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GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION

GRADUATE STUDENT MANUAL MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH

IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION College of Health and Human Services San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue, HSS 326 San Francisco, California 94132 Tel: (415) 338-1413 Fax: (415) 338-0570 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.sfsu.edu/~hed/ 2006-2007

San Francisco State University

Department of Health Education

Dear New MPH Student, Welcome to the Master in Public Health program at San Francisco State University. We are very excited to begin a three-year journey with you as you learn the professional and personal skills required to be a leader in Public Health Education. The faculty thank you in advance for the hard work and personal sacrifices you will make to earn this degree. We know your commitment over the next three years will prepare you to take your place among community health educators working to promote health and social justice in various communities in California. The Mission of the Health Education Department is to promote health and justice in urban communities. Central to this vision is the development of diverse leadership that advances individual, social and ecological health. To fulfill our mission, student centered approaches engage students through innovative pedagogy integrating theory and practice. The ultimate aim is to develop culturally competent professionals able to apply systems theory to prevent disease and promote the health of the public. Students who graduate with a Master's in Public Health from SFSU demonstrate high levels of competence in: 1. Master's level competency in public health knowledge and skills as established by the National Task Force on Preparation and Practice of Health Educators as master's level knowledge/skills for Community Health Educators; and 2. Leadership skills; team building; cultural competence; and written and oral communication skills. The faculty in the Department of Health Education is committed to your success in our program. This manual will be a valuable resource for you over the next three years as it explains how the curriculum at SFSU unfolds as well as many of your responsibilities as a student in the MPH at SFSU. We also encourage you to get involved with the Public Health Organization of Graduate Students (PHOGS). Here you will find equally committed students who can help guide and shepherd you through this degree program. Welcome again, are we look forward to getting to know you through our work together over the next three years. Warmly,

Mary Beth Love, Ph.D. Professor and Chair

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Master of Public Health in Community Health Education SFSU: Mission, Program Design & Goals MPH Principles to Achieve Health Equity & Cultural Competence

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5-6

7-8

History of the MPH at SFSU Health Education Faculty & Staff Directory SFSU MPH Faculty & Courses SFSU MPH Faculty: Biographies & Research Interests Faculty ­ MPH Student Advising MPH Student Cohorts' Email Directory Student Leadership: Membership in Professional Associations · Public Health Organization of Graduate Students (PHOGS) · Northern California Professional Organizations · National Professional Organizations · Code of Ethics for the Health Education Profession SFSU Campus Resources Graduate Essay Test (GET) ­ The SFSU Literacy Requirement SFSU MPH Department of Health Education Instructions for Preparing a Paper SFSU MPH Department of Health Education Plagiarism and Academic Honesty SFSU Registration, Enrollment & Course Waivers MPH-SFSU Grading SFSU MPH Curriculum · SFSU MPH Course Descriptions · HED 811: Electronic Portfolio Format Guidelines for SFSU MPH Candidates · MPH Reflective Seminars HED 890.01, 890.02, 890.03 · Responsibilities & Competencies for MPH Courses

9 10 11 12-17 18-19 20-28 29 30-32 33 34 35-38 39-44 45 46 47 48 49-51 52 53-63 64-99 100 101-111

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Practice-Conjoined Courses (Practicum) · Roles & Responsibilities: Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF) & Practice Coordinator · Table 1: Sample MPH Practice Sites, CAFs, & Project Descriptions

112 113-114

115-116

HED 892: MPH Summer Internship · HED 892: MPH Summer Internship Guidelines · Table 2: Sample HED 892 Internship Projects & Preceptors

117 118-119 120-121

HED 895: Culminating Experience (CE); Important Resources and Websites

122-141

Graduation: Preparation & Completion of Application for the Master's Degree

142

Appendices U.S. Schools of Public Health and other MS and MPH Programs Professional Websites Request for Independent Student Travel Funding Guidelines

143 144-147 148-149 150

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MASTERS OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

MISSION STATEMENT The Mission of the MPH in Community Health Education at San Francisco State University is to promote health and social justice in urban communities. Central to this vision is an emphasis on a community-based approach that builds diverse, collaborative leadership and recognizes the importance of understanding the multiple determinants of health to design effective, comprehensive solutions. To fulfill our mission, we engage students through contextual and participatory teaching approaches integrating theory and practice, with an emphasis on developing team, leadership and communication skills in our graduates. The ultimate aim is to develop culturally and professionally competent leaders in public health able to work with communities to apply systems theory to prevent disease and promote the health of the public. PROGRAM DESIGN & GOALS The curriculum for the MPH is designed as a three-year sequence in which collaborative learning and problem solving are fostered. The three years include practice courses in semesters 2-4, a summer internship after year two, and a creative culminating research project in the last semester. Students move through the entire program as a cohort learning community for the entire three years. Upon graduation our students demonstrate mastery of the responsibilities and competencies for Community Health Educators, adapted from those developed by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and the American Association of Health Education (AAHE). Every MPH student develops a portfolio with examples of deliverables reflecting mastery of responsibilities I-X, competencies and professional skills.

Responsibility I: Responsibility II: Responsibility III: Responsibility IV: Responsibility V: Responsibility VI: Responsibility VII: Responsibility VIII: Responsibility IX: Responsibility X: Assessing Individual and Community Needs for Community Health Education Planning Effective Community Health Education Programs Implementing Community Health Education Programs Evaluating Effectiveness of Community health Education Programs Coordinating Provision of Community Health Education Services Acting as a Resource Person in Community Health Education Communicating Health and Community Health Ed. Needs, Concerns, & Resources Apply Appropriate Research Principles and Methods in Community Health Education Administering Community Health Education Programs Advancing the Profession of Community Health Education

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SFSU's MPH curriculum embraces an ecological approach, emphasizing the importance of addressing determinants of health at the individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and policy levels. MPH courses provide students with the theoretical foundations and skills necessary to develop, implement and evaluate comprehensive, multi-sectoral programs. Upon graduation, our students demonstrate an ability to identify and analyze and address public health problems from a multi-level perspective. They demonstrate knowledge of the political, economic, social and cultural environments in which they are working, and are able to apply that knowledge to understanding and solving complex health problems of diverse, urban populations. To summarize, the SFSU MPH curriculum is distinct in the following ways: 1. The learning community model fosters team work and collaborative leadership as well as providing social and peer academic support to MPH students.

2. The curriculum integrates three semesters of practice-conjoined courses, beyond the normal summer internship experience. In the practice-conjoined courses, students spend a minimum of 5 hours per week in the community practicing the core skills of assessment, planning and evaluation. These three core public health competency courses (HED 820, 830, 840) include a community-based practice component (HED 821, 831, 841) with Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF) as preceptors and a summer internship (HED 892). These placements provide hands-on experience for the students in the application of public health theory and competence in practice. 3. Pedagogy within the classroom emphasizes the use of active student learning and casebased instruction. This approach utilizes the principles of adult learning theories that requiring students to think critically about complex problems in the context of diverse communities. Team and leadership skills are honed through the development of a learning community for each MPH cohort. This provides students with a living lab to learn how to delegate work, resolve conflict and problem solve collaboratively. 4. Students spend 15 hours in a one-unit reflective seminar (HED 890) offered each semester designed to nurture self care, identifying as a learner and developing leadership and build community skills. Students also discuss ethics, understand group dynamics, practice conflict resolution and explore issues of power and cultural competence. 5. Students develop a skills portfolio (HED 811) and a culminating experience project (HED 895) that illustrates the synthesis and knowledge integration of the theory and principles of community health education in public health practice. 6. Formal presentations to local public health leaders and funders as well as other forms of professional contributions are encouraged.

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MPH PRINCIPLES TO ACHIEVE HEALTH EQUITY & CULTURAL COMPETENCE1 Masters in Public Health (MPH) students and faculty have developed a set of principles to achieve health equity as well as address discrimination and other forms of oppression/societal privilege in our curriculum. The following six principles apply to the entire program ­ not just to the content of a particular course. They address outreach, recruitment and retention as well as cross cohort activities, faculty-student relations and learning across the curriculum. Cultural competence emphasizes the ability to function effectively with members of different groups through cultural awareness and sensitivity. Cultural competence is a developmental process that evolves over an extended period. MPH students and faculty have various levels of awareness, knowledge and skills along a cultural competence continuum. Nonetheless, we are united by our departmental mission and committed to taking the steps necessary for addressing injustices at the personal and community levels. 1. The MPH faculty will speak to our mission statement in the classroom and/or syllabus by identifying how the principles are operationalized and manifested throughout their class. The Mission of the MPH in Community Health Education at SFSU focuses on promoting health and social justice in urban communities. Central to this vision is an emphasis on a community-based training approach that builds diverse, collaborative leadership and recognizes the importance of understanding the multiple determinants of health to design effective, comprehensive solutions.

2. The MPH program will pro-actively reach out to, recruit and retain students from the communities where health disparities manifest. The Health Education Department will identify steps to address the lack of diversity in the public health workforce on an on-going basis. 3. The theme of health equity, cultural competence and power dynamics will be taught across the curriculum. The Health Education Department and its faculty recognize that achieving health equity is a long-term process. It takes time and commitment to social justice to build relationships of trust and evolve cultural competencies in service to achieving social justice. 4. The department will assist students and faculty in organizing learning opportunities where experiences of oppression, power imbalance, and societal privilege are discussed. Emphasis will be on developing exchanges of ideas where people feel safe to speak their mind ­ including expressing any internal fears or feelings of inadequacy that exists within individuals and/or organizations. Respect is always the cornerstone of this discussion. 5. Faculty will have on-going training opportunities that address issues of health equity and cultural competency issues, with special attention on techniques for proactively identifying and engaging cultural diversity and power dynamics within the classroom.

1

Adopted at the MPH retreat on August 26, 2005.

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6. Faculty/students will actively seek teaching moments regarding how oppression, power imbalance, and societal privilege express themselves constructively/destructively in the classroom and community. In service to these teachable moments, they will: A) Identify personal value systems as well as positions of power, oppression and societal privilege relevant to working on improving health equity. B) Identify techniques for working effectively in cross-cultural settings ­ including practicum and classroom group projects, acknowledging diversity within and between racial/ethnic groups. C) Develop an in-depth understanding of the present-day existence related to health equity. Develop an in-depth understanding of the impacts of institutionalized/structural, personally mediated and internalized racism that emphasizes the "intersectionality" of race, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, and class as well as forms of oppression, power imbalance and societal privilege. D) Define cultural competency within an organizational setting. Discuss culturally appropriate public health interventions locally, nationally and internationally. E) Identify the role of political, economic, cultural, societal and behavioral factors in determining disease, as well as supporting disease prevention and health promotion behavior, and medical service delivery.

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HISTORY OF THE MASTERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM AT SFSU

This first memo of intention to begin planning for a new degree was written in 1993. During the next year a group of 30 leaders in public health in the Bay Area were engaged as members of an advisory board to help in the development of the mission and curriculum for the program. In spring of 1995, the Department undertook an extensive labor market survey to assess the employment prospects for MPH graduates and to ascertain the competencies most desired from an employers perspective. Of hiring factors deemed most important to 519 prospective employers of masters level health educators, multicultural competence, knowledge of health problems important to the clientele, and health education experiences were ranked most important in hiring decisions. These same three factors were deemed to be the areas of greatest weakness among current staff and also the factors most difficult to find when hiring new staff. About a third of all respondents reported that Latinos, African-Americans, and Asians were underrepresented in their current health education staff. In academic year 95-96, the MPH received approval from the SFSU Curriculum Review Board and the Faculty Senate. We also gained approval by the chancellor's office to be placed on the CSU Master plan. In 1997, we were very busy with our final proposal to the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) which was submitted in April, 1997. Nine months later, in January 1998, CPEC approved the MPH at SFSU. With the support of an external grant from the Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE), a new MPH degree was launched in Community Health Education at SFSU. FIPSE supported the innovations in the MPH degree which included: practice based course development where students applied in community-based settings what they learned in their coursework; reflective seminars where leadership and team work could be nurtured; ecological thinking using innovative contextual learning; and learning communities where students work and study with a cohort of fellow students over three years and 53 academic units. The first group of 20 students were admitted to the MPH at SFSU in the fall of 1998 and graduated in the spring of 2001. In the Spring of 2003, the MPH degree was accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).

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HEALTH EDUCATION FACULTY & STAFF DIRECTORY

Department of Health Education Main Office: HSS 326 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132 Tel: (415) 338-1413 Fax: (415) 338-0570 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.sfsu.edu/~hed/

FACULTY Ramon Castellblanch Vivian Chavez Zoe Clayson John P. Elia Roma Guy Rick Harvey Mary Beth Love Mia Luluquisen Lisa Moore Juliana van Olphen Victoria Quijano Jose Ramon Fernandez-Pena Emma Sanchez Jessica Wolin TELEPHONE (415) 405-2151 (415) 338-1307 (415) 338-2318 (415) 338-7568 (415) 338-1938 (415) 338-3478 (415) 338-2708 (415) 893-4152 (415) 338-2109 (415) 405-2149 (415) 405-2416 (415) 405-0488 (415) 338-1413 (415) 405-2415 E-MAIL [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

OFFICE HSS 318 HSS 314 HSS 314 HSS 321 HSS 319 HSS 318 HSS 323 HSS 319 HSS 315 HSS 312 HSS 319 HSS 303 HSS 315 HSS 319

POSITION Assistant Professor Assistant Professor Professor Associate Professor & Chair and MPH Co-Coordinator Clinical Faculty Assistant Professor Chair and Professor Lecturer/Consultant Associate Professor Assistant Professor and MPH Co-Coordinator Lecturer Associate Professor Assistant Professor Lecturer

[email protected]

HEALTH EDUCATION SUPPORT STAFF

STAFF Atina Delfino Mari Fong Lesa Gerhard TELEPHONE (415) 338-1413 (415) 338-1413 (415) 338-6954 E-MAIL [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] OFFICE HSS 326 HSS 326 HSS 319 POSITION Academic Office Coordinator Administrative Support Assistant Graduate Assistant

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SFSU Masters in Public Health Faculty & Courses

Ramon Castellblanch

Assistant Professor HED 835: Public Health Policy HED 850: Health Administration and Management HED 895: Culminating Experience

John P. Elia

Associate Professor/Associate Chair HED 845: Training and Educational Processes HED 895: Culminating Experience

Vivian Chávez

Assistant Professor HED 810: Public Health and Principles of Community Organizing HED 895: Culminating Experience

Jessica Wolin

Lecturer HED 830: Program Planning for Community Change

Zoe Cardoza Clayson

Professor HED 840: Program Evaluation Design and Research HED 855: Environmental Health HED 895: Culminating Experience

Mary Beth Love

Professor/Chair HED 811: HED Skills Portfolio HED 890: MPH Seminar HED 895: Culminating Experience

Lisa Moore

Associate Professor HED 815: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education HED 895: Culminating Experience

Juliana van Olphen

Assistant Professor HED 815: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education HED 895: Culminating Experience

Roma Guy

Clinical Faculty HED 821: Community Health Assessment Planning HED 831: Community Health Assessment Implementation Practicum HED 841: Program Planning & Evaluation Design Practicum HED 895: Culminating Experience

Victoria Quijano

Lecturer HED 815: Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health Education HED 830: Program Planning for Community Change HED 840: Program, Evaluation Design and Research HED 845: Training and Educational Processes HED 892: Supervised Field Internship

Emma Sanchez

Assistant Professor HED 829: Biostatistics HED 895: Culminating Experience

José Ramón Fernández-Peña

Assistant Professor HED 895: Culminating Experience

Rick Harvey

Assistant Professor HED 895: Culminating Experience

Mia Luluquisen

Lecturer/Consultant HED 830: Program Planning for Community Change

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SFSU Master in Public Health Faculty: Biographies and Research Interests

Ramon Castellblanch, PhD Education: A.A., Merritt College (Labor & Urban Studies) A.B., University of California at Berkeley (Economics) Master in Public Policy, Harvard University Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University (Health Policy & Management) Dr. Castellblanch's research focuses on the politics of health policy. He had two articles on the politics of prescription drug prices published in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy & Law in 2003. He also writes on health administration and has a peer-reviewed book chapter on how managers can take a preventative approach to racism. He is conducted focus groups of people with mental disabilities on their attitudes toward US mental health care under a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health; the results were published in Professional Psychology. He served on the Section Council of the Medical Care Section of the American Public Health Association and as chair of the Health Equity & Public Hospital Caucus of the APHA. He is an op-ed columnist for the Progressive Media Project syndicated through Knight-Ridder and a guest op-ed columnist for the Sacramento Bee. Dr. Castellblanch is lobbying the state capitol on prescription drug policy on behalf of Senior Action Network. He is coordinating a 2005 California conference that will bring together state policy makers concerned about state legislation promoting access to prescription drugs. At SFSU Ramón is faculty advisor for PHOGS, the Public Health Organization of Graduate Students, and serves on the Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. Prior to earning his doctorate, he served as the California health policy lobbyist for the Service Employees International Union and as national political action director for the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. Vivian Chávez, DrPH, MPH Education: B.A., Universidad Complutense - Madrid, Spain (Spanish Philology) B.A., San Francisco State University (La Raza Studies, Behavioral and Social Sciences) M.P.H., University of California at Berkeley (Community Health Education) Dr PH., University of California at Berkeley (Community Health Education; International Health Specialty; Designated Emphasis: Women, Gender and Sexuality) Dr. Chávez's dissertation research titled: Violence in the Lives of Young Women in Urban Environments, was a qualitative study focused on female perspectives and language about youth violence. Her research interests are in community organization, collaborative leadership, youth development, violence prevention and multimedia evaluation. Chávez serves on the American Public Health Association's Health Education Health Promotion section as governing councilor; she also serves on the W. K. Kellogg Foundation National Advisory Committee for the Community Health Scholars Program. She produced A Bridge between Communities a 32-minute documentary video on the research partnership between community-based organizations in Detroit, the Center's for Disease Control and the University of Michigan. At SFSU Vivian is faculty advisor for HESA, the Health Education Student Association. Soon she will be working with the San Francisco Department of Public Health as lead evaluator on their new youth violence prevention project targeting Latina and Asian "newcomer" high school students.

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Zoe Cardoza Clayson, ScD Education: B.A., California State Hayward (Political Science) Sc.D., The John Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health (Health Policy and Management) Dr. Clayson has directed numerous projects, policy analyses and program evaluations in the areas of women's health, children's services, community economic development, and occupational and environmental health. She has been instrumental in developing new prototypes for evaluating interventions that seek to improve the overall health and well-being of communities; and, she has crafted innovative approaches to public health education using problem-based learning and multi-media methods. She has extensive experience working with low income, diverse ethnic communities as well as with small community organizations, large public agencies, statewide coalitions, international non-governmental organizations (NGO's), policymakers and foundation executives. Her current research projects include evaluation studies of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation's Communities 2000 Initiative and the National Economic Development and Law Center's Family Support Initiative. John P. Elia, Ph. D. Education: B.A., San Francisco State University (Physical Education) (1986) B.A., San Francisco State University (History) (1986) M.A., San Francisco State University (History) (1989) Advanced Study, San Francisco State University (1991) Ph.D., University of California, Davis (Education) (1997) Dr. Elia, Associate Professor of Health Education, has been on the faculty at San Francisco State University for nearly two decades. Besides teaching over a dozen courses on the undergraduate and graduate levels, he has served as Interim Chair and Associate Chair of the Department of Health Education, and is CoGraduate Coordinator of the Masters of Public Health Program. His recent scholarship has focused on democracy and sexuality education in public schools, and he has published numerous articles and book reviews in The Educational Forum, The Journal of Sex Education and Therapy, the Journal of the History of Sexuality, and the Journal of Homosexuality. The books he has co-edited include: Sex and Relationships, 2nd edition (2005), Readings in Contemporary Sexuality, 2nd edition (2005), Queer Theory and Communication: From Disciplining the Queers to Queering the Disciplines (2003), and If You Seduce a Straight Person Can You Make Him Gay?: Issues in Biological Essentialism and Social Constructionism in Gay and Lesbian Identities (1993). Currently, he is co-editing two books. One of them deals with the contested terrain of queer theory and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender studies, and the other volume is on sexual minority youth and school culture. Recently, he was interviewed as an expert on school-based sexuality education for a PBS video series on sociology. Most recently, he has authored encyclopedia entries on homophobia and sexuality education for The International Encyclopedia of [Homo] sexualities, Education, and Cultures (2005), as well as serving on the international advisory board of this publication. His areas of expertise are: school-based sexuality education, school health education, health promotion of sexual minority youth, youth development, history and philosophy of American education, critical pedagogy, and queer studies. He is on the editorial boards of two international peer reviewed journals, The Educational Forum and the Journal of Gay and Lesbian Issues in Education. Additionally, after many years, he continues to serve as the Associate Editor and Book Review Editor of the Journal of Homosexuality, an internationally renowned peer-reviewed journal.

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Roma Guy, MSW Education: B.S., University of Maine (Major History, Minor Sociology; Teaching Credential) M.S.W., Wayne State University (Major Community Organizing, Concentration Urban Planning) Roma Guy is the practice coordinator for the internships and team placements in the MPH conjoined and sequence courses. Ms. Guy has developed innovative courses and approaches to distance learning, problem-based learning and community service learning courses on health, homeless and public policy as well as a course that focus on wealth/poverty/health and justice. Ms. Guy has supervised undergraduates and graduate students in Health Education, Social Work and Women's Studies both on and off-campus in the disciplines of health and human services, community organizing, policy and program planning. A long-time community activist in San Francisco and the Bay Area, Ms. Guy maintains her involvement with advocacy and non-profit organizations. She is a community activist for women, girls, disabled and sexuality rights; issues related to universal health care and access, multiculturalism and the civil rights of poor and disenfranchised related to race and immigrant/refugee status. She is a founder of the Women's Building, the Women's Foundation and California Women's Agenda and other community based projects. She currently serves on two policy governing boards: Health Commission, City and County of San Francisco and the Local Homeless Board.

Richard Harvey, PhD Education: B.A., University of California at Santa Cruz (Psychology) M.A., San Francisco State University (Research Psychology) Ph.D., University of California at Irvine (Health Psychology)

Dr. Harvey specializes in applied health psychology. He worked as a Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Epidemiologist for the Orange County Health Care Agency before joining the faculty at San Francisco State University. During his graduate career training, he worked for five years encouraging high-risk high school student to stay in school during a difficult transition to college. During that time, he also worked at the UC Irvine Counseling Center running the Stress Management Program and, was a research fellow at a national Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Research Center (TTTURC). There, he authored several papers related to factors affecting successful collaboration between university and community health officers working to reduce adolescent susceptibility to tobacco use. He is currently focusing on developing interventions for encouraging high-risk students to have the courage to stay in school and improve their health.

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Mary Beth Love, PhD Education: B.A., The Pennsylvania State University, (Psychology) M.S., University of South Carolina, (Community Health Education) Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst (Community Health Education) As Department Chair, Dr. Love manages both a Master in Public Health and a Bachelor of Science in Community Health Education as well as a minor in Holistic Health. Dr. Love has been integrally involved in numerous projects aimed at diversifying the public health workforce. She has been honored three times with highly competitive grants from the US Department of Education, Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE) to develop innovative curriculum that strengthens public health practice skills and addresses the issue of diversifying the workforce. She was pivotal in the development of the Master of Public Health Program at SFSU now in its fifth year and is the founder of Community Health Works the first academic preparation program for Community Health Workers in the country. Dr. Love is the Principal Investigator of a statewide initiative to integrate foreign trained health care providers into health and public health professions in the US. Dr. Love is the Co-Principal Investigator of a new 12 million dollar statewide prevention (TCE) initiative to reduce asthma triggers to prevent childhood asthma. Mia Luluquisen, DrPH, MPH, RN Education: B.S., University of San Francisco (Nursing) M.P.H., University of California, Berkeley (Health Policy and Administration) Dr.P.H. University of California, Berkeley (Community Health Education) Mia Luluquisen has over 30 years of working in communities focusing on social justice. She was born in the Philippines and moved to Oakland as a child. Throughout college and early adulthood, Mia became acutely aware of social and economic differences among people based on their race, ethnicity, education and other factors. In the mid-1970?s while employed as a nurse, she became very active in health care organizing and community activism around issues facing people of color and women. She helped to create and nurture the early years of the San Antonio Neighborhood Health Center (SANHC), now part of La Clinica de la Raza on International Boulevard. Throughout the late 1970's and early 1980's, Mia taught classes and workshops on eliminating racism and internalized oppression throughout the Bay Area, Hawaii, other parts of the U.S. and Canada Currently, Mia works with Alameda County Public Health as a Senior Program Specialist, focusing on the department's community capacity building efforts, as a planner, evaluator/researcher, and trainer/educator. Since 2002, Mia has been a part-time faculty member with San Francisco State University's MPH program, teaching community assessment, program planning and evaluation courses Additionally, Mia continues to work on national and international social justice issues and serves on the Board of Directors for the Community Health Academy, the Native American Community Board and Sariling Gawa Youth Council, Inc. Lisa Dorothy Moore, DrPH Education: B.A., University of California at Berkeley (Health Arts and Sciences); B.A., University of California at Berkeley (Physiology); M.P.H., University of California at Berkeley (Community Health Education); Dr. P.H., University of California at Berkeley (Community Health Education) Dr. Moore has directed research projects in the areas of HIV epidemiology, qualitative and quantitative evaluations of harm reduction services, tuberculosis prevention evaluation and needs assessment and process evaluations associated with the Treatment on Demand initiative in San Francisco. She has experience working with diverse racial/ethnic and sexual communities and indigent drug user communities. She has worked to develop a national agency of harm reduction education as well as on local level interventions and policies. Her current research projects include a needs assessment of occupational health and harm reduction workers, and a continuing process evaluation of Treatment on Demand, funded by CSAT.

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Juliana van Olphen, PhD, MPH Education: B.A., University of California at Berkeley (Anthropology) M.P.H., University of California at Los Angeles (Population & Family) Ph.D., University of Michigan School of Public Health at Ann Arbor (Health Behavior and Health Education) Dr. van Olphen has extensive experience in the design, implementation and evaluation of intervention projects guided by a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach. She has developed expertise in the application of CBPR principles to applied mixed method (quantitative and qualitative) research projects implemented in diverse, urban communities. Her research interests include social inequalities in health, policy analysis and development, community reintegration of ex-offenders, and community development and social capital for health. With co-authors, she developed a model to enhance understanding of the linkages between social capital and health, and is currently developing innovative strategies to build social capital for health. Most recently, she was involved in the design and implementation of a community-based policy intervention to enhance the community reintegration of substance users leaving jail in New York City, and she continues to work on parallel issues in the San Francisco Bay Area. José Ramón Fernández-Peña, MD, MPA Education: M.P.A., New York University (Health Policy and Management) MD, National Autonomous University of Mexico (Medicine) José Ramón Fernández-Peña, MD, MPA is an associate professor of Health Education at San Francisco State University and the director of the Welcome Back Initiative, a statewide demonstration project developed to assist internationally trained health professionals, residing in California, in the process of re-entering the health workforce. He is also the co-director of Community Health Works of San Francisco, a partnership program between at San Francisco State University's Department of Health Education and City College of San Francisco's Health Sciences Dept. Previously, he was director of Health Education at Mission Neighborhood Health Center in San Francisco, where he oversaw the health education activities of the Center. Before coming to California, Dr. Fernández-Peña worked with the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation in the areas of Quality Management, Medical Affairs, and Planning. His areas of expertise include the development and implementation of programs to diversify the health workforce and to improve cross cultural communication in health. Victoria Quijano, MPH Education: B.S., San Francisco State University (Community Health Education) M.P.H., San Jose State University (Community Health Education) Victoria Quijano has experience working closely and collaboratively with community-based organizations that serve culturally, linguistically, and economically diverse populations. A Filipino-Russian American, former welfare recipient, and SFSU Health Education alumni, Ms. Quijano is intimately familiar with and committed to working with diverse and underrepresented populations. As an independent consultant in the field for over 7 years, most of her work focuses on evaluating programs that serve women on welfare particularly those who wish to pursue a college degree. Ms. Quijano has extensive experience in the areas of evaluation, program planning, and curriculum development. Most recently, she was involved in the evaluation of a three-year, wage-based welfare-to-work pilot program through the San Francisco Department of Health and Human Services.

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Emma V. Sanchez, PhD, MPH Education: Masters in Public Health, San Francisco State University Sc.D., Harvard University, School of Public Health Dr. Sanchez' research interests include etiological research on social inequalities in health, methodological issues in the assessment and understanding of social disparities in health and disease outcomes pertaining to race/ethnicity, immigrant status and social class, investigating geographic variation of health inequalities and integrating qualitative and quantitative methodologies to produce sound theoretical and empirical research for the purposes of guiding program planning, implementing health evaluations and informing public health policies. As part of her dissertation, Ms. Sanchez' research involves examining social inequalities in overweight and obesity in relation to race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and the role of place, migration and integration factors. Ms. Sanchez has extensive public health experience working across settings, including academic institutions, community based organizations and government entities. Prior to starting her doctoral studies, she served on a national blue ribbon panel put together by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to work on developing a guide for evaluating the efforts of community based programs working to eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in health. Jessica S. Wolin, MPH, MCP Education: B.A., Vassar College (Science, Technology and Society) Masters in Public Health, UC Berkeley (Health Policy and Admin) Henrik Blum Award for Social Action, UC Berkeley 1996 Masters in City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley (Community Development) Jessica Wolin has over a decade of experience in planning and implementing public health programs in the Bay Area. She has served in leadership and consulting positions at the San Francisco Public Health Department, Alameda County Public Health Department and numerous local non-profits working on community health issues. Along with several clinicians, Jessica Wolin founded the Women's Community Clinic, the only free clinic for women in San Francisco. Currently, JessicaWolin is the Associate Director, Community Support at the Marin Institute where she directs the organizations efforts to support communities as they engage in environmental prevention of alcohol problems.

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FACULTY ­ MPH STUDENT ADVISING

Beyond general advising and career counseling, the nature of advising varies according to where students are in the MPH curriculum. Students are assigned a Faculty Advisor in the first semester at SFSU and work closely with the Practice Coordinator for specific academic and career guidance throughout their graduate experience. It is expected that students will initiate advising appointments, develop a professional relationship with their assigned advisor, and seek advice when difficulties occur. Advisors and the Practice Coordinator facilitate intellectual, professional, and personal development, and are committed to work in collaboration with students each semester. By initiating regular advising meetings, students insure professional success and enhance academic performance. In general, student and advisor roles and responsibilities are delineated as follow: Student roles and responsibilities include: · Pre-registering for all courses during the SFSU touch tone timeline prior to each semester; · Meeting program deadlines for internship, culminating experience and field practicum ; · Meeting SFSU Graduate Division deadlines for internship, culminating experience, and graduation; · Meeting course deadlines to complete requirements, follow program sequence and maintain grade point average of 3.0; · Consulting early with advisor and graduate coordinator to resolve personal and community difficulties; · Consulting early with instructors about difficulties related to coursework; and · Notifying Health Education Department and SFSU Registrar of change of address/telephone/e-mail. Advisor roles and responsibilities include: · Holding introductory meeting with advisee; · Ensuring that all advisees have passed the Graduate Essay Test (GET); · Reviewing field internships (HED 892); · Approving culminating experience (HED 895); · Approving independent study (HED 899) or electives; · Serving as chair of culminating experience (HED 895) committee; and · Filing `Report of Completion' for Culminating Experience Approval of application for graduation. While much of the advising occurs in the context of the faculty advisor relationships, all the Faculty, as well as the Practice Coordinator, play a role in supporting the advising process. For example, at end of each semester at an MPH Faculty meeting, the Faculty participates in a discussion related to individual student status and any particular challenges that need to be addressed. This discussion serves to enhance on-going advising by providing each Advisor with an opportunity to gain a more comprehensive understanding of her/his advisee by hearing the perspectives of the other Faculty members in contact with the particular student.

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ADVISING TASKS BY YEAR IN THE PROGRAM

YEAR 1

The MPH student meets her/his advisor during the first semester orientation session scheduled the day before the first day of classes. This is an informal and brief opportunity to get acquainted; students can learn about their advisor's research and service expertise as well as teaching philosophy, and the advisor can learn about the student's work experience, along with reviewing statement of purpose and long term goals. Students are urged to schedule subsequent meetings as necessary.

YEAR 2

In addition to ongoing advising, Year 2 includes discussion and guidance for students' summer internship placement. The MPH student initiates a meeting with her/his advisor to discuss goals and competencies wish to practice at potential internship sites. The Practice Coordinator facilitates a discussion of site selection during one of the Reflective Seminars in the fall semester. Students pursue final site selection in the spring semester. Advisor listens and asks questions about the student's preferences in terms of: (1) public health issue/topic area of interest; (2) local, statewide, national, international site location; (3) private non-profit, government, business, hospital, research, academic sector; and (4) specific preceptor or agency of interest. Students are invited to schedule subsequent meetings as necessary to discuss the relationship between the internship and a potential culminating experience project.

YEAR 3

The MPH student initiates a meeting with her/his advisor to discuss culminating experience possibilities and to debrief about the internship experience. In the beginning of the Fall semester, a culminating experience committee is formed with the student advisor as chair. Exceptions are made for students to work with faculty with specific experiences in their topic of interest. The advisor reviews the proposed culminating experience project and arranges an appointment with the student to review the drafts of human subjects protocol before submission. The advisor and graduate coordinator meet with the students in the spring semester to guide the culminating experience project. A minimum of three meetings are scheduled with students to advise completion of the project and prepare them to present it in written and oral format. Career options are discussed and letters of reference are completed upon request.

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MPH STUDENT COHORTS' EMAIL DIRECTORY

Y E A R 1 STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2001 ALUMNI Name 1. Noelle Blick 2. Drina Boban 3. Francis Chang 4. Viva Delgado 5. Celia Graterol 6. Debra Howell 7. Melissa Jones 8. Sheila Lancaster 9. Yvonne Littleton 10. Linda Mack-Burch 11. Curtis Moore 12. Nieu Nguyen 13. Thi Pham 14. Greg Rojas 15. Emma Sanchez Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Cohort of 2001

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YEAR 2 Name

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2002 ALUMNI

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

1. Jesse Troy Boone 2. Sandra Carrillo 3. Monica Dea 4. Cindy Evangelista 5. Ayanna Kiburi 6. Anne King 7. Alice Lee 8. Jennifer Lorvick 9. Monica McLemore 10. Kelley Mullin 11. James Rapues 12. Martin Rios 13. Kevin Roe 14. Mary Schroeder 15. Jacqueline Siller 16. Shannon Singleton-Banks 17. Judith Snead 18. Susana Torres 19. Keisha Tyler 20. Rosalind Wright 21. Judith Young

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YEAR 3 Name

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2003 ALUMNI

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

1. Nicholas Alvarado 2. Kym Dorman 3. Jessica Finney 4. Shadia Merukeb 5. Karla Rodriguez 6. Sharon Turner

Cohort of 2003 and friends

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YEAR 4

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2004 ALUMNI

Name 1. Sabrina Aldama 2. Meron Bekele 3. Carrie Brogoitti 4. Barbara Clifton 5. Sage Foster 6. Rachel Gacula 7. Emily Galpern 8. Amanda Goldberg 9. Cassandra Hernandez-Vives 10. Andrea Japhet 11. Chauncey Johnson 12. Paul Koch 13. Regina A. Lagman 14. Melinda Martin 15. Kim Nguyen 16. Queenette Nsima 17. Julia Rinaldi 18. Pearlie Ruiz 19. Melinda Shott 20. Cristina Ugaitafa 21. Nathaniel VerGow 22. Katie Vu-Ng

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Cohort of 2004

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YEAR 5 Name 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2005 ALUMNI

Alita Alee Kris Popplewell Ahmed Jessica Bowen Scott Brown Meghan Clouse Tamra Groode Jennifer Lee Rachel Poulain Estelle Schneider Catherine Swanson Jason Vaudrey Donna Willmott Belinda Wong Mariana Zuzunaga

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Cohort of 2005

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YEAR 6

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2006 ALUMNI

Name 1. Nabil Alsoufi 2. John Banagan 3. Katherine Brown 4. Mylene A. Cahambing 5. Sahru Cowans 6. Amanda Cue 7. Linda Dewitt 8. Katherine Hawksworth 9. Jen Hult 10. Maurissa Koide 11. Norma Lisenko 12. Catherine Magee 13. Shelby McMillan 14. Ingrid Ochoa 15. Juan Carlos Palacios 16. Lisa Fujie-Parks 17. Alberto Perez Rendon 18. Ana Maria Espinosa Rydman 19. Ruby-Asuncion Turalba 20. Shawna Whitney

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Class of FALL 2003 HED 810 Introduction to Public Health (Includes Cohort of 2006 and other graduate students) 25

YEAR7

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2007

Name 1. Naomi Akers 2. Victoria Aldaz 3. Pedro Arista 4. Jessica Cremin 5. Kanwarpal Dhaliwal 6. Morgan Fitzpatrick 7. Lesa Gerhard 8. Jason Lim 9. Shireen Malekafzali 10. Savita Malik 11. Josiane Mengue 12. Denise Gallegos-Milosevich 13. Anisha Moore 14. Liliana Ramirez 15. Caroline Sison 16. Kristina Spurgeon 17. Brad Vanderbilt 18. Craig Wingate 19. Cotys Winston 20. Rheena Yangson

Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

Spring 2005: HED 820 - Needs Assessment in Community Health Cohort of 2007 and Friends

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YEAR 8 Name 1. Jolly Bugari

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2008 Email

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

2. Patrice Chamberlain 3. Danice Cook 4. Paulina Flint de Castro 5. Eva Gabel 6. Raymond Hernandez 7. Joanna Laffey 8. Erika Linden 9. Rosalyn Moya 10. Maricela Pina 11. Charles Romillo 12. Paul Rueckhaus 13. Teresa Shartel 14. Jamila Shipp 15. Jill Tregor 16. Nyisha Underwood 17. Ann Whidden 18. Javarre Wilson

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YEAR 9 Name 1. Jennifer Awa 2. Jeane Bosch 3. Sara Cahill

STUDENT COHORT: Class of 2009 Email [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

4. Judy Cervantes-Connell 5. Evelyn Chan 6. Pedro Contreras-Torres 7. Deborah Craig 8. Erin DeMicco 9. Cristy Dieterich 10. Henry Ekwoge 11. Vicky Gomez 12. Jeffery Grantham 13. Elizabeth Greenblatt 14. Ming Hu 15. Xiao Ting Huang 16. Rachel Kradin 17. Laura Millar 18. Grace Neequaye 19. Heather Rodriguez 20. Suzanne Ryan 21. Nishat Nishat 22. Poroshat Shekarloo

23. Rebecca Wildman-Tobriner [email protected]

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STUDENT LEADERSHIP: MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

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PHOGS PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATION OF GRADUATE STUDENTS

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

THE MISSION of the San Francisco State University Public Health Organization of Graduate Students (PHOGS) is to support individual academic and professional development, promote student governance of the Masters of Public Health in Community Health Education (MPH) program, and coordinate the collective activities of MPH students to advance the MPH program's mission of social justice.

GOALS

1. To provide a diverse network for social and professional development 2. To coordinate cross-cohort activities, including graduation and an annual spring event. 3. To provide opportunities for students to practice skills learned in class 4. To ensure student participation in student and faculty selection and input on program content 5. To create a strategy for funding PHOGS activities 6. To promote a healthy environment for respecting and learning about diversity 7. Ensure active participation in PHOGS by providing continuity from cohort to cohort 8. To facilitate communication between department, faculty and MPH students

BENEFITS OF PARTICIPATING IN THE MPH STUDENT ORGANIZATION

· · · · · Get to know your fellow MPH Students Develop your professional skills Expand your network of public health professionals and organizations Stay abreast of current training and public health events in the Bay Area and beyond Participate in the ongoing development of the MPH program

MPH Student Participation It is an expectation of the MPH program for all students to participate at some level in PHOGS activities as a vehicle for developing leadership within the cohorts. In order to best serve students' needs, PHOGS needs participation from all students.

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PHOGS STRUCTURE:

Cohort Liaisons: Each cohort will select two students each semester to serve as cohort liaisons to represent their cohort at monthly PHOGS meetings and to facilitate communication between the department and cohorts. Cohort Cohort of 2007 Cohort of 2008 PHOGS Advisor Liaisons Savita Malik Lesa Gerhard Rosalyn Moya Nyisha Underwood Ramon Castellblanch Email [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

Description of duties for Cohort Liaisons: Get updates from cohorts and special projects about their activities and bring to PHOGS general meeting Coordinate representation at faculty meetings and PHOGS meetings (and other meeting that need student representation) Communicate with the appropriate cohort Coordinate with faculty advisor, Ramon Castellblanch (faculty advisor will coordinate liaisons and put together agenda from student suggestions) Attend liaison coordination meetings, minimum of 2 times per semester Gather students' suggestions to put together agenda for PHOGS meetings Rotate coordinating facilitation and note taking for PHOGS meetings Current PHOGS Activities: 1. Professional Development · Speakers planned for monthly PHOGS meetings · Planning Fall and Spring Cross-cohort Seminars 2. · · · Departmental Role Student representation at faculty retreat Participation in new student information sessions Student representatives on Admissions Committee

3. Communications · PHOGSzette annual newsletter. Contact [email protected] · Maintain Yahoo Groups list 4. · · · Social Implement Buddy System Plan Social Events Graduation

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Other Possible Activities for PHOGS: · · · · · Fall Picnic/Social Event Social Justice Activism Creating Links with HESA Improved ties with SFSU MPH alumni Maintain MPH bulletin board. Visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sfsumphstudents/

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NORTHERN CALIFORNIA PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

The Northern California Chapter of the Society for Public Health Education, Inc. 1230 Market Street - Box 245 San Francisco, CA 94102-4801 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.ncsophe.org/

The Northern California Chapter of the Society for Public Health Education, Inc. (NCSOPHE) is a professional organization for health educators. Individuals who are actively engaged in health education, students, and emeriti comprise the membership of NCSOPHE. Assuming a broad range of responsibilities in a variety of settings, members share a common goal: to promote, encourage, and contribute to the advancement of the health of all people through the practice of health education. Mission Statement We, the members of the Northern California Chapter of the Society for Public Health Education, Inc. (NCSOPHE), are committed to improving the health of all people and their communities. We achieve this by supporting health education and contributing to the professional preparation and practice of health educators. In the spirit of professional camaraderie, we offer quality leadership and professional development opportunities. The tenets of our practice include passionately striving for advocacy, collaboration, community participation, coordination, education, and environmental and social change. We believe a diverse membership promotes the achievement of our goals for public policy and ensures professional and ethical standards of practice.

The California Public Health Association - North (CPHA-N) Post Office Box 934, Berkeley, CA 94701 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.cphan.org/ As the No California affiliate of the American Public Health Association, we take part in the national public health policy discussion. CPHA-N sponsors continuing education opportunities through conferences & seminars which promote dialogue with prominent public policy thinkers. Mission Statement The California Public Health Association - North (CPHA-N) will provide leadership in public health in California by studying and becoming familiar with public health needs and problems, and by initiating and supporting action to meet needs or remedy problems including education and legislation. CPHA-N will provide an opportunity for persons actively engaged or interested in the broad field of public health to share knowledge and experiences in order to achieve the primary goal of protecting and promoting public, environmental and personal health. CPHA-N will also function actively as an affiliate of the American Public Health Association by supporting and contributing to the work of the national organization. CPHA-N offers a free student membership program where membership fees are waived for those enrolled in graduate degree programs. Current CPHA-N policy provides for 3 years of free student membership: Two years in a graduate studies program and one year after graduation. To join: Provide Name, Address, Phone, Email, Fax, etc., Name of University and Graduate Program, Special Areas of Interest and send it back along with a copy of your current student ID. Send information to above address, ATTN: Student Memberships.

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NATIONAL PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) 750 First St. NE, Suite 910, Washington, DC 20002-4242 Phone: (202) 408-9804 Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.sophe.org

SOPHE is an independent, international professional association made up of a diverse membership of health education professionals and students. The Society promotes healthy behaviors, healthy communities, and healthy environments through its membership, its network of local chapters, and its numerous partnerships with other organizations. With its primary focus on public health education, SOPHE provides leadership through a code of ethics, standard for professional preparation, research, and practice; professional development; and public outreach. Mission Statement The Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) mission is to provide leadership to the profession of health education and health promotion to contribute to the health of all people through advances in health education theory and research, excellence in health education practice, and the promotion of public policies conducive to health.

American Public Health Association (APHA) 800 I. Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001-3710 Phone: (202) 777-APHA (2742) Email: [email protected] Website: http://www.apha.org The American Public Health Association (APHA) is the oldest and largest organization of public health professionals in the world, representing more than 50,000 members from over 50 occupations of public health. APHA brings together researchers, health service providers, administrators, teachers, and other health workers in a unique, multidisciplinary environment of professional exchange, study, and action. It is concerned with a broad set of issues affecting personal and environmental health, including federal and state funding for health programs, pollution control, programs and policies related to chronic and infectious diseases, a smoke-free society, and professional education in public health. APHA actively serves the public, its members, and the public health profession through its scientific and practice programs, publications, annual meeting, awards program, educational services and advocacy efforts.

The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20192-1598 Phone: 1-800-213-7193 Website: http://www.aahperd.org/

THE AMERICAN ALLIANCE FOR HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION & DANCE (AEHPERD) is an alliance of six national organizations designed to support practitioners to improve their skills and further the health and well-being of the public. The American Association for Health Education (AAHE) is one of the six organizations that compose AEHPERD. It serves health educators and other professionals who promote health by encouraging, supporting and assisting health professionals through education and other systematic strategies.

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CODE OF ETHICS FOR THE HEALTH EDUCATION PROFESSION

Designed by The American Association for Health Education (AAHE)

Preamble

The Health Education Profession is dedicated to excellence in the practice of promoting individual, family, organizational, and community health. Guided by common ideals, Health Educators are responsible for upholding the integrity and ethics of the profession as they face the daily challenges of making decisions. By acknowledging the value of diversity in society and embracing a cross-cultural approach, Health Educators support the worth, dignity, potential, and uniqueness of all people. The Code of Ethics provides a framework of shared values within which Health Education is practiced. The Code of Ethics is grounded in fundamental ethical principles that underlie all health care services: respect for autonomy, promotion of social justice, active promotion of good, and avoidance of harm. The responsibility of each Health Educator is to aspire to the highest possible standards of conduct and to encourage the ethical behavior of all those with whom they work. Regardless of job title, professional affiliation, work setting, or population served, Health Educators abide by these guidelines when making professional decisions.

Article I: Responsibility to the Public

A Health Educator's ultimate responsibility is to educate people for the purpose of promoting, maintaining, and improving individual, family, and community health. When a conflict of issues arises among individuals, groups, organizations, agencies, or institutions, health educators must consider all issues and give priority to those that promote wellness and quality of living through principles of selfdetermination and freedom of choice for the individual. Section 1: Health Educators support the right of individuals to make informed decisions regarding health, as long as such decisions pose no threat to the health of others. Section 2: Health Educators encourage actions and social policies that support and facilitate the best balance of benefits over harm for all affected parties. Section 3: Health Educators accurately communicate the potential benefits and consequences of the services and programs with which they are associated. Section 4: Health Educators accept the responsibility to act on issues that can adversely affect the health of individuals, families, and communities. Section 5: Health Educators are truthful about their qualifications and the limitations of their expertise and provide services consistent with their competencies. Section 6: Health Educators protect the privacy and dignity of individuals. Section 7: Health Educators actively involve individuals, groups, and communities in the entire educational process so that all aspects of the process are clearly understood by those who may be affected. Section 8: Health Educators respect and acknowledge the rights of others to hold diverse values, attitudes, and opinions.

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Section 9: Health Educators provide services equitably to all people.

Article II: Responsibility to the Profession

Health Educators are responsible for their professional behavior, for the reputation of their profession, and for promoting ethical conduct amount their colleagues. Section 1: Health Educators maintain, improve, and expand their professional competence through continued study and education; membership, participation, and leadership in professional organizations; and involvement in issues related to the health of the public. Section 2: Health Educators model and encourage nondiscriminatory standards of behavior in their interactions with others. Section 3: Health Educators encourage and accept responsible critical discourse to protect and enhance the profession. Section 4: Health Educators contribute to the development of the profession by sharing the processes and outcomes of their work. Section 5: Health Educators are aware of possible professional conflicts of interest, exercise integrity in conflict situations, and do not manipulate or violate the rights of others. Section 6: Health Educators give appropriate recognition to others for their professional contributions and achievements.

Article III: Responsibility to Employers

Health Educators recognize the boundaries of their professional competence and are accountable for their professional activities and actions. Section 1: Health Educators accurately represent their qualifications and the qualifications of others whom they recommend. Section 2: Health Educators use appropriate standards, theories, and guidelines as criteria when carrying out their professional responsibilities. Section 3: Health Educators accurately represent potential service and program outcomes to employers. Section 4: Health Educators anticipate and disclose competing commitments, conflicts of interest, and endorsement of products. Section 5: Health Educators openly communicate to employers, expectations of job-related assignments that conflict with their professional ethics. Section 6: Health Educators maintain competence in their areas of professional practice.

Article IV: Responsibility in the Delivery of Health Education

Health Educators promote integrity in the delivery of health education. They respect the rights, dignity, confidentiality, and worth of all people by adapting strategies and methods to meet the needs of diverse populations and communities.

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Section 1: Health Educators are sensitive to social and cultural diversity and are in accord with the law, when planning and implementing programs.. Section 2: Health Educators are informed of the latest advances in theory, research, and practice, and use strategies and methods that are grounded in and contribute to development of professional standards, theories, guidelines, statistics, and experience. Section 3: Health Educators are committed to rigorous evaluation of both program effectiveness and the methods used to achieve results. Section 4: Health Educators empower individuals to adopt healthy lifestyles through informed choice rather than by coercion or intimidation. Section 5: Health Educators communicate the potential outcomes of proposed services, strategies, and pending decisions to all individuals who will be affected.

Article V: Responsibility in Research and Evaluation

Health Educators contribute to the health of the population and to the profession through research and evaluation activities. When planning and conducting research or evaluation, health educators do so in accordance with federal and state laws and regulations, organizational and institutional policies, and professional standards. Section 1: Health Educators support principles and practices of research and evaluation that do no harm to individuals, groups, society, or the environment. Section 2: Health Educators ensure that participation in research is voluntary and is based upon the informed consent of the participants. Section 3: Health Educators respect the privacy, rights, and dignity of research participants, and honor commitments made to those participants. Section 4: Health Educators treat all information obtained from participants as confidential unless otherwise required by law. Section 5: Health Educators take credit, including authorship, only for work they have actually performed and give credit to the contributions of others. Section 6: Health Educators who serve as research or evaluation consultants discuss their results only with those to whom they are providing service, unless maintaining such confidentiality would jeopardize the health or safety of others. Section 7: Health Educators report the results of their research and evaluation objectively, accurately and in a timely fashion.

Article VI: Responsibility in Professional Preparation

Those involved in the preparation and training of Health Educators have an obligation to accord learners the same respect and treatment given other groups by providing quality education that benefits the profession and the public. Section 1: Health Educators select students for professional preparation programs based upon equal opportunity for all, and the individual's academic performance, abilities, and potential contribution to the profession and the public's health.

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Section 2: Health Educators strive to make the educational environment and culture conducive to the health of all involved, and free from sexual harassment and all forms of discrimination. Section 3: Health Educators involved in professional preparation and professional development engage in careful preparation; present material that is accurate, up-to-date, and timely; provide reasonable and timely feedback; state clear and reasonable expectations; and conduct fair assessments and evaluations of learners. Section 4: Health Educators provide objective and accurate counseling to learners about career opportunities, development, and advancement, and assist learners to secure professional employment. Section 5: Health Educators provide adequate supervision and meaningful opportunities for the professional development of learners.

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SFSU CAMPUS RESOURCES

SFSU BULLETIN:

It is strongly recommended that every MPH student purchase the SFSU Bulletin where s/he can find more information regarding campus resources. The following policies and practices of the MPH program presented here are based on the guidelines and foundations set by San Francisco State University. The SFSU Bulletin serves as a contract between students and the university on policies, practices and program requirements. If at any time a student encounters circumstances that may lead to any change of commitment to course enrollment or program, reviewing the Graduate Studies section of the SFSU Bulletin will serve as the best tool to resolve academic issues and to proceed successfully through the program.

STUDENT I.D. ONE CARD:

An official student photo ID card is required within 15 days of the start of the semester. The ID will provide access to all SFSU Library and other services. To obtain the ID, bring the necessary information from your registration packet to the Student Services Building, Room 103 for a photograph. Telephone: (415) 338-3619

PAC (PERSONAL ACCESS CODE):

A PAC is a four digit number designed to keep your personal information private. If you have never selected a PAC, use the PAC initialization service (accessible at http://www.sfsu.edu/online/troubletips.htm#pacinfo) or call the SFSU Touch Tone system at (415) 3387000. You will be asked to enter your birth date, using two digits each for month, day and year. For example, if you were born on December 15, 1975, enter 121575.You will then be asked to select a fourdigit PAC. Choose a number you will remember. You will need this number to get information about registration for classes, grades, to pay your fees, and your financial aid application status. If you are an employee or CEL student you can try using the day and year of your birth date, entered as a four-digit number. For example, the personal access code for students born on June 8, 1973, is 0873. MySFSU: In order to sign in and register for classes, access your grades, class schedule, unofficial transcript, test score report, financial statement and more, use your SFSU ID and PAC to login at https://www.sfsu.edu/online/login.htm

EMAIL:

As a new student at SFSU, if you do not have an active email account, it is important that you immediately establish an email address at SFSU by September 1st. This may be accomplished simply by visiting the SFSU Computing Center in ADM 102. Staff at the center can also advise you about how to access your SFSU email address from your home computer. You may also go online to set up your sfsu.edu email account: http://www.sfsu.edu/~helpdesk/webmail/using-webmail.htm.

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If you have a personal or work email that you plan on checking much more regularly than your sfsu account, it is imperative that you arrange to have email addressed to your SFSU account forwarded to this account. To do this, please visit the following URL: http://www.sfsu.edu/~doit/account.htm#forward. Note that you must have an SFSU ID # (see above) and a PAC that you plan to keep as your regular account, it is very important that you Those of you who do not have access to a computer at home or at a work site, computers are available at the SFSU library on a 24-hour basis. MPH students are expected to check email communication regularly. While e-mail may be used to communicate with MPH faculty and fellow students, course assignments and required proposals will not be accepted as email attachments or as a FAX. For SFSU ID, PAC and LOGIN Assistance, please visit: http://www.sfsu.edu/online/troubletips.htm

TRANSCRIPTS:

Official and unofficial transcripts are issued only with the permission of the student concerned. Following the first semester of enrollment, it is helpful for students to obtain a copy of the most recent transcript of SFSU coursework completed and bring it to all advising sessions. Unofficial transcripts are easily available by students from one of several kiosks located in the SFSU Library, Cesar Chavez Center, or Student Services Center. Students can also access transcripts online by accessing https://www.sfsu.edu/online/login.htm. For official transcripts, follow procedures set by the SFSU Registrar for request and fees. Transcripts from prior universities and colleges attended are not available from the SFSU Registrar.

SFSU CAMPUS STUDENT RESOURCE CENTER (SRC) http://www.sfsu.edu/~srcenter

Within the College of Health & Human Services, the advisors at the Student Resource Center are available to assist students with comprehensive support to achieve academic success. Staff members are available to recommend university resources to facilitate life on campus. The SRC is located at: HSS, Room 236. Telephone: (415) 405-3533. E-mail: [email protected]

CENTER FOR TEACHING AND FACULTY DEVELOPMENT (CTFD) The CTFD (accessible at http://www.cet.sfsu.edu) offers a variety of student learning resources, including some highly relevant online tutorials. These include: Working in Groups: There is No "I" In Group Work; Class Participation: More than Just Raising Your Hand; The Citation Challenge: Demystifying APA and MLA; Using Someone Else's Words: Quote, Summarize and Paraphrase; and Presentation Skills: More than just Powerpoint. Access the tutorials at the following URL: http://cet.sfsu.edu/index.cfm?section=etl&content=studentsupport/modules. It is highly recommended that MPH students complete tutorials in the areas where they feel they need to strengthen their skills. J. PAUL LEONARD LIBRARY: http://www.library.sfsu.edu

· · · Campus library resources for students and faculty include: Media Access Center ­ non-print materials including videotapes, discs, film, compact discs, audiotapes, pictures and computer software; audio-visual equipment and production equipment for analog and digital video editing. 24-hour computer laboratory with internet, printing and scanning equipment for Macintosh and PC access Government Publications Department ­ depository for federal, state, international and local government catalogs

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· ·

Rapid Copy Center ­copying on demand and course readers; direct article ordering from CARLUnCover; direct ordering of books through Link+, a search catalog Self-guided audio orientation library tour and workshops devoted to database searching in a variety of subject areas

Key library resources are available at:

24-Hour Computer Lab (415) 338-1490 Book Renewal-by telephone (415) 338-6460 Cataloging Services (415) 338-1828 Information Desk (415) 338-1854 Library Service hours (415) 338-1841 Media Access Center Computer Lab (415) 338-2997 Periodicals/Microforms (415) 338-1128 Rapid Copy (415) 338-2120 Reference Desk (415) 338-1391 Reserve Book Room (415) 338-1881

CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS · Econ Lab-Open Hours: http://bss.sfsu.edu/economics/openlab.htm · SFSU Division of Information Technology Computer Labs: http://www.sfsu.edu/~doit/labs/24hour.htm · SFSU Computer Facility ­ John F. True Computer Lab- 24-hour lab Main Floor - J. Paul Leonard Library, 415.338.1490 http://www.sfsu.edu/~doit/labs/24hour.htm 24 · MAC (Media Access Center): 3rd Floor Library, 415.338.2991 http://www.library.sfsu.edu/servcoll/mac.html · Computer Lab ­ College of Education (Cahill): http://www.sfsu.edu/~educ/coe/supportservices/cahilllab.htm · Computer Lab ­ College of Education (COE): 214 Burk Hall, 415.338.6364 http://www.sfsu.edu/~educ/coe/supportservices/coelab.htm OTHER CAMPUS COMPUTING FACILITIES are available. Note: Restricted facilities are for use by a specific audience - call the facility for details. CESAR CHAVEZ STUDENT CENTER: Information Desk (415)338-1112; http://sfsustudentcenter.com/ BOOKSTORE: (415) 338-2023 http://sfsubookstore.com/catalog/ FOOD SERVICES: http://sfsustudentcenter.com/foodservices/ DISABILITY RESOURCE CENTER (DRC): http://www.sfsu.edu/~dprc/

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The DRC is available to promote and provide equal access to the classroom and to campus-related activities. Students are provided assistance in coordinating a full range of support services for students to achieve a successful academic program. The DRC serves students with mobility, hearing, visual, communication, and with conditions of functional challenges such as HIV/AIDS, psychological, environmental illness and learning disabilities. DRC support services for enrolled students include: · Admission assistance · Note-taking assistance · On-campus shuttle · Sign language interpreters · Assistive listening devices · Large Print & Braille transcription · · · · · ·

Priority registration Parking Orientation & Mobility Real-time captioning Books on tape Lab assistance

DRC provides eligible students with help understanding and managing: · DRC services · Access campus-wide · Attitudinal barriers · General campus resources · Disability civil rights A number of computer workstations are designed to meet the needs of students with various disabilities. Access to these workstations is based on disability-related need. The DRC is located at: Student Services Building, Room 110; Monday ­ Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (415) 338-2472 (voice/TDD).

THE STUDENT HEALTH CENTER: http://www.sfsu.edu/~shs/

The mission of the SHS at SFSU is the provision of high quality medical care to promote an optimal state of health, to stimulate better health awareness, and to carry out education of high standards of therapeutic and preventive care for all registered students of SFSU. As part of an institution of higher learning, the SHS participates in the educational process by increasing students' knowledge and supporting students' positive health behaviors to promote health and prevent disease. Our primary goal is to serve SFSU students to the best of the Student Health Service's capabilities and capacity. Appointments Appointments may be made in person at the Student Health Center or by telephone (415) 338-1719. Some same-day appointments may be available. Important Phone Numbers Emergency 24 hr. (415) 338-2222 Clinic A (415) 338-2018. Lab (415) 338-1223 TTY (415) 338-2564 HIV Information Line (415) 338-1013 Parenting Resource Center (415) 338-2574 Advice Nurse (415) 338-2754 Clinic C (415) 338-2431 SHS Cashier (415) 338-1416 SHS Information Line (415) 338-1251 Health Promotion Inf. Line (415) 338-1714 Cancellation Line (415) 338-1251

THE LEARNING CENTER (LAC): http://www.sfsu.edu/~lac/ 42

The LAC supports SFSU students in becoming independent and successful learners by providing skills-based tutoring and academic support referrals. The LAC is located at: HSS 348; Monday ­ Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (415) 338-1993

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Learning Center Student Support at SFSU: http://cet.sfsu.edu/index.cfm?section=etl&content=studentsupport/faculty&menu=1 Writing link to the Learning Assistance Center (LAC) and location on campus for each tutoring interest: http://www.sfsu.edu/~lac/ Select "writing" identify your need or http://www.sfsu.edu/~lac/writing.htm Tutoring at LAC: schedule appointment or drop-in tutoring, HSS 348. Phone at 338 1993

·

·

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS (OIP): http://www.sfsu.edu/~oip/

At the beginning of each semester, OIP conducts a one-week orientation for new international students arriving at SFSU. The OIP provides advice concerning immigration and visa matters, cultural adjustment, academic matters, personal and financial counseling and employment regulations. Workshops during the academic years are provided on topics of special interest to international students. The OIP also organizes a variety of social, cultural, educational and recreational activities designed to help students adjust with life in the United States and California. The OIP is located at: Administration Building, Room 450.

FINANCIAL AID/SCHOLARSHIPS:

http://www.sfsu.edu/~finaid/scholarships/

Student expenses to attend the university cover a broad variety of needs, including tuition, processing fees, books, supplies, transportation, meals and lodging. Financial aid is available to supplement student resources. Types of financial aid include: Grants, Scholarships, Work-Study & Loans. To qualify for financial aid, the first step is to apply with a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Applications are available January with a post-mark due date of March 1 prior to the upcoming academic year. SFSU will notify students to submit verification documents if necessary. Documentation may include IRS tax forms and verification of household size. Check eligibility criteria regarding satisfactory academic progress, residency, citizenship, graduate & undergraduate aid, and minimum unit enrollment. Visit the Office of Student Financial Aid. Counselors are available to respond to inquiries or provide individual help. OSFA is located at: Student Services Building, Room 302, and One Stop Counter Monday ­ Friday, 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. (extended hours on some designated days) (415) 338-0200 (415) 338-2437 Scholarships (415) 338-7000 Financial Aid Voice Response System [FAVoRS]

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION: http://www.sfsu.edu/~parking/

Cost $1 per hour, $5.00 per day Where and When Can I Park? Lot 20 Garage (see campus map in Appendices section) is general paid public, visitor/guest, student parking. Open 24-hours, 7 days a week. Pay stations will accept quarter, $1, $5 and $10 bills as well as prepaid debit cards. $20 and $50 prepaid debit cards are available at the One Stop Shop in the Student Service Building. Debit cards are NOT available at the Parking Office. Note: Roof level is restricted to staff and faculty between 7a.m. and 5p.m. Monday - Friday.

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Alternate Transportation The San Francisco State Transportation Department provides free shuttle service to the campus community. Services include, Daly City BART, Bay Bridge, Golden Gate Bridge, and shuttle stops around the campus. (415) 338-2744.

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GRADUATE ESSAY TEST (GET) ­ SFSU LITERACY REQUIREMENT

Upon admission to SFSU, all graduate students are expected to meet two levels of literacy competence. For the MPH program, students may demonstrate competence as follows: LEVEL I: Graduate students are expected to be able to use correct grammar, syntax, spelling and punctuation and to present concepts and information in a logically organized and coherent form appropriate for initial study in the graduate level field. The exam takes two hours and is offered at the beginning of each semester. Papers are evaluated for organization and content, as well as for usage, mechanics, sentence structure and mastery of basic idioms. The purpose of this test is to identify writing deficiencies early in the program and provide assistance to students before encountering more complex requirements in the program. Students successfully demonstrate proficiency by passing the Graduate Essay Test (GET). The GET must be taken prior to enrollment for the first semester. The SFSU Testing Center provides the GET prior to the start of each semester for a $25 fee (can be paid online: http://www.sfsu.edu/~testing). Students who pass this test have met the minimum writing and composition standards expected of students in graduate study at SFSU. Results will be available in the health education department by the Advising Day following the test. Students who do not receive passing scores should make an appointment immediately with their adviser, who will recommend placement in an appropriate writing course, either Business 514 or Education 614 or a preliminary course in English writing skills or another alternative. Students who take an alternative course will be required to take Business 514 or Education 614 at a later date or register and pay to take the GET again, in order to satisfy the graduate writing requirement. Students who wish to appeal their initial score on the GET should consult with their department advisors. A student who is enrolled in a designated remedial writing course, and completes the mid-term or the final examination successfully, will have met the Level I literacy requirement. SFSU Testing Center: (415) 338-2271, (415) 338-0589 (fax), via e-mail: [email protected], WWW: http://www.sfsu.edu/~testing/get.html. Office: Administration Building 152 Office hours: M-F 8:30AM-5:00PM, Tuesdays and Wednesdays 5:00PM-7:00PM. LEVEL II: Graduate students are expected to demonstrate writing skills, which exemplify scholarly style in the chosen discipline. Students will demonstrate skills in the use of quotation, paraphrase, integrate quotations and rephrasing with original ideas, cite sources, and prepare manuscripts or other works in accordance with accepted scholarly style in the field of study. Students successfully demonstrate proficiency of the second level of literacy by satisfactory completion of a final paper for the culminating experience in HED 895.

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SFSU ­ MPH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING A PAPER

Writing is a skill that improves with practice, reading, observation, and feedback. It is a skill that is developed. Writing is also personal. The guidelines below were adapted from the: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. http:www.apa.org/journals/faq.html

1. All papers are to be word processed on one side of standard-sized (8 x 11 in), heavy white bond paper. Do not use erasable or colored paper. 2. Typeface should be a 12 point-font, using a standard, business font. Acceptable fonts are: Times New Roman, Palatino, or Courier. The type on the paper should be dark (black) and readable. 3. All papers are to be double-spaced, unless otherwise specified. 4. Margins should be set uniformly, with one inch on all sides-no less. 5. All papers are to be free of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and usage errors. 6. Papers should be written in a style that is appropriate for the assignment. That is, subjective, process papers are appropriately written in the first person, whereas research papers or reports should be written in a more formal tone-typically in the third person. 7. References should be cited using American Psychological Association (APA) format. Any paper using information that is not common knowledge must cite the source of that information. The absence of citations and a reference list may result in an `F' grade as well as disciplinary action. 8. Plagiarism is a form of cheating or fraud; it occurs when a student misrepresents the work of another as his or her own. Plagiarism may consist of using the ideas, sentences, paragraphs, or the whole text of another without appropriate acknowledgment, but it also includes employing or allowing another person to write or substantially alter work that a student then submits as his or her own. Any assignment found to be plagiarized will be given an "F" grade. All instances of plagiarism in the Department of Health Education, College of Health and Human Services (CHHS) will be reported to the Chair of the Department and may be reported to the Dean of the College and the University Judicial Affairs Officer for further action. For more information please refer to website: http://www.sfsu.edu/~collhum/plagiarism.html

Other writing resources:

The following are resources used to compose papers. These books may have had more recent updates, so look for the latest edition. Of course this list is not, by any means, exhaustive. 1)_ Ellsworth, B & Higgins, J. (1994). English simplified (7th ed.). New York: Harper Collins College Publishers. 2) Markman, R., Markman, P.T., Waddell, M.L. (2001) Ten Steps in Writing the Research Paper. Barrons Educational Series Inc.: Hauppauge, NY. 3) Miles, R., Bertonasco, M. & Karns, W. (1991). Prose style: A contemporary guide (2nd ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. 4) Zinzer, Z. (1990). On writing well (4th ed.). New York: Harper Perennial.

Through dialogue, the teacher-of-the-students and the students-of-theteacher cease to exist and a new term emerges...they become jointly responsible for a process in which all grow. -Paulo Freire

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SFSU ­ MPH DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION PLAGIARISM AND ACADEMIC HONESTY

Plagiarism is using someone else's words or ideas without clearly acknowledging the source of that information. The best way to avoid plagiarism is to learn what it is and how to avoid it. Knowing how to cite someone else's work within your own work is a very important skill and something that all graduate students should be able to do. With the growing popularity of the World Wide Web as a source of information, it can be even more difficult avoid plagiarism. The following web resource "Plagiarism: What it Is and How to Recognize and Avoid It" at http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/pamphlets/plagiarism.shtml provides a good overview of plagiarism, sharing examples of both acceptable and unacceptable paraphrases and strategies to avoid plagiarism. Other helpful online resources can be found at the following URLs: Plagiarism, the Dos and Don'ts http://online.sfsu.edu/~rone/StudentHelp/Plagiarism.html SFSU Department of Computer Science Policy on Cheating and Plagiarism http://cs.sfsu.edu/plagarism.html CET Online Tutorials: Using Someone Else's Words and The Citation Challenge http://www.cet.sfsu.edu/index.cfm?section=etl&content=studentsupport/students&menu=7#online_tutori als The Department of Health Education expects students to understand what plagiarism is and how to avoid it. Acts of plagiarism are considered very serious breaches of academic honesty and integrity and will be handled appropriately. The Department of Health Education currently follows the San Francisco State University Policy on Academic Honesty (see below for this policy). POLICY ON PLAGIARISM: SFSU BULLETIN: EXPLUSION, SUSPENSION, PROBATION (FROM

HTTP://CET.SFSU.EDU/INDEX.CFM?SECTION=ETL&CONTENT=INTEGRITY/BULLETIN&MENU=7)

"Students or applicants for admission who display inappropriate conduct, including cheating and plagiarism, may be subject to disciplinary action as provided in Title 5, California Code of Regulations. Any student may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, or given a lesser sanction for discipline problems. The Student Discipline Officer, housed in the Dean of Students Office, is responsible for administering the Student Disciplinary Procedures for the California State University and should be contacted for further information. Inappropriate conduct by students or by applicants for admission is subject to discipline as provided in Sections 41301 through 41304 of Title 5, California Code of Regulations. These sections are as follows: 41301. Expulsion, Suspension, and Probation of Students. Following procedures consonant with due process established pursuant to Section 41304, any student of a campus may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, or given a lesser sanction for one or more of the following causes which must be campus related: a. Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at a campus. b. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of campus documents, records, or identification or knowingly furnishing false information to a campus. c. Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization to be an agent of a campus. ..." For more information, please review the SFSU Student Code of Conduct available in the SFSU Bulletin or online at http://www.sfsu.edu/~bulletin/current/supp-reg.htm

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SFSU MPH: REGISTRATION, ENROLLMENT & COURSE WAIVERS

Course Registration: All students in the MPH program are expected to pre-register prior to each semester within the regularly scheduled timeline provided for SFSU touch-tone registration. Failure to register jeopardizes continuation of a course for the given semester. You can register during any Open Registration Period (check registration schedule online) after your Priority Appointment time. Registration procedures are mailed to all students, published online at: http://www.sfsu.edu/~admisrec/reg/ttreg.html Also, available in the Class Schedule which may be purchased at the campus bookstore or view online at http://www.sfsu.edu/online/clssch.htm . All holds must be cleared and your fees paid. Registration is complete only when all fees are paid directly or through financial aid. For the fall 2004 semester, the cost of graduate registration fees to the university is $1683 plus an average cost of $250 for books and supplies. Late Adds: (Adding Courses after Initial Touch Tone) If the student has paid sufficient fees and has instructor approval, s/he may add courses via Touch Tone with instructor assigned permit stickers during the first two weeks of the semester. Students are advised to check their own class list at: https://www.sfsu.edu/online/clslst.html. The student is responsible for ensuring timely enrollment. Late adding after the 2nd week is permitted by exception only. You must add using an instructor authorized late permit number. Adding after the 4th week is NOT PERMITTED, NO EXCEPTIONS. Waivers or substitutions: The MPH program requires students to follow a prescribed sequence of coursework throughout the three-year program. Practice conjoined courses (HED 820, 830 & 840) foster a team collaborative approach to professional development. Waivers or substitutions are not considered in these courses. Waivers or substitutions may be considered where coursework is measured on an individual basis. Petitions are considered and approved by the advisor and department chairperson. Consideration for waivers or substitutions requires documented proof of experience, or a course description with a transcript for proof of coursework. Continuing Enrollment: Students admitted to the MPH program as a classified graduate maintain matriculated status by continuous enrollment in coursework each semester following admission. For a master's degree, the State of California validates coursework completed within a seven-year limit. Interruptions to continuous enrollment may derail a student in making satisfactory progress with

her or his peers. An interruption of a semester or longer from the prescribed 3-year MPH program may only be considered for compelling reasons.

Students who interrupt their course work for one semester may continue in the program. Students who interrupt their course work for two consecutive semesters must reapply to the university in order to continue in the MPH program. Additionally, because of the cohort nature of the MPH curriculum, if a student needs to withdraw for a semester, re-entry into the program is possible only in the fall semester of the next academic year with a new cohort of students.

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SFSU MPH GRADING

Satisfactory academic progress demonstrates that a student has met the professional, personal, scholastic and other standards prescribed by the program. Along with self-assessment, student performance in coursework and practice will be measured by grading standards and practices set by the university. It is the responsibility of the instructor to describe and define expectations and requirements for each course. When course outlines are distributed to the class, students are encouraged to ask for explanation of any grading practices. An instructor will evaluate and measure student performance for a final grade on the basis of a variety of factors. Variables may include, but are not limited to, class attendance, written assignments, in-class participation, meeting deadlines, etc. Each course outline will define a measurable percentage of course requirements and a final grade will be issued on the basis of student performance.

Grade Point Average:

To remain a classified graduate student in good standing, a student must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better. If a student experiences difficulty in completing coursework successfully with a letter grade of "B" or better, consultation with the instructor and the program advisor is important to resolve difficulties and avoid academic probation. The following summarizes the SFSU Bulletin grading policy and academic standards. Only grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C and CR are acceptable in courses reflected on the Graduate Approved Program. Classified students whose performance, academic progress, or conduct in a graduate program is judged to be unsatisfactory may be required to withdraw from the program.

· Good standing: maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better in any term. · Probation: subject when cumulative grade point average falls below 3.0 (B) or better in any term. · Disqualification: subject to discontinuance in graduate degree programs and from further enrollment

in the university, if during the semester of probation, the student fails to achieve the minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (B).

Class Attendance:

Students are expected to attend classes weekly throughout the semester. Attendance is necessary and important to learning and attaining the educational objectives of the program. Failure to attend classes will impact grading. For absence due to valid reasons such as illness, accidents or participation in officially approved program activities, students are responsible for communicating with instructor to arrange for make-up of assignments and class work.

The College of Health and Human Services Withdrawal from Course Policy:

You must touch-tone drop classes by the fourth week of the semester. Withdrawal from a course indicates that that student was permitted to drop the course after the 4th week of instruction with the approval of the instructor, the department chairperson and the college dean. Prior to considering this option, students are encouraged to meet with the instructor and their advisor to assist in this decision. Withdrawal from a course in the last three weeks of the semester is permissible only when serious or compelling reasons where the cause of withdrawal are due to circumstances clearly beyond the student's control, and where the assignment of an incomplete is not practicable. All requests for withdrawal during this period must be made in writing on the appropriate petition and must be verifiable. IF YOU

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REQUEST A WITHDRAWAL AFTER THE 4TH WEEK, CONTINUE ATTENDING CLASS UNTIL YOU KNOW THAT YOUR WITHDRAWAL REQUEST HAS BEEN GRANTED.

Incomplete Grade:

An instructor may consider incomplete performance in coursework for compelling reasons when the student has encountered circumstances beyond their control. At the time an incomplete may be considered, the student has been performing satisfactorily in the course and there is a possibility that the student will earn credit within the time allowed. Completion of course requirements resulting from an incomplete grade must be accomplished within one year following enrollment in the course, or the instructor and student may negotiate a reasonable time for requirements to be completed prior to the one year allowed by the university. When an instructor approves a grade of incomplete, it is understood that s/he is agreeing to work with a student beyond the contracted period of the course in which the student was enrolled, will be available to the student beyond the semester of enrollment, and will evaluate the coursework for a final grade within the one-year timeline or earlier. Students are not encouraged to use this option unless absolutely necessary. Students who leave a course without officially withdrawing from their enrollment commitments are subject to a failing grade in the course, or a grade of "U", unauthorized incomplete, which is equivalent to an "F" grade point factor.

Grade Changes:

Grades are not convertible to other letter grades except in cases of instructor or administrative error. Grade changes for the improvement of a grade by way of extra credit work may be considered only if the extra credit option is made to all students in the course at the time of enrollment and measured with the grading criteria provided in the course outline. All grade changes are by petition to the instructor and approval by the department chairperson. A student wishing to request a retroactive grade change or withdrawal must initiate the request during the semester in attendance immediately following the semester when the original grade was assigned. Retroactive grade changes are subject to review by the Board of Appeals and Review. Grade changes are not permitted after the award of a degree.

Grade Reports:

Students may obtain grade results approximately two weeks of the grade report deadline. Visit SFSU Student Information Service at https://www.sfsu.edu/online/login.htm. Enter Student ID and Personal Access Code (PAC) and select "Grades" or "Unofficial Transcript." Grades can also be obtained over the phone by calling: (415) 338-7000.

Academic Disqualification and Probation:

Once in the MPH program, a student will be placed on academic probation if her or his overall GPA falls below a 3.0 (B average). The student's name will be reported to the Graduate Studies' Division and the Health Education Department indicating the student's academic probation status. Essentially what this means is that a student on probation will need to raise her or his grades in future courses to a 3.0. As long as progress is made to this end, a student will be fine and eventually taken off of probation. For more clarity on this, please see the University Bulletin (2005-2006) p. 144 under the heading "GRADUATE CLASSIFIED, GRADUATE CONDITIONALLY CLASSIFIED, and POSTBACCALAURETTE CLASSIFIED (up in the right-hand corner of the page).

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A student may be declassified/dropped from a graduate program for a range of reasons including, but not restricted to: · Deficient grade point average for graduate degree · Unprofessional conduct · Professional judgment of the faculty of the program that the student is incapable of completing the degree requirements · Withdrawal from all or a substantial portion of program coursework unless directly related to chronic or recurring disability or its treatment · Repeated failure to progress toward the stated degree and program objective when such failure appears to be due to circumstances within the control of the student · Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation which is routine for all students within the defined program Readmission to the program is subject to petition to the program faculty and department chairperson. If an interruption of enrollment for one semester or more in the program becomes necessary, consult the SFSU Bulletin for criteria regarding re-entry. SFSU provides a grievance and appeal process for students. Students with problems arising from disqualification may appeal first with a program advisor, then follow with the department chairperson, the graduate coordinator, and the college dean, in that order. Once all informal procedures for grievance and appeal are exhausted, the student may initiate formal petition procedures with the Dean of the Graduate Division.

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MPH CURRICULUM AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY 53 UNITS: 3 YEAR PROGRAM

Year One Fall Description Public Health and Principles of Community Organizing Theories of Social Behavioral Change in Community Health HED 815 Education HED 829 Biostatistics HED 890.01 MPH Seminar HED 820 HED 821 HED 825 HED 890.01 Needs Assessment in Community Health Education Needs Assessment Practicum Epidemiology MPH Seminar Course HED 810 Units 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 1

Spring

Year Two Fall

HED 830 HED 831

Program Planning for Community Change Community Health Assessment Practicum

3 3 3 3 1 4

Spring

HED 840 Program Evaluation Design and Research HED 841 Program Planning and Evaluation Design Practicum HED 890.02 MPH Seminar HED 892 Supervised Field Internship

Summer Year Three Fall

HED 890.03 MPH Seminar HED 811 Health Education Skills Portfolio HED 895 Applied Research Project in Health (Culminating Experience) HED 890.03 MPH Seminar

1 1 3 1

Spring

Non-Sequenced Courses (MUST be taken prior to enrolling in HED 895) HED 835 HED 845 HED 850 HED 855 Public Health Policy Training and Educational Processes Health Administration and Management Environmental Health 3 3 3 3

Total Degree Units:

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SFSU MPH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

The primary goal of the MPH curriculum is to provide hands-on learning opportunities and contextual learning through the emphasis on practice, and team work developed in the innovations in our curriculum. Course descriptions are listed by the semester and year they are to be completed. MPH courses in the Community Health program at SFSU are also listed by the responsibilities and sub-competencies for Master level preparation in Community Health Education. This list was developed by the MPH committee in the fall of 2000 and revised most recently Fall of 2002. The responsibilities and competency requirements for MPH courses were adapted from those developed by the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and the American Association of Health Education (AAHE). FALL ­ Year 1 HED 810: INTRO TO PUBLIC HEALTH & PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNITY ORGANIZING Course Description: HED 810 is a gateway course to professional socialization in the Masters in Public Health program at SFSU. The purpose of this class is to provide basic knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of Community-Based Public Health (CBPH). CBPH is an approach explicitly grounded in cultural competency. It unites community residents, academic institutions, local public health agencies and community-based organizations in sharedleadership partnerships for health. The trilogy of race/ethnicity, racism and privilege are underscored not because they are more important than other dimensions, such as social class or gender, but because they are often neglected areas of study. Learning Objectives: By the end of the semester, students will be able to carry out a Community-Based Public Health analysis of a health/social issue and apply concepts relating to the: 1. Mission and political nature of community-based public health; 2. History and foundations of non-violent social action community organizing; 3. Impact of social support and social networks on individual and community health; 4. Power analysis of social and economic determinants of the public's health; 5. Ethical dilemmas in Health Education practice and research; 6. Methodology of community diagnosis, community mapping and stakeholder analysis; 7. Media literacy & media advocacy applications of community-based public health; and 8. Globalization and international CBPH efforts that build solidarity across geography, difference and diversity. In addition students will achieve the following cultural competencies: 1. Identify student's own value systems and styles of creative expression as well as those of other cultural groups; 2. Understand and develop the "cultural competency" necessary for effective interpersonal and intercultural group interactions; and

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3. Recognize concerns regarding cultural stereotypes and address them. Develop multiple socio-cultural participation skills in order to be effective in multicultural communities locally, nationally and internationally.

HED 811: ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO

Course Description: MPH students are required to prepare an electronic portfolio, or Efolio, during the MPH program as their professional public health portfolio. This Efolio will demonstrate competence in Community Health Education through evidence from academic classes and practice courses, as well as the internship and culminating experience project. Students work on their Efolio throughout the MPH experience and seek to create a site that reflects the professional health education competencies as defined by the Health Education Department. Learning Objectives: The objectives of the MPH Efolio are to: 1. Engage students in a process of reflection and evaluation of: -Responsibilities, competencies & sub competencies required for a master level health education professional; and -Leadership, team, and communication skills gained from the MPH program. 2. Assess HED graduate students' ability to apply these core competencies and varied skills in the practice of public health; 3. Provide students with a dynamic electronic portfolio to demonstrate professional competencies and support future employment opportunities. 4. Assess the overall effectiveness of the MPH program in developing the master level core competencies in community health education. Please see the Efolio Handbook chapter of this manual for details on the Efolio process. HED 815: THEORIES OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL CHANGE IN CHE Course Description: HED 815 introduces theories relevant to health education practice to students. This is accomplished by having students critically analyze theories and their development. Students are required to contextualize theory and provide practical applications. Health educators need to be skillful at using theory, if they are to plan, implement and evaluate programs that are effective and have a solid foundation. Health educators must be able to critically analyze theory. They must know who defined the problem, who is seen as having the problem and who created the problem. They must understand systematically created oppressions (racism, sexism, etc.), hegemony and how ideology is produced and reproduced. Learning Objectives: Specific objectives for this course are that, by the end of the semester, each class participant will; 1. Be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of selected theories and conceptual frameworks as guides to health education practice;

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2. Assess and strengthen the rationale for health education practice by making the assumptions about the change process explicit and by linking these assumptions to theories in social science; 3. Be able to apply multiple theoretical perspectives in analyzing the educational dimensions of health problems and in designing and justifying educational approaches to these problems; 4. Distinguish between behaviors that foster and those that hinder well-being; 5. Interpret concepts, purposes, and theories of Health Education; 6. Predict the impact of societal value systems on Health Education programs; 7. Select a variety of communication methods and techniques in providing health information; 8. Provide a critical analysis of current and future needs in Health Education; and 9. Apply ethical principles as they relate to the practice of Health Education. HED 829: BIOSTATISTICS Course Description: This class provides an overview of the types of quantitative analysis commonly used in public health programs and related research. Students gain an understanding of the underlying concepts of biostatistical tests; are able to perform basic biostatistical calculations and procedures; and thus are able to understand and use biostatistical data encountered in the public health workplace. Learning Objectives By the end of the semester, each class participant will: 1. Gain an understanding of the underlying concepts as well as the procedures involved in biostatistical techniques that graduates are likely to encounter in their professions; 2. Provide the necessary background to enable graduates to understand statistical reports, including policy reports and program evaluations that they will encounter in their work; 3. Acquire a level of statistical literacy that enables graduates to work with statistical consultants in their workplaces and "know the questions to ask;" 4. Be able to judiciously read statistical findings as reported in the scientific literature that is relevant to their field; 5. Gain a familiarity with vital statistics (e.g., rates, life tables) and with the types of data collected via large national probability samples (such as NHIS and NHANES); 6. Become aware of the many ways to visually depict data, to become careful interpreters of visual depictions of data, and to be able to contribute to decisions about visual representation of summary data in reports that are generated within the workplace; 7. Gain a fundamental understanding of probability and probability distributions, and to see how those concepts form the basis for making statistical inference from sample to population. 8. Clearly understand how correlation is an aspect of causation, but to also clearly understand that correlation does not imply causation. To understand the requirements of causal modeling; and 9. Learn several techniques that are appropriate for small samples and for data that are not normally distributed.

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HED 890.01: REFLECTIVE SEMINAR Course Description: The role of the MPH Reflective Seminars is to deepen students' understanding of self care, collaborative leadership and to reinforce your group skills and understanding of group process. The focus will be on developing student ability to demonstrate collaborative leadership both in your practice groups and in your cohort. Ongoing work on the MPH portfolio is part of the work in the seminar each semester. Reflective time is devoted to understanding the portfolio and its presentation. HED 890 is a year long course designed to strengthen cohort cohesion. Towards this end, exercises and activities that build ties are incorporated. Learning Objectives: 1. Understand the mission and values of the MPH program at SFSU; 2. Understand student roles and responsibilities as members of the MPH community at SFSU; 3. Develop an understanding of collaborative leadership and its value for diversity; 4. Understand the importance of self care skills in leadership; 5. Establish a self care plan; 6. Learn good interpersonal communication skills; 7. Develop an understanding of group dynamics and team skills; 8. Understand the elements of effective conflict resolution; 9. Understand the role and responsibility of citizenship in the MPH program and their cohort through participation in PHOGS and activities designed to strengthen cohort cohesion; 10. Understand the MPH expectations beyond course work that must be completed in the second year of the program; and 11. Create a process to creatively problem solve cohort issues that arise in the course of the first year. SPRING ­ Year 1 HED 825: EPIDEMIOLOGY Course Description: This course is designed to provide students with an introductory and comprehensive survey of epidemiological principles and methods. A history and overview of the field, including contemporary case studies will be covered along with an examination of the methods used to study disease distributions in diverse human populations. Readings and assignments will emphasize concepts of risk, disease etiology, transmission, and prevention. Learning Objectives: 1. Analyze and understand biological, social, cultural, economic and political factors that impact health; 2. Understand factors that shape distributions of disease among diverse populations; 3. Understand descriptive and observational epidemiological approaches for analyzing health data; 4. Evaluate the research design, methodology, and findings from the epidemiological literature; and 5. Acquire and analyze survey information using standard epidemiological methods and calculations.

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HED 820: COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT Course Description This course focuses on assessment processes using applied research methods which empower communities to create programs that respond to their health challenges, concerns, and strengths. Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the different purposes, scopes and methodologies of conducting community health assessment; 2. Apply skills of data collection, data management, analysis and reporting related to community health assessments; 3. Identify appropriate uses of the various assessment methods and contrast their strengths and limitations for describing and analyzing a community's health; and 4. Work in a group to write a community health assessment plan that address the intent and purpose; description of the community to be assessed; relevant questions on issues to be assessed; methods of assessment and plan for analysis. HED 821: COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT PRACTICUM Course Description: HED 821 is a practice conjoined course with HED 820 designed to strengthen the link between theory and practice in three skills-based research methods course. Students are assigned to public health or community based organizations in teams of 3-4 members. Student teams develop a community health assessment plan under the supervision of the Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF). Students practice development and leadership principles, use knowledge and skills from the previous semester and from conjoined class HED 820. Each team--in meetings with CAF and the HED 821 instructor as well as through input from class discussions-- writes a research plan for implementation their next semester in HED 831 Advanced Community Assessment Practice. Learning Objectives: By the end of the course, students will be able to 1. Identify individual strengths; delineate roles responsibilities and obstacles in team building; 2. Establish an ongoing team structure and plan to accomplish tasks, address and resolve obstacles that inhibit individual contributions and team objectives; 3. Assess community health needs and select appropriate needs assessment tools; and 4. Write a team report and present a summary of the report describing site (agency and community context) and the rationale for selection of the community health assessment tool.

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FALL ­ Year 2 HED 830: PROGRAM PLANNING FOR COMMUNITY CHANGE Course Description: HED 830 is the first component of a one-year approach to mastering program planning and evaluation. This semester provides students with the fundamentals and skills necessary to design and implement public health programs to prevent disease and promote health and well-being. In this course, students apply the ecological model to program planning, analyzing the individual, interpersonal, community, organizational, and policy determinants of health to design a multilevel program targeting these determinants. Learning Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the essential phases of program planning and describe their functions; 2. Understand and apply the basic principles and processes of program planning to the design of a health promotion program; 3. Understand and apply theory in the development and implementation of health promotion programs and its relationship to health and social justice; 4. Develop a logic model and implementation plan for a health promotion program; and 5. Design a multi-level comprehensive health education program consistent with specified program objectives. HED 831: ADVANCED COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT PRACTICUM Course Description: HED 831 is the sequenced practice course following HED 821. The goal of HED 831 is to successfully implement the community assessment design and plan developed with CAF preceptor in HED 820/821. Implementation will reflect the strengths of the linking theory, knowledge and practice in one or more of the three skilled-based methods in public health community assessments taught in HED 820. Learning Objectives: By the end of the semester MPH students will 1. Understand and practice conducting a community assessment; and 2. Gain skills in the following three skills practiced: (1) focus groups, (2) key informant interviews, and (3) surveys. HED 890.02: SECOND YEAR REFLECTIVE SEMINAR Course Description: This is a two part year long seminar (Fall and Spring semester) for students in the second year of the MPH program. The role of the MPH Reflective Seminars during year 2 is to deepen students' understanding of self care, collaborative leadership and to reinforce group skills and understanding of group process. The focus will be on developing your ability to demonstrate collaborative leadership both in practice groups and in the cohort. Ongoing work on the MPH

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portfolio is part of the work in the seminar each semester. Reflective time will be devoted to understanding the portfolio and its presentation. Learning Objectives: The students in the second year of the MPH program: 1. Deepen their understanding of collaborative leadership; 2. Practice team and conflict resolution skills; 3. Understand and assume the role of leadership coach with fellow classmates; 4. Understand the role and responsibility of citizenship in the MPH program and their cohort through participation in PHOGS and activities designed to strengthen cohort cohesion; 5. Understand the MPH expectations beyond course work that must be completed in the second year of the program; 6. Reflect on the competencies they have developed thus far in the MPH and reflect this understanding in their MPH portfolio; 7. Create a process to problem solve cohort issues that arise in the course of the second year; 8. Develop a cohort mission statement; and 9. Develop a personal mission statement.

SPRING ­ Year 2 HED 840: PROGRAM EVALUATION DESIGN AND RESEARCH Course Description: HED 840 is the second half of a one year course designed to provide students with a basic mastery of program planning, evaluation, grant writing, and strategic planning. The student teams will focus on transforming the program plan produced last semester (HED 830/831) into a fundable grant proposal. Learning Objectives By the end of the course students will have achieved the following learning objectives: 1. Mastered the basic evaluation format presented using the PRECEDE/PROCEED and other frameworks; 2. Developed a grant proposal from the plan developed last semester; 3. Critically assessed evaluation research published in peer-reviewed journals; 4. Understood the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches to program evaluation; 5. Identified the issues involved in communicating results and utilizing evaluation findings with diverse audiences; and 6. Mastered the basic skills necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of community health education programs.

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HED 841: PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION PRACTICUM Course Description: The practicum component this semester will focus on transforming the program plan produced last semester into a fundable grant proposal. This task will be followed by more advanced level inquiry in evaluation theories, methodologies, and designs including fine-tuning student's abilities to critically review public health evaluation studies. Evaluation practitioners will present their work during this period. Learning Objectives By the end of the course students will have achieved the following learning objectives: 1. Mastered the basic evaluation format presented using the PRECEDE/PROCEED and other frameworks; 2. Developed a grant proposal from the plan developed last semester; 3. Critically assessed evaluations published in peer-reviewed journals; 4. Understood the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches to program evaluation; 5. Identified the issues involved in communicating results and utilizing evaluation findings with diverse audiences; and 6. Mastered the basic skills necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of community health education programs. SUMMER Year 2 HED 892: MPH SUMMER FIELD INTERNSHIP Course Description: HED 892 is an opportunity for students to demonstrate and further refine core knowledge and skills in community health assessment, program planning and evaluation design. Students are expected to integrate into the internship experience, the knowledge and principles of theory, principles of public health and community organizing, epidemiology, statistics and leadership from the previous four semesters. Emphasis is placed on each student's initiative and career goals to design and develop a summer internship proposal. Once a site has been determined, the student's proposal becomes a contractual agreement that each student monitors by developing a 200 hour work plan (mid-term report and final report). Learning Objectives By the end of the internships students will have: 1. Developed a proposal with a purpose, work plan, time line and expected outcomes; 2. Conducted a literature search; 3. Organized and facilitated a site visit with course instructor, site supervisor and other relevant staff/community partners; 4. Implemented the proposed praxis and write a report in which the goals, objectives, methods will be described and assessed (reviewed and comments from site supervisor); and 5. Developed two preliminary culminating project (HED 895) concepts: purpose, goal, objective(s), methods.

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FALL ­ Year 3 HED 890.03: THIRD YEAR REFLECTIVE SEMINAR Course Description: This is a two part year long seminar (Fall and Spring semester) for students in the third year of the MPH program. The role of the MPH Reflective Seminars is to deepen understanding of self care, collaborative leadership and to reinforce students' group skills and understanding of group process. Preparation for the culminating experience is emphasized Learning Objectives 1. Develop a process to decide the content objectives for their cohort for the third year reflective seminar of the MPH program; 2. Provide both instrumental and emotional support for the completion of the culminating experience; 3. Understand the roles and responsibilities for advancing the Health Education and Public Health profession. 4. Understand the role and responsibility of citizenship in the MPH program and their cohort through participation in PHOGS and activities designed to strengthen cohort cohesion; 5. Understand the MPH expectations beyond course work that must be completed in the third year of the program; 6. Reflect on the competencies they have developed thus far in the MPH and reflect this understanding in their MPH portfolio; and 7. Create a process to problem solve cohort issues that arise in the course of the third year. SPRING ­ Year 3 HED 895: APPLIED RESEARCH PROJECT IN HEALTH EDUCATION Course Description: This capstone course in the MPH program is the culminating experience requirement. It requires that students synthesize and integrate the knowledge they have acquired in their coursework and apply the theory and principles of community health education in public health practice. Learning Objectives: 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to design, implement and evaluate a communitybased project in Community Health Education; 2. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop an informed consent and study protocol for human subjects approval; 3. Students will demonstrate the ability to write an abstract of a community-based project; 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop a professional presentation of the results of community based research; 5. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the health education competencies applied in their community based research project; and 6. Students will demonstrate the ability to write a report documenting the elements of a good, applied community based research project and its results. 61

DESCRIPTION OF NON-SEQUENCED COURSES

HED 845: TRAINING AND EDUCATIONAL PROCESS Course Description: This class is designed to expose students to various approaches to health education trainings, with a special emphasis placed on educating culturally diverse populations. This will be accomplished, in part, by exposing students to a wide variety of readings covering everything from traditional learning theories to critical pedagogy and popular education. Additionally, this class will include: discussions, activities, group projects (conceptualizing, developing and carrying out health education training), guest speakers, and a critical analysis of a health education training of the students' choice. By the conclusion of the course, students will be able to plan, implement, and evaluate health education trainings. Learning Objectives Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 1. Do an educational needs assessment, design, and plan educational programs for a variety of health professionals (e.g., for teachers, volunteers, and other interested personnel) in a variety of settings; 2. Assess individual learning styles while taking into account the broader learning environment; 3. Employ a wide range of educational methods and techniques to best communicate health and community health education information; 4. Critically analyze the pros and cons of various educational technologies and be able to select appropriate media for health trainings while fully taking into account the needs and learning styles of diverse populations; 5. Consult with those requesting assistance (i.e., health education training) and work with these individuals while also utilizing a professional network to create an optimal training for her or his personnel; and 6. Evaluate the effectiveness of health education trainings/educational interventions. HED 835: HEALTH POLICY Course Description: This course is designed to help students better understand the political environment in which public health operates and how to work within it. It features discussions on ethics as applied to public health, politics and media advocacy. Learning Objectives: By the end of the semester students will: 1. Better understand the relationship between ethics and public health politics; 2. Be better able to analyze how social, economic, and political factors influence health in the US; 3. Be able to outline how each branch of government affects public health; 4. Be able to analyze how interest groups operate in a political environment; 5. Have an improved understanding of how community health education can affect policy formation;

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6. 7.

Obtain an introduction to the literature about the changing political climate affecting the goals of public health programs; and Review media advocacy principles and techniques to achieve program goals.

HED 850: HEALTH ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT Course Description This course is designed to help students better understand management skills as they apply to strategic planning, working with staff, and collaborating with leaders of other organizations. Developing mission statements and financing are outlined. Motivating and respecting staff is discussed. The course relies primarily on the case study method for learning. Where skills can, to a greater extent be imparted through lecture, e.g., a basic understanding of how private insurance works, students will learn about them through lectures. Learning Objectives 1. Students will have improved skill in collaborating with health professionals in administering public health programs; 2. Students will develop knowledge of key labor laws affecting health administration; 3. Students will receive an introduction to the concepts of Peter Drucker on selecting, developing, and motivating non-profit staff; 4. Students will develop an understanding of an approach to queuing problems in managing human resources; 5. Students will have an overview of sources of revenue for public health; and 6. Students will receive practice in the development of mission-based planning objectives.

HED 855: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH Course Description This graduate-level seminar is focused on engaging students in critically thinking about environmental health issues. A common thread throughout the course will be the incorporation of a global perspective with environmental justice principles and community organizing. There will be two overarching themes: 1) the Politics of Health in a Toxic Culture (three modules on Perspectives on Human Health and the Environment; Shaping Consciousness; and Communities Speak Out), and; 2) Poverty, Food Production and Distribution. Learning Objectives By the end of the course students will have achieved the following learning objectives: 1. Demonstrated knowledge in major areas of environmental health; 2. Understood and used scientific and socio-political frameworks to interpret environmental health information and data; 3. Critically assessed environmental health issues appearing in scholarly publications and the popular press; and 4. Accessed environmental health data from multiple sources.

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EFOLIO HANDBOOK

By Catherine Magee, MPH & Ruth Cox, Ph.D

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW 2. TIMELINE 3. EFOLIO ORGANIZATION/NAVIGATION 4. EFOLIO CONTENT REQUIREMENTS 5. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 6. EFOLIO EVALUATION & GRADING a. PEER REVIEW PROCESS b. FINAL GRADING PROCESS 7. RESOURCES a. TIPS & TRICKS FOR BUILDING YOUR EFOLIO b. TIPS FOR CREATING A STELLAR ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO c. EFOLIO SITE MANAGEMENT GUIDE d. ALUMNI EFOLIO SITES e. USEFUL WEBSITES f. LITERATURE ON EFOLIOS

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1. INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW What is this "Efolio," anyway? For many years, health education departments in colleges and universities have employed the use of professional portfolios as a means of assessing the level of skill graduates have achieved in a particular program. Typically paper-based, these portfolios presented evidence of students' knowledge of responsibilities and competencies as public health practitioners. With constant innovation in technology, professional portfolios are swiftly moving to web-based formats, allowing for a more dynamic presentation of student and faculty work through the creation of individual websites. Now, SFSU MPH students have the opportunity to create an electronic portfolio, or Efolio, as their professional public health portfolio. This Efolio will demonstrate your competence in Community Health Education through evidence from academic classes and practice courses, as well as the internship and culminating experience project. You will work on their Efolio throughout the MPH experience and seek to create a site that reflects the professional health education competencies as defined by the SFSU Health Education Department.

Shelby McMillan's (2006) Home Page

What's its Purpose? Creating your Efolio is designed to engage you in a process of reflection and evaluation of: 1) responsibilities, competencies & sub competencies required for a master level health education professional; and 2) leadership, team, and communication skills gained from the MPH program. It is also meant to assess your ability to apply these core competencies and varied skills in the practice of public health. In building your Efolio site, you will have the chance to document and reflect upon the valuable work you undertake in the MPH program and develop the ability to integrate technology into your professional work. Furthermore, as a student, the digital format of the Efolio is a powerful tool for demonstrating your passion for public health and your creativity as a health educator as you enter the job market as a public health professional. Within the SFSU MPH program, the Efolio will serve as both a formative and summative evaluation tool for students. As a formative evaluation tool, the Efolio can be used to cultivate relationships between students and their advisors and other faculty members, providing a foundation for students' academic and professional development during the program. Once the Efolio is completed in the final year of the MPH program, it will serve as a summative tool to evaluate your overall mastery of the health education competencies.

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What's the Process? Building an Efolio is a reflective learning process in which you will engage in collecting, selecting, building, and publishing your work using electronic technology as the container. These steps have been described this way: · Collection: The portfolio's purpose, audience, and future use of the artifacts will determine what artifacts to collect. · Selection: Selection criteria for materials to include should reflect the learning objectives established for the portfolio. These should follow from associated evaluation rubrics or performance indicators and national, state, or local standards when relevant. · Reflection: Students enter into a reflection on artifacts in the portfolio and an overall reflection. Research indicates that students become more actively involved in assessing their own learning when using portfolios as they reflect on coursework, special projects, and life experiences. · Projection (or Direction): Reviewing reflections on learning, portfolios can be used to look ahead, set goals for the future, supporting professional development and career bridging. The creative challenge of assembling the Efolio strengthens the learning process by helping students become critical thinkers, and provides a structured opportunity to reflect on the experience of the MPH program. Without the reflective element, portfolios merely become an enhanced electronic resume, web page, or a digital scrapbook. The power of reflection turns the collection into evidence of a deeper learning experience.

So where do I start? You'll be introduced to the Efolio in the first semester of the MPH program through a training seminar. Periodic trainings will occur throughout the three years of the program. These trainings will cover both the content requirements of the Efolio and the technical aspects of the Efolio software program. The Efolio is your opportunity to reflect on the experience of the MPH program. It's a chance to spend some time away from skill-based classes, away from teamwork, away from lit reviews, and to get reacquainted with the passion you bring to your work--to reflect on what drives you forward, what invigorates you, what brings meaning and purpose to your work. The task may seem daunting--so many competencies, so many sections to complete. Take them one at a time. Use time away from the computer to write and plan. Think about how you want to present yourself to the public. Use this site to distill your work into a clear and powerful illustration of your skills, abilities, and convictions.

Rachel Poulain's (2005) Home Page

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This is your opportunity to create a unique site. The basic structure is there, but the flexibility and freedom you have to make it your own is endless. As you start to plan your site, think about how you want to present yourself. What do you want people to come away with after viewing your Efolio? What do you want to showcase? Perhaps think about a theme to tie much of your site together--for Donna Willmott, it was her prison advocacy work; for Rachel Poulain, it was her experience working in Haiti. What is it for you? Your connection to art? Your passion for women's health? Your work with indigenous communities? This is your site. Personalize, make it your own. Make it relevant, compelling and authentic to who you are and what you are most passionate about.

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2. TIMELINE The following outlines the timeline for the Efolio process. It includes both the training sessions and the different milestones for completing sections of the Efolio. Please see the following page for a more narrative description of the Efolio process across the three years of the MPH program. YEAR 1 Introduce Efolio concept at Cross Cohort seminar YEAR 2 Advisor Meeting · Students provide advisor with URL · Review Efolio progress and content · Discuss options for summer internship Ongoing work: Continue to save work to site and rework content E-folio Refresher Seminar · Images · PDFs · Formatting · Site content & requirements for the fall Ongoing work: Continue to save work to site and rework content YEAR 3 Advisor Meeting CE meeting and Efolio feedback session Efolio Refresher Seminar Complete sections: · Community Based Experience · Leadership Skills · Embracing Diversity · Resume Completion of Sites: · Finish remaining competency sections · Complete Culminating Experience section · Revise, refine and finalize site Peer Review (early February) Final Efolio worksession seminar (mid-March) Final Efolio Due Date (midApril; one week after DRAFT CE is due)) Program Review Process-- internal & external review of Efolios

Semester 1

E-folio Introduction Seminar: · Students are assigned sites · Students participate in hands-on training session Semester 2

Summer

Begin working on the Complete the following following Efolio sections: sections (by fall of Year 3): · Introduction · Introduction · Mission Statement · Mission Statement · Research Principles · Community & Methods (informed Assessment by HED 825) · Program Planning · Embracing Diversity · Program Evaluation (informed by HED · Implementing HED 810) Programs (HED 845) · Leadership Skills · ONE other competency

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Year 1 During the first year of the MPH program, you will be introduced to the Efolio during your MPH orientation session. Then, in the second semester, you will participate in a hands-on introductory training seminar in the computer lab to learn the basics of the Efolio software and the overall process of creating your website. As illustrated in the table on the preceding page, the Efolio is an iterative process. That is, you will gain the basic skills during Year 1 and will then practice those skills over the course of three years, continuously revising and reworking the various sections of your site. As soon as you are introduced to the software during the second semester of Year 1, it is highly recommended that you start to work on your Efolio. The Efolio should be used as a place to continuously collect your work and reflect on its significance. During the summer of your first year, you should begin work on the following sections: · · · · Introduction Mission Statement Competencies: o Research Principles & Methods o Embracing Diversity Leadership Skills

In working on the Competencies, focus on the requirements for the Reflective Statement. This is a critical piece of the Efolio content. For details, please see the Responsibilities & Competencies Requirements for MPH Courses in the MPH manual. Refer to the recommended alumni sites for examples.

Year 2 When you return to school in the fall of Year 2, you should schedule a meeting with your advisor. At this meeting, you will discuss the work you have done on your Efolio and plan for the upcoming year. Be sure to email your Efolio URL to your advisor at least two weeks prior to the meeting and request that they review it before you meet. During Year 2, you will have the chance to work in the computer lab again for a refresher seminar. Typically, this seminar will take place during the second semester. You should continue to work on your site during that semester and the summer months. By the fall of Year 3, you should have the following sections fully completed: · · · Introduction Mission Statement Competencies: o Community Assessment o Program Planning o Program Evaluation o Implementing HED Programs o At LEAST one additional competency

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Though this may seem like a lot to accomplish, the sooner you can work on your site, the better off you will be entering Year 3. The demands of the Culminating Experience project will create a crunch for you if you wait to work on this site until Year 3. The sooner you can start collecting and reflecting, the more time you will have to truly select the best work to put forth in your Efolio.

Year 3 This is a busy year for the Efolio! In the fall of this year, you should meet with your advisor once again to discuss your Efolio and your Culminating Experience project. You will also participate in one final training session during the first semester. Over the winter break, you should complete the following sections: · · · · Community Based Experience Leadership Skills Embracing Diversity Resume

In the second semester, in early February, you will participate in the Peer Review process for the Efolio. At this point, your Efolio should be nearly completed. It is important that you go into the Peer Review process with a substantial portion of your site finished so that you can get substantive feedback to help you finalize your Efolio. Please see the Evaluation & Grading section of the Efolio handbook for details on this process. There will be an optional computer lab work session provided during the spring semester and individual assistance if required. The FINAL due date for the EFolio will be in mid-April, one week after the DRAFT CE paper is due. Please make a note of this, and plan ahead!

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3. EFOLIO ORGANIZATION/NAVIGATION The following outline reflects the organization of sections and subsections in the Efolio template. 1. Introduction 2. Professional Mission Statement 3. Competencies in Public Health a. Community Assessment2 i. Evidence of Competence ii. Relevant Coursework3 b. Program Planning c. Implementing Community HED Programs d. Evaluating Community HED Programs e. Coordinating HED Services f. Consulting & Resource Skills g. Advocacy & Communication h. Research Principles & Methods i. Administration Skills j. Professional Leadership k. Embracing Diversity 4. Culminating MPH Project a. Evidence of Competence b. Project Reflection c. Relevant Coursework 5. Leadership Skills a. Professional Presentations & Papers b. Civic Engagement c. Personal Strengths & Abilities 6. Community Based Experience a. Evidence of Competence b. Relevant Coursework 7. Resume a. Contact Information b. Career Objectives c. Employment History d. Educational Achievements e. Volunteer Activities f. Honors & Awards g. Printable Resume 8. SFSU MPH Overview4

2 3

Please note that all competencies in the Efolio have these two sections: Evidence of Competence & Relevant Coursework All Relevant Coursework sections are preformatted for students and therefore require no additional content except for Embracing Diversity and the Culminating Experience sections. 4 This section is preformatted by the Health Education Department. Students should not change the content of this section.

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4. EFOLIO CONTENT REQUIREMENTS This section will give you some guidelines about the content requirements for the Efolio content. Most main sections in the Efolio are reflected here. I. Introduction (Home Page) (100-150 words) This is the first page people will see when they arrive at your site. It is an opportunity for people to get to know you and what you're about. In creating the introduction, think about the connections that run in your professional and, perhaps, personal life. Are you focused on one issue? Are you more interested in strategies and policies? Does a theoretical foundation drive you? This section should be brief but descriptive. It should set the tone for your site and provide users with a quick view into the content/philosophy of your public health work. II. Professional Mission Statement (50-75 words) This mission statement should be brief, concise and direct. It should be connected to your introduction in some manner. Refer to alumni sites for examples of these statements. III. Competencies You will be required to complete 7 of the 11 competencies. The following competencies are required: · · · · · Community Assessment Program Planning Implementing Community HED Programs Evaluating Community HED Programs Embracing Diversity

The remaining 2 competencies can be TWO of your choice. There are three main sections within each competency: a. Competency landing/home page This section is what people will see when they click on a competency. This page should contain two sections: 1) Reflective Statement and 2) Practical Experience. i. Reflective Statement (100-150 words) The Reflective Statement should be a personal reflection on your own understanding of a particular competency--what it is, how it's used, and its role/value in the field. The statement should illustrate your personal understanding of a competency and perhaps your deeper philosophy around that competency. For instance, if community participation is what drives your program planning work, use this space as an opportunity to describe that belief, how it applies to program planning and what its value is to public health. Some suggestions: 1) Do some free writing about the competency. Step away from the computer and just write for a while about what you 72

know and believe about a competency; 2) Draw on your process papers for content. Use these documents to help you reflect on the work you have done. 3) Get a feel for what is expected by looking at some exemplary alumni sites. These sites will help you with ideas and may answer some of your questions: Shelby McMillan (2006): http://shelbymcmillan.sfsu.myefolio.com Ingrid Ochoa (2006): http://ingridochoa.sfsu.myefolio.com Linda DeWitt (2006): http://lindadewitt.sfsu.myefolio.com Catie Magee (2006): http://catherinemagee.sfsu.myefolio.com ii. Practical Experience & Project Reflection (75-100 words) Following the Reflective Statement, use this section to connect your reflection to your practical experience in the competency. Write a very brief description of work you have done in a particular area (i.e., community assessment, program planning, evaluation, etc.). This section will be a brief description of what you will more fully discuss in the evidence section. Create a link here to the evidence section of the competency. You can also use this section to briefly reflect on your learning from the project--how the experience informed your perspective on the particular competency. This should be a more specific reflection on the project itself. b. Evidence of Competence (300-350 words) This is your opportunity to elaborate on the practical experience you described on the Competency Landing Page. This section should describe the project in brief form. Sections to include are: i. Background/Overview of Project This might include pieces of information from a literature review and/or a brief overview of the project. ii. Methods iii. Findings iv. Recommendations v. Next Steps If applicable, this section would describe the next step in the project's life. For example, with your community assessment within the conjoined courses, this section could mention the program plan that was developed out of the assessment, with a link to program plan section. Be sure to explicitly connect your evidence to your coursework. That is, describe how the project is connected to a particular course to show the integration of practice with classroom experience. For example, within community assessment, you could briefly describe the Practicum Experience and thread this through both 73

program planning and evaluation. BE SURE to include all relevant documents in your evidence sections. You will attach these documents so that they will appear at the bottom of each Evidence page. c. Relevant Coursework & Competencies This section is preformatted and requires no additional content. IV. Culminating Experience: Efolio Guidelines This section contains three subsections: 1) Evidence; 2) Project Reflection; and 3) Relevant Coursework. a. Evidence Guidelines (300-350 words) Include a project description based on the guidelines for the competencies. This section should describe the project in brief form. Sections to include are: i. Background/Overview of Project ii. Methods iii. Findings iv. Recommendations v. Next Steps If applicable, this section would describe the next step in the project's life. b. Project Reflective Statement Guidelines (250-300 words) Please reflect on the following questions: i. How did your project meet the objectives of the CE course as described below? ii. What challenges emerged in this project? iii. What is the value/benefit of the project to the field of public health? c. Course Description This capstone course in the MPH program is the culminating experience requirement. It requires that students synthesize and integrate the knowledge they have acquired in their coursework and apply the theory and principles of community health education in public health practice. d. Learning Objectives i. Students will demonstrate the ability to design, implement and evaluate a community-based project in Community Health Education; ii. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop an informed consent and study protocol for human subjects approval; iii. Students will demonstrate the ability to write an abstract of a communitybased project; iv. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop a professional presentation of the results of community based research; 74

v. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the health education competencies applied in their community based research project; and vi. Students will demonstrate the ability to write a report documenting the elements of a good, applied community based research project and its results. V. Community Based Experience This section is one of the most flexible content sections in the Efolio. Though many students choose to showcase their summer internship projects here, it can be used to contain other community-based work as well. For students who have engaged deeply in a community through a multitude of projects, this section is a perfect place to highlight that work. Be creative with this part of your site. Take a look at alumni sites to see the many unique presentations of community based experience. Though you are free to choose what content to include in this section, please follow the guidelines for the "Competency Landing Page" and "Evidence of Competence (Sections 3a & 3b0 for instructions on how to present the content you choose for this section. If you decide to include any work in this section or any other part of your Efolio that is unrelated to your MPH academic experience, this work: 1) must be relevant to public health and community health education; and 2) must have been conducted during your time as a student in the MPH program. VI. Embracing Diversity This section is similar to the other competency sections. Please feel free to be creative with this section--include your reflections on health equity and cultural competence within your role as a public health practitioner. Review alumni sites for ideas. a. Embracing Diversity Landing Page The landing page should contain two sections: a) Reflective Statement and b) Practical Experience. i. Reflective Statement (100-150 words) The Reflective Statement should be a personal reflection on your own understanding "Embracing Diversity." Review the "MPH Principles to Achieve Health Equity & Cultural Competence" found below for your reflection. How do cultural competence and health equity relate to each other? What is their place in public health? ii. Practical Experience & Project Reflection (75-100 words) Following the Reflective Statement, use this section to connect your reflection to your practical experience with "Embracing Diversity." Write a very brief description of how your public health experience demonstrates the integration of this principle into your work. If applicable, use this section to briefly reflect on your learnings from the project you will discuss in the "Evidence" subsection--how your experience informed your perspective on "Embracing Diversity."

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b. Evidence of Competence (300-350 words) This is your opportunity to elaborate on the practical experience you described on the Embracing Diversity Landing Page. This section should describe the project in brief form. Feel free to be creative wit this section. If there is more than one project that illustrates your commitment to "Embracing Diversity," use this section to describe your overall involvement in work that exemplifies the competency. Sections to include are: BE SURE to include all relevant documents in your evidence sections. c. MPH Principles to Achieve Health Equity & Cultural Competence i. Masters in Public Health (MPH) students and faculty have developed a set of principles to support cultural competence, achieve health equity, and address discrimination and other forms of oppression/societal privilege in our curriculum. The following six principles apply not only to the content of individual courses but to the program as a whole. ii. The MPH faculty will speak to our mission statement in the classroom and/or syllabus by identifying how its principles are operationalized and manifested throughout a course. iii. The MPH program will proactively recruit and retain students from the communities where health disparities manifest while continually identifying opportunities to address the lack of diversity in the public health field as whole. iv. The theme of health equity, cultural competence and power dynamics will be taught across the curriculum. v. The department will promote learning opportunities that allow for the discussion of oppression, power imbalance, and societal privilege in an atmosphere of honesty and respect. vi. Faculty will be provided with on-going training opportunities that address health equity and cultural competency, with special attention to techniques for identifying and engaging cultural diversity and power dynamics within the classroom. vii. Faculty and students will actively seek teaching moments that illustrate the ways in which oppression, power imbalance, and societal privilege manifest constructively and destructively in the classroom and community by: a. Identifying personal value systems related to power, oppression, and societal privilege relevant to improving health equity. b. Identifying techniques for working effectively in cross-cultural settings. c. Developing a consciousness about the impacts of institutional/structural, personally mediated, and internalized racism in a framework that emphasizes the "intersectionality" of

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race, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, and class as well as other forms of oppression, power imbalance, and societal privilege. d. Defining cultural competency within an organizational setting and its relevance to public health interventions. e. Identifying the role of political, economic, cultural, societal, and behavioral determinants of health.

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5. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

The Efolio site has many different technical assistance resources. You can access the "Help" feature directly through the "Admin" page of your Efolio site. When you click on the "Help" tab, you'll find a wide range of resources such as FAQs, "Quick Tips," and even online tutorials to learn about the software. To get to the Help site, visit http://help.myefolio.com/. Direct support from Avenet staff can be accessed via email at [email protected] Please see the Useful Sites section of this handbook under Resources. Efolio Training Session: Building a Section The following is an example of an Efolio training session process. This information will be provided to you during your training sessions, but you can use this for reference as you start to get a feel for the software. Getting started · You should download the Firefox web browser to work on your Efolio (www.mozilla.com). This is the best browser for the EFolio software. It's the only one that works for the MAC, and it's the best option of the PC · Keep your ID and password somewhere SAFE. You'll need this information for reference. · Bookmark your URL (http://yourname.sfsu.myefolio.com/admin) Working on your site · It's helpful to have two browsers open at the same time. Log in to your administrative account for Efolio and then open up a second window with the admin site. Click on the "Live Site" tab in the upper right hand corner of the page. · The GREEN Finish button is your best friend! Don't forget to click this when finished editing. · The RESET button is NOT your friend! Be careful with this button--clicking it will clear the page you have been working on. Competencies: Community Health Assessment 1. Navigating in Site Administration a. Make sure you're in the Content Tools tab. b. Click on the +/- next to the Competencies in Public Health section title to open up the section. c. Click on the +/- next to the Community Assessment section to open it up. d. Please note that each competency has two sections within it: Evidence of Competence & Relevant Coursework. You are ONLY responsible for the Evidence page

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2. Editing Competency Introduction Page Community Assessment Introduction a. Click on SECTION TITLE (e.g., 1. Community Assessment) to edit the section. This is the INTRODUCTION page, or LANDING page, for this section. (Clicking on the SECTION TITLE will get you into the editing tools for that page in your site.) b. Section Navigation: Reordering the Subsections 1) You will need to reorder the Subsections in each of the competencies. 2) Click on "Sort Subsections" in Section Tools 3) Click on "Evidence", move it UP and click the GREEN finished button. c. There are two editing areas in each of the sections in your site: Section Introduction Items You can put all your content in the Section Introduction, or you can use the Items editing tools to add your content in different sections. For example, for each competency, you would make one item "Reflective Statement" and the other "Practical Experience" for the Section Page.

o o

One thing to note with the Items editing tool is that you cannot change the order of the items once you've entered them. Each item that is added will appear BEFORE the item that you added last. d. Formatting text 1) Click on the Section Introduction title (e.g., Community Assessment 2) The editing toolbar above the textbox will help you format headers and body text. 3) A sans serif font such as Verdana or Arial is recommended. Serif fonts like Times are difficult to read onscreen. 4) Size "2" text seems to work for body text and size "3" for headers. 5) Cutting and pasting from word, PPT, etc. can sometime be an issue. If you find that your text can't be formatted once you cut and paste, try using an interim step to get rid of all formatting. You can use a text document to help you o Open a text document on your desktop o Copy and paste the test you want to use into it o Then copy the text in the text document and paste it into your editing box in the site. e. Images 1) To add images to your page, click on "Images" in the left hand toolbar. 2) Images MUST be .jpg or .gif files

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3) You can add captions to the images. 4) Be sure to indicate how you want the images positioned (left, right or alternating). f. Sidebars Promote, promote, promote! Use the sidebars for quotes you love, comments professors or your CAFs have made about your work, presentations your have made, awards your have won, etc. 1) Click on the "Sidebar" tool in the left hand side toolbar 2) You can give your sidebar a title if you want, but you don't have to. 3) Enter and format text in the editing box. 4) To add an image click on "Manage Images" 5) Browse for your image and upload it g. Adding links 1) You can link to pages within your site OR to outside sites. 2) There are three different places you can add links in your site: o Within the text (body of a page or a sidebar) Highlight the word or words you want to people to click on to link to a particular site. Click on the GLOBE ICON w/ Paperclip in the text editing toolbar Find the page you want to link to and copy the web address Click back in the box to add the web address, delete the http:// that appears and paste the web address you want. o Images (main page or sidebar) When you upload an image either to the body of a page or to a sidebar, you will be able to add a link to the image if you choose to. Find the page you want to link to and copy the web address. Add the web address to the "Link" section under the image. Be sure to choose the "Target" you want--do you want to have the link open in a new window or in the same one you're in. Often it's better to have a new window open so people don't lose their place in your site while they look at another site. This option is ONLY available with images. Linking in the text will only open the link in the same window. If you know HTML, you can change this in the code. o "Related Links" in the left hand side toolbar (links will appear at the bottom of the page) Click on the "Related Links" tool in the left hand toolbar. Add a link Input the relevant information Link will appear at the bottom of the page.

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h. Making PDFs 1) Most Microsoft Office programs will give you an option to save your documents (.doc, .ppt, .xls) as PDFs. To do this, go to "File" then "Save As" PDF. Often there is an icon on the toolbar (the Adobe PDF symbol) that will allow you to directly convert your document to a PDF. 2) If your software does not have either of these options, you can download a free PDF converter software from www.pdf995.com. Please see the Useful Sites section of this handbook under Resources. i. Adding documents 1) Word, PDFs, PPT o Click on the "Manage Document" tool in the left hand toolbar o Browse for and upload your document o Add title and description 2) Audio o Audio files can ONLY be added to the bottom of the page. o The ideal file for audio is an .mp3 file because it is the smallest file type o Click on the "Audio" tool in the left hand toolbar o Browse for and upload the file o Add title and description 3) Video o Video files can ONLY be added to the bottom of the page. o Click on the "Video" tool in the left hand toolbar o Browse for and upload the file o Add title and description 3. Editing Competency Evidence Page Community Assessment Evidence a. Follow the same steps as above to edit the Evidence section b. Be sure to include all recommended sections as outlined in the Guidelines document.

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6. EFOLIO EVALUATION & GRADING The Efolio will be evaluated both by your peers as a mid-term review and by the department as a final review. a. PEER REVIEW PROCESS During the second semester of Year 3, in early February, you will be able to participate in a mid-term Peer Review of each other's Efolio sites. This review process has been invaluable to students in creating their Efolios. It provides the opportunity to experience other students' sites, develop a deeper understanding of each other's work, and model best practices, good ideas, and creative content. For the Peer Review process, you will be partnered with one other student in your cohort. You will each review each other's Efolios following an evaluation tool that will be provided to you. The review process will include both quantitative and qualitative evaluation measures and will take place over the period of about two weeks, providing ample time to review each site and give substantive feedback. It is important that you complete as much of your Efolio as possible for the Peer Review. This process will be a gauge for where each student is in the Efolio process. The last semester of the program will be much easier if you have continued to work on your Efolio consistently throughout the program. It is important that you enter the Peer Review process with the majority of your site completed. Ideally, the following sections should be nearly finished: · · · Introduction Professional Mission Statement Competencies in Public Health o Community Assessment o Program Planning o Implementing Community HED Programs o Evaluating Community HED Programs o Embracing Diversity o Two other competencies of your choice Community Based Experience Leadership Resume

· · ·

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b. FINAL GRADING PROCESS The Efolio is assessed upon completion in the students' last semester of the program. It is evaluated through both quantitative and qualitative measures. The following rubric reflects the evaluation process for the 2006 Cohort Efolios. Please note that, in the final grading process, you will receive a score for each competency you complete. This rubric is subject to change for the upcoming graduating cohort. Updated criteria will be provided as it becomes available. Quantitative Measures

E-folio Component

Competencies Good personal reflection and critical Excellent personal reflection and understanding of competency critical understanding of competency All evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; all relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached Most evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; most relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached Average personal reflection and critical understanding of competency

Criteria

Scoring Guidelines

3 2 1

Reflective Statement

Evidence of personal reflection and critical understanding of competency

Evidence of Competence

Relevant and quality evidence presented for competencies with documents attached.

Some evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; few relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached

Specific Site Content

Introduction

Organized, clear and concise introduction

Introduction is clear and concisely communicates intention of efolio

Introduction is mostly clear and generally communicates intention of efolio

Introduction is somewhat clear and somewhat communicates intention of efolio

Mission Statement

Organized, clear and concise mission statement

Mission statement is is wellorganized, clear and concise

Mission statement is mostly wellorganized, clear and concise

Mission statement is somewhat wellorganized, clear and concise

Community Based Experience

Well-developed presentation of specific Excellent, clear, and dynamic community-based experience complete relfection of community-based with relfective statement and evidence experience.

Relfection of community-based experience is mostly clear and dynamic.

Relfection of community-based experience is somewhat clear and dynamic.

Culminating MPH Project Relevant and quality evidence presented for competencies with documents attached. Reflection cpatures and effectively articluates essential learnings from project All evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; all relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached Most evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; most relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached Some evidence presented is relevant to the competency and of high quality; few relevant documents (reports/PPT) attached Reflection is of fair quality and somewhat reflects essential learnings

Evidence

Reflection

Reflection is of high quality and Reflection is of good quality and 83 effectively reflects essential learnings mostly reflects essential learnings

E-folio Component

Structure

Criteria

Scoring Guidelines

3 2 1

Organization of efolio content

Evidence and content is presented in a All content is well-organized and logical order and navigation is easy to navigation is seamless and logical follow Content on site reflects strong writing and grammatical skills

Most content is well-organized and Some content is well-organized and navigation is generally seamless and navigation is partially seamless and logical logical

Writing skills Appearance/ Look & Feel

Overall, content in site is mostly well- Overall, content in site is somewhat Overall, content in site is well-written written with few (2-5) grammatical well-written with some (6-9) with no (0-1) grammatical errors errors grammatical errors

Visual appeal & Presentation

Site displays an excellent overall Site is dynamic and displays a balance balance between text and media; a between text and media (images, strong use of multimedia and/or quotes, graphics, sidebars etc.) graphics; effective use of quotes; and is dynamic and interesting. Content and evidence presented in the Serious commitment efolio reflect a commitment to the profession of public health

Site displays a good overall balance between text and media; a good use of multimedia and/or graphics; some quotes; and is mostly dynamic and interesting. Good commitment

Site displays an average overall balance between text and media; an average use of multimedia and/or graphics; few quotes; and is somewhat dynamic and interesting. Average commitment

Commitment to the profession

Qualitative Measures You will receive qualitative feedback on all the sections listed above in addition to being scored on each section.

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7. RESOURCES a. TIPS & TRICKS FOR BUILDING YOUR EFOLIO Here are some tips & tricks to help you create a fabulous efolio! We encourage you to share your own tips & tricks with each other as you go! Getting Started · Check out past efolios and other resources for ideas · Make a storyboard · Create a master text document Files & Things · Organize your files in a directory (folders with documents & images) · Make PDFs of your final presentations and reports · Images must be either .jpg or .gif files · Audio clips must be .mp3 files · File size is very important--there is limited space on the site Organizing the Site · Arrange navigation to emphasize your best work--direct users where you want them to go · Create balance--not too content heavy, not too image heavy · Use what's relevant--distill your content into the essentials Content, Content, Content · Be concise & to the point--avoid scrolling pages · Provide good, relevant information but don't overwhelm readers Formatting · Formatting in the efolio tool can be challenging · Do all formatting INSIDE the tool; do not copy and paste text that has already been formatted in Word · If copying text from Word isn't working, try pasting text into the notepad on your computer to clear all formatting the text may have. Promote, Promote, Promote · Use links within the site to showcase other efolio sections · Use links outside the site to promote relevant agencies and associated projects · Be creative with sidebars--images, quotes, links, etc.

b. TIPS FOR CREATING A STELLAR ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO

TIPS FOR CREATING A STELLAR ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO 1. Reflect: Reflect on what you're accomplishing in your MPH academic program and in your career, and how it fits with your goals. 2. Collect: Collect evidence for your electronic portfolio. Organize your artifacts (evidence of work: papers, PPT presentations, abstracts, great quotes, digital images, audio/video files) on your computer desktop. SAVE, SAVE. And SAVE your digital files not only on your computer ,but also keep another copy on CD, USB, and even in your Efolio. 3. Select: The portfolio highlights your best work. TIP: Create folders for each competency/section of the portfolio on your computer. Drop relevant evidence into each folder. Then, when you are online working on your portfolio, you can easily select the documents that are most pertinent to your EFolio. 4. Build: Build your site using the Efolio software. Along with evidence of your work, be creative--include quotes and images! Look at other Efolios for ideas and inspiration. 5. Publish: Publish your portfolio and share it with you MPH faculty, the communities your serve, your family and friends, and potential employers. You can give your URL to anyone you like to see your work. When completed, the Efolios will be listed with search engines like Google. After you complete the program, and you Efolio has been graded, you can continue to update and change your site. MORE TIPS... Keep track of your user name and password. Bookmark your URL (http://yourname.sfsu.myefolio.com/admin) As you work on your site with the Efolio software, make note of the online help feature. MAC Users: To get fully functional within Efolio, you will need OS 10 and Mozilla/Firefox browser. (www.mozilla.com) USEFUL SITES... Efolio Minnesota Showcase: http://efoliomn.com (career links; gallery of portfolios) Google Images: www.google.com (for finding useful images; download images as .jpgs to your computer; be sure to include photo credits for all images you use that are NOT your own) Photo Resizing: www.resize2mail.com (resize your photos online; images only need to be 72 dpi for the web)

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c. EFOLIO SITE MANAGEMENT GUIDE

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d. ALUMNI STUDENT EFOLIO SITES Here's a list of all the MPH Efolios that have been created to date. Please note that the requirements for the Efolio presented in this handbook are significantly different than what was give to the 2005 cohort. Use these sites as a reference, but please follow the requirements outlined in the handbook. 2005 Cohort http://alitaalee.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://kristinaahmed.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://jessicabowen.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://scottbrown.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://meghanclouse.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://anamariaespinosarydman.sfsu.myefolio.com http://tamragroode.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://jenniferlee.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://rachelpoulain.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://estelleschneider.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://jasonvaudrey.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://donnawillmott.sfsu.myefolio.com/ http://belindawong.sfsu.myefolio.com/ 2006 Cohort http://nabilalsoufi.sfsu.myefolio.com http://johnbanagan.sfsu.myefolio.com http://katherinebrown.sfsu.myefolio.com http://mylenecahambing.sfsu.myefolio.com http://sahrucowans.sfsu.myefolio.com http://amandacue.sfsu.myefolio.com http://lindadewitt.sfsu.myefolio.com http://katherinehawksworth.sfsu.myefolio.com http://jenhult.sfsu.myefolio.com http://maurissakoide.sfsu.myefolio.com http://normalisenko.sfsu.myefolio.com http://catherinemagee.sfsu.myefolio.com http://shelbymcmillan.sfsu.myefolio.com http://ingridochoa.sfsu.myefolio.com http://juancarlospalacios.sfsu.myefolio.com http://lisafujieparks.sfsu.myefolio.com http://albertoperezrendon.sfsu.myefolio.com http://rubyturalba.sfsu.myefolio.com http://shawnawhitney.sfsu.myefolio.com

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e. USEFUL WEBSITES Efolio Help Sites · · · · Avenet website (Efolio software company): www.avenetefolio.com Efolio Customer FAQs: http://efolio.custhelp.com Efolio HELP site: http://help.myefolio.com/ Efolio Minnesota Showcase: http://efoliomn.com (career links; gallery of portfolios)

PDF Sites · · Overview of PDFs: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portable_Document_Format PDF 995 (software to create PDFs for free): http://www.pdf995.com/

Resources · Google Images: www.google.com (for finding useful images; download images as .jpgs to your computer; be sure to include photo credits for all images you use that are NOT your own) Photo Resizing: www.resize2mail.com (resize your photos online; images only need to be 72 dpi for the web) Mozilla www.mozilla.com (this is the IDEAL web browser for the EFolio for both MAC and PC; Internet Explorer can work with PC, but this one is better.)

· ·

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f. EFOLIO BIBLIOGRAPHY Barrett, H. (1998). Strategic questions: What to consider when planning for electronic portfolios. Learning & Leading with Technology 26(2), 6­13. Retrieved Jan. 5, 2006 from: www.iste.org/L&L/archive/vol26/no2/feature/index.html. Barrett, H. (1999). Using technology to support alternative assessment and electronic portfolios [Online document]. Anchorage: University of Alaska Anchorage. Retrieved Jan. 5, 2006 from: http://transition.alaska.edu/www/portfolios.html. Batson, Trent. "The Electronic Portfolio Boom: What's it All About?" Syllabus 16, no.5 (2002): 14-17 Cambridge, D. (2005) "e-Folio for Life-Long, Life-Wide Learning: Research Results". Minnesota State Colleges and Universities. Retrieved May 5, 2006 from:http://www.efoliominnesota.com/index.asp?Type=B_PR&SEC={4FFD14BC-BE504B27-BB57-314A464DFFF5}&DE={47D6DD49-C697-4F5D-8B63-ED85A05C5C99} Danielson, C., & Abrutyn, L. (1997). An introduction to using portfolios in the classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Retrieved Feb.10, 2006 from: http://www.ascd.org/portal/site/ascd/template.book/menuitem.ccf6e1bf6046da7cdeb3ffdb621 08a0c/?bookMgmtId=b58564597dcaff00VgnVCM1000003d01a8c0RCRD Lorenzo, G. & Ittelson, J. (2005). An Overview of Electronic Portfolios. Educause, Article ELI3001. Retrieved May 1, 2006, from: http://www.educause.edu/LibraryDetailPage/666?ID=ELI3001 McKenzie, J., Cleary, M., McKenzie, B. & Stephen, C. (2002). E-Portfolios: Their creation and use by pre-service health educator. The International Electronic Journal of Health Education. 4, 79-83. www.iejhe.org National Learning Structure Initiative E-Portfolio Overview (2003). Retrieved from: http://www.educause.edu/E-Portfolios/5524 Treuer, P. & Jensen J. (2003) "Setting Standards for Electronic Portfolios: a Broader Vision for Educational Revolution", EDUCAUSE Quarterly, Vol. 26, No. 2, 2003.

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MPH REFLECTIVE SEMINARS HED 890.01, 890.02, 890.03

For five of the six semesters in the MPH program, students enroll in a one unit course, HED 890, MPH Reflective Seminar. The Reflective Seminar meets five afternoons per semester for three hours. Example: Year One Fall/Spring Year Two Spring Year Three Fall/Spring

HED 890.01 HED 890.02 HED 890.03 (only one semester)

Each Reflective Seminar is for you to strengthen your ties and trust as members of a class cohort. Towards this end, trust building exercises and activities are built into the seminar. Time is made in the Reflective Seminar for major cohort issues that may arise. The goal of the Reflective Seminar is to build leadership skills and serves to strengthen and nurture each class cohort through experiential learning activities and group reflection. In the first semester of the MPH, the focus in the Reflective Seminar is to develop an understanding of our ecological perspective on health address both the personally and social determinants. Additionally, the students are exposed to the social justice framework that drives our curriculum. In the next semester of the Reflective Seminar the major objective is to deepen students understanding of group dynamics. The focus here is on developing the ability to work effectively in groups, build team skills and resolve conflict. This seminar will serve to facilitate the process of team building in the community practice and strengthen the functioning of each class cohort. In the following two semesters the Reflective Seminar develops personal leadership skills involving professional mission statements, public speaking, critical thinking and others needs as they emerge from the student cohort. Finally, the Reflective Seminar is where the "nuts and bolts" of the MPH get presented and discussed. Issues such as the team assignments, internship, course work, portfolio development are discussed and clarified.

REQUIREMENTS and GRADING 1. Students are required to attend each seminar.

Enrollment by Gator Reg Web Registration (www.sfsu.edu/student) 1. If you are in your first year of the MPH program you should enroll in 890.01 2. If you are in your second year of the MPH program you should enroll in 890.02 3. If you are in your third year of the MPH program you should enroll in 890.03

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RESPONSIBILITIES AND COMPETENCIES REQUIREMENTS FOR MPH COURSES

RESPONSIBILITY I: ASSESSING INDIVIDUAL AND COMMUNITY NEEDS FOR COMMUNIY HEALTH EDUCATION Competency A: Obtain Health-Related Data About Social and Cultural Environments HED 820, HED 821 and Growth and Development Factors, Needs, and Interest. HED 825 Sub-Competencies HED 810, HED 815 1. Select valid sources of information about health needs and interests. HED 820, HED 825 HED 840, HED 841 HED 855 2. Utilize computerized sources of health-related information. HED 820, HED 830 HED 895, HED 815 HED 825, HED 840 HED 841, HED 855 HED 892 HED 820, HED 825 HED 830, HED 840 HED 841 HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 840, HED 841 HED 820, HED 831 HED 810, HED 815 HED 820, HED 821 HED 825, HED 830 HED 835, HED 892 HED 810, HED 815 HED 820, HED 825 HED 830, HED 835 HED 892 HED 815, HED 810 HED 820, HED 825 HED 835 HED 815, HED 821 HED 831, HED 841 HED 890 HED 815, HED 820 HED 821, HED 825 HED 830, HED 831 HED 835, HED 840 HED 841, HED 855 HED 810;892

3.

Employ or develop appropriate data-gathering instruments.

4.

Apply survey techniques to acquire health data.

5.

Conduct health-related needs assessment in communities.

Competency B: Distinguish Between Factors That Foster and Those That Hinder Well-Being.

Sub-Competencies 1. Investigate physical, social, emotional, and intellectual behavioral factors influencing health.

2.

Identify factors that tend to promote or compromise health.

3.

Recognize the role of learning and affective experiences in shaping patterns of health, and disease.

4.

Analyze social, cultural, economic, and political factors that influence health.

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Competency C: Infer Needs for Community Health Education on the Basis of Obtained Data Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze needs assessment data. 2. Determine priority areas of need for community health education.

HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 845, HED 892 HED 820, HED 831 HED 820, HED 821 HED 835

Competency D: Determine Factors That Influence Learning and Development Sub-Competencies 1. Assess individual learning styles. 2. Assess individual literacy.

HED 845

HED 821; HED 845; HED 890 HED 821845, HED 840 HED 841

3.

Assess the learning environment.

HED 845, HED 840 HED 850; HED 821 RESPONSIBILITY II: PLANNING EFFECTIVE COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS Competency A: Recruit Community Organizations, Resource People, and Potential HED 830, HED 831 Participants for Support and Assistance in Program Planning. HED 840, HED 841 HED 810, HED 892 HED 895 Sub-Competencies HED 830, HED 831 1. Communicate need for the program to those who will be involved. HED 840, HED 841 2. Obtain commitments from personnel and decision makers who will be involved in the program. HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 892, HED 840 HED 841;HED 895 HED 830, HED 831 HED 810, HED 815 HED 840, HED 841 HED 892 HED 830, HED 831 HED 840, HED 841 HED 835 HED 810, HED 830 HED 831, HED 840 HED 841

3.

Seek ideas and options of those who will affect or be affected by the program.

4.

Incorporate feasible ideas and recommendations into the planning process.

5. Apply principles of community organization in planning programs.

Competency B: Develop a Logical Scope and Sequence Plan for a Community Health Education Program. Sub-Competencies 1. Determine the range of health information requisite to a given program of instruction.

HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 840, HED 841 HED 820,HED 821 HED 830,HED 831 HED 840,HED 841

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2.

Organize the subject areas comprising the scope of a program in logical sequence. Review philosophical and theory-based foundations in planning community health education-programs.

HED 820,HED 821 HED 830,HED 831 HED 892, HED 895 HED 815, HED 820 HED 821, HED 830 HED 831, HED 840 HED 841 HED 810, HED 820 HED 821, HED 830 HED 831, HED 835 HED 815,HED 820 HED 821,HED 830 HED 831 HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 840,HED 841 HED 845 HED 830, HED 841 HED 845,HED 831 HED 840 HED 830,HED 845 HED 831 HED 830, HED 831 HED 845,HED 840 HED 841 HED 830, HED 831 HED 845, HED 840 HED 841,HED 892 HED 895 HED 815, HED 830 HED 831,HED 820 HED 821 HED 845 HED 830, HED 831 HED 840, HED 841 HED 892, HED 895 HED 830,HED 831 HED 845,HED 840 HED 841 HED 840,HED 841 HED 830, HED 831

3.

4.

Analyze the process for integrating effective prevention as part of a broader health care or community health education program.

5.

Develop a theory-based framework for community health education programs.

Competency D: Design Educational Programs Consistent With Specified Program Objectives.

Sub-Competencies 1. Match proposed learning activities with those implicit in the stated objectives.

2.

Formulate a wide variety of alternative educational methods.

3.

Select strategies best suited to implementation of educational objectives in a given setting.

4.

Plan a sequence of learning opportunities building upon and reinforcing mastery of preceding objectives.

5.

Select appropriate theory-based strategies in health program planning.

6. Plan training and instructional programs for health professionals. Competency C: Formulate Appropriate and Measurable Program Objectives.

Sub-Competencies 1. Infer educational objectives facilitative of achievement of specified competencies.

2.

Develop a framework of broadly stated, operational objectives relevant to a proposed community health education program.

Competency E: Develop Community Health Education Programs Using Media HED 810, HED 815 Advocacy Principles. RESPONSIBILITY III: IMPLEMENTING COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS Competency A: Exhibit Competency in Carrying Out Planned Educational Programs. HED 821, HED 831 HED 841, HED 845 HED 892,HED 895

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Sub-Competencies 1. Employ a wide range of educational methods and techniques.

HED 845, HED 830 HED 831, HED 840 HED 841, HED 892 HED 895 HED 845, HED 821 HED 831, HED 840 HED 841, HED 890 HED 892, HED 895 HED 821, HED 831 HED 841, HED 845 HED 830, HED 845 HED 845,HED 831 HED 841 HED 845, HED 895 HED 831 HED 845, HED 895 HED 810, HED 815 HED 820, HED 830 HED 840 HED 845, HED 821 HED 831, HED 841 HED 892 HED 845, HED 841 HED 895 HED 845, HED 895 HED 845, HED 810 HED 845 HED 845, HED 810 HED 845,HED 821 HED 831, HED 841 HED 850 HED 845, HED 810 HED 815, HED 810 HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 840, HED 841 HED 892, HED 895 HED 840,HED 841

2.

Apply individual or group process methods as appropriate to given learning situations.

3.

Utilize instructional equipment and other instructional media effectively.

4. 5.

Select methods that best facilitate practice of program objectives. Assess, select, and apply technologies that will contribute to program objectives. Develop, demonstrate, and model implementation strategies.

6.

7. 8.

Deliver educational programs for health professionals. Understand community organization principles that guide and facilitate community development.

Competency B: Infer Enabling Objectives as Needed to Implement Instructional Programs in Specified Settings. Sub-Competencies 1. Pretest learners to ascertain present abilities and knowledge relative to proposed program objectives. 2. Develop subordinate measurable objectives as needed for instruction.

Competency C: Select Methods and Media Best Suited to Implement Program Plans, for Diverse Populations. Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze learner characteristics, legal aspects, feasibility, and other considerations I influencing choices among methods. 2. Evaluate the efficacy of alternative methods and techniques capable of facilitating program objectives. Determine the availability of information, personnel, time, and equipment needed to implement the program for a given audience. Critically analyze technologies, methods, and media for their acceptability to diverse groups. Apply theoretical and conceptual models from community health education and related disciplines to improve program delivery. Competency D: Monitor Educational Programs and Adjust Objectives and Activities as Necessary. Sub-Competencies 1. Compare actual program activities with the stated objectives.

3. 4.

HED 840 , HED 841

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HED 840, HED 841 2. 3. Assess the relevance of existing program objectives to current needs. Revise program activities and objectives as necessitated by changes in learner needs. HED 840, HED 841 HED 840, HED 841 Appraise applicability to resources and materials relative to given educational objectives. RESPONSIBILITY IV: EVALUATING EFFECTIVENESS OF CHE PROGRAMS COMPETENCY A: DEVELOP PLANS TO ASSESS ACHIEVEMENT OF PROGRAM OBJECTIVES. Sub-Competencies 1. Determine standards of performance to be applied as criteria of effectiveness. 2. Establish a realistic scope of evaluation efforts.

HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 820, HED 825 HED 840, HED 841 HED 820, HED 825 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 830, HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895

3.

Develop an inventory of existing valid and reliable tests and survey instruments. Select appropriate methods for evaluating program effectiveness.

4.

5.

Identify existing sources of health-related databases.

6.

Evaluate existing data-gathering instruments and processes.

7.

Select appropriate qualitative and/or quantitative evaluation design.

8.

Develop valid and reliable evaluation instruments.

Competency B: Carry Out Evaluation Plans Sub-Competencies 1. Facilitate administration of the tests and activities specified in the plan.

2.

Utilize data-collecting methods appropriate to the objectives.

3.

Analyze resulting evaluation data.

4.

Implement appropriate qualitative and quantitative evaluation techniques. Apply evaluation technology as appropriate.

5.

Competency C: Interpret Results of Program Evaluation

Sub-Competencies 1. Apply criteria of effectiveness to obtained results of a program.

HED 840 , HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895

2.

Translate evaluation results into terms easily understood by others.

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3.

Report effectiveness of educational programs in achieving proposed objectives.

HED 840, HED 841 HED 895, HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 HED 840,HED 841 HED 895

4.

Implement strategies to analyze data from evaluation assessments.

5.

Compare evaluation results to other findings.

6.

Make recommendations from evaluation results.

Competency D: Infer Implications From Findings for Future Program Planning Sub-Competencies l. Explore possible explanations for important evaluation findings. 2. Recommend strategies for implementing results of evaluation. 3. Apply findings to refine and maintain programs.

HED 840, HED 841 HED 895 RESPONSIBILITY V: COORDINATING PROVISION OF COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION SERVICES Competency A: Develop a Plan for Coordinating Community Health Education HED 830, HED 831 Services 4 Use evaluation findings in policy analysis and development. Sub-Competencies 1. Determine the extent of available community health education services. 2. Match community health education services to proposed program activities. HED 820, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 820, HED 830

HED 830, HED 831

3. Identify gaps and overlaps in the provision of collaborative health services. Competency B: Facilitate Cooperation Between and Among Levels of Program Personnel. Sub-Competencies l. Promote cooperation and feedback among personnel related to the program.

HED 810, HED 850 HED 890 HED 810, HED 850 HED 890

2. 3.

Apply various methods of conflict reduction as needed.

Analyze the role of health educator as liaison between program staff and outside groups and organizations. COMPETENCY C: FORMULATE PRACTICAL MODES OF COLLABORATION AMONG HEALTH AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS. Sub-Competencies l. Stimulate development of cooperation among personnel responsible for community health education programs.

HED 821, HED 831 HED 841, HED 890 HED 810 HED 850, HED 810 HED 850, HED 821 HED 831, HED 841

HED 850

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2.

Suggest approaches for integrating community health education within existing health programs. Develop plans for promoting collaborative efforts among health agencies and organizations with mutual interests.

HED 850, HED 845

3.

HED 850, HED 830 HED 831, HED 840 HED 841 HED 810, HED 821 HED 831, HED 841 HED 892 HED 845

4.

Organize and facilitate groups, coalitions, and partnerships.

Competency D: Organize In-Service Training Programs for Teachers, Volunteers, and Other Interested Personnel, Sub-Competencies l. Plan an operational, competency-oriented training program. 2. Utilize instructional resources that meet a variety of in-service training needs. Develop plans for promoting collaborative efforts among health agencies and organizations with mutual interests.

HED 845 HED 845

3.

HED 850

HED 845, HED 892 Facilitate collaborative training efforts among health agencies and organizations. RESPONSIBILITY VI: ACTING AS A RESOURCE PERSON IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION HED 829, HED 821 COMPETENCY A: UTILIZE COMPUTERIZED HEALTH INFORMATION HED 825, HED 850 RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS EFFECTIVELY HED 855 4. Sub-Competencies l. Match an information need with the appropriate retrieval system. 2. Access principal on-line and other database health information resources. HED 821, HED 825 HED 855 HED 815, HED 820 HED 821, HED 825 HED 829, HED 830 HED 831, HED 835 HED 855 HED 820, HED 821 HED 825, HED 830 HED 835, HED 855 HED 815, HED 820 HED 825, HED 830 HED 840, HED 855 HED 855 5. Assist in establishing and monitoring policies for use of Data-gathering practices.

3.

Select a data system commensurate with program needs.

4.

Determine relevance of various computerized health information resources.

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COMPETENCY B: ESTABLISH EFFECTIVE CONSULTATIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH THOSE REQUESTING ASSISTANCE IN SOLVING HEALTH-RELATED PROBLEMS. Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze parameters of effective consultative relationships 2. Describe special skills and abilities needed by health educators for consultation activities.

HED 845, HED 831

HED 845, HED 831 HED 845 HED 831

HED 850 3. 4. Formulate a plan for providing consultation to other health professionals. HED 845 Explain the process of marketing community health education consultative services.

HED 845, HED 810 Apply networking skills to develop and maintain consultative relationships. RESPONSIBILITY VII: COMMUNICATING HEALTH AND COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION NEEDS, CONCERNS, AND RESOURCES Competency A: Interpret Concepts, Purposes, and Theories of Community Health HED 815 Education. Sub-Competencies 1. Evaluate the state of the art of community health education. HED 810,HED 815 5. 2. 3. Analyze the foundations of the discipline of community health education. Describe major responsibilities of the health educator in the practice of community health education. HED 810,HED 815 HED 815, HED 830 HED 815, HED 821 HED 830, HED 831 HED 841 HED 815 HED 810 HED 835 HED 855 HED 892 HED 810 HED 815 HED 811, HED 835 HED 840 HED 810, HED 815 HED 811 HED 821 HED 831, HED 835 HED 841, HED 892 HED 895

ARTICULATE THE HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL BASES OF COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION. Competency B: Understand the Impact of Societal Value Systems on Public Community Health Education Programs. Sub-Competencies 1. Investigate social forces causing opposing viewpoints regarding community health education needs and concerns.

2.

Employ a wide range of strategies for dealing with controversial health issues.

3.

Analyze social, cultural, demographic, and political factors that influence decision makers.

HED 892, HED 810 HED 811 HED 815 HED 830 HED 835 HED 840 HED 850 HED 811 HED 815 HED 820, HED 825 HED 835, HED 855 HED 810 HED 892 HED 815, HED 821 HED 831, HED 835 HED 841 HED 845

4.

Understand the future community health needs based upon societal changes.

5.

Understand challenges to community health programs.

Competency C: Select a Variety of Communication Methods and Techniques in

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Providing Health Information. Sub-Competencies 1. Utilize a wide range of techniques for communicating health and community health education information. 2. Demonstrate proficiency in communicating health information and community health education needs. Demonstrate both proficiency and accuracy in oral and written presentations. HED 845, HED 810 HED 821, HED 831 HED 841, HED 895 HED 821, HED 831 HED 835, HED 841 HED 845, HED 895 HED 810, HED 825 HED 855

3.

HED 821, HED 835 HED 841, HED 845 HED 895, HED 810 HED 825, HED 855 RESPONSIBILITY VIII: APPLY APPROPRIATE RESEARCH PRINCIPLES AND METHODS IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION HED 815, HED 810 COMPETENCY A: CONDUCT THOROUGH REVIEWS OF LITERATURE HED 820, HED 825 HED 830, HED 895 HED 840, HED 850 Sub-Competencies HED 815, HED 820 1. Employ electronic technology for retrieving references. HED 830, HED 810 HED 855, HED 895 2. Analyze references to identify those pertinent to selected community health education issues or programs. HED 815 HED 820 HED 821 HED 825 3. Select and critique sources of health information. 4. Use culturally sensitive communication methods and techniques. HED 825 HED 815 HED 840 HED 841 HED 835, HED 840 HED 855 HED 815 HED 810 ED 820, HED 825, HED 830, HED 840, HED 892, HED 895 HED 825, HED 829 HED 820, HED 830 HED 840 HED 815, HED 825 HED 829, HED 820 HED 825, HED 830 HED 840 HED 840, HED 841 HED 821 HED 821, HED 831 HED 841, HED 892 HED 895 HED 820 HED 821 HED 830 HED 831

4.

Evaluate the research design, methodology, and findings from the literature.

5.

Synthesize key information from the literature.

COMPETENCY B: USE APPROPRIATE QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Sub-Competencies 1. Assess the merits and limitations of qualitative and quantitative research methods. 2. Apply qualitative and/or quantitative research methods in research designs.

Competency C: Apply Research to Community Health Education Practice

Sub-Competencies 1. Use appropriate research methods and designs in assessing needs. 2. Use information derived from research for program planning.

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3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Select implementation strategies based upon research results. Employ research design, methods, and analysis in program evaluation. Describe how research results inform health policy development. Use research results to inform health policy development. Use protocol for dissemination of research findings.

HED 830 HED 831 HED 840 HED 841 HED 835 HED 835 HED 840 HED 841

RESPONSIBILITY IX: ADMINISTERING COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS Competency A: Develop and Manage Fiscal Resources HED 850, HED 851 HED 835 Sub-Competencies 1. Prepare proposals to obtain fiscal resources through grants, contracts, and HED 830, HED 831 other internal and external sources. HED 850 2. Develop and manage realistic budgets to support program requirements. HED 830 HED 831 HED 850 HED 850 HED 851 HED 850 HED 851 HED 830 HED 831 HED 850 HED 851 2. Recruit, employ, and evaluate staff members. HED 850 HED 851 HED 850, HED 851 HED 890 HED 850 HED 851

Competency B: Develop and Manage Human Resources Sub-Competencies 1. Assess and communicate qualifications of personnel needed for programs.

3. 4. 5.

Provide staff development. Demonstrate leadership in managing human resources.

Apply human resource policies consistent with relevant laws and regulations. Competency C: Exercise Organizational Leadership. Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze the organization's culture in relationship to program goals.

HED 810 HED 890 HED 850 HED 851 HED 810 HED 830 HED 831 HED 840 HED 841 HED 850 HED 890 HED 835, HED 810 HED 850 HED 851 HED 850, HED 851 HED 830, HED 831 HED 850 HED 851

2.

Assess the political climate of the organization, community, state, and nation regarding conditions that advance or inhibit the goals of the program. Understand long-range and strategic planning.

3.

4.

Develop strategies to reinforce or change organizational culture to achieve program goals. Develop strategies to influence public policy.

HED 835 HED 850 HED 851

5.

Competency D: Obtain Acceptance and Support for Programs

HED 810, HED 815 HED 820, HED 830 HED 840, HED 835 HED 835 HED 810 HED

Sub-Competencies 1. Apply media advocacy principles and techniques to achieve program

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goals.

850 HED 851 HED 835 HED 810 HED 850 HED 851 HED 845 HED 850 HED 810, HED 830

2.

Employ concepts and theories of public relations and communications to obtain program support. Incorporate demographically and culturally sensitive techniques to promote programs.

3.

HED 830 HED 831 Use needs assessment information to advocate for community health education programs. RESPONSIBILITY X: ADVANCING THE PROFESSION OF COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION Competency A: Provide a Critical Analysis of Current and Future Needs in Community HED 815, HED 810 Health Education. HED 850 4. Sub-Competencies 1. Relate community health education issues to larger social issues. 2. Articulate community health education's role in policy formation at various organizational and community levels. HED 810, HED 815 HED 835 HED 835, HED 810 HED 815

Competency B: Assume Responsibility for Advancing the Profession Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze the role of the community health education associations in advancing the profession. 2. Participate in professional organizations.

HED 890, HED 895

HED 890 HED 890 HED 895 HED 811, HED 890 HED 851, HED 895 HED 810, HED 815 HED 890 HED 810, HED 815 HED 821, HED 831 HED 835, HED 841 HED 890, HED 892 HED 810, HED 890 HED 810, HED 890

3. Develop a personal plan for professional growth. Competency C: Apply Ethical Principles as They Relate to the Practice of Community Health Education. Sub-Competencies 1. Analyze the interrelationships among ethics, values, and behavior.

2. 3.

Relate the importance of a code of ethics to professional practice. Review and Contribute to a professionally recognized community health education code of ethics.

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PRACTICE-CONJOINED COURSES PRACTICUM

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PRACTICE-CONJOINED COURSES

ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES: COMMUNITY ADJUNCT FACULTY (CAF) AND PRACTICE COORDINATOR

Since the inception of the MPH program numerous public health and community-based organizations have provided a supervised practice experience for our MPH students. For all practice courses HED 821, 831, 841, students will receive grades for team work. Each individual within the team is also assessed, but the major emphasis is on the team. (Table 1: Sample MPH Practice Sites,

Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF) and Project Description)

Assessment criteria for practicum experience are the following: · · · · · · · Work Plan for team each semester Written Agenda for each meeting Meeting minutes for each meeting Relationship with Community Adjunct Faculty and other participants Quality of draft products especially outlines and writing throughout the semester Mock Presentation Final Presentation

Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF) provides feedback to the Practice Coordinator throughout the semester. The practice coordinator attends a minimum of one team meeting each semester, and monitors the team work plan reports through the minutes of team meetings. Throughout the semester the practice coordinator meets with individual teams and/or individual students depending on specific challenges related to communication, accountability and productivity. Roles & Responsibilities of the Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF) · · · · · · MPH credential or other equivalent masters level credential or experience; Appropriate organizational support to mentor and work with a team of MPH students for a year and half; Actual experience mentoring and/or ability to articulate their own experience being mentored; Desire to implement a program or project that contains the elements of assessment, program planning and evaluation; Commitment to meet at the beginning and again at the end of the semester with the MPH Practice Coordinator and other CAF to assess group progress, team work and student learning related to practice; Availability to meet about two hours a week with students throughout the semester as determined in the semester work plan.

To ensure CAF understand the role and the Department's expectations, all receive the following set of expectations. · Lead and facilitate contact with stakeholders and other resources that are required for MPH student success at your agency and/or community.

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· · · · · · · · · · · · ·

Provide opportunities to reflect and discuss in team meetings how their proposed program goal(s) and objectives will work in the "real" world of the practice setting including issues of cultural appropriateness of the intervention and effective team work. Discuss the pros and cons of a variety of possible public health approaches and methods during project development. Discuss issues of individual accountability for team products. Develop and adopt a formal work plan with the student team for the semester which is forwarded to the Practicum Coordinator for final approval by the forth week of the semester. Meet with students on a regular basis, as reflected in the semester Work Plan Help establish communication procedures with the student team and with community stakeholders as appropriate to the goals and objectives of the project and written semester Work Plan (by the 4th week of each semester). Contact, discuss and/or meet with Practice Coordinator to discuss and/or mediate any team or individual negative/harmful dynamics or lack of accountability of team and/or individual members. Guide students on the involvement of the appropriate stakeholders, data collection methods, intervention goals and objectives as well as the methods proposed for evaluation. Review and provide critical feedback on the drafts and the final team document as well as the power point presentation. Attend final presentation and provide feedback to students on their presentation. After the final presentation, conduct a team debrief and provide an evaluation of each student. Provide comments to the Practice Coordinator at the end of the semester giving feedback regarding practice course outline and structure and to provide input for student final grades. Participate in a collaboratory focus group at the end of the three semesters to help assess the effectiveness of the practice-conjoined courses and the skills of the MPH students.

Roles & Responsibilities of the Practice Coordinator The Practice Coordinator works with CAF to support both academic and site project objectives integrating theory, knowledge and practice. The roles of the Practice Coordinator are to: · · · · · · · Assure clear communication and an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of all of the major players--students, CAF, academic faculty and the practice coordinator. Clarify the work plan and the requirements of the syllabus. Facilitate and problem-solve group dynamics. Establish the relationship between the CAF and the academic faculty. Uphold standards and expectations of student work related to the MPH competencies as identified in syllabi. Provide feedback and consultation with student advisors, enriching the student's personal and professional learning objectives. Intervene and establish a process for change if teams cannot be productive and/or CAF cannot fulfill expectations.

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Table 1: Sample of MPH Practice Sites, CAFs, and Project Description

Practicum Sites Location Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF)

Tony Paz, MPH & Jeff Klausner, M.D.

Project Description

STD Tuberculosis Outreach & Prevention (TOPS), Filipino Wellness Project (FWP)

DPH, SF STD Division

Homeless Prenatal Program

Homeless Prenatal Program, SF

Martha Ryan, MPH, RN

SF AIDS Office Transgender Sensitivity Education & Training Program Newcomers Program

DPH, SF

Laura Thomas, MPH

Health Promotion, DPH, SF

Patricia Erwin, MPH,

Bay View Hunter's Point Community Development and Health Prevention

DPH, SF Environmental Assessment Task Force

Virginia Smyly, MPH

Pedestrian Safety Prevention Project Share the Streets Project

Community Health & Prevention, DPH, SF

Michael Radesky, MPH

Child Injury Project Toddler Poisoning Prevention Project Yes, We Can, Asthma Project, Community Health & Development Training Ctr

Community Health & Prevention, DPH, SF

Ginger Smyly, MPH

HED, SFSU,

Vicki Legion, MPH

Latina Mental Health Project

Community Mental Health, SF

Kevin McGirr, MPH, RN

Russian Émigrés Project

Newcomers Program, DPH, SF

Patricia Erwin, MPH

Community Substance Abuse Providers Project

Participatory Research Program, DPH, SF

Alice Gleghorn, Ph.D. & Roni Rucker, Ph.D.

Assessment/focus groups/Filipino population; risk factors; plan is a community based capacity building program. Assessment/focus group/drop-in needs of clients; program plan for drop-in and links to referrals and center counseling and support services. Assessment/focus groups of HIV risk of transgendered population; program plan to establish peer-based services Assessment/focus groups/key informant interviews11/6/2002 of Bosnian immigrant needs SF; develop of a strategic plan for Bosnian community center. Assessment to complete analysis of community survey; program plan related to priorities drug/alcohol abuse & employment opportunities. Assessment/focus groups/ of neighborhood perceptions related to pedestrian concerns; program plan & evaluation to provide environmental aids mitigating risk and increasing safety for pedestrians. Assessment of child injury risk in the home; program plan & evaluation introducing home safety kit. Assessment/key informant interviews to develop an interdisciplinary asthma intervention team in primary health care setting from a hospital clinic. Assessment/key informant interviews of Latina perception of personal and family mental health issues; program plan & evaluation broaden to organize a consumer and provider conference on prevention and mental health. Prog plan for support groups to older Russian women migrés; prog plan & evaluation to initiate support grps focused on depressions & access to hlthcare Assessment phone survey and interviews of substance abuse providers of youth; program plan to integrate youth providers in Providers Advisory Council.

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Practicum Sites

Location

Community Adjunct Faculty (CAF)

Jessica Wolin, MPH and Joshua Bamberger, M.D.MPH, Laura Brainin-Rodriquez, MPH, MS. RD

Project Description

Heroin Overdose Prevention

Population Health & Prevention, DPH, SF

Nutrition/SRO Project

Health Promotion, DPH, SF

Regional Health Disparities Project

Public Health Institute, Oakland

Robert Prentice, Ph.D.

Middle School Prevention Project

Prevention Institute, Oakland

Leslie Mikkelsen, MPH,

WEDGE Public School, HIV Health Promotion Program Team-Up for Youth Project

Collaborative Project, DPH, SF & Unified Public School

Christine Wong Mineta, MPH

Community Sports Organizing Project, Oakland

Jessica Wolin, MPH

Community Adolescent Project

Coleman Children & Youth, SF

Janet Shalwitz, M.D. MPH

Vietnamese Immigrant Project

Newcomers Program, DPH, SF

Patricia Erwin, MPH

Dually Diagnosis Intervention Project

Community Mental Health, SF

Kevin McGirr, RN, MPH

Women's Homeless Project

Mission Neighborhood Resource Center, SF Welcome Back, SF office

Laura Guzman, & Julie Leadbetter Brenda Storey, MSW

Employment Opportunities Project

Assessment, clip board, face-toface survey, of active heroin users; program plan & funding proposal. Assessment, key informant interviews, of adults with families, living in Single Room Occupancy Hotels (SRO); program plan to DPH and coalition partners for intervention and policy changes. Program plan to evaluate priorities regarding health disparities at regional conference; evaluation plan and funding proposal for regional conference. Assessment/focus groups, to introduce an empowerment curriculum in Richmond middle school with emphasis on arts. Assessment/focus groups and key informant interviews, to change the HIV prevention curriculum in schools. Assessment/key informant interviews with youth to link perceptions related to nutrition and physical activity. Assessment/key informant interviews/focus group to assess youth perceptions of health issues. Assessment/key informant interviews with Vietnamese providers of high risk behavior in Vietnamese immigrants Assessment/key informant interviews of dually diagnosed chronically ill (substance abuse and mental health). Assessment/key informant interviews of homeless women who use drop-in services at site. Assessment/key informant interviews of providers to identify opportunities and barriers hiring immigrants with health credentials.

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HED 892: MPH Summer Internship

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HED 892: MPH SUMMER INTERNSHIP GUIDELINES

A summer internship, HED 892, follows the completion of the conjoined courses HED 820/821, 830/831, and 840/841. Unlike the team practicum experience, students complete their internship individually and are self-directing. The process to establish goals and objectives and select a site begins late fall semester in reflective seminar. A supervised field internship involves the placement of the student in a work experience situation. The student is expected to establish written goals to be addressed. A written report, addressing the significance, objectives, methodology, and a conclusion is required. An oral defense of the report may be required by the department. Current employment is not appropriate for an internship site. Vision and Purpose: a. Professional socialization and development of Community Health Educators b. Integration of theory, knowledge, and practice c. Global perspective of urban health education as human rights Length of Time: The MPH summer internship will take place in summer between the 2nd and 3rd years of the MPH. The student is required to spend 200 hours in a work setting with a public health focus. The student, together with the HED 892 instructor and academic advisor, will decide how those 200 hours are scheduled. The expectation is either 40 hours/week for 5 weeks or 20 hours/week for 10 weeks. Supervisory Requirements: Two types of supervisors are involved in the internship: Preceptor: educational and site supervisor. Responsibilities: approve and supervise the educational plan; supervise student on site, approve and supervise the work plan, provide support and guidance for the work, and review of comments. The midterm and final report of work performance is based on the work plan. Instructor: faculty fieldwork supervisor of all interns. Responsibilities: assisting students to secure an internship placement with appropriate supervision and develop a plan (work plan and educational plan); coordinate and oversee internship through monthly contact with the preceptor and intern; conduct site visits, read and evaluate midterm and final reports; assign final grade. Expectations of Students: a) Students will search for a site and develop a preliminary Internship Plan, in the spring semester of the 2nd academic year. Due: By no later than the 2nd Monday of February, students will submit proposal with their first and second possible sites. Following discussion with advisor and instructor, student will: -Select two potential sites: contact name(s), address, phone number -Identify topic, target population, and competencies that will be practiced Due: By no later than the 1st Monday of March spring semester, students will submit to the advisor and instructor a hard copy of the Field Internship Proposal Form. Instructor will 118

communicate with students to approve final selection of site (one only). Advisor or instructor may identify any concerns or questions with student. A site visit between instructor and potential preceptor may be scheduled. Based on the approval of the Field Internship Proposal Form, student will submit Field Internship Agreement Plan. At this point, there is only one site. Due: By no later than the 2nd Monday of April in the spring semester, students will submit a Field Internship Agreement Plan signed by the community site preceptor and the instructor. A copy will be forwarded to the student's academic advisor. Due: By the 2nd Monday of May, any modifications of the Final Internship Agreement Plan will be approved and signed by the community site preceptor and the instructor. A copy will be forwarded to the student's academic advisor. b) Registration for HED 892 is for 4 units of credit/no credit. c) External Funding. Students should not expect to be paid for the internship; they may secure funding for their work through their own strategies and in consultation with advisor and Graduate Coordinator. d) Reports: Students will prepare and submit a midterm report and submit to the site preceptor and the instructor. The reports will summarize achievements relative to the work plan, evaluate learning and professional development against the educational objectives, and where appropriate indicates how the internship will be extended into a culminating experience. See appropriate forms and guidelines in manual. Internship Selection Process Students identify two potential interests and submit them to the Practice Coordinator, during the fall semester of year two. Students submit their preferences based on two criteria: (1) which core competencies they seek to practice such as community organizing, applied research, policy, program planning and evaluation; and (2) what community context and field of interest would enhance their skills related to their professional goals. In the spring semester, students narrow their preferences through conversations with their advisors, the summer internship instructor and by interviewing potential sites. Initially, students investigate sites to find potential agencies, organizations, and/or individuals to match their learning objectives and interests. Students may then also utilize the large pool of potential sites (examples of sites listed in the table below) catalogued with the Practice Coordinator, to support their initial investigation. This pool of potential sites has been developed through requests and recommendations from faculty, potential preceptors, and current and former students. Most sites are located in San Francisco or the surrounding Bay Area, although, there are a few national and international sites. Students will develop a preliminary proposal for two sites (Plan A & Plan B). Instructor reviews and approves one of the two sites as the final site. From the final site approved, students will complete the Field Internship Agreement Plan. The plan that is not selected as the final plan remains as a backup plan. Criteria for Selecting Preceptors 1. Credentials and experience in core competencies, MPH preferred. 2. Experience and interest in mentoring. 3. Support from organization to supervise MPH student for 200 hours. 4. Availability of preceptor during the summer. 5. Provides the direct supervision for student's project. 119

Table 2: Sample HED 892 Summer Internship Projects & Preceptors Site

Board of Supervisors, SF

Project

Investigate, analyze and report findings and recommendation for proposed local legislation to reduce polluting air particulates in SF, Bay View Hunter's Point area. Developed a survey instrument and conducted an assessment targeting physicians in California who use prescription drugs (ADAP) for HIV patients. Program Plan to develop a teen-based case management program. Program plan to develop a high blood pressure community based prevention intervention program targeting African American in San Bernardino County. Conducted needs assessment and made recommendations for selection of trainers, technical support, and outreach to providers who serve prisoners. Develop and pilot test a curriculum on violence prevention with monolingual Chinese parents and caregivers. Developed an assessment tool and proposal to produce a teaching manual on community based harm reduction intervention models for heroin users. Developed the instrument, implemented & analyzed the overall evaluation of a new Summer Institute on sexuality, society & health Developed a speaker training kit on preventing youth violence that focuses on educational strategies for sheriffs and police Focus groups with Filipino gay and bisexual men. Produced story boards and scripts for potential video project; wrote a grant. Designed a support group plan for inmates related to general health risks and practices as well as HIV/AIDS. Conducted a literature search on lesbian health and cancer; assisted in effort to HIV criteria and links to (viral) HIV/cancer. Implement an evaluation of a new summer institute on Sexuality, Society & Health---conducted interviews with faculty and pre-registrants who did not attend the institute. Conducted in depth interviews of African American women who delivered low birth weight babies. Conducted an evaluation of the Smoking Cessation program at SF General Hospital & Community Health Network primary care clinics. Assisted in data collection of data for an evaluation

Preceptor

Greg Asay, Environmental Legislative Aide Michael Reyes, M.D., MPH

UCSF Pacific AIDS Education & Training Center West Bay Filipino Multi-Service Ctr Dept Health Services, Sacto. California Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Harm Reduction Training Institute, Oakland SF DPH Domestic Violence Prevention SF DPH Action Point I Center

Cristina Sprague, MSN Liana Lilanov, M.D. MPH

Delia Garcia, MSW

Nora Goodfriend-Koven, MPH Joshua Bamberger, M.D., MPH

Human Sexuality Studies Program, SFSU Fight Crime: Invest in Kids California, Oakland Filipino Task Force on AIDS SF Forensic AIDS Project Jail Health Services, SF DPH No CA Cancer Ctr, Surveillance Research Department, Union City Human Sexuality Studies Program, SFSU Berkeley Dept. of Public Health SF Tobacco Free Project Health Promotion, DPH SF UCSF Institute for

Caitlin Ryan, MSW

Mary Ann O'Sullivan, JD

Victor Hall, Director

Kate Monico Klein, MSW Christina Clark, Ph.D.

Caitlin Ryan, MSW

Vicki Alexander, M.D. Darlene Bahrs, MPH

Regina Otero-Sabogal,

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Site

Health & Aging

Project

Preceptor

Ph.D. & Joyce Bird, Ph.D. Flo Stroud, MPH

of a culturally related outreach and education program for low-income women of color. Black Women Developed several focus groups to assess the health Organized for Political concerns and action-driven health issues of African Action, Oakland American women. Developed a phone survey instrument and Alameda County & implemented it to a faith-based community to elicit Community Services participation and develop programs on injury Collaboration, Senior Injury Project, Oakland prevention. Human Sexuality Develop & implement an evaluation of a new Studies, SFSU Summer Institute on Sexuality, Society & Health Homeless Prenatal Focus groups and implementation of pilot Program curriculum on child development and parenting class for clients Education & Training Focus groups of consumers for Allies: An Research, Stockton, Integrated System of Care---mental health and CA substance abuse evaluation San Mateo County South SF Community Partnership Project, phone Health Services survey/community health assessment of Agency monolingual Spanish-speaking populations Department of Health Oasis Project: focus groups of teens on interest and Services, STD Branch, knowledge of STD. Piloted a state-wide STD State of CA curriculum in public schools. Mexfam Family planning evaluation (interviews) with Huajuapan de Leon, "Promotoras" on impact of program Oaxaca, Mexico Incorporate and synthesize results of an evaluation Alameda County of a community health assessment; expand DPH, Office of literature search; develop draft of recommendations CommAssessment, for program development Planning & Ed SF DPH Occupational Social Indicators Project/key informant interviews & Environment Health Bay View Hunters Point Community to assess perceived definition of community health Collaborative Projects Latino Day Workers Program Health and HIV with City of Berkeley, assessment/focus groups of health knowledge and risk to HIV DPH & School of Social Welfare, UCB Maxine Hall Health Develop focus groups with diverse faith based Ctr, DPH, SF organization related to African American youth and HIV education & risk behavior National Women's Development of Policy Packet, lupus; lobbying on Health Network issue with Congressional staff & representatives Women's Intercultural Participate in Uganda Circle project, Kampala, Network/California Uganda. Key informant interviews on women's Women's Agenda health, reproductive health, food & HIV.

Mary Louise Zernick, RD,MPH

Caitlin Ryan, MSW Nancy Frappier, MSW

Jennifer Crews Thom, MA Edith Cabuslay, MPH

Amy Smith, MPH

Elizabeth Butrick, MPH

Liz Maker, MPH

Rajiv Bhatia, M.D., Ph.D.

Kurt Organista, Ph.D.

Marcellina Ogbu, MPH & Linda MackBurch, MPH Stephanie Donne Michelle Eddleman, MA

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HED 895: CULMINATING EXPERIENCE (CE) MPH CE GUIDELINES ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-07

TABLE OF CONTENTS WHAT IS THE CULMINATING EXPERIENCE (CE) PROJECT? THE CULMINATING EXPERIENCE COMMITTEE THE SIX P's of the CULMINATING EXPERIENCE . 1. PREREQUISITES Pass HED 892 with a B or better Submit the Graduate Approved Program (GAP) Form Review the SFSU Graduate Division Website and Forms 2. PROJECT DEVELOPMENT Things to Consider Project Categories Table: Categories-at-a-Glance 3. PROPOSAL Proposal for Culminating Experience Form Human Subjects Protocol Proposal Outline Category One Proposal Outline Category Two 4. PROGRESS (INTERIM) REPORT Progress Report Outline 5. PROJECT FINAL REPORT Project Final Report Outline 6. PRESENTATION

REPORT FORMAT GUIDELINES ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF FACULTY AND STUDENTS REPORT OF COMPLETION CE TIMELINE

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HED 895: Culminating Experience (CE) Project Guidelines

WHAT IS THE CULMINATING EXPERIENCE PROJECT? Students will devote most of their third year in the MPH program to developing and completing of the Culminating Experience (HED 895) Project. The purpose of the Culminating Experience is for students to demonstrate mastery of practical skills and professional MPH competencies through application. Students are expected to demonstrate self-direction, leadership, and professionalism in this process. While the summer internship operates under a shared partnership between the student, faculty supervisor and community preceptor, the culminating experience is entirely self-directed. Students will, however, work closely with a culminating experience committee.

CULMINATING EXPERIENCE COMMITTEE The purpose of the CE Committee is to advise and monitor students in the CE process and ultimately approve students' projects. In the fall of their third year, students will be assigned a Culminating Experience Committee, which will consist of the student's faculty advisor as Committee Chair and one other faculty member as second reader. In general, the faculty as a whole will assign one second reader during a faculty meeting early in the fall of students' third year. This process is done systematically so that students are matched with faculty with relevant expertise and interests, and to assure an equitable workload across faculty. Students will receive the timeline and detailed guidelines on the Culminating Experience (CE) in their first reflective seminar in the fall of their third year.

THE SIX P's OF THE CULMINATING EXPERIENCE The Culminating Experience is a year-long process that begins early in the fall semester of the third year. The CE process includes many steps, requirements, and deliverables that could be best understood by thinking about the process as a series of six P's: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Prerequisites Project Development Proposal Progress Report Project Final Report Presentation

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1. PREREQUISITES

Pass HED 892 with a B or Better Typically students complete HED 892: Summer Internship during the summer between their second and third year of the program. Students must pass HED 892 with a B or better before enrolling in HED 895. In HED 892, a `CR' or `credit' grade received for HED 892 is equivalent to a B or better. At the close of the summer internship, students are required to submit two, one-page proposals describing CE Project ideas. Students are required to format the proposal according to the HED 892 Syllabus and email the proposals to their faculty advisor. Students are also required to provide their advisor with a final copy of the HED 892 Final Report. Students should plan to meet with their advisors early in September to discuss these proposals and make a final decision about the direction of the Culminating Experience. Students may begin to develop the CE Proposal after meeting with their advisor.

Submit the Graduate Approved Program (GAP) Form The GAP form should have been submitted in the Spring of your first year in the MPH program to move you to classified standing. If you have already submitted the GAP form, you do not need to resubmit the form unless there have been significant changes to your original form. The GAP form is available at http://www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy/gap.htm. Please complete the GAP online and print the form to review with your advisor. Refer to the Graduate Student Manual for the Master of Public Health (MPH) in Community Health Education for more information on the GAP. Important Note: Students must have an approved Graduate Approved Program (GAP) and an approved Proposal for Culminating Experience on file with the Division of Graduate Studies in order to register for HED 895: Culminating Experience.

Review the SFSU Graduate Division Website and Forms Students are strongly recommended to review the following websites before beginning the CE process. Familiarizing yourself with these sites helps you anticipate important details, requirements and deadlines.

www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy/culminating-experience.htm www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy/current-form.htm

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2. PROJECT DEVELOPMENT Things to Consider The Culminating Experience project will be developed following a process much like the summer internship. Students are required to develop a project that reflects the mission of the MPH as well as MPH competencies (see mission statement and competencies in the MPH Manual). You are strongly encouraged to develop a project that allows you to practice and deepen one or more of the many MPH core competencies; i.e., health assessment, planning, evaluation, policy development, etc. Also consider how your project fits into the mission of the program, particularly the framework of social justice. It is recommended that students develop a project that expands or continues the work of their summer internship. This process involves discussing possibilities with your HED 892 preceptor before the end of the summer. It is not required that students remain connected to their summer internship sites, preceptors, or projects; however, it is a much easier process as students have already completed a significant amount of research. Students have had very rich and rewarding experiences under both scenarios; however, we recommend that students accurately assess their own readiness before making the choice to move in a new direction. Students are encouraged to seriously consider their professional interests and direction. Many students use the summer internship and the CE as an opportunity to expand their personal interests and/or professional experience. For many students, they have worked in a familiar setting and use this project to "try on" a new interest. Project Categories There are three categories of projects. The organization and content of the proposal and report will vary depending on the category of project you develop. Below are examples of the types of projects. Category One Category One is characterized by the following criteria: researching or the gathering of information from one or more group/s of stakeholders (community members/groups, key informants, etc); selecting and applying appropriate research methods; selecting and applying appropriate sampling methods; managing and analyzing data; and interpreting results. These projects often involve direct contact with community members and for this reason can involve a more time consuming Human Subjects approval process. Category One projects aim to answer key research questions with the purpose of informing future interventions and programs. Examples of Category One projects include, but are not limited to: · Community Health Assessment · Program or Project Evaluation · Public Policy Development and/or Analysis · Theory Evaluation · Environmental Health Assessment · Epidemiological Study Category Two Category Two is characterized by the development of a strategy or intervention to address an unmet public health need previously identified through a research study or community health assessment. Students who conduct Category One projects during their summer internship often continue their work in year three through the development of a Category Two project. Students apply theoretical 125

frameworks and models to guide the implementation of the intervention and are expected to conduct a small-scale evaluation upon implementation. Examples of Category Two projects include but are not limited to: · Curriculum/Course Development · Multimedia Health Education · Advocacy/Media Advocacy · Health Promotion/Protection · Health Education Training · Social Marketing Campaigns · Program Planning/Grant Proposal Category Three Category Three includes projects that students develop in very close cooperation and collaboration with their Committee. Category Three projects are widely varied. For this reason, guidelines in this document may not apply to projects that fall under Category Three. Examples of Category Three projects include but are not limited to: · · · · · Article Publication Theoretical Analysis Community Organizing Community Building Documentary Film

Once the type of project and preliminary project details have been discussed with the faculty advisor, the student is ready to begin developing the proposal.

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Project Categories At-a-Glance

Deliverable

Brief Description

Category One

Category Two

Category Three

Research or assessment projects involving instrument development, sampling, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation. Sample Projects (includes but are NOT limited) · · · · · · Community Health Assessment Program or Project Evaluation Policy Development and/or Analysis Theory Evaluation Environmental Health Assessment Epidemiological Study

Development of strategies or interventions to address an unmet public health need. Involves creative and theoretical approaches to a problem. · · · · · · · Curriculum/Course Development Multimedia Health Education Advocacy/Media Advocacy Health Promotion/Protection Health Education Workshops Social Marketing Campaign Program Planning/Grant Proposal

Widely varied projects developed under close collaboration with CE Committee. · Article Publication · Theoretical Analysis · Community Organizing · Community Building · Documentary Film

Human Subjects Protocol

Early processing recommended. Process can take 4 to 12 weeks for approval.

Early processing recommended. Process can take 4 to 12 weeks for approval.

Early processing recommended.

Proposal Outline (see detailed description on page 130)

Cover Page Description (future Abstract) Introduction and Purpose Problem Statement Literature Review Key Questions Methods -Target Population/Community -Description of Research Methods -Sampling Plan -Data Management/Analysis Plan 8. Workplan 9. References 10. Appendix

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Cover Page Description (future Abstract) Introduction and Purpose Problem Statement Literature Review Process, Impact, Outcome Objectives Methods -Target Population/Community -Intervention Description -Theoretical Application -Evaluation Plan -Budget (if applic.) 8. Workplan 9. References 10. Appendix

To be determined by Committee.

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Deliverable

Progress Report Outline (see detailed description on page 135) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Category One

Summary of Current Status Cover Page Table of Contents Abstract (Draft) Introduction and Purpose Problem Statement Literature Review Key Questions Methods -Target Population -Description of Research Methods -Sampling Methods -Data Management and Analysis Plan 10. Results 11. References 12. Appendix Revision Page Loose Abstract with Student Name and Title 1. Cover Page 2. Dedications/Acknowledgements 3. Table of Contents 4. Abstract 5. Introduction and Purpose 6. Problem Statement 7. Literature Review 8. Key Questions 9. Methods -Target Population -Description of Research Methods -Sampling Plan -Data Management/Analysis 10. Results 11. Limitations 12. Discussion and Conclusion 13. Author's Reflection 14. References 15. Appendix 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Category Two

Summary of Current Status Cover Page Table of Contents Abstract (Draft) Introduction and Goal Problem Statement Literature Review Process, Impact, Outcome Objectives Methods -Target Population/Community -Intervention Description -Theoretical Application -Budget (if applic.) 10. Evaluation Design and Results 11. References 12. Appendix Revision Page Loose Abstract with Student Name and Title 1. Cover Page 2. Dedications/Acknowledgements 3. Table of Contents 4. Abstract 5. Introduction and Purpose 6. Problem Statement 7. Literature Review 8. Process, Impact, Outcome Objectives 9. Methods -Target Population/Community -Intervention Description -Theoretical Application -Budget (if applic.) 10. Evaluation Design and Results 11. Limitations 12. Discussion and Conclusions 13. Author's Reflection 14. References 15. Appendix

Category Three

To be determined by CE Committee.

Project Final Report (see detailed description on page 137)

To be determined by CE Committee.

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3. PROPOSALS Proposal for Culminating Experience Form http://www.sfsu.edu/~gradstdy/forms/895-field-study-or-applied-research.pdf The Proposal for Culminating Experience Form is a one-page fill-in form that must be filed with the Division of Graduate Studies. Your project Description is reviewed by the Division of Graduate Studies to decide whether your proposal requires Human Subjects review. The Description has a 150-word maximum so that it can fit into the space allotted on the CE Form. You will also be asked to include the Title (12 words maximum) of your project. The Description includes the following: 1) Purpose of Study ­ Describe the main purpose of your project in one or two sentences, including the need your project meets and the target population or community. 2) Methods of Data Collection ­ Describe the method, quantitative (survey/questionnaire), or qualitative (interview, focus groups, observations), you will use to collect your data. 3) Sources of Data ­ The description of the source of data here is key because it assists the Division of Graduate Studies in determining whether your Culminating Experience Proposal must undergo full review by the Human Subjects Committee, a process which can take a minimum of 4 to 12 weeks, or if your project is exempt from full review. Generally, if your project involves literature review, public data, or content experts/key informants only, your project will be exempt from human subjects review. 4) Applications ­ Include a brief statement of how your results will be applied or valuable to Public Health.

Human Subjects Protocol Every student submitting a CE Proposal is required to submit a Human Subjects Protocol. For more information, please see the website of the SFSU Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects at http://www.sfsu.edu/~protocol/human.htm This website has all the information you will need to complete the Human Subjects Approval. In addition, you may contact the SFSU Office for the Protection of Human and Animal Subjects at [email protected] or by phone at (415)338-1093 to discuss the nature of your specific project. The Human Subjects Protocol Package includes the following: 1) Protocol Approval Form (see http://www.sfsu.edu/~protocol/human/forms.htm for forms and templates) 2) Protocol Statement ­ template provided under "forms and templates" 3) Consent form(s) ­ templates provided under "forms and templates" 4) NIH Certificate- http://cme.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/learning/humanparticipant-protections.asp Students must demonstrate that they have completed and successfully mastered the online tutorial developed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Human Participant Protections Education for Research Teams. This tutorial responds to the mandate requiring education on human subjects' protection for all investigators who apply for or receive NIH funds for research involving people. Depending on the nature of your project, other documents (such as permission letters, data collection instruments, recruitment materials, etc.) may be required (see http://www.sfsu.edu/~protocol/human/apply.htm for more information). You may review examples of protocols submitted in the past at http://www.sfsu.edu/~protocol/human/docsam.htm.

Proposal Outline (for Category One Projects) I. II. Cover Page Description This is the same as the Description that will be cut and pasted into the Proposal for Culminating Experience form (see above for more information). III. Introduction and Purpose This section briefly describes the context of the project. What is the history that led to the development of this project? Why is this project important? What is the purpose of the project? What is the role of the community partner, if any? Problem Statement The Problem Statement should answer the following questions using relevant statistical resources and information to justify the need and relevance of your proposed project: · What is the problem in terms of who, what, and where? · Why is this a problem for this particular population? · What are the risk factors from an ecological perspective? From a social justice perspective? · Emphasize the particular risk factors that your project plans to address--without directly articulating what you will do. · What existing interventions and/or programs, if any, have been implemented to address this problem? Identify gaps. V. Literature Review A review of the literature is a document that reflects what has been published about a given topic by scholars, researchers, and authors from the popular press. The materials that should be used in such a review of the literature include, but are not limited to: books, journal articles, unpublished manuscripts, published interviews, government documents, census data, etc. It is not, however, a listing of sources in an essay or a description of the facts and statistics related to rates, determinants, risk factor, and consequences. Rather a literature review is a critical appraisal of works published about a particular topic or issue. The literature review analyzes the overall body of literature and synthesizes its meaning to justify the need for your project. Review the following resources below as well as the attached document entitled "Literature Review." Please see the following resources for assistance in writing the Literature Review: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/literature_review.html http://www.utoronto.ca/hswriting/lit-review.htm Garrand, J. (2001). Health sciences literature review made easy: The matrix method. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers. VI. Key Questions Describe the key questions that will guide your research or assessment. 130

IV.

VII.

Methods Target population/community and setting Describe the target group and community as clearly as possible, with attention to sociodemographics such as race, age, gender, socioeconomic status etc. and the setting/social environment of the target group. Also include specifics about how will you recruit this group (include a description of methods of recruitment, sampling methods, and composition of different subgroups if applicable). Description of Research Methods Describe the methods you will use and develop to carry out the project. Sampling Methods Describe the sampling methods you plan to use to recruit your target population. Data Management/Analysis Plans Discuss how you plan to manage and analyze the data.

VIII. Workplan The timeline for your project and major activities associated with your project should help to guide your efforts throughout the CE process. The timeline may undergo some revision throughout, particularly for students who are waiting for Human Subjects Approval before they can begin their research. The timeline should be revisited regularly throughout the CE process to assure that you are staying on track.

IX. References This is your preliminary list of references, formatted according to American Psychological Association (APA) format. If you have any questions about APA format, please see the San Francisco State University (SFSU) Center for Enhancement of Teaching (CET) at http://cet.sfsu.edu/etl/content/citations/ and complete the tutorial "The Citation Challenge: Demystifying APA and MLA." It is expected that the majority of the references in your bibliography will be from peer-reviewed literature, such as scholarly journal articles. This reference list should be developed and expanded between submission of this proposal and submission of the final project. X. Appendix Submit any additional material that should be reviewed, including (in particular) any data collection tools and any tables/graphs relevant to the literature review.

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Proposal Outline (for Category Two Projects) I. II. Cover Page Description This is the same as the Description that will be cut and pasted into the Proposal for Culminating Experience form (see above for more information). III. Introduction and Purpose This section briefly describes the context of the project. What is the history that led to the development of this project? Why is this project important? What is the purpose of the project? What is the role of the community partner, if any? IV. Problem Statement The Problem Statement should answer the following questions using relevant resources to justify the need and relevance of your proposed intervention: · What is the problem in terms of who, what, and where? · Why is this a problem for this population? · What are the risk factors from an ecological perspective? From a social justice perspective? Emphasize the particular risk factors that your intervention plans to address--without directly articulating your intervention. · What existing interventions and/or programs, if any, have been implemented to address this problem? Identify gaps, implicitly justifying the need for your project. V. Literature Review A review of the literature is a document that reflects what has been published about a given topic by scholars, researchers, and authors from the popular press. The materials that should be used in such a review of the literature include, but are not limited to: books, journal articles, unpublished manuscripts, published interviews, government documents, census data, etc. It is not, however, a listing of sources in an essay or a description of the facts and statistics related to rates, determinants, risk factor, and consequences. Rather a literature review is a critical appraisal of works published about a particular topic or issue. The literature review analyzes the overall body of literature and synthesizes its meaning to justify the need for your project. Review the following resources below as well as the attached document entitled "Literature Review." Please see the following resources for assistance in writing the Literature Review: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/literature_review.html http://www.utoronto.ca/hswriting/lit-review.htm Garrand, J. (2001). Health sciences literature review made easy: The matrix method. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers.

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VI. Goal and Process, Impact, Outcome Objectives Describe the overall goal and the specific process, impact, and outcome objectives for the project. VII. Methods Target Population/Community Describe the target group and community as clearly as possible, with attention to sociodemographics such as race, age, gender, socioeconomic status etc. and the setting/social environment of the target group. Also include specifics about how will you recruit this group (include a description of methods of recruitment, sampling methods, and composition of different subgroups if applicable). Intervention Description Describe the HOW of your project. HOW do you plan to reach your objectives? Describe the details of your strategy or intervention. What are the specific activities and tasks that will be carried out to meet your objectives? Who will be involved in the implementation of the project? Make sure that your methods section is critically linked to your problem statement, goal and objectives. Theoretical Application ­ Please discuss how theories of behavioral and social change or models integrating theories of behavioral/social change inform your work ­ How will health education theory and/or models guide your project? Evaluation Plan (if applicable) Describe your evaluation plans. What type of evaluation to you plan to conduct? Who will conduct the evaluation? What will the evaluation measure? Budget (if applicable) What, if any, budgetary need does your project require? Include this in a standard budget format.

VIII. Workplan The timeline for your project and major activities associated with your project should help to guide your efforts throughout the CE process. The timeline may undergo some revision throughout, particularly for students who are waiting for Human Subjects Approval before they can begin their research. But the timeline should be revisited regularly throughout the CE process to assure that you are staying on track. IX. References This is your preliminary list of references, formatted according to American Psychological Association (APA) format. If you have any questions about APA format, please see the San Francisco State University (SFSU) Center for Enhancement of Teaching (CET) at http://cet.sfsu.edu/etl/content/citations/ and complete the tutorial "The Citation Challenge:

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Demystifying APA and MLA." It is expected that the majority of the references in your bibliography will be from peer-reviewed literature, such as scholarly journal articles. This reference list should be developed and expanded between submission of this proposal and submission of the final project. X. Appendices Submit any additional material that should be reviewed, including (in particular) any data collection tools and any tables/graphs relevant to the literature review.

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4. PROGRESS REPORT The Progress Report is an early draft of your CE Project Final Report. You may not have completed data collection and analysis at this point; however, it is important for you to have done substantive work revising your initial literature review, and refining the CE Proposal you submitted in the fall. Begin writing the narrative describing and interpreting your findings as early as possible. In addition, this Progress Report provides you the opportunity to share your work to date with your CE Committee and receive feedback on that work. The Progress Report should also include a summary of current status (see below). All sections are required for both Categories One and Two unless otherwise noted. Summary of Current Status Please summarize in brief your accomplishments to date, any major changes in the focus of your project, including changes to the methods. (These changes should have been discussed with and approved by your CE Committee in advance of submission here). Discuss any challenges you have faced or are currently facing, and outline any lessons learned to date. Assess where you are in your project timeline and anticipated results. I. II. III. Cover Page Table of Contents (Including List of Illustrations and Tables (if applicable) Abstract Revise the Description submitted with the proposal to reflect an appropriately written abstract; include any preliminary findings and the implications of those findings. The following is an excellent resource on abstract writing. http://www.utoronto.ca/hswriting/abstract.htm IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. Introduction and Purpose Problem Statement Literature Review Key Questions (Category One) OR Goal and Objectives (Category Two Methods (Category One) -Target population/community and setting -Description of Research Methods -Sampling Methods -Data Management and Analysis

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Methods (Category Two) -Target population/community and setting -Intervention Description -Theoretical Application -Budget (if applicable) IX. Results and Findings (Category One) It is not expected that this section will be fully developed at this stage. This section should include a report of the results and findings. For example, this is where you report themes that emerged from your analysis of qualitative data (with quotes to illustrate themes), or descriptive and other statistics from your quantitative analyses (with tables or graphs to illustrate these data). Please note: this section is NOT where you interpret your findings, but where you organize and report the central findings from your project. Evaluation Design and Results (Category Two) Describe your evaluation design. Describe evaluation findings to date. To what extend did you reach your objectives and measures?

X. XI.

References Appendices

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5. PROJECT FINAL REPORT It is expected that the sections that were submitted as part of the CE Proposal and Interim Progress Report will have undergone substantial revision and supplementation by the time they are submitted as part of the final report. Revision Page (for Final draft only) Provide a loose page describing in detail, revisions made and corresponding page numbers. These revisions must correspond with prior Committee feedback. Loose Abstract (for final draft) Provide a copy of the abstract on a loose page with student name and title of project. This page is required for Report of Completion to the Graduate Division. PROVIDE FOUR BOUND COPIES TO THE DEPARTMENT (One for each: Faculty Reader Advisor, HED Department, & Graduate Division) I. Cover Page II. Dedication/Acknowledgements III. Table of Contents (Including List of Illustrations and Tables (if applicable) IV. Abstract (250 words maximum; see guidelines for Proposal) V. Introduction and Purpose VI. Problem Statement VII. Literature Review VIII. Purpose and Key Questions (Category One) OR Goal and Objectives (Category Two) IX. Methods (for Category One Projects) -Target population/community and setting -Description of Research Methods -Sampling Methods -Data Management and Analysis Methods (for Category Two Projects) -Target population/community and setting -Intervention Description -Application of Theoretical Framework -Budget (if applicable) X. Results and Findings (Category One) OR Evaluation Design & Results (Category Two)

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XI. Limitations Describe the limitations of your project. What factors may have influenced the reliability or validity of your project?

XII. Discussion and Conclusion This section is where you discuss your findings, and provide insight on their significance. Interpret the findings, and integrate literature as appropriate (to show support for your findings, or discuss how your findings shed new light on phenomena that have been reported in the literature). This section should also include some discussion of the implications of your findings for future public health prevention and intervention strategies. This section should be very brief (one page or less) and should summarize the key learnings from this CE project. XIII. Author's Reflection This is where the student should reflect on the process of conducting the Culminating Experience, including addressing learning experiences, challenges met, and any insights on how this experience has contributed to you personally and professionally. XIV. References (see guidelines for Proposal) XV. Appendices (data collection tools, illustrations, tables, etc.; see Proposal Guidelines)

6. PRESENTATION Prepare a 20-minute presentation, using visual aids (e.g., PowerPoint, transparencies, video, etc.) that convey the essence of the project (purpose OR goals and objectives, methods, findings, recommendations/conclusions, the learning experience, and the implications of the work for public health prevention and intervention). During this session, your faculty committee and audience will have an opportunity to ask you questions and provide constructive feedback about your CE project.

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REPORT FORMAT GUIDELINES

In addition to substantive content and quality, reports will be graded based on the adherence to the following format guidelines. 1) The report should be written according to the most recent edition of The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 2) The report should be single-sided, with standard margins, and standard font and size (12 point). 3) The report should not use 1st person, but should refer to "the researcher" in third person. 4) The report should have subheadings reflecting the major sections required, and to help meaningfully subdivide these sections, especially the methods and the findings sections. 5) Submit at least three bound copies of your Final Culminating Experience Project, including two copies to the Chair of your CE Committee (one will be kept on file for current and future students to peruse) and an additional copy should be provided for every other member of your CE Committee.

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF MPH FACULTY AND STUDENTS

Role and Responsibilities of the Culminating Experience (CE) Chair and Committee · The CE Chair oversees the student's progress and completion of HED 895, including scheduling meetings, addressing student concerns, and assuring that the CE Committee provides feedback to the student in a timely fashion. · The CE Committee provides all students will feedback on the forms required (GAP, CE Proposal Form) and on the CE Proposal, Interim Progress Report, Final Project and Final Presentation. · The CE Committee attends meetings as agreed upon with the student. · The Chair of CE Committee submits a "Report of Completion" for HED 895 and final grade by the deadline. · The student is expected to seek assistance from one of the co-Graduate Coordinators to resolve any problems that are not addressed (or have not been addressed) by the CE Committee. Role and Responsibilities of the Student · The student will submit all forms and reports (including proposal, interim progress report, final report and presentation) to the CE Chair and Committee according to the timeline provided at the beginning of the 3rd academic year.

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· · · ·

The student will attends all meetings with the CE Committee and address all feedback and recommendations of CE Committee members. The student will seek assistance when needed. The student will inform the CE Committee of any significant changes to the CE project, timeline or activities in a timely fashion. The student will seek assistance from one of the co-Graduate Coordinators to resolve any problems that are not addressed (or have not been addressed) by the CE Committee.

REPORT OF COMPLETION Upon completion of your Culminating Experience, a "Report of Completion" must be submitted to the Division of Graduate Studies (ADM 254). The Graduate Coordinator(s) will handle this function, providing the forms to be completed and filing the forms with the Division of Graduate Studies.

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MPH Culminating Experience (CE) Timeline Department of Health Education ACADEMIC YEAR 2006-2007 Deadlines Summer 2006 August October 15th Task Internship 892 (Pass with a B or better) Email two 895 proposals to Advisor/CE Committee Chair Who Student Student Student

9th Submit: GAP form to Graduate Division Proposal for Culminating Experience Form Human Subjects Protocol CE Proposal to Committee 16th Attend CE Committee Meeting for feedback on above items. 23rd Submit: Final GAP form to Graduate Division Final Proposal for Culminating Experience Form Final Human Subjects Protocol Final revised CE Proposal to CE Committee Chair

Committee/ Student Student

Nov thru Jan January

Begin CE Project pending final approval by the CE Committee and the SFSU Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects. 24th Enroll in HED 895 (last day to add is 2/9/07) Chair of CE Committee and Student Check-In Submit Progress Report to CE Committee

Student Student Chair and Student Student Committee/ Student Student Committee/ Student Student Student MPH Coordinator ALL!!

Jan 24 thru Feb 16 March 12th

19th Attend CE Committee Meeting for feedback April 9th Submit Draft of CE Project Final Report and Presentation to CE Committee

16th Attend CE Committee Meeting for feedback on Final Report & Presentation Apr 25th & May 2nd May CE Presentations (Location TBA)

14th Submit Final CE Report to Chair of CE Committee and distribute bound copies to other members of CE Committee 18th CE Report of Completion Form to Graduate Studies (Sent by HED Office) 26th Spring '07 Commencement

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GRADUATION: PREPARATION & COMPLETION OF APPLICATION FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE IN COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION

In addition to the CE requirements for graduation outlined above, students preparing for graduation must complete these tasks: Obtain the Application for Graduation available at the Graduate Division (ADM 254) or at the Student Services Center. Follow instructions provided in the application packet and attach documents as needed. Pay a processing fee to the Bursar's office with the application forms. Meet with program advisor for signature approval. Submit the Application for Award of the Master's Degree to the Graduate Division. Prior to graduation ceremonies and the preparation of the graduate degree certificate, the Graduate Division will review the academic record for completion of established program and university requirements outlined in the SFSU Bulletin. This will include all final grades of the previous and current semesters, as well as the Report of Completion for the internship and culminating experience. If for any reason graduation does not occur for the semester of the application, the student may reapply for the subsequent term in which graduation is anticipated. Please see below for more information on the time limit to complete requirements for graduate degrees. The expectation is that you should be able to complete the requirements for the MPH in three years. Besides this professional expectation, there are specific university regulations that all graduate students should be aware of. Some of the more important ones are enumerated below, but as always, you should carefully read the University Bulletin for all of the pertinent regulations. TIME LIMIT TO COMPLETE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE DEGREES The California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Education, requires that all the requirements for a master's degree be completed within a seven-year period. No more than seven years may elapse between the start of the term of the earliest dated course on the Graduate Approved Program and the date the last course is actually completed and the application for graduation is filed. Most graduate students attending part-time, complete their degrees in 2-3 years. For example, in a 30 unit degree program, taking one, three unit course per semester would lead to degree completion in 5 years. Many students in professional programs must maintain continuous enrollment to complete courses in sequence as required for licensure. Extension of the Seven-year Limit. In unusual circumstances, a candidate may file a Petition for Waiver of the Seven-Year Limit with the dean of Graduate Studies for a one-time extension to complete the requirements for the degree. The outdated course work must be validated by examination or other demonstration of competency in the relevant course or subject field as determined by the major department. The department must provide the student with a statement of support to be submitted with the petition, providing proof of competency in the subject matter as stated above, or establishing requirements for additional course work as appropriate. This statement must also set a final deadline for completion of the degree. Please see: http://www.sfsu.edu/~bulletin/current/gradpol.htm for more information on this policy.

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APPENDICES

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U.S. SCHOOLS OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND OTHER MS AND MPH PROGRAMS

American University (Master's in Fitness Management) Department of Health and Fitness Nebraska Hall--Lower Level 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20016-8037 Phone: (202) 885-6275 Fax: (202) 885-6288 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.american.edu/healthpromotion University of Albany SUNY School of Public Health The Office of Graduate Admissions University at Albany 1400 Washington Avenue Albany, NY 12222 Phone: (800) 440-GRAD or (518) 442-3980 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.albany.edu/sph

Arizona Graduate Program in Public Health (a triinstitutional program through the University of Arizona, Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University) 1501 N. Campbell Avenue, Room 1115A P.O. Box 245033 Tucson, AZ 85724 Phone: (520) 626-3207 Fax: (520) 626-3206 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.ahsc.arizona.edu/pub-hlth

Columbia School of Public Health Office of Admissions The Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health Columbia University 722 West 168th Street, Suite 1030, New York, NY 10032 Phone: (212) 305-3927 Fax: (212) 342-1830 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/sph

Boston University School of Public Health 715 Albany Street, Talbot Building Boston, MA 02118 Phone: (617) 638-4640 Fax: (617) 638-5299 E-mail: [email protected] (Barbara St. Onge, AdmissionsStudent Services) WWW: http://www.bumc.bu.edu/SPH

Emory University Rollins School of Public Health Rollins School of Public Health 1518 Clifton Road NE - 1st Floor Atlanta, GA 30322 Phone: (404) 727-5481 Fax: (404) 727-3956 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.emory.edu/home.html

Southern Connecticut State University Department of Public Health 144 Farnham Avenue New Haven, CT 06515 Phone: (203) 392-6950 Fax: (203) 392-6965 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.southernct.edu/departments/public health/index.htm

George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services 2300 I Street, NW 202 Ross Hall Washington, DC 20037 Phone: (202) 994-2160 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.gwumc.edu/sphhs/

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John A. Burns School of Medicine Department of Public Health Sciences & Epidemiology Office of Graduate Student Academic Services 1960 East-West Road Biomed D-204 Honolulu, HI 96822 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.hawaii.edu/ogsas/ Hunter College Graduate Community Health Education Program Office of Admissions - Hunter College City University of New York 695 Park Avenue - New York, N.Y. 10021 Phone: (212) 772-4490 E-mail: [email protected]

http://admissions.hunter.cuny.edu/~graduate/default.html

University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health Toni Flynn, Admissions Officer, Degrees Programs 171 SPH-PI - 1603 West Taylor Street Chicago, IL 60612-4310 Phone: (312) 413-1151 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.uic.edu/depts/spha/ University of Illinois at Springfield (MPH Program) Public Health Department College of Public Affairs & Administration University of Illinois at Springfield Springfield, Illinois 62794 Phone: (217) 206-6301 Fax: (217) 206-7279 E-mail: [email protected] http://www.uis.edu/publichealth/ University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Department of Community Health 120 Huff Hall MC-588 1206 S. Fourth St. Champaign, IL 61820 Phone: (217) 333-2307 Fax: (217) 333-2766 WWW: http://www.chlth.uiuc.edu/ University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine 1010 N. Kansas, Suite 1300 Wichita, KS 67214 Phone: (316) 293-2627 Fax: (316) 293-2695 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://prevmed.kumc.edu/ Loma Linda University School of Public Health School of Public Health Admissions Loma Linda, California 92350 Phone: (909) 558-4694, extension 88036 or (800) 4224558 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.llu.edu/llu/sph

Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene & Public Health-Bloomberg School of Public Health 615 N. Wolfe Street, Suite E1002 Baltimore, MD 21205 Phone: (410) 955-3543 E-mail: [email protected] and [email protected] WWW: http://www.jhsph.edu/ University of California at Berkeley School of Public Health 140 Warren Hall #7360 Berkeley, CA 94720-7360 Phone: (510) 643-0881 or (510) 643-0881 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://garnet.berkeley.edu/~sph

UCLA School of Public Health Student Services Office UCLA School of Public Health Box 951772 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1772 Phone: (310) 825-5524 E-mail: N/A WWW: http://www.ph.ucla.edu/ Florida International University Graduate Program in Community Health and Preventive Medicine 3000 NE 151st Street, AC I-394 North Miami, Florida 33181 Phone: (305) 919-5877 Fax: (305) 919-5507 E-mail: N/A WWW: http://www.fiu.edu/~phealth

University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences 101 Arnold House 715 North Pleasant Street Amherst, MA 01003-9304 Phone: (413) 545-1303 Fax: (413) 545-1264 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://umass.edu/sphhs

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University of Michigan School of Public Health Office of Academic Affairs 109 Observatory St., 3537 SPH I Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029 Phone: (734) 764-5425 Fax: (734) 763-5455 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.umich.edu/index.html

University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, College of Public Health 1000 Stanton L. Young Blvd. P.O. Box 26901 Oklahoma, OK 73190 Phone: (405) 271-2085 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://w3.ouhsc.edu/graduate/

University of Minnesota School of Public Health Student Services Center 420 Delaware St. SE, Box 819 Minneapolis, MN 55455 Phone: (800) SPH-UofM or 626-3500 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.umn.edu/

Oregon State University Department of Public Health College of Health and Human Performance 120 Women's Building Corvallis, OR 97331 Phone: P. Hanson (541) 737-3825 or (541) 737-2631 Fax: (541) 737-4230 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://oregonstate.edu/hhp/ph/

University of North Florida College of Health University of North Florida Office of Admissions 4567 St. Johns Bluff Road South Jacksonville, Florida 32224-2645 Phone: (904) 620-2624 or (904) 620-1360 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.unf.edu/coh Ohio State University School of Public Health M-120 Starling-Loving Hall 320 West 10th Avenue Columbus, Ohio 43210-1240 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.ohio-state.edu/

Sarah Lawrence College Master's Program in Health Advocacy 1 Mead Way Bronxville, NY 10708-5999 Phone: (914) 395-2373 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.slc.edu/%7Ehealth/index.htm University of South Florida College of Public Health 13201 Bruce B. Downs Blvd. MDC 56 Tampa, FL 33612-3805 Phone: (813) 974-3623 Fax: (813) 974-4718 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.hsc.usf.edu/publichealth/

Wichita State University Department of Public Health Sciences School of Health Sciences College of Health Professions Wichita State University 1845 North Fairmount Wichita, KS 67260-0152 Phone: (316) 978-3060 or (800) 340-7472 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.twsu.edu/~wsucofhp/science.html

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry Department of Community and Preventive Medicine Community & Preventive Medicine 601 Elmwood Avenue Box 644 Rochester, NY 14642 Phone: (716) 275-7882 Fax: (716) 461-4532 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/smd/cpm St. Louis University School of Public Health Saint Louis University 221 North Grand Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103 Phone: (800) SLU.FOR.U E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.slu.edu/colleges/sph

University of Texas at Houston School of Public Health 1200 Herman Pressler Houston, TX 77030 P.O. Box 20186 Houston, TX 77225 Phone: (713)500-9000

WWW: http://www.sph.uth.tmc.edu/

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San Diego State University Graduate School of Public Health Graduate School of Public Health San Diego State University San Diego, CA 92182-4162 Phone: Brenda Fass-Holmes, (619) 594-4492 or (619) 5946317 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/dept/gsph

University of North Texas Health Science Center MPH Program 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd. Fort Worth, TX 76107 Phone: (817) 735-2000 Fax: N/A E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.hsc.unt.edu/

University of South Carolina School of Public Health The University of South Carolina Columbia, South Carolina 29208 Phone: (803) 777-5031 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.sc.edu/

Virginia Commonwealth University MPH Program 1008 E. Clay St. Richmond, VA 23298 Phone: (804) 828-9785 Fax: (804) 828-9773 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://views.vcu.edu/commed

Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine 1440 Canal Street, Suite 2460 New Orleans, LA 70112 Phone: (800) 676-5389 Fax: (504) 584-1667 E-mail: Jeffery Johnson at [email protected] WWW: http://www.sph.tulane.edu/

University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine Box 357230 Seattle, WA 98195 Phone: (206) 543-1144 Fax: (206) 543-3813 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://depts.washington.edu/sphcm/

Yale University Department of Epidemiology & Public Health 60 College St. P.O. Box 208034 New Haven, CT 06520-8034 Phone: (203) 785-2844 Fax: (203) 785-4845 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.info.med.yale.edu/eph

Walden University, Division of Health and Human Services 155 Fifth Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55401 Phone: (866) 4-WALDEN or (612) 338-7224 Fax: (612) 338-5092 E-mail: [email protected] WWW: http://www.waldenu.edu/pv/programs/msph/index.html

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PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES

Organization American Public Health Association Description The American Public Health Association (APHA) is the oldest and largest organization of public health professionals in the world, representing more than 50,000 members from over 50 occupations of public health. The American Red Cross touches millions of people every year. Whether it's offering disaster and emergency relief, teaching lifesaving skills such as CPR and first aid, or collecting and distributing half the nation's blood supply, We'll Be There. You may be providing these services directly to the American public or supporting those who do ­ both roles help further the mission of the Red Cross. Blue Cross (covering hospital care) and Blue Shield (covering physicians' services) Plans were the first prepaid health care coverage in America. Today, both brands represent the full spectrum of health care coverage. With the support of skilled, dedicated employees and the application of public health sciences, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) is committed to protecting and improving the health of all Californians Its mission is to assist health care professionals, health professions schools, care delivery organizations and public policy makers respond to the challenges of educating and managing a health care workforce capable of improving the health and well being of people and their communities. Family Health International (FHI) works to improve reproductive and family health around the world through biomedical and social science research, innovative health service delivery interventions, training and information programs. We work in partnership with universities, ministries of health and non-governmental organizations, conducting ongoing projects in the U.S. and more than 40 developing countries. Genentech, Inc. is a leading biotechnology company using human genetic information to develop, manufacture and market pharmaceuticals that address significant unmet medical needs. Genentech commits itself to the highest standards of integrity in contributing to the best interests of patients, the medical profession and its employees, and to seeking significant returns to its stockholders based on the continued pursuit of excellent science. Non-profit organization whose mission is to end the sexual abuse of children within 5 generations--by fostering survivor leadership in community organizing, public education, and legislative efforts. To promote the health of the world's population by advancing the Department of Health and Human Services' global strategies and partnerships, thus serving the health of the people of the U.S. Website http://www.apha.org/career/

American Red Cross

http://www.redcross.org/jobs/

BlueCross BlueShield Association California Department of Health Services Center for the Health Professions News

http://www.bluecares.com/whoweare/ career.html

http://www.dhs.ca.gov/jobs/index.htm

http://futurehealth.ucsf.edu

Family Health International

http://www.fhi.org/

Genentech, Inc.

http://www.gene.com/gene/careers/

Generation FIVE

http://www.generationfive.org

Global health.gov-- sharing solutions to shared problems

http://www.globalhealth.gov/

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Organization Global strategies on traditional and alternative medicine

Description The World Health Organization (WHO) released a global plan to address issues of global strategies on traditional and alternative medicine. The strategy provides a framework for policy to assist countries to regulate traditional or complementary/alternative medicine (TM/CAM) to make its use safer, more accessible to their populations and sustainable. Real-time career services for students in health promotion. Select only the info you want receive. Learn about great jobs, internships & grad programs the minute they become available. All services for students are free and confidential. The National Academy of Sciences and its associated organizations--the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council-together constitute the most important advisory mechanism for science and technology policy in the U.S., and perhaps in the world. No other government has created a private scientific organization with such a relationship to itself. In recent decades, advice rendered by the Academies, largely through the National Research Council, and by the Institute of Medicine has also exerted increasing influence on universities, businesses, other non-governmental entities, and consumers. Kaiser Permanente is one of the nation's largest managed care providers. We are a working partnership of two organizations: the not-for profit Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, and the Permanente Medical Groups. This integrated approach continues to provide a model for efficient, stable and financially sound managed care. The NIH mission is to uncover new knowledge that will lead to better health for everyone. NIH works toward that mission by: conducting research in its own laboratories; supporting the research of non-Federal scientists in universities, medical schools, hospitals, and research institutions throughout the country and abroad; helping in the training of research investigators; and fostering communication of medical information. The Internet's leading source of nonprofit jobs and career opportunities. Building upon its original mission to educate, the AIDS Foundation added comprehensive services for people living with HIV disease and AIDS and an aggressive public policy component to compel federal and state governments to address the growing epidemic. Located in Northern California's beautiful Bay Area on approximately 8200 acres of pristine land and almost 12,000 people in the Stanford community and one of the largest employers in Silicon Valley. This is the home page of the Human Resources Department, UC Office of the President, providing comprehensive UC human resources news, information, and web site links.

Website http://www.who.int/en/

HPCAREER.NET

http://www.hpcareer.net/

Institute of Medicine/NAS

http://www4.nationalacademies.org/ohr .nsf/

Kaiser Permanente

http://www.kaiserpermanentejobs.org/

National Institute of Health

http://www.jobs.nih.gov/

Opportunity Nocs San Francisco AIDS Foundation

http://www.opportunitynocs.com http://www.sfaf.org/aboutsfaf/jobs/

Stanford University

http://jobs.stanford.edu/

Univ. of CA Human Resources Online

http://www.ucop.edu/humres/

149

REQUEST FOR INDEPENDENT STUDENT TRAVEL FUNDING GUIDELINES

SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY

Students may be funded for independent travel through the Instructionally Related Activities (IRA) fund in accordance with the guidelines and procedures printed below. Student travel will be funded only if the following conditions are met and the request is approved in advance by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. GUIDELINES. 1. The student must be currently enrolled at SFSU. 2. The student must be an active participant in the conference/meeting he/she wishes to attend, (i.e. a presenter of a paper or performer). 3. The student will not be funded if he/she is eligible to receive travel funds to attend the same conference/meeting through any IRA budget (e.g. Forensics, Model UN). 4. No more than $600 will be awarded per student each fiscal year. Funds must be expended in accordance with state travel regulations. PROCEDURES. 1. The student prepares a written statement indicating the name of the conference or meeting, the location and date of the conference/meeting, and the amount of travel funds requested. He/she includes a brief statement indicating how participation in this conference/meeting will enhance his/her educational goals and attaches evidence of his/her participation (such as a letter of invitation or acceptance from the conference/meeting, conference program). 2. The student forwards the request and supporting documents to the Chair of his/her major department. The Chair either endorses the request or denies it based on its adherence to the guidelines stated above and/or its educational merits. If endorsed, the student forwards the request and supporting documents to the Dean of the College. 3. The Dean endorses or denies the request based on its adherence to the guidelines stated above and/or its educational merits. If endorsed, the Dean's office prepares travel request forms for the student and forwards the request and supporting documents to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 4. The VP for Academic Affairs either endorses or denies the request based on its adherence to the guidelines, educational merits, and budgetary restrictions. If approved, travel documents for the student will be returned to the College Office to hold until the student returns from his/her travel and submits the appropriate receipts and travel expense paperwork to receive reimbursement. 5. Following the trip, the student turns in receipts for airline tickets, parking, meal, etc. to the College Office along with a brief written evaluation of the conference/meetings attended and the value of the experience. The College Office then prepares the Travel Expense Claim form and submits it and the student's written evaluation of the conference to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs for processing. For further information, contact Stephanie Schwartz, (415) 338-1142. Vice President for Academic Affairs Revised Summer 2002.

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