032 322 5278, email: [email protected] UK: Technical Help, Sibelius Software Ltd., The Old Toy Factory, 20­22 City North, Fonthill Road, London N4 3HF. Email: [email protected], fax: 020 7561 7888 (+44 20 7561 7888), tel: 020 7561 7997 (+44 20 7561 7997) Monday-Friday 10am-6pm UK time except public holidays.

8

Getting started

Getting started

GPO in five minutes

Using Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition is very simple. To get greatsounding playback, all you have to do is:

* Choose the appropriate sound set for your score * Adjust the default choice of sounds in Sibelius's Mixer window, if required * Ensure your score is marked up appropriately with dynamics, hairpins, slurs,

trills, and so on

* Hit the Play button and listen to the results of your handiwork!

Choosing an appropriate sound set Because Garritan Personal Orchestra has more than 280 sounds, we've supplied a number of different sound sets suited to a variety of ensembles to help Sibelius choose the most appropriate default sounds for your score. So once you know what forces you're writing for:

* Choose Play > Playback and Input Devices * On the Playback Devices page, ensure that Kontakt Player is set as your default device (on Windows, this means that the Use column is set to Yes for Kontakt Player and to No for all other devices, and on Mac, Kontakt Player

should be selected and blue in color)

* Under the Sound set column, choose the most appropriate sound set, e.g. GPO Modern Orchestra, GPO String Orchestra, or GPO Kontakt Gold Combo * Click OK to close the dialog.

For help in choosing which sound set is most appropriate for which kind of score, see Choosing a sound set on page 12. Adjusting the default choice of sounds Each of the sound sets includes a reasonable set of default sounds for your score's playback. If you discover, however, that you prefer the lush violin sounds to the standard sectional violin sounds, simply open Sibelius's Mixer window, select the fader for the staff whose sound you want to modify, and choose the desired sound from the Sound menu. For help with using the Mixer window, refer to 4.2 Mixer in Sibelius Reference. For more information about when you may want to adjust the default choice of sounds, see Choosing instruments on page 15. Marking up your score Unlike other advanced sample libraries, Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition is integrated into Sibelius itself, so there's no need to jump through any of the 10

GPO in five minutes hoops normally associated with getting great sample playback from a notation application. You don't need to insert a whole new staff when you want your violin to switch from arco to pizz. You don't need to add hidden notes to activate a keyswitch. You don't need to laboriously record in modulation wheel changes or sustain pedal MIDI messages to achieve volume changes or legato. Instead, you simply mark up your score with normal, musical markings: add slurs for legato, add hairpins for volume changes, add up-bow and down-bow articulations for quick runs of string notes, add "pizz." and "arco" as text. Sibelius interprets all of these markings automatically to take advantage of many of the advanced capabilities of the Garritan Personal Orchestra library. For more information about exactly which markings Sibelius interprets, see What

Sibelius interprets on page 19.

Just hit Play When you're ready to hear your music brought to life, just click the Play button in the Playback window, or hit Space. If you need help with the Playback window, see 4.1 Playback in Sibelius Reference. If the necessary sounds haven't been loaded into the Kontakt Player, they'll now load. A progress bar will then appear for a moment while Sibelius analyses your score and creates the appropriate controller messages. (If you have View > Hidden Objects switched on you may notice lots of small gray text items drawn above the staves in your score ­ don't worry, they'll disappear again when you stop playback.) You'll then hear your score played back with greater realism and expression than ever! How to use the Kontakt Player To show or hide the Kontakt Player window, choose Window > Kontakt Player (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+O or zXO). Refer to the 4.9 Kontakt Player topic in Sibelius Reference for further details about how to use the Kontakt Player interface.

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Getting started

Choosing a sound set

Because Garritan Personal Orchestra contains more than 280 different sounds, we have provided 10 different sound sets designed for different ensembles, so you can in each case choose from a different subset of specially-targeted sounds drawn from the whole collection. How to change sound set * Choose Play > Playback and Input Devices * Click in the Sound Set column to show the menu of sound sets, as shown:

* Choose the desired sound set, then click Close to confirm your choice.

See 4.10 Playback and input devices in Sibelius Reference for more help on using this dialog. GPO sound sets The 10 supplied sound sets are as follows:

* GPO 32 Slot Orchestra: This is the best sound set for quickly setting up and

playing back any score. Only 32 instruments are available, to fit into the 32 slots of the Kontakt Player, and each instrument has been carefully chosen to allow the best overall coverage of most orchestral scores without having to spend time changing sounds in the Mixer. Standard orchestral instrument staves in Sibelius will default to the closest-matching instrument, and non-orchestral instrument staves will default to piano, so you will never encounter staves in your score remaining silent during playback. * GPO Baroque Orchestra: All the string instruments and their variants are included in this sound set, along with all the pipe organ sounds, to allow maximum variation and choice. Period wind and brass instruments are chosen where available. Only the timpani and basic orchestral percussion instruments are available. This sound set is ideal for the kinds of forces used in Bach or Handel oratorios and concertos.

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Choosing a sound set

* GPO Chamber Ensembles: A flexible sound set consisting of all the solo instruments in the collection, as well as most of the ensemble (Plr) instruments,

*

*

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allowing you to build ensembles from individual instruments to your own requirements. A comprehensive set of percussion and keyboards, including the piano duo instruments, means just about every chamber ensemble possibility is covered. GPO Classical Orchestra: This sound set has an emphasis on strings, including as many variations and effects as possible. Percussion is trimmed back, but there is a full complement of keyboard instruments, as well as most of the wind and brass sounds. This sound set is ideal for the kinds of forces used in Beethoven symphonies. GPO Keyboards and Percussion: This sound set gives access to all the keyboards and percussion sounds in the library, some of which are not available in any other set. GPO Kontakt Gold Combo: This sound set is only suitable for use if you already have Kontakt Gold installed as well as GPO Sibelius Edition. It combines the best of both Kontakt Gold and GPO, allowing access to the instruments otherwise not represented in GPO, such as voices, guitars and bass guitars, euphonium, Rhodes keyboard and saxophones. GPO Modern Orchestra: This is intended to be an all-purpose sound set, featuring guitar and tenor sax from the Kontakt Player Silver/Gold library and offering the best set of options for winds, brass, percussion and strings. It has only a few solo strings and fewer keyboards but almost all the percussion options, catering more for the colorful orchestrations of modern orchestral music. This sound set is ideal for the kinds of forces used in twentieth century orchestral music, e.g. film scores. GPO Romantic Orchestra: Fewer percussion and string instruments give more options for subtle changes of wind and brass in this sound set. However, a full complement of Romantic-era percussion is available. Try using the "Lush" string instruments for that big Mahler-esque sound. GPO String Orchestra: All of the collection's 95 string instruments are included in this sound set. Each instrument has been carefully matched with effects such as pizzicato, tremolo, mute, solo and tutti to allow easy score playback setup. Most of the percussion and keyboard sounds are also available in this set. GPO Wind Orchestra: This sound set features all solo wind and brass instruments and as many of the ensemble (Plr) samples as possible to allow for the maximum number of simultaneous individual wind and brass parts. It also includes a wide selection of percussion, keyboards, tenor sax from Kontakt Player Silver, and a double bass (string bass) instrument. 13

Getting started Different sound sets for different scores Because each of the sound sets contains a different subset of the available sounds, you will often need to choose different sound sets for different scores. To change the sound set used by a score, see How to change sound set on page 12. Sibelius will prompt you to reset the sounds in your score, so click Yes to confirm the change. If Sibelius doesn't prompt you to reset sounds, open Window > Mixer (shortcut zXM or M on Mac) and click the Reset Sounds button. When you save your score, Sibelius will also save your choice of sound set. If you open a score that uses a different GPO sound set to the currently chosen one, Sibelius will automatically switch to that sound set, so you don't need to keep track of which sound set you use for each score. If, for some reason, Sibelius can't find the GPO sound set used by a particular score, it will allow you to reset the sounds to the sound set currently in use instead. Sibelius will only switch the sound set used by Kontakt Player if the sound set currently in use is a GPO sound set; if Kontakt Player is in use but set to play back via e.g. the Kontakt Gold sound set, it will instead prompt you to reset the sounds. Similarly, if you have GPO Sibelius Edition installed, but Kontakt Player is not currently set as an active playback device, Sibelius will not activate the Kontakt Player device; instead, it will prompt you to reset the sounds. Creating your own sound set Because of all the extra information required to allow Sibelius to make use of the many special playback features in Garritan Personal Orchestra, and because each sound set also needs its own corresponding set of sound description files for Kontakt Player to use, it is not possible to create your own sound set for Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition.

14

Choosing instruments

Choosing instruments

One of the joys of Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition is the enormous variety and attention to detail that is provided by having, for example, 95 different string sounds and effects or 28 individual wind instruments available to you. So even though Sibelius always chooses appropriate sounds for each staff in your score, you may want to take advantage of some of this remarkable variety. Here are some ideas to get you started. Know your limits The first thing to do is find the playback limit of your computer, as this will affect the choices you make. See Setting up Kontakt Player on page 28 for some steps to work through to assess the capabilities of your current hardware and software configuration. Choosing which instruments to use When you have determined how many slots you can comfortably use simultaneously, you then need to decide which sounds to use. Provided you have chosen the most appropriate sound set for your score, Sibelius will normally do a good job of deciding which sound to use for each instrument in your score. Sibelius attempts to allocate sounds into the smallest possible number of slots, because even the most powerful computer cannot currently handle playing 32 slots simultaneously (with reverb) in Sibelius's Kontakt Player. Additionally, Kontakt Player cannot swap instruments during playback (that is, load a new sound into a slot that already has a sound loaded), so all the sounds you want to use while playing back need to fit in 32 slots or fewer. Percussive and sustaining instruments There are two types of instrument in Garritan Personal Orchestra: percussive instruments, which use MIDI note velocity to determine their dynamics, and sustaining instruments, which use velocity to determine attack, but use the MIDI modulation controller to determine dynamics. Percussive instruments include piano, harpsichord, timpani, harp, and so on. Sustaining instruments include strings, woodwind and brass. Fortunately, you don't need to think about this distinction at all, since Sibelius takes care of this for you, automatically interpreting dynamics on sustaining instruments as appropriate modulation controller changes.

15

Getting started Naming conventions When you use the Mixer to change the sounds used by your score, you will notice that the Garritan Personal Orchestra instruments are named in a specific way, with different suffixes depending on the type of instrument:

* KS = keyswitch ­ see Keyswitch instruments below * NV = non-vibrato; only specified where there is also a V alternative * V = vibrato; only specified where there is also an NV alternative * Solo = a solo instrument; there will also normally be either a section alternative or Plr1, Plr2, etc. instruments * Plr1, Plr2 = instruments designed for doubling up to produce ensembles ­ see Building ensembles with players below * Overlay = instruments designed to be added to existing combinations of Plr1, Plr2 etc. instruments ­ see Building ensembles with players below * ag = aggressive; Sibelius does not use these by default, but they are available if

you require a more aggressive sound for a passage Keyswitch instruments Several Garritan Personal Orchestra instruments make use of a technique called keyswitching. Instruments that support keyswitching use specific MIDI pitches (normally at the extremes of register, either very low or very high on a MIDI keyboard) to tell the sampler to switch to a different sample. For example, for a violin sound, one keyswitch may tell the sampler to switch to a pizzicato sample, another keyswitch may tell the sampler to switch to a half-step (semitone) trill sample, another may tell it to switch to a whole-step (tone) trill sample, another still may tell it to switch to a tremolando sample, and so on. This is a convenient way of combining a number of different sounds and effects within an instrument that can be loaded into a single slot in the Kontakt Player. Keyswitch instruments are, therefore, larger and will take up more memory, though this should not normally be a problem, provided you are using Kontakt Player's Direct From Disk (DFD) streaming feature, which loads the samples bit by bit from your hard drive as they are needed rather than loading them into memory in their entirety before starting playback. By default, Sibelius will choose to use keyswitch instruments (denoted by having KS in their names) where available, because this allows the greatest flexibility and expression in playback. If you know that you don't need the extra sounds provided by a keyswitch instrument ­ e.g. if you never need tremolo, trill or pizzicato techniques in your string writing ­ then you can choose one of the smaller, more specialized instruments instead. 16

Choosing instruments Building ensembles with players In orchestral scores using double, triple or greater numbers of wind and brass instruments, two systems of notating these instruments are commonly used: either each instrument (e.g. horn 1, horn 2, etc.) has its own staff in the score, or more than one instrument (but normally no more than two) share the same staff. The Plr1 and Plr2 instruments are specially designed to ensure that if both instruments play the same note simultaneously, they do not use the same sample, thus avoiding the "phasing" that can jar the listener's ear. For an even bigger sound, you can add the FHorn Overlay f instrument to either of your existing horn parts. To make use of these ensemble sounds in Sibelius, you will need to add extra staves. You can, for example, add an extra staff, copy the music from the primary instrument staff to the new one, assign the new staff to use (say) the Plr2 instrument, then hide it using Layout > Focus on Staves. For more details of using ensemble sounds, see Instruments sharing the same staff below. Instruments sharing the same staff When using Garritan Personal Orchestra in a sequencer, you might create separate tracks for, say, each horn instrument, assigning French horn 1 Plr1 KS to the first track, French horn 2 Plr1 KS to the second track, and so on. This produces a single horn playing each horn part. You could then "double up" each horn player by adding tracks for French horn 1 Plr2 KS and French horn 2 Plr2 KS, which produces two horns on each part. These techniques, however, are less convenient in Sibelius, where instruments often share the same staff. So you should be aware of the following limitations:

* The most important case is that of two woodwind or brass parts written on the same staff. The default GPO Plr1 or Plr2 instruments cannot play the following

situations: more than two notes simultaneously; a normal sample and an effect (say, mute) simultaneously; or a "resound", where one part is holding a long note and the other part plays the same pitch at some point during the long held note (the long note will stop after the other part has finished). If your score exhibits any of these situations, you will need to copy one part (e.g. by tripleclicking the staff and using Edit > Filter > Voice 2 or Bottom Notes) to a new staff and load a new GPO instrument. * If you have wind or brass parts that sometimes play in unison and sometimes play different parts on the same staff, it is important not to use the Plr1, Plr2 etc. instruments and the Solo instrument of the same name (e.g. don't use French horn 1 Plr1 KS, French horn 1 Plr2 KS, or French horn 1 Plr3 KS with French horn 1 solo). Plr instruments do not share samples with each 17

Getting started other, but in order to avoid phasing problems they should not be used with the solo instruments from which they are derived. For example, to solve the case of four horns, where Horn 1 and Horn 2 might sometimes play in unison, and so might Horn 3 and Horn 4, assign the staves as follows: % Horn 1 = French Horn 1 Solo KS % Horn 2 = French Horn 2 Plr 1 % Horn 3 = French Horn 2 Solo KS % Horn 4 = French Horn 1 Plr 1 * When using keyswitch instruments (e.g. Vlns 1 KS), beware that if multiple staves are playing back on the same slot, if one of the staves requires an effect that uses a keyswitch (e.g. pizz., tremolos, etc.), all of the staves playing back on that slot will play the same effect. So you cannot have two staves sharing the same Vlns 1 KS slot, one playing arco, and another playing pizzicato ­ this is because keyswitches apply to the entire instrument, rather than individual notes. To obtain correct playback in this case you need to create a new staff and copy the relevant section into it, then set the new staff to use another instrument (or a different Kontakt Player slot) in the Mixer. * There are similar issues to consider when working with lots of percussion staves in the same score ­ see Choosing the right percussion sound on page 26.

18

What Sibelius interprets

What Sibelius interprets

To get great-sounding playback with Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition, it's mostly sufficient to mark up your score with all the usual musical markings, such as slurs, articulations, dynamics, and so on. For more detailed information about the specific capabilities of each instrumental family, refer to Strings on page 33, Woodwinds on page 36, Brass on page 38, and Keyboards and harp on page 44. To find out about percussion, turn to page 23. Dynamics As in normal Sibelius playback, all instruments in GPO Sibelius Edition respond to dynamics ­ both by way of Expression text such as p, ff, etc., and cresc./dim. hairpins ­ but the precise manner in which they respond depends on whether they are percussive or sustaining instruments (see Percussive and sustaining instruments on page 15). Percussive instruments (such as piano, harpsichord, timpani, etc.) cannot increase the dynamic of a note while it is being played, so if you add a crescendo hairpin beneath a bar of quarter notes (crotchets) in the timpani staff, each successive note will get louder, but the decay of each note will not get louder. These instruments play dynamics via MIDI velocity (as in normal Sibelius playback), and respond to Espressivo and changes to Live Playback as you would expect. Sustaining instruments (such as violin, trumpet, organ, etc.) can increase the dynamic of a note while it is being played ­ by bowing with greater force, by increasing the pressure of the column of air, by opening the swell box, etc. ­ so if you add a crescendo hairpin beneath a bar of quarter notes (crotchets) in a violin staff, the volume will continuously increase. For sustaining instruments, Sibelius converts dynamics such as mp, ff, etc. to appropriate values for the modulation controller (which controls volume), according to the mapping set in Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options, under Dynamics for Modulation Wheel Instruments, also taking into account the current Espressivo setting and any adjustments to Live Playback velocity. You can optionally also tell Sibelius to alter the attack of each note (which adjusts the note velocity), by switching on Change attack with dynamics. This has the effect of giving louder notes a more definite attack. Sibelius is also able to interpret other dynamics specific to sustaining instruments, such as sfz (a sudden attack that quickly subsides), fp (a forte attack, immediately dropping to piano), and so on. Again, you can adjust the amount and speed of the 19

Getting started decay of these so-called "envelope" effects in Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options, under Envelope. These options do not affect percussive instruments. Sibelius only recognizes the standard dynamic markings from ppp­fff, plus fp, fz and sfz. More extreme dynamics can, of course, be written, but will not be played back differently via GPO Sibelius Edition. Sibelius will attempt to read dynamics at either or both ends of a hairpin to determine the starting and ending dynamics. Consider these two examples:

mf f

The example above left will play back exactly as you would expect, beginning mf and ending f. The example above right is more ambiguous: so Sibelius will obey the setting chosen in the Playback panel of Properties for the hairpin. If you don't want to use the Properties window to define the start or end dynamic for a hairpin, you can alternatively insert some Expression text, then hide it. (Refer to 5.14 Properties in Sibelius Reference for help with the Properties window.) Sibelius does not interpret the text cresc. or dim. on its own, because such text items do not show the duration of the change in dynamics, or the start and/or end dynamic of the change. If you want such dynamics to appear in your score and play back correctly, simply insert hairpins (and Expression text for the start and/ or end dynamics, if you wish) and hide them. Slurs Sibelius interprets slurs written for sustaining instruments to mean that the notes under the slur should be played legato. Using the legato feature will make notes blend into an unbroken and seamless musical phrase, by removing the attack portion of the sample to connect the notes for a smoother sounding effect. The result sounds like a real legato phrase. Slurs on percussive instruments have no audible effect beyond that which is defined in Sibelius's standard Play > Performance dialog. Tremolos Several GPO instruments, including the string sectional instruments (except double basses), employ keyswitches (see Keyswitch instruments on page 16) to produce special effects including tremolos, trills, and so on. Instruments such as Vlns 1 KS, for example, include a keyswitch for unmeasured (i.e. very fast) tremolos. Sibelius will automatically use these sampled tremolos if 20

What Sibelius interprets it calculates that, based on the number of tremolo strokes in a single-note tremolo, it would be played unmeasured rather than as a series of repeated notes of a particular value. You can adjust the threshold above which Sibelius should use sampled tremolos ­ see Garritan Personal Orchestra Options on page 30. Trills Like sampled tremolos, a number of GPO instruments support sampled trills by way of keyswitches. Sibelius will use these sampled trills when it encounters a trill line that is set to play back (via the Playback panel of Properties) as an interval of up to two half-steps (semitones), or if it encounters a tr symbol, which it will treat as a diatonic trill in the current key. (If a diatonic trill is inappropriate, replace the tr symbol with a trill line from Create > Line and set its playback appropriately.) For other trills, Sibelius will play them back as normal (i.e. by playing a series of distinct notes instead of a single sample). Articulations Since Sibelius already plays most articulations (such as staccato, marcato, etc.), only a few articulations have extra special playback in GPO Sibelius Edition. The most significant are the up- and down-bow articulations, which are supported by means of a keyswitch in each of the string instruments. However, the up- and down-bow samples are very short, and therefore are only suitable for fast runs of notes. As such, Sibelius will only use these keyswitches for notes of a short duration (which it calculates based on the actual time duration of the note at the prevailing tempo, rather than its strict written duration). Sibelius also plays harmonic articulations on the harp, automatically switching to the appropriate keyswitch. Text As with normal Sibelius playback, the words in the Play > Dictionary dialog are used when playing back through GPO Sibelius Edition. Examples of some of the text that plays back, when attached to a staff using e.g. Technique or Expression text:

* solo and tutti * arco and pizz. * con sord./avec sourd/mute/closed and senza sord./sans sourd/open * fluttertongue/buzztongue/Flatterzunge/frullato * let ring/L.V. and non-L.V. * vib./vibrato and non-vib./non-vibrato

21

Getting started Some additional words can also be used to cancel any preceding effect, e.g. nat., natural, naturale, no effect, white tone. Unlike Sibelius's normal playback, GPO Sibelius Edition is sufficiently flexible that you can (say) create a Violin I instrument (i.e. a staff for the whole section), then add "solo" as text (which switches to a solo violin sound), then add "pizz." as text (which switches to a solo pizzicato sound), then add "tutti" (which switches to a sectional pizzicato sound), and finally add "arco" (which switches back to the sectional bowed sound). There's no need to add extra staves to switch from sectional to solo writing, and Sibelius keeps track of whether you're working "solo" or "tutti" with regard to the effects it can play back. If you're an advanced user, you can also add specific MIDI messages to activate some of the particularly esoteric behaviors of a few of the GPO instruments. This is described in some detail in the Advanced use section, later in this User Guide. Live Playback You may notice that Play > Live Playback is switched on when you start playback, even if it is normally switched off; if you have View > Live Playback Velocities switched on, you may see these appear during playback, and disappear again when playback stops. This is completely normal. Sibelius makes a number of temporary adjustments to your score's Live Playback data "on the fly" in order to achieve the special effects enabled by Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition. Tweaking things further If you've got a lot of time on your hands and a strong tendency towards tinkering, you can add further instructions to the score to improve the realism of the performance yet further ­ see Fine-tuning your performance on page 32.

22

Basic percussion

Basic percussion

You don't generally have to do anything out of the ordinary in terms of the way you create your score to obtain great playback through GPO Sibelius Edition, but percussion instruments are a little more complex. This topic explains the basics of how to use GPO Sibelius Edition's percussion instruments effectively; more detailed information can be found in Percussion on page 41. Instruments and staff types Unpitched percussion instruments in Sibelius use particular staff types, which define the mappings between the different noteheads that appear at different positions on the staff (which may have any number of staff lines between one and five) and the sounds produced for playback. (For more details on percussion staff types, see 2.20 Percussion in Sibelius Reference.) By default, when you create an unpitched percussion instrument in Sibelius, it is given a staff type that uses a mapping suitable for General MIDI-compatible (GM) devices. However, this is unsuitable for GPO Sibelius Edition, because (with the notable exception of the timpani, which is pitched percussion anyway) it does not use GM mappings for its percussion instruments, so you need to set the most appropriate staff type for each percussion staff in your score, as follows:

* If you are starting a new score or adding one or more new unpitched percussion instruments to an existing score, choose Layout > Instruments and Staves (shortcut I) and add the necessary instruments * Once a percussion staff exists in your score, select any bar in that staff, and open the Staves panel of Properties. If the Properties window isn't visible, show it using Window > Properties (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+P or zXP). * From the menu in the Staves panel, choose the most appropriate staff type; GPO-compatible staff types all have the letters GPO in their names. (If you can't find any GPO-compatible staff types, see Missing staff types? on page 26.) * Now open Window > Mixer (shortcut Ctrl+Alt+M or M) and check that the

selected staff is set to play back with one of GPO Sibelius Edition's percussion sounds (e.g. Basic Orchestral Percussion or Percussion Toys, but not Drums and Percussion, which is from Kontakt Player Silver/Gold, and does not support GPO's special percussion features) ­ for further advice on this subject, see Choosing the right percussion sound on page 26. * If working with an existing score, or a percussion staff, to which you have already added notes, you may now need to filter the existing notes on the staff and change their pitch and/or notehead to match the mapping of the particular 23

Getting started GPO-compatible staff type you have chosen (refer to 5.5 Filters and Find in Sibelius Reference for more details). Now you know how to set a percussion staff to use an appropriate staff type and playback sound, let's look at how to write effectively for each of the most important percussion instruments supported by GPO Sibelius Edition. Bass drum Use the 1 line (bass drum, GPO) staff type, and choose Bass Drum KS (or Basic Orchestral Percussion if you do not require sampled rolls) in the Mixer.

Bass Drum

L R R

Notehead 0

Notehead 1

Notehead 2

You can use notehead types 0, 1 or 2 on the bass drum staff type. By default, Sibelius will alternate between left strokes and right strokes on successive notes. To specify a left or a right stroke, add the text L or R to the relevant notes using Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Percussion Stickings. For a sampled roll (using a keyswitch), either create an unmeasured single note tremolo, use a "z on stem," or add a trill to the note(s). For a "let ring" or non-dampened note, either add a dangling tie (i.e. a tie that is not terminated with another note) or the appropriate l.v. up or l.v. down symbol (from the Notes rows of the Create > Symbol dialog). Cymbal Use the 1 line (cymbal, GPO) staff type, and choose Cymbals KS (or Basic Orchestral Percussion if you do not require sampled rolls) in the Mixer.

Cymbal

Notehead 0

Notehead 1

L R R

Notehead 2

You can use notehead types 0, 1 or 2 on the cymbal staff type. By default, Sibelius will alternate between left strokes and right strokes on successive notes. To specify a left or a right stroke, add the text L or R to the relevant notes using Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Percussion Stickings. For a sampled roll (using a keyswitch), either create an unmeasured single note tremolo, use a "z on stem," or add a trill to the note(s).

24

Basic percussion Snare drum and side drum Use the 1 line (side drum, GPO) staff type if you want your side drum to have snares off by default, or use 1 line (snare drum, GPO) if you want your side drum to have snares on by default, and choose Snares KS (or Basic Orchestral Percussion if you do not require sampled rolls) in the Mixer.

Side drum

Notehead 0

Notehead 1

Snares on Snares off

L R R

Notehead 2

You can use notehead types 0, 1 or 2 on the side drum and snare drum staff types. By default, Sibelius will alternate between left strokes and right strokes on successive notes. To specify a left or a right stroke, add the text L or R to the relevant notes using Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Percussion Stickings. For a sampled roll (using a keyswitch), either create an unmeasured single note tremolo, use a "z on stem," or add a trill to the note(s). To put snares on, either add the snare drum symbol (first symbol in the ...drums row in Create > Symbol), or add the text "Snares on" or "Snare on" above the note from which you want the snares on. To take snares off, either add the side drum symbol (second symbol in the ...drums row in Create > Symbol), or add the text "Snares off " or "Snare off " above the note from which you want the snares off. Timpani Use the normal 5 lines (no key signatures) staff type, and choose Timpani KS or Basic Orchestral Percussion in the Mixer.

Timpani

p

ff

By default, Sibelius will alternate between left strokes and right strokes on successive notes. To specify a left or a right stroke, add the text L or R to the relevant notes using Create > Text > Other Staff Text > Percussion Stickings. For a "let ring" or non-dampened note, either add a dangling tie (i.e. a tie that is not terminated with another note) or the appropriate l.v. up or l.v. down symbol (from the Notes rows of the Create > Symbol dialog), as shown in the example above. Creating your own staff types You can, of course, create your own staff types in order to mix and match other GPO percussion sounds on the same staff ­ see Percussion on page 41 for more details. 25

Getting started Choosing the right percussion sound Depending on the size of your ensemble (and therefore how many of Kontakt Player's 32 slots you can spare for percussion), your system resources (and therefore how many slots you can play altogether in the first place), and the density of the special keyswitch-triggered effects you require in your score, you will need to choose your percussion sounds carefully. If one staff requires a keyswitch effect (e.g. a roll on the bass drum), all the staves that are playing that sound at that moment will also receive the same keyswitch ­ keyswitches apply to all the notes being played on that slot. Therefore, only the individual sounds for each percussion instrument (e.g. Bass Drum KS, Cymbals KS, etc.) support sampled rolls; staves that use Basic Orchestral Percussion will play rolls using lots of repeated notes instead of a roll sample. So if you want to hear sampled rolls, you should use separate sounds loaded into separate slots for each percussion staff in your score. For large ensembles, it is recommended to leave Use same slot for identical sounds switched on (in Kontakt Player Options, accessed from Play > Playback and Input Devices), and to use e.g. Bass Drum KS for your bass drum, Cymbals KS for your cymbals, Timpani KS for your timpani, and so on. This allows maximum flexibility for the use of keyswitches in the percussion staves, but uses less memory than using lots of instances of Basic Orchestral Percussion. Missing staff types? If the score you're working on was created in a version of Sibelius earlier than Sibelius 4.1, it won't include any of the GPO-compatible staff types. But don't worry ­ it's easy to import them:

* Choose House Style > Import House Style * Choose any of the predefined house styles supplied with Sibelius; if you don't know which one to choose, choose Standard Opus (Times).lib * Switch off all of the checkboxes on the right-hand side of the dialog except for Staff types, Noteheads, Symbols and Text Styles * Click OK to import the house style.

The Staves panel of Properties will now include all the GPO-compatible staff types.

26

Advanced use

Advanced use

Setting up Kontakt Player

Getting the optimum level of performance out of Kontakt Player on your particular hardware configuration can take a little experimentation, but it is time wellspent. Initial calibration * First, check in Kontakt Player Options (from Play > Playback and Input Devices) that Use Reverb is switched off. * While you're in Play > Playback and Input Devices, make sure you have Kontakt Player selected as your playback device, and have selected GPO Modern Orchestra as its sound set. * Open a score that uses a relatively large number of staves, such as Blue Danube from the Orchestral folder inside Example Scores. Click Yes if Sibelius asks you if you want to reset the sounds. * Sibelius will load the best sounds for each staff. Now open Window > Mixer and check the choices it has made. * Hit the Play button and listen to the results ­ don't worry if you think it's too loud or too soft, just listen for any stuttering, clicks or drop-out of the sound, especially in sections where lots of instruments play simultaneously. If you can play the score without any problems, then congratulations, that's what you spent all that money on your computer for! * Now try switching on Use Reverb and try again. If you now hear any faltering in the playback, you have reached the limits of your computer system and you need to employ one of several tricks. Read on! Improving performance * If you find that you cannot play back sufficient slots in Kontakt Player, the single best improvement you could make is in a soundcard that has ASIO support (Windows) or Core Audio acceleration (Mac OS X). * Increasing output latency help to alleviate stuttering and drop-outs during playback. Depending on your sound hardware, you may be able to increase the latency as follows: % With a score open, choose Window > Kontakt Player, click Audio Setup, and drag the Output Latency slider rightwards. % If no slider is present, click ASIO Config, which will open your sound hardware's control panel, where you can increase the latency. Some soundcards don't show an explicit latency option, but look for settings like DMA Buffer Size or Sample Buffer Size ­ increasing this will increase the output latency. 28

Setting up Kontakt Player

* If your computer has a large amount of total system RAM (e.g. more than

*

*

*

*

1.5Gb), try disabling Kontakt Player's Direct From Disk (DFD) streaming: open Window > Kontakt Player, click Options, then click DFD Active (when the button is gray, DFD is off; when it is blue, DFD is on). Switch on Use same slot for identical sounds (in Kontakt Player Options, from Play > Playback and Input Devices), which will encourage Sibelius to use fewer slots. You can further reduce the number of slots used simultaneously by forcing Sibelius to play multiple staves with a single GPO instrument. Wind and Brass GPO instruments can only play a few notes at the same time, so only assign two or three staves to each wind or brass instrument. For strings, you could try changing, say, the first and second violins and the violas to use the Full Strgs KS instrument. (Using the GPO 32 Slot Orchestra sound set will achieve a similar result, as it has most Sibelius staves allocated to only a few GPO instruments.) If you want to use File > Export > Audio Track but find that you can't play back all of the staves simultaneously, try exporting only one section at a time (e.g. winds first, then brass, then strings), before combining the resulting audio files in an audio editing application (such as Audacity, which is freely available from http://audacity.sourceforge.net/). All the files will be the same length, so it will be simple to mix them together. This will also allow you to use an external, off-line reverb for a more realistic recording. If Kontakt Player produces warnings about low physical memory when loading the sounds, try selecting a "lite" version of the GPO instrument if available. Some of the GPO instruments (e.g. Steinway Piano, and the string sectional keyswitch instruments) use a lot of memory. If you are short on memory, you should also ensure that Direct From Disk (DFD) is switched on, which helps to minimize memory usage. Sibelius can use multiple playback devices simultaneously, so you could even use another playback device for some staves. On Windows, make sure the Use column is set to Yes for all the devices you want to use (on Mac, all devices are always available), then select each staff in the Mixer and change the setting under Device as appropriate. You may need to adjust the Latency values in Play > Playback and Input Devices for devices other than Kontakt Player to get the sounds to play back at the same time.

For further reading For information on how to use the Kontakt Player window, refer to 4.9 Kontakt Player in Sibelius Reference. For further help on obtaining the best possible performance on your system, see

http://www.sibelius.com/helpcenter/en/a386.

29

Advanced use

Garritan Personal Orchestra Options

Though you won't often need to go there, Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options contains some options that advanced users may wish to adjust:

* The Volume values allow you to specify the modulation wheel value to be used

for sustaining instruments for each dynamic from ppp­fff.

* Change attack with dynamics allows you to also adjust the attack (MIDI

velocity) associated with each dynamic level; this option is off by default.

* Default Attack specifies the attack to use for notes on sustaining instruments if Change attack with dynamics and Convert all Live Playback velocities to attack are switched off. * Modify attack for articulations and accents allows you to adjust the attack

(MIDI velocity) associated with each articulation; this option is off by default. The value for each articulation is added to the current attack of the note, up to a maximum of 127. * Convert all Live Playback velocities to volume determines whether Sibelius should convert existing Live Playback velocities to modulation wheel changes, or ignore them; this option is on by default. (In normal Sibelius playback, Live Playback velocities adjust the volume of the note, so this option maps this behavior onto GPO's sustaining instruments.) * Convert all Live Playback velocities to attack allows existing Live Playback velocities to control the attack of notes on sustaining instruments; this option is off by default. Use this if you want to specify the precise attack of notes for sus30

Garritan Personal Orchestra Options taining instruments; you can specify the attack by adjusting the Live Playback velocity. * The Envelope options specify the Boost (whereby the value is added to the current volume of the note, up to a maximum of 127) and the Decay (the percentage of the note's duration over which the envelope takes effect) for fp, fz and sfz dynamics. * Play unmeasured tremolos with n or more strokes allows you to adjust the threshold above which Sibelius will use a sampled tremolo instead of a number of repeated notes, calculated in terms of the number of strokes on a quarter note (crotchet). * Attack for played trills and tremolos allows you to set the attack to be used for the sampled tremolos and trills played via keyswitches. All the options in this dialog are application-wide, i.e. they are not saved in your score.

31

Advanced use

Fine-tuning your performance

If you are an accredited MIDI wizard, you may wish to add extra MIDI messages to your score in order to further enhance the realism of Sibelius's performance. For help on adding MIDI messages, refer to 4.12 MIDI messages in Sibelius Reference. Completely disabling all special playback If you want to prevent Sibelius from doing any special processing at all in your scores (e.g. if you're a total MIDI wizard and have laboriously added all the necessary programming to your score by hand), choose Play > Playback and Input Devices, click the Kontakt Player Options button, and switch off Play articulations, dynamics, techniques etc. This setting is program-wide, i.e. it applies to all scores. Temporarily disabling special playback If you want to prevent Sibelius from doing any special processing for the markings in just a section of your score, create the text ~SibeliusSoundsPlaybackOff in a staff text style (e.g. Technique text) on the staff you want Sibelius to ignore. When you want Sibelius to start processing the markings on that staff again, create the text ~SibeliusSoundsPlaybackOn. Adding other MIDI messages As in normal Sibelius playback, Sibelius will read any MIDI message text you create in your score. You may want to create:

* Program changes (e.g. ~P64) to switch to different sounds (e.g. from a "lush"

string sound to a more aggressive string sound for a faster passage). Beware that the program number for each sound may vary, depending on the sound set you are using for your score; refer to the additional tables found on your Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition DVD-ROM. * Variation changes (e.g. ~C22,3 and ~C24,8) to make repeated notes sound more human, by introducing tiny changes in intonation and attack from note to note. * Length (e.g. ~C21,64) to change the release of the samples; you can adjust the Length knob in the Kontakt Player window to set the length for all the staves that play back via that slot, but you may want to adjust it on a local basis in the middle of the score. Refer to Strings on page 33, Woodwinds on page 36, Brass on page 38, and Keyboards and harp on page 44 for details of which MIDI controllers are supported by each kind of instrument. 32

Strings

Strings

The string instruments in Garritan Personal Orchestra include a pair of Stradivaris, a Guarneri, several Gaglianos, two Pierrays, two Montagnana cellos, a Testore, a Pallota viola, a Calcanius, a Klotz, a Vaillant, and a Betts, all of which were made circa 1700. Amazingly, these string instruments have lasted hundreds of years and still have a powerful and beautiful sound. Collectively, these instruments are worth millions of dollars, although the true value of any fine string instrument is in its sound, which is priceless. The sounds of these exquisite string instruments are now at your command. Capabilities of GPO string instruments Garritan Personal Orchestra's string instruments are organized to allow maximum flexibility and customization. Solo sounds for each member of the string family are included, as well as keyswitched instruments, which incorporate the most commonly-used string articulations into one sound, with the articulations activated automatically by Sibelius triggering a note outside the playable range of the instrument. Multiple ensemble string instruments are also included, each programmed in a way that allows you to build custom string sections. These ensemble patches are useful in creating unison and divisi lines where control over each instrument in the section is desired ­ see Building ensembles with players on page 17. Typically, though, you will use the pre-built keyswitched string section sounds, which include sustained/legato, pizzicato, trills, tremolo, muted, and short bow articulations. Aggressive sounds (denoted by the suffix ag in their names) for the short bow and sustained string patches are included for when a more aggressive sound is needed. These sounds have a more distinct attack and are therefore more suitable for passages requiring a brighter or harder articulation. How the sounds are programmed The special programming included in GPO's solo and ensemble string samples is activated by the use of keyswitches and standard MIDI controller messages, as follows:

* Velocity = Attack/Volume (non-sustain only): MIDI note velocity is used to con-

trol the initial "note on" attack strength on all sustained/legato solo and ensemble string sounds. This attack equates to how hard the bow strikes the string. Velocity is also used to control attack and volume on pizzicato patches. For sustained sounds, Sibelius automatically converts the velocities of the notes in the 33

Advanced use score to modulation controllers (see below), and then sets the attack of the notes according to the settings in the Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Settings dialog. Modulation (CC1) = Volume (sustain only): Modulation is used to control the volume and timbre characteristics of all sustained/legato solo, ensemble, section and full string sounds. Sibelius adds modulation controller messages automatically in response to dynamics written in the score (or Live Playback velocities) according to the mappings defined in Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options, but you can also control your own modulation changes via the wheel on your MIDI keyboard if necessary. Legato (CC68): This controller is used to create smooth, legato playback. Sibelius adds legato controller messages automatically in response to slurs written in the score. You can also add suitable MIDI messages to your score: ~C68,0 produces a detaché sound; ~C68,127 produces a legato sound. Portamento (CC20): This controller is used to create portamento during legato passages based on note intervals and the controller value. The closer the notes, the higher the portamento value used; inversely, the larger the interval between notes, the lower the portamento value used. Notes further than an octave apart typically do not use portamento. This controller can be used only in conjunction with legato playing when the sustain pedal controller is active. Sibelius does not add portamento controller messages automatically; you can add them by hand using text such as ~C20,16. Length (CC21): This controller is used to shorten or lengthen the playback of the samples. When used with the short bow sounds this controller is useful for creating the effect of marcato articulations, or can inversely give the effect of lighter bowstrokes in a sautillé fashion. When using this controller with sustained strings higher values of CC21 can be useful for obtaining smoother legato lines. Most instruments load with this controller set to a moderate level by default. Sibelius does not adjust the length controller automatically; you can adjust it for yourself by hand using text such as ~C21,64. Variability (CC22, CC24): CC22 controls the intonation of the notes, and is useful during repeated note phrases. Very small adjustments to CC22 can help reduce the "machine gun" effect of repeated notes using precisely the same sample. CC24 controls variations in timbre/volume for the solo and ensemble sounds. Sibelius does not adjust the variability controllers automatically, since they must be used in moderation; you can adjust them by hang using text such as ~C22,2 and ~C24,64. Portamento (CC19): This controller is used on all sustained string samples to aid the creation of portamento when going from detached (non-legato) playing to legato playing. This controller switches to a layer that does not respond to

*

*

*

*

*

*

34

Strings pitch bend data. This gives the user the flexibility to create pitch bend MIDI messages between two notes, which only have an effect on the second note of the pair. This solves certain kinds of portamento problems. Sibelius does not adjust the portamento controller automatically. * Playable trills/Bow noise (CC16): This controller has two functions that are specific to particular sounds. When used with the ag (aggressive) short bow sounds, this controller controls bow noise and can be used to add "grit" to the sound. The solo keyswitch strings use CC16 to control an alternative switching system for trills on keyswitch notes G# and A. The standard keyswitches (G#­ B) give the user control over half-step and whole-step trills plus their muted counterparts. CC16 extends switching to intervals from a half-step to as wide as a major third using the following values: % ~C16,0 ­ ~C16,32 = half-step (semitone) % ~C16,33 ­ ~C16,64 = whole step (tone) % ~C16,65 ­ ~C16,96 = minor third % ~C16,97 ­ ~C16,127 = major third Sibelius only automatically supports the standard keyswitches for half-step (semitone) and whole step (tone) trills. These so-called "playable" trills are not appropriate for use in Sibelius, and are therefore not supported; they play one note of the trill when a key on a MIDI keyboard is depressed, and play the other note of the trill when the key is released, thus making the trill playable using a single key (plus the appropriate keyswitch).

35

Advanced use

Woodwinds

The woodwind family consists of a wide variety of instruments, each with its own unique sound, including varieties of flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons. Quality woodwind instruments sampled for this library include Haynes flutes, Selmer clarinets and Heckel bassoons. Capabilities of GPO woodwind instruments The wind instrument samples in Garritan Personal Orchestra are expressive and beautiful, whether you choose to use them in a solo context, in small intimate ensembles, or in vast orchestral pieces. Included in the library are solo and ensemble versions of all the major instruments in the woodwind family. Keyswitched flute and piccolo sounds are included. How the sounds are programmed The special programming included in GPO's woodwind instruments is activated by the use of keyswitches and standard MIDI controller messages, as follows:

* Velocity = Attack/Volume (non-sustain only): MIDI note velocity is used to con-

trol the initial "note on" attack strength on all sustained/legato solo and ensemble woodwind sounds. This attack equates to how forcefully the instrument is played. For sustained sounds, Sibelius automatically converts the velocities of the notes in the score to modulation controllers (see below), and then sets the attack of the notes according to the settings in the Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Settings dialog. * Modulation (CC1) = Volume (sustain only): Modulation is used to control the volume and timbre characteristics of all sustained/legato solo and ensemble woodwind sounds. Sibelius adds modulation controller messages automatically in response to dynamics written in the score (or Live Playback velocities) according to the mappings defined in Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options, but you can also control your own modulation changes via the wheel on your MIDI keyboard if necessary. * Legato (CC68): This controller is used to create smooth, legato playback. Sibelius adds legato controller messages automatically in response to slurs written in the score. You can also add suitable MIDI messages to your score: ~C68,0 produces a tongued sound; ~C68,127 produces a legato sound. * Portamento (CC20): This controller is used to create portamento during legato passages based on note intervals and the controller value. The closer the notes, the higher the portamento value used; inversely, the larger the interval between notes, the lower the portamento value used. Notes further than an octave apart typically do not use portamento. This controller can be used only in conjunc36

Woodwinds tion with legato playing when the sustain pedal controller is active. Sibelius does not add portamento controller messages automatically; you can add them by hand using text such as ~C20,16. Length (CC21): This controller is used to shorten or lengthen the playback of the samples. This controller can be used to improve emulation of double- and triple-tonguing in the woodwinds. When using this controller with sustained woodwinds higher values of CC21 can be useful for obtaining smoother legato lines. Most instruments load with this controller set to a moderate level by default. Sibelius does not adjust the length controller automatically; you can adjust it for yourself by hand using text such as ~C21,64. Variability (CC22, CC24): CC22 controls the intonation of the notes, and is useful during repeated note phrases. Very small adjustments to CC22 can help reduce the "machine gun" effect of repeated notes using precisely the same sample. CC24 controls variations in timbre/volume for the solo and ensemble sounds. Sibelius does not adjust the variability controllers automatically, since they must be used in moderation; you can adjust them by hang using text such as ~C22,2 and ~C24,64. Aftertouch (CC131) = vibrato intensity: Many of the non-vibrato solo woodwinds have a hidden vibrato intensity controller to allow the user to apply the level of vibrato to the instrument. This controller does not apply to the instruments that contain natural vibrato and therefore only applies to instruments that have a non-vibrato choice (denoted by the suffix NV in their names). This controller has also been added to some instruments that do not normally have vibrato (e.g. clarinet, French horn). This controller should be used along with the vibrato speed controller (see below). Sibelius does not adjust the vibrato intensity controller automatically; you can adjust it by hand using text such as ~C131,64. Vibrato speed controller (CC17): This controller, when used in conjunction with the vibrato intensity controller (see above), will vary the vibrato speed of those instruments that normally contain no vibrato. As before, this does not affect instruments that have natural vibrato and will apply only to non-vibrato sounds (with NV in their names). Sibelius does not adjust the vibrato intensity controller automatically; you can adjust it by hand using text such as ~C17,64.

*

*

*

*

37

Advanced use

Brass

The brass instruments in a modern orchestra include variations of the French horn, the trumpet, the trombone, and the tuba. Each possesses a unique color and range, from the bright piercing sound of the trumpet to the deep, dark tones of the tuba. Capabilities of GPO brass instruments The brass instruments in Garritan Personal Orchestra have been exquisitely captured and allows for a very dynamic brass section in your Sibelius score. In addition to the standard solo sounds included in GPO, there are also ensemble sounds and brass overlays, mutes, and aggressive patches. The overlays are used to create a larger brass sound, while the aggressive patches are useful in adding a punch to the brass section by increasing the hardness of the attack. How the sounds are programmed The special programming included in GPO's solo and ensemble brass samples is activated by the use of keyswitches and standard MIDI controller messages, as follows:

* Velocity = Attack/Volume (non-sustain only): MIDI note velocity is used to con-

trol the initial "note on" attack strength on all sustained/legato solo and ensemble brass sounds. This attack equates to how forcefully the player releases the air column to begin the note. Velocity is also used to control attack and volume on pizzicato patches. For sustained sounds, Sibelius automatically converts the velocities of the notes in the score to modulation controllers (see below), and then sets the attack of the notes according to the settings in the Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Settings dialog. * Modulation (CC1) = Volume (sustain only): Modulation is used to control the volume and timbre characteristics of all sustained/legato solo and ensemble brass sounds. Sibelius adds modulation controller messages automatically in response to dynamics written in the score (or Live Playback velocities) according to the mappings defined in Play > Garritan Personal Orchestra Options, but you can also control your own modulation changes via the wheel on your MIDI keyboard if necessary. * Legato (CC68): This controller is used to create smooth, legato playback. Sibelius adds legato controller messages automatically in response to slurs written in the score. You can also add suitable MIDI messages to your score: ~C68,0 produces a detaché sound; ~C68,127 produces a legato sound. * Portamento (CC20): This controller is used to create portamento during legato passages based on note intervals and the controller value. The closer the notes, 38

Brass the higher the portamento value used; inversely, the larger the interval between notes, the lower the portamento value used. Notes further than an octave apart typically do not use portamento. This controller can be used only in conjunction with legato playing when the sustain pedal controller is active. Sibelius does not add portamento controller messages automatically; you can add them by hand using text such as ~C20,16. Length (CC21): This controller is used to shorten or lengthen the playback of the samples. It is useful for creating sforzando articulations when using the aggressive (named ag) sounds, or for obtaining a convincing staccato sound. It can also be valuable in helping to create double- and triple-tonguing passages. When using this controller with sustained brass higher values of CC21 can be useful for obtaining smoother legato lines. Most instruments load with this controller set to a moderate level by default. Sibelius does not adjust the length controller automatically; you can adjust it for yourself by hand using text such as ~C21,64. Variability (CC22, CC24): CC22 controls the intonation of the notes, and is useful during repeated note phrases. Very small adjustments to CC22 can help reduce the "machine gun" effect of repeated notes using precisely the same sample. CC24 controls variations in timbre/volume for the solo and ensemble sounds. Sibelius does not adjust the variability controllers automatically, since they must be used in moderation; you can adjust them by hang using text such as ~C22,2 and ~C24,64. Aftertouch (CC131) = vibrato intensity: Many of the non-vibrato solo brass instruments have a hidden vibrato intensity controller to allow the user to apply the level of vibrato to the instrument. This controller does not apply to the instruments that contain natural vibrato and therefore only applies to instruments that have a non-vibrato choice (denoted by the suffix NV in their names). This controller has also been added to some instruments that do not normally have vibrato (e.g. French horn). This controller should be used along with the vibrato speed controller (see below). Sibelius does not adjust the vibrato intensity controller automatically; you can adjust it by hand using text such as ~C131,64. Vibrato speed controller (CC17): This controller, when used in conjunction with the vibrato intensity controller (see above), will vary the vibrato speed of those instruments that normally contain no vibrato. As before, this does not affect instruments that have natural vibrato and will apply only to non-vibrato sounds (with NV in their names). Sibelius does not adjust the vibrato intensity controller automatically; you can adjust it by hand using text such as ~C17,64. Portamento (CC19): This controller is used on the solo trombone samples to aid the creation of portamento when going from detached (non-legato) playing to 39

*

*

*

*

*

Advanced use legato playing. This controller switches to a layer that does not respond to pitch bend data. This gives the user the flexibility to create pitch bend MIDI messages between two notes, which only have an effect on the second note of the pair. This solves certain kinds of portamento problems. Sibelius does not adjust the portamento controller automatically. * Saturation (CC16): This controller is used in conjunction with the aggressive brass sounds (named ag) to add more forcefulness and "grit" to the sound. Sibelius does not adjust the saturation controller automatically. * Pitch bend: This controller can be effectively used with the solo trombone patches to create "scoops" or "drops" at the beginning of notes or passages, and can be used in conjunction with the other portamento controllers (CC20 and CC19). Trombones have a wider pitchbend range than most instruments: six half-steps (semitones). Brass overlays The brass instruments have Overlay instruments, sampled at the forte or fortissimo level, that can be layered with the solo and ensemble instruments to achieve a fuller, more massive section sound. The trumpets, trombones, and tubas each have one Overlay instrument and the French horns have two. In general, the Overlay instruments can be used to:

* Add "body" and resonance to the sound of a brass section. This can affect the

apparent size of the section, making it sound larger.

* Increase the contrast in timbre from soft to loud. The contrast increases as you add more Overlay. The soft end of the spectrum becomes mellower, the loud

end becomes brighter and brassier.

* Give the impression of a larger section size while using fewer resources, con-

suming fewer instrument slots within the Kontakt Player.

* Give greater control over strong articulations. The French horns have two Overlay instruments (f and ff ) because the horns often require a large range of timbre variation in typical orchestral writing. The combination of Solo and player (Plr) instruments with either or both Overlays can create a large variety of

characteristics.

40

Percussion

Percussion

The percussion instruments are often the loudest members of the orchestra and are therefore normally seated at the back! The instruments of the percussion family are played by being hit, shaken or scraped, and provide a variety of rhythms and tonal textures. For basic information about how to use percussion in your score, see Basic percussion on page 23. Creating your own percussion staff types In order to use GPO's percussion instruments most effectively, you need to use the supplied GPO-compatible staff types, or create your own. To do this:

* Choose House Style > Edit Staff Types, and choose the Percussion radio but-

ton in the dialog

* Select an existing percussion staff type that is similar to the kind of staff type you want to create, and click New * Change the name of the staff type on the General tab of the Edit Staff Type dia-

log; make sure you give it a distinctive name so that you can find it in the list of staff types later on * Adjust the number of staff lines as appropriate on the Notes and Rests tab of the dialog * On the Percussion tab, add noteheads to map onto percussion sounds. For GPO, you should switch on Use MIDI pitch instead of choosing a named sound from the Sound menu (which only lists the default General MIDI percussion sounds, and as such is inappropriate for GPO). To find out which MIDI pitch you need to select for each sound, refer to the list for each GPO instrument in Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings on page 66. For more details about editing staff types, refer to 6.14 Edit Staff Types in Sibelius Reference. Don't forget: any staff type you create is only available in the score in which you create it, but you can make your own staff types available in other scores by means of exporting and importing house styles or setting up your own manuscript papers ­ refer to 6.7 House style and 2.17 Manuscript papers in Sibelius Reference for more details. Capabilities of GPO percussion instruments A varied collection of percussion instruments is at your disposal, almost all of which are keyswitched instruments (with the exception of the cymbals and wind machine). 41

Advanced use There are also two combination sounds: Basic Orchestral Percussion (which combines the commonly-used orchestral percussion into one instrument) and Percussion Toys (which combines a number of more esoteric instruments, such as mark tree). How the sounds are programmed The special programming included in GPO's percussion samples is activated by the use of keyswitches and standard MIDI controller messages. Some of these controllers are universal across all percussion instruments, while others are specific to certain instruments or types of instruments (see below).

* Velocity = Attack/Volume: All percussion instruments included in Garritan Per-

sonal Orchestra use velocity for attack and volume control.

* Length (CC21): This controller is used to shorten or lengthen the playback of

the samples. It is not available for all samples. Sibelius does not adjust the length controller automatically, but it can be adjusted manually by means of text instructions such as ~C21,32. * Modulation (CC1) = Percussion roll volume (for recorded rolls): The modulation control, for those percussion instruments that use it, works in a similar manner as the sustaining instruments. Cymbals, snare drum and bass drum all use the modulation wheel for rolled crescendos/decrescendos, and the wind machine uses mod wheel control for volume. Sibelius automatically applies modulation control changes for hairpins on rolls (notated as unmeasured tremolos or trills) on the supplied GPO percussion staff types. * Sustain pedal (CC64) = Dampening: This controller switches whether percussion instruments should be allowed to let ring (sustain pedal on) or be dampened (sustain pedal off). * Variability (CC22, CC24): CC22 controls the intonation of the notes, and is useful during repeated note phrases. Very small adjustments to CC22 can help reduce the "machine gun" effect of repeated notes using precisely the same sample. CC24 controls variations in timbre/volume for the percussion sounds. Sibelius does not adjust the variability controllers automatically, since they must be used in moderation; you can adjust them by hang using text such as ~C22,2 and ~C24,64. Bass drum * Bass drum fundamental (CC20): Although the bass drum is an instrument of indefinite pitch, its tone is very deep and booming and capable of being adjusted. The bass drum in Personal Orchestra has an adjustable fundamental that is controlled either via the BDFund knob in the Kontakt Player window or

42

Percussion via MIDI messages such as ~C20,64. This control can add a great deal of energy to extremely low frequencies, so use it with care. * Aggressive brightness (CC16): Increasing the value of this controller can give the impression of harder mallets being played aggressively, e.g. via MIDI messages such as ~C16,72. Vibraphone * Attack (CC20): For the vibraphone this controller controls the vibraphone's attack speed. This allows continuous control of the vibraphone's attack speed from hard to "bowed" attacks, either via the Attack knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages such as ~C20,84. * Tremolo level (CC22): For the vibraphone this controller controls the level of tremolo, to be used in tandem with tremolo speed (see below). Controlled by the TRMLEV knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages such as ~C22,64. * Tremolo speed (CC24): For the vibraphone this controller controls the speed of the tremolo. to be used in tandem with tremolo level (see above). Controlled by the TRMSPD knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages such as ~C24,32.

43

Advanced use

Keyboards and harp

The two harps that are included in Garritan Personal Orchestra are a Venus Grand Concert harp and a Wurlitzer Concert harp, circa 1920s. High-quality keyboard instruments were also sampled: a Steinway® 9' Concert Grand Piano was sampled at two dynamic levels (Steinway® name used by permission from Steinway and Sons); the harpsichord is a double manual French harpsichord, built by Hubbard; the celeste was manufactured by Mustel; the Concert Pipe Organ is a German Baroque pipe organ built by Rudolf von Beckerath, with three manuals and pedals, containing 11 individual stops. Steinway Concert Grand Piano Included in Garritan Personal Orchestra is a full Steinway Concert Grand instrument as well as two piano duo instruments that are meant for duo piano pieces, as well as a "lite" version of the full piano instrument to be used in ensemble situations when computer resources are at a premium.

* Velocity = Note Attack and Volume: Note attack and volume are controlled by

velocity.

* Sustain pedal (CC64): As you would expect, the piano responds correctly to the

sustain pedal controller, which you can achieve either via use of the pedal lines (in Create > Line) or MIDI messages in the form ~C64,127. Celeste and Glass Harmonica These two instruments share similar programming but give entirely different sounds. The celeste is a beautiful bell-sounding instrument, while the rare glass harmonica is a sound unique unto itself.

* Velocity = Note Attack: Velocity only controls the note attack on the celeste and

glass harmonica.

* Sustain Pedal (CC64) = Dampening: The sustain pedal acts to dampen the notes

played on the celeste and glass harmonica. Harps Because of the way a harp is played Garritan Personal Orchestra offers different types of harp patches. There are standard chromatic harp instruments for single plucked notes, glissando harps to emulate harp glissandos, harp harmonics patches for harp effects to add realism, and harp keyswitch instruments so that the user has access to all these types of sounds in one convenient instrument.

* Velocity = Note Attack and Volume: Note attack and volume are controlled by

velocity. 44

Keyboards and harp

* Sustain pedal (CC64) = damping: MIDI messages of the form ~C64,127 will engage the sustain pedal controller, allowing the harp to let ring; ~C64,0

damps the harp strings. By default, the harp will play back with the strings undampened (i.e. the sustain pedal is on). * Keyswitches: The harp keyswitch instruments combine the chromatic harp, the glissando harp, and the harp harmonics into one convenient instrument. Concert Pipe Organ The organ is the only keyboard instrument that does not use velocity to control the volume/timbre characteristics of the instrument. Since the pipe organ is controlled by wind pressure from the bellows, this works quite well and lends to a more satisfying experience when playing live. There are 13 organ patches in Garritan Personal Orchestra, each with a unique and particular sound. Extra controls have been added to the pipe organ instruments to increase the tonal possibilities. Using the programming listed below you should be able to create convincing organ pieces quickly and efficiently.

* Velocity = Note Attack: Velocity only controls the note attack on the organ. * Modulation (CC1) = Volume/Timbre: The modulation controller controls the

volume and timbre dynamics of the organ. This affords greater dynamic control of the organ. * Organ Fundamental (CC20): This controller controls the fundamental strength of the organ sounds, and is especially useful in the pedal instruments. Controlled via the FUND knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages of the form e.g. ~C20,64. * Organ Filter Strength (CC22): This controller, when used in conjunction with filter frequency (see below), allows the user to boost certain frequencies of the organ. Controlled via the FILTLV knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages of the form e.g. ~C22,64. * Organ Filter Frequency (CC24): This controller, when used in conjunction with filter strength (see above), allows the user to boost certain frequencies of the organ. Controlled via the FILTFQ knob in the Kontakt Player window, or via MIDI messages of the form e.g. ~C24,64. Harpsichord The harpsichord's programming is also simple yet effective, with all of the stops available via a keyswitch. The harpsichord always produces notes of the same volume and attack at each dynamic level; Sibelius will automatically switch to the 4' stop when a p dynamic is encountered, switch to the 8'+4' stop when a f dynamic is encountered, and switch to the lute stop when the Technique text lute is encountered. 45

Advanced use

46

Appendices

Appendices

Appendix A: List of instruments

Listed below are all the instruments included in GPO Sibelius Edition. Additional tables listing the specific capabilities of each instrument, which sound sets they are found in, etc. can be found on your GPO Sibelius Edition DVD-ROM. Key

* Leg = CC68 legato control * Sus (sus) = sustain pedal for normal sustain control * SusDp = sustain pedal with damping control * MW = modulation wheel expression control * Vel = note velocity for accents and attack * Vel (vol) = note velocity for volume control * VAR 1 = automatic variability of intonation * VAR 2 = automatic variability of timbre * ALT = up and down bowstrokes * BDFund = fundamental of the bass drum * KS = keyswitch instrument. All the notes used by keyswitches are in the octave C­1 to B­1, i.e. MIDI notes 0­11. * Length = sample length. * Plr instruments do not share samples with each other but must not be used with

the solo instruments from which they are derived to avoid phasing problems; e.g. don't use French horn 1 Plr1*, Plr2*, or Plr3* with French horn 1 (solo).

Name Description Controls

WOODWIND INSTRUMENTS Alto Flute Solo Alto Flute Plr1*

Principal alto flute. The alto flute plays four notes lower than a conventional flute. Made by Mönnig. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Alto Flute Solo instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Alto Flute Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Alto Flute VAR 2, Length Solo instrument.

Alto Flute Plr3*

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Alto Flute Solo instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Bass Clarinet Solo

Principal bass clarinet. Plays one octave lower than a con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length ventional clarinet.

48

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Bass Clarinet Plr1* Bass Clarinet Plr2* Bass Clarinet Plr3* Bass Flute Solo Vib Bass Flute Solo NV Bass Flute Plr1*

Description Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Clarinet Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Clarinet Solo instrument.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Clari- VAR 2, Length net Solo instrument.

Principal bass flute, played with vibrato. Plays one octave Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length lower than a conventional flute. Principal bass flute, played without vibrato. Plays one octave lower than a conventional flute. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Flute Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Flute Solo instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Bass Flute Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Bass Flute Plr3*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Bass Flute VAR 2, Length Solo instrument.

Bassoon 1 Solo Bassoon 2 Solo Bassoon Plr1*

Principal solo bassoon. Made by Heckel.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length VAR 2, Length

Second bassoon. A different bassoon with a different tone. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Bassoon 1 Solo instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Bassoon Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Bassoon VAR 2, Length 1 Solo instrument. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Bassoon 1 VAR 2, Length Solo instrument.

Bassoon Plr3*

Bb Clarinet Solo

Principal solo Bb clarinet. Made by Buffet.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Bb Clarinet Plr1* Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Bb Clarinet VAR 2, Length Solo instrument. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Bb Clarinet Plr2* Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Bb Clari- VAR 2, Length net Solo instrument.

49

Appendices

Name Description Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Bb Clarinet Plr3* Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Bb Clarinet VAR 2, Length Solo instrument.

Contrabass Clari- Principal contrabass clarinet. Plays an octave lower than net Solo the bass clarinet. Contrabassoon 1 Principal contrabassoon. Plays one octave lower than a Solo conventional bassoon and lower than any instrument in

LEg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

the orchestra.

Contrabassoon 2 Second contrabassoon. Has a wider note range and a difSolo ferent tone quality. Made by Schreiber. Eb Clarinet Solo English Horn 1 Solo English Horn 2 Solo English Horn 1 Plr1* English Horn 1 Plr2* English Horn 1 Plr3* Flute Solo Vib Flute Solo NV Flute Solo KS

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Principal Eb Solo Clarinet. Plays four notes higher than the Bb Clarinet.

Principal English horn. Also referred to as a cor anglais or Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length alto oboe. Second English horn (cor anglais) with a different tone and more pronounced vibrato. Made by Loree. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the English Horn 1 Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the English Horn 1 Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the English Horn 1 Solo instrument. Principal solo flute. played vibrato. Made by Haynes. Principal solo flute. played non vibrato. Keyswitch version of the solo flute instrument (C-1 = vibrato; D-1 = non vibrato; E-1 = fluttertongue).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length, KS Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Flute Solo Flutter Principal solo flute, played fluttertongue. Flute Plr1*

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Flute Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Flute Solo instrument.

Flute Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Flute Plr3*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Flute Solo VAR 2, Length instrument.

50

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Oboe 1 Modern Solo Oboe 2 Modern Solo Oboe 3 Modern Solo Oboe 1 Modern Plr1* Oboe 1 Modern Plr2* Oboe 1 Modern Plr3* Oboe Classical Solo Oboe D'Amore Piccolo Vib Solo Piccolo NV Solo Piccolo Solo KS Piccolo Flutter

Description Principal solo oboe. Second solo oboe, with a little more vibrato. Made by Püchner. Third solo oboe, with a slightly different tone and more pronounced vibrato. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble derived from the Oboe 1 Modern Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble derived from the Oboe 1 Modern Solo instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble derived from the Oboe 1 Modern Solo instrument.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Fourth solo oboe. Older vintage instrument with a differ- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length ent tone quality. Solo oboe d'amore. Principal piccolo. played vibrato. Made by Hammig. Principal piccolo. played non vibrato. Keyswitch version of the piccolo instrument (C-1 = vibrato; D-1 = non vibrato; E-1 = fluttertongue). Principal piccolo, played fluttertongue.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

BRASS INSTRUMENTS Bass Trombone 1 Principal Bass Trombone. Plays one octave lower than a Solo conventional trombone. Made by Bach. Bass Trombone 2 2nd Bass Trombone. A different bass trombone with a Solo brighter tone.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Bass Trombone 2 Same as Bass Trombone 2 Solo, but programmed for a Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Solo ag more aggressive sound. Contratuba Solo French horn 1 Solo French horn 1 Solo KS French horn 1 Solo ag

Principle contratuba. Plays lower than a conventional tuba. Specially made by Melton. Principal solo French horn.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Keyswitch version of the French horn 1 Solo instrument Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length (C-1 = regular sustain, D-1 = mutes). The same as French Horn 1 Solo but with a more aggressive sound.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

51

Appendices

Name

French horn 1 Plr1* French horn 1 Plr1 KS* French horn 1 Plr2* French horn 1 Plr2 KS* French horn 1 Plr3* French horn 1 Plr3 KS* French horn 2 Solo French horn 2 Solo Ag

Description Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the principle French horn instrument.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A keyswitch version of French horn 1 Plr1 (C-1 = regu- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length lar sustain, D-1 = mutes).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the principle VAR 2, Length French horn instrument.

A keyswitch version of French horn 1 Plr2 (C-1 = regu- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length lar sustain, D-1 = mutes). Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the principle French horn instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A keyswitch version of French horn 1 Plr3 (C-1 = regu- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length lar sustain, D-1 = mutes). Second French horn. A different French horn with a different tone quality. The same as French horn 2 Solo but programmed for a more aggressive sound.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

French horn 2 Plr Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. 1* First player in an ensemble, derived from the second

French horn instrument.

French horn 2 Plr2* French horn 2 Plr3*

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the second French horn instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the second French horn instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

French Horn Solo Principal French horn played with a straight mute (sorMute dino) French Horn Mute Plr1* French Horn Mute Plr2* French Horn Mute Plr3* F Horn f overlay

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the French horn VAR 2, Length muted instrument.

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the French horn muted instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the French horn muted instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A different solo French horn played forte and intended to Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length be played with other horns to create a fuller section sound.

52

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

F Horn f overlay ag F Horn ff overlay

Description The same as F Horn f overlay but programmed for a more aggressive sound. A different solo French horn played fortissimo and intended to be layered with other horns to create a fuller section sound. Principal solo tenor trombone, made by Conn.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tenor Tbone Solo Tenor Tbone Solo KS Tenor Tbone Solo ag Tenor Tbone Plr1*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A keyswitch version of the Tenor Tbone Solo instrument Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length (C-1 = regular sustains, D-1 = mutes). The same as Tenor Tbone Solo but programmed for a more aggressive sound. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the principal tenor trombone instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tenor Tbone Plr1 A keyswitch version of Tenor Tbone Plr1 (C-1 = regular Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length KS* sustains, D-1 = mutes). Tenor Tbone Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the principal VAR 2, Length tenor trombone instrument.

Tenor Tbone Plr2 A keyswitch version of Tenor Tbone Plr2 (C-1 = regular Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length KS* sustains, D-1 = mutes). Tenor Tbone Plr3*

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the principal tenor trombone instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tenor Tbone Plr3 A keyswitch version of Tenor Tbone Plr3 (C-1 = regular Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length KS* sustains, D-1 = mutes). Tenor Tbone Solo Mute Tenor Tbone Mute Plr1* Tenor Tbone Mute Plr2* Tenor Tbone Mute Plr3* Tbone Overlay

Principle tenor trombone played with a straight mute (sordino)

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the tenor trom- VAR 2, Length bone muted instrument.

Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the tenor trombone muted instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the tenor trom- VAR 2, Length bone muted instrument.

A different solo trombone played forte and intended to be Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length layered with other trombones to create a fuller section sound. aggressive sound.

VAR 2, Length

Tbone Overlay ag The same as Tbone Overlay but programmed for a more Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1,

53

Appendices

Name

Tpt 1 Solo Tpt 1 Solo KS Tpt 1 Solo ag Tpt 1 Plr1*

Description Principal solo C trumpet.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A keyswitch version of the Tpt 1 Solo instrument (C-1 = Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length regular sustains, D-1 = mutes). The same as Tpt 1 Solo but programmed for a more aggressive sound. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the principal trumpet instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt 1 Plr1 KS* Tpt 1 Plr2*

A keyswitch version of Tpt1 Plr1 (C-1 = regular sustains, Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length D-1 = mutes).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the principal VAR 2, Length trumpet instrument.

Tpt 1 Plr2 KS* Tpt 1 Plr3*

A keyswitch version of Tpt1 Plr2 (C-1 = regular sustains, Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length D-1 = mutes). Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the principal trumpet instrument.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt 1 Plr3 KS* Tpt 2 Solo Tpt 2 Plr1*

A keyswitch version of Tpt1 Plr3 (C-1 = regular sustains, Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Length D-1 = mutes). Second solo trumpet; a different trumpet with a brighter sound than Tpt 1 Solo. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. First player in an ensemble, derived from the second trumpet instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Second player in an ensemble, derived from the second trumpet instrument. Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Third player in an ensemble, derived from the second trumpet instrument. Piccolo trumpet played with no vibrato. Made by Bach Stradivarius. Piccolo trumpet played with vibrato. Principal trumpet played with a straight mute (sordino).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt 2 Plr2*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt 2 Plr3*

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt Piccolo NV Solo Tpt Piccolo V Solo Tpt Solo Straight Mute

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Tpt Straight Mute Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Plr1* First player in an ensemble derived from the muted trum- VAR 2, Length

pet instrument.

54

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name Description Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt Straight Mute Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Plr2* Second player in an ensemble derived from the muted

trumpet instrument.

Tpt Straight Mute Associate ensemble instrument for building ensembles. Plr3* Third player in an ensemble derived from the muted

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

trumpet instrument.

Tpt Overlay

A different solo trumpet played forte and intended to be layered with other trumpets to create a fuller section sound. The same as Tpt Overlay but programmed for a more aggressive sound. Principal solo bass tuba. Made by Bohland Fuchs. Second solo bass tuba, with a different tone. The same as Tuba 2 Solo but programmed for a more aggressive sound. A different solo tuba played forte and intended to be layered or played solo for a fuller sound. The same as Tuba Overlay but programmed for a more aggressive sound.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Tpt Overlay ag Tuba 1 Solo Tuba 2 Solo Tuba 2 Solo ag Tuba Overlay Tuba Overlay ag

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

HARP INSTRUMENTS Chromatic Harp 1 Chromatic Harp 1 Lite Chromatic Harp 2 Chromatic Harp 2 Lite

Venus harp with a mellow sound. A lite version of the Chromatic Harp 1 instrument. Wurlitzer harp with a clearer sound. A lite version of the Chromatic Harp 2 instrument.

Vel (vol), SusDp Vel (vol), SusDp Vel (vol), SusDp Vel (vol), SusDp MIDI maps are used to emulate pedals.

Glissando Harp 1 Maps Chromatic Harp 1 samples to the white notes of

the keyboard. Simulate harp glissandos in real time by running your finger up and down the white notes.

Glissando Harp 2 Maps Chromatic Harp 2 samples to the white notes of

the keyboard.

Harp 1 KS

MIDI maps are used to emulate pedals. Vel (vol), SusDp

A keyswitch instrument containing all the Chromatic Harp 1 instruments (C-1 = chromatic harp; D-1 = glissando harp; G-1 = harp harmonics) A keyswitch instrument containing all the Chromatic Harp 2 instruments (C-1 = chromatic harp; D-1 = glissando harp; G-1 = harp harmonics) Venus harp playing harmonics.

Harp 2 KS

Vel (vol), SusDp

Harp Harmonics 1

SusDp

55

Appendices

Name

Harp Harmonics 2

Description Wurlitzer harp playing harmonics.

Controls

SusDp

KEYBOARD INSTRUMENTS Celesta

Solo celesta instrument, made by Mustel.

Vel (vol), SusDp, Sus (sus) Vel (vol) KS, Vel (vol), Sus (sus)

Glass Harmonica Emulation of a glass harmonica. Harpsichord KS

The harpsichord is a double manual French harpsichord made by Hubbard. The stops are selected by keyswitches (C-1 = 8' stop; D-1 = 8'+4' stop; E-1 = buff/lute stop, muted sound) Steinway concert grand piano, chromatic with two dynamics. Steinway concert grand piano, chromatic with two dynamics, using fewer samples. The instrument is mapped so two keyboards do not have samples in common. They can be used in piano duos. The pipe organ is a German Baroque organ build by Rudolf von Beckerath. It has three manuals and pedals, each containing from 7 to 11 individual stops. Stops include: Baroque Plen Reed Ped; Baroque Plen Reeds; Baroque Plenum Ped; Baroque Plenum; Brustwerk All stops; Cornet; Flutes; Full Organ; Haupt Mix; Hauptwerk All Stops; Prinzipal; Scharf IV; Symphonic Plenum

Steinway Piano Steinway Piano Lite Steinway Piano Duo 1 & Duo 2 Pipe Organ

Vel (vol), Sus (sus)

Vel (vol), Sus (sus)

Vel (vol), Sus (sus)

Vel (vol), Fund, FiltLV, FiltFQ

PERCUSSION INSTRUMENTS Basic Orch Percussion Bass Drum KS

See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings.

Vel (vol), BDFund, BD Aggressive control VAR 1, VAR 2, KS BDFund, Vel (vol), KS, VAR 1, VAR 2 aggressive control Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2

See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings.

Crotales Cymbals KS Glockenspiel Marimba Handbells Percussion Toys Snares KS Timpani KS Tubular Bells

Crotales resemble small cymbals and produce a definite pitch. See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings. The glockenspiel is another name for orchestral bells.

Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2, KS Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2

The marimba has two rows of wooden bars that are played Vel (vol), SusDp, VAR1, VAR2 with beaters (mallets). Handbells are sets of brass bells, each tuned to a particular Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2 note of the scale. See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings. See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings. See Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings. Tubular bells are also known as orchestral chimes.

Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2, KS Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2, KS Vel (vol), VAR1, VAR2, KS Vel (vol), SusDp, VAR 1, VAR 2

56

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Vibraphone

Description

Controls

The vibraphone has two rows of metal bars with electric Vel (vol) Sus Attack, resonators that produce a distinctive vibrato or throbbing Length, TrmLev, TrmSpd effect. A wind machine is an effects instrument that emulates the MW (vol) sound of wind. Made by Amati. The xylophone has two rows of graduated wooden bars, mounted in a frame, that are played with beaters (mallets).

Vel (vol), SusDp

Wind Machine Xylophone

SECTIONAL STRING INSTRUMENTS Vln 1 Lush

A lush sustain with strong vibrato played by a twelveplayer first violin section.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Vln 1 Lush Mutes Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Vlns 1 Pizzicato

First violin section played pizzicato. Velocity controls vol- Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2 ume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities). First violin section played short bow style, controlled by Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR velocity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 = 1, VAR 2 alternate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2)

Vlns 1 Short Bows with more aggressive sound, con-

Vlns 1 Short Bows KS

Vlns 1 Short Bows KS ag Vlns 1 Sustain+Short

trolled by velocity. Keyswitch as above.

Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

First violin section strings that combine characteristics of Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 both long and short bows into single instruments.

Vlns 1 Vlns 1 Sustain+Short with more aggressive sound, con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Sustain+Short ag trolled by the modulation controller (CC1). Vlns 1 Sustain+ Short Mutes Vlns 1 Tremolo Vlns 1 Trills Half Vlns 1 Trills Whole Vlns 1 KS

Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). First violin section played tremolo. First violin section played half-step (semitone) trills. First violin section played whole-step (tone) trills.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Keyswitch instrument containing all Vlns 1 instruments Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alter- Alt nate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal).

57

Appendices

Name

Vln 2 Lush

Description A lush sustain with strong vibrato played by a ten-player second violin section.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Vln 2 Lush Mutes Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Vlns 2 Pizzicato

Second violin section played pizzicato. Velocity controls Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2 volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities). Second violin section played short bow style, controlled Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR by velocity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 1, VAR 2 = alternate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2)

Vlns 2 Short Bows with more aggressive sound, con-

Vlns 2 Short Bows KS

Vlns 2 Short Bows KS ag Vlns 2 Sustain+ Short Vlns 2 Sustain+ Short ag Vlns 2 Sustain+ Short Mutes Vlns 2 Tremolo Vlns 2 Trills Half Vlns 2 Trills Whole Vlns 2 KS

trolled by velocity. Keyswitch as above.

Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Second violin section strings that combine characteristics Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 of both long and short bows into single instruments.

Vlns 2 Sustain+Short with more aggressive sound, con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port,

trolled by the modulation controller (CC1). Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Second violin section played tremolo. Second violin section played half-step (semitone) trills. Second violin section played whole-step (tone) trills.

Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Keyswitch instrument containing all Vlns 2 instruments Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alter- Alt nate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal). A lush sustain with strong vibrato played by a ten-player viola section. Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Viola section played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2

Violas Lush Violas Lush Mutes Violas Pizzicato Violas Short Bows KS

Viola section played short bow style, controlled by veloc- Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR ity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 = alter- 1, VAR 2 nate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2)

58

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Violas Short Bows KS ag Violas Sustain+ Short Violas Sustain+ Short ag Violas Sustain+ Short Mutes Violas Tremolo Violas Trills Half Violas Trills Whole Violas KS

Description

Violas Short Bows with more aggressive sound, con-

Controls

Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

trolled by velocity. Keyswitch as above.

Viola section strings that combine characteristics of both Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 long and short bows into single instruments.

Violas Sustain+Short with more aggressive sound, con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port,

trolled by the modulation controller (CC1). Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Viola section played tremolo. Viola section played half-step (semitone) trills. Viola section played whole-step (tone) trills.

Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Keyswitch instrument containing all Violas instruments Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alter- Alt nate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal). A lush sustain with strong vibrato played by an eightplayer viola section. Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Cello section played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2

Cellos Lush Cellos Lush Mutes Cellos Pizzicato Cellos Short Bows KS

Cello section played short bow style, controlled by veloc- Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR ity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 = alter- 1, VAR 2 nate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2)

Cellos Short Bows with more aggressive sound, con-

Cellos Short Bows KS ag Cellos Sustain+ Short Cellos Sustain+ Short ag Cellos Sustain+ Short Mutes Cellos Tremolo

trolled by velocity. Keyswitch as above. Cello section strings that combine characteristics of both long and short bows into single instruments. trolled by the modulation controller (CC1). Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Cello section played tremolo.

Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Cellos Sustain+Short with more aggressive sound, con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port,

Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

59

Appendices

Name

Cellos Trills Half Cellos Trills Whole Cellos KS

Description Cello section played half-step (semitone) trills. Cello section played whole-step (tone) trills.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Keyswitch instrument containing all Cellos instruments Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alter- Alt nate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal). A lush sustain with strong vibrato played by a sevenplayer double bass section. Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Basses Lush Basses Lush Mutes Basses Pizzicato

Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2 Double bass section played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities).

Basses Short Bows KS

Double bass section played short bow style, controlled by Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR velocity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 = 1, VAR 2 alternate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2)

Basses Short Bows with more aggressive sound, con-

Basses Short Bows KS ag Basses Sustain+ Short Basses Sustain+ Short ag Basses Sustain+ Short Mutes Basses Tremolo Basses KS

trolled by velocity. Keyswitch as above. Double bass section strings that combine characteristics of both long and short bows into single instruments. trolled by the modulation controller (CC1). Same as above, played with mutes (con sordino). Double bass section played tremolo.

Vel (vol), KS, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Basses Sustain+Short with more aggressive sound, con- Leg, MW, Vel, Port,

Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Keyswitch instrument containing all Basses instruments Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alter- Alt nate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal).

60

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Full Strgs Pizz

Description

Controls

Full string section played pizzicato. Velocity controls vol- Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, ume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher veloci- Length ties).

Vel (vol), KS, VAR 1, VAR Full string section played short bow style, controlled by velocity. Uses keyswitch for bow direction control (D-1 = 2, Length alternate bow strokes; D#-1 = bow stroke 1; E-1 = bow stroke 2).

Full Strgs Short Bows KS

Full Strgs Sustain+Short Full Strgs Sustain+Short ag

Full string section that combine characteristics of both long and short bows into single instruments. sive sound, controlled by the modulation controller (CC1).

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Full Strgs Sustain+Short instrument with more aggres- Leg, MW, Vel, Port,

Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Full Strgs SusSame as above, played with mutes (con sordino). tain+Short Mutes Full Strgs Tremolo Full Strgs Trills Half Full Strgs Trills Whole Full Strgs KS

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Length, VAR 1, VAR 2

Full string section played tremolo. Full string section played half-step (semitone) trills. Full string section played whole-step (tone) trills.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, Keyswitch instrument containing all Full Strgs instruments (C-1 = Sus+short (legato with sustain pedal); C#-1 Length, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Alt = Sus+short mutes (legato with sustain pedal); D-1 = Alternate up- and down-bows; D#-1 Up-bows; E-1 = Down-bows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Tremolo mutes (legato with sustain pedal); G-1 = Tremolo (legato with sustain pedal); G#-1 = Half-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); A-1 = Half step trills (legato with sustain pedal); A#-1 = Whole-step trills mutes (legato with sustain pedal); B-1 = Whole step trills (legato with sustain pedal).

SOLO STRING INSTRUMENTS Violin 1 Gagli Solo Violin 1 Gagli KS Solo

Gagliano solo violin, principal violin. Combines characteristics of both long and short bows.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

A keyswitch version of the Violin Gagli Solo instrument Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, (C-1 = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automati- VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length cally alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 = Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills). First player in an ensemble derived from Violin 1 Gagli Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Violin 1 Gagli Plr1*

61

Appendices

Name

Violin 1 Gagli Plr2* Violin 1 Gagli Plr3* Violin 1 Gagli Pizz Solo Violin 2 Strad Solo

Description Second player in an ensemble derived from Violin 1

Gagli Solo.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Third player in an ensemble derived from Violin 1 Gagli Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Solo.

Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, Gagliano solo violin, played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher veloc- Length ities).

Stradivarius solo violin, Concertmaster. Combines charac- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length teristics of both long and short bows.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Violin 2 Strad KS A keyswitch version of the Violin 2 Strad Solo instruSolo ment (C-1 = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Auto- VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length matically alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 =

Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills).

Violin 2 Strad Plr1* Violin 2 Strad Plr2* Violin 2 Strad Plr3* Violin 2 Strad Pizz Solo Violin 3 Guarn Solo

First player in an ensemble derived from Violin 2 Strad Solo. Second player in an ensemble derived from Violin 2

Strad Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Third player in an ensemble derived from Violin 2 Strad Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Solo. Stradivarius solo violin, played pizzicato. Velocity controls Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher veloc- Length ities). Guarneri solo violin, Concertmaster. Combines character- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length istics of both long and short bows.

Violin 3 Guarn KS A keyswitch version of the Violin 3 Guarn Solo instru- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Solo ment (C-1 = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Auto- VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length matically alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 =

Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills).

Violin 3 Guarn Plr1* Violin 3 Guarn Plr2* Violin 3 Guarn Plr3*

First player in an ensemble derived from Violin 3 Guarn Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Solo. Second player in an ensemble derived from Violin 3

Guarn Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Third player in an ensemble derived from Violin 3 Guarn Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Solo.

62

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Violin 3 Guarn Pizz Solo Viola Solo Viola KS Solo

Description

Controls

Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, Guarneri solo violin, played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher veloc- Length ities).

18th century solo viola, principal viola. Combines charac- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length teristics of both long and short bows. A keyswitch version of the Viola Solo instrument (C-1 = Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automatically alter- VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length nating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 = Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills). First player in an ensemble derived from Viola Solo. Second player in an ensemble derived from Viola Solo. Third player in an ensemble derived from Viola Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Viola Plr1* Viola Plr2* Viola Plr3* Viola Pizz Solo Cello 1 Solo Cello 1 KS Solo

Solo viola, played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, Length and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities). Vuillaume solo cello, principal cello. Combines character- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length istics of both long and short bows. A keyswitch version of the Cello 1 Solo instrument (C-1 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automatically alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 = Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills). First player in an ensemble derived from Cello 1 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length VAR 2, Length

Cello 1 Plr1* Cello 1 Plr2* Cello 1 Plr3* Cello 2 Solo

Second player in an ensemble derived from Cello 1 Solo. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Third player in an ensemble derived from Cello 1 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Montagnana solo cello, principal cello. Combines charac- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length teristics of both long and short bows.

63

Appendices

Name

Cello 2 KS Solo

Description

Controls

A keyswitch version of the Cello 2 Solo instrument (C-1 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automatically alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 = Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills). First player in an ensemble derived from Cello 2 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length VAR 2, Length

Cello 2 Plr1* Cello 2 Plr2* Cello 2 Plr3* Cello 3 Solo Cello 3 KS Solo

Second player in an ensemble derived from Cello 2 Solo. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Third player in an ensemble derived from Cello 2 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Gofriller solo cello, principal cello. Combines characteris- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length tics of both long and short bows. A keyswitch version of the Cello 3 Solo instrument (C-1 Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automatically alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 = Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills). First player in an ensemble derived from Cello 3 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length VAR 2, Length

Cello 3 Plr1* Cello 3 Plr2* Cello 3 Plr3* Cello Pizz Solo Dbl Bass Solo

Second player in an ensemble derived from Cello 3 Solo. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, Third player in an ensemble derived from Cello 3 Solo.

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Solo cello, played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, Length and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities). 18th century solo double bass. Principal. Combines char- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length acteristics of both long and short bows.

Dbl Bass KS Solo A keyswitch version of the Dbl Bass Solo instrument (C- Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, 1 = Sustain; C#-1 = Sustain mute; D-1 = Automatically VAR 2, KS, Alt, Length alternating up and downbows; D#-1 = Upbows; E-1 = Downbows; F-1 = Pizzicato; F#-1 = Playable tremolo mute; G-1 = Playable tremolo; G#-1 = Playable muted trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A-1 =

Playable trills (extended intervals can be chosen with CC16); A#-1 = Playable whole step muted trills; B-1 = Playable whole step trills).

Dbl Bass Plr1*

First player in an ensemble derived from Dbl Bass Solo. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1,

VAR 2, Length

64

Appendix A: List of instruments

Name

Dbl Bass Plr2* Dbl Bass Plr3* Dbl Bass Pizz Solo

Description Second player in an ensemble derived from Dbl Bass

Solo.

Controls

Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

Third player in an ensemble derived from Dbl Bass Solo. Leg, MW, Vel, Port, VAR 1,

VAR 2, Length

Solo double bass, played pizzicato. Velocity controls volume level and timbre changes (brighter at higher velocities).

Vel (vol), VAR 1, VAR 2, Length

65

Appendices

Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings

Listed below are the MIDI pitches used for each unpitched percussion sound in GPO's percussion instruments. Plug these values into the Use MIDI pitch option in the Edit Staff Type dialog when modifying existing GPO percussion staff types or creating your own (see Creating your own percussion staff types on page 41). Bass Drum KS

MIDI pitch

C2 C#2

Description Bass drum hit Bass drum roll (controlled by modulation wheel)

Keyswitches:

* C­1: Hits full decay * D­1: Hits hand dampened

Snares KS

MIDI pitch

G#3 A3 A#3 B4

Description Side drum hit (left hand) Side drum hit (right hand) Side drum roll (controlled by modulation wheel) Keyswitch (left/right hits, left hand, right hand, roll)

Keyswitches:

* C­1: Alternate hits (left- and right- hand) * D­1: Left-hand hits only * E­1: Right-hand hits only * F­1: Roll 1 (controlled by modulation wheel)

66

Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings Timpani KS

MIDI pitch

D2­G3 D4­G5

Description Timpani hits (left hand) Timpani hits (right hand)

Keyswitches:

* C­1: Hits full decay * D­1: Hits hand dampened

Cymbals KS

MIDI pitch

G#5 A5 A#5 B5 C6 C#6 D6 D#6 E6 F6

Description Large gong Medium gong 1 Tam tam Medium gong 2 Piatti cymbal 1 Piatti cymbal 2 Piatti cymbal 3 Crash cymbal Choke cymbal Keyswitch (left/right ping, left only, right only, roll 1, roll 2)

Keyswitches:

* C­1: Alternate pings (left- and right- hand) * D­1: Left-hand pings only * E­1: Right-hand pings only * F­1: Roll 1 (controlled by modulation wheel) * G­1: Roll 2 (controlled by modulation wheel; not directly supported)

67

Appendices Percussion Toys

MIDI pitch

A#3 B3 C4 C#4 D4 D#4 E4 C5 C#5 D5 D#5 E5 F5 F#5 G5 G#5 A5 A#5

Description Cowbell 1 Cowbell 2 Cowbell 3 Gourd 1 Gourd 2 Shaker 1 Shaker 2 Tambourine pop Tambourine shake Castanet hit Castanet roll Clave 1 Clave 2 Ratchet Sleigh bells Mark tree Triangle short (add sustain pedal or ~C64,127 for dampened) Triangle long (add sustain pedal or ~C64,127 for dampened)

68

Appendix B: Percussion instrument mappings Basic Orchestral Percussion

MIDI pitch

C3 C#3 D3­G4 G#4 A4 A#4 B4 G#5 A5 A#5 B5 C6 C#6 D6 D#6 E6 F6 A#6 B6 C7

Description Bass drum hit Bass drum roll (controlled by modulation wheel) Timpani hit (left hand) Side drum hit (left hand) Side drum hit (right hand) Side drum roll (controlled by modulation wheel) Snare drum keyswitch (left/right hit, left only, right only) Large gong Medium gong 1 Tam tam Medium gong 2 Piatti cymbal 1 Piatti cymbal 2 Piatti cymbal 3 Crash cymbal Choke cymbal Cymbal keyswitch (left/right ping, left only, right only) Cymbal roll crescendo Triangle long Triangle short

Keyswitches:

* C­1: Alternate hits (left- and right- hand) * D­1: Left-hand hits only * E­1: Right-hand hits only

69

Appendices

70

License Agreement

License Agreement

By installing or using any component of the Software, or by registering the Product, you (an individual or legal entity) agree with the Licensor to be bound by the terms of this License which will govern your use of the Product. If you do not accept these terms you may within 14 days of purchase return the Product, its packaging and documentation unused and intact to your supplier together with dated proof of purchase for a full refund. The Product is copyright © Sibelius Software Limited and its licensors 2005.

1. DEFINITIONS In this License the following words and expressions have the following meanings: "Documentation": any documentation relating to the Software supplied to you in any form by the Licensor or with the Software. "License": this agreement between you and the Licensor and, if permitted by the context, the conditional license granted to you in this agreement. "Licensor": "Product": "Software": 2. License 2.1 (1) The Licensor grants to you a non-exclusive non-transferable license to use the Software in accordance with the Documentation, subject to the terms of any discount, offer or scheme which the Product may have been obtained under. Some components of the Software may be subject to separate license agreements which you will need to agree to in order to use them. (2) You may install the Software on a single computer. You may also install a second copy on one additional computer, provided that you ensure that you are the only person who uses the Software on either computer, that you own legitimate registered copies of Sibelius 3 or later which are installed on both computers, and that the Software is never used on both computers simultaneously. (3) Title to the Product is not transferred to you. Ownership of the Product remains vested in the Licensor and its licensors, subject to the rights granted to you under this License. All other rights are reserved. (4) If the Software was supplied as an upgrade or update from an earlier version, the license to use that earlier version is hereby terminated. 2.2 You may make one printout for your own use of any part of the Documentation provided in electronic form. You shall not make or permit any third party to make any further copies of any part of the Product whether in eye or machinereadable form. 2.3 You shall not, and shall not cause or permit any third party to, translate, enhance, modify, alter, adapt or create derivative works based on the Product or any part of it for any purpose (including without limitation for the purpose of error correction), or cause the whole or any part of the Product to be combined with or incorporated into any other program, file or product for any purpose, except as expressly permitted by the Documentation. 2.4 You shall not, and shall not cause or permit any third party to, decompile, decode, disassemble or reverse engineer the Software in whole or in part for any purpose. 2.5 The Product or any part of it must not be used to infringe any right of copyright or right of privacy, publicity or personality or any other right whatsoever of any other person or entity. Copyright 3.1 You acknowledge that copyright in the Product as a whole and in the components of the Product as between you and the Licensor belongs to the Licensor or its licensors and is protected by copyright laws, national and international, and all other applicable laws. Further details of the ownership of all copyright in the components of the Product are set out in the Product. Liability of the Licensor 4.1 The Licensor warrants that the Product will be free from defects in materials and workmanship and perform substantially in accordance with the Documentation under normal use for a period of 90 days after the date of original purchase (the "Warranty Period"). If a defect in the Product shall occur during the Warranty Period, the Product may be Sibelius Software Limited, an English company (registered no. 3338819) of The Old Toy Factory, 20-22 City North, Fonthill Road, London N4 3HF, UK. the Software and the Documentation. Kontakt Gold, Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition or Sibelius Rock & Pop Collection (as applicable); its installer; and any other programs or files supplied to you with or for use with it.

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Garritan Personal Orchestra Sibelius Edition User Guide

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