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Research

2006 Strategic HR Management

Survey Report

A Study by the Society for Human Resource Management

2006 Strategic HR Management

Survey Report

Shawn Fegley

Survey Research Specialist

SHRM Research

October 2006

This report is published by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). All content is for informational purposes only and is not to be construed as a guaranteed outcome. The Society for Human Resource Management cannot accept responsibility for any errors or omissions or any liability resulting from the use or misuse of any such information. © 2006 Society for Human Resource Management. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. This publication may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in whole or in part, in any form of by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the Society for Human Resource management, 1800 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA. For more information, please contact: SHRM Research Department 1800 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA Phone: (703) 548-3440 Fax: (703) 535-6432 Web: www.shrm.org/research

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2006 Strategic HR Management

Survey Report

Contents

v v v v v 1 2 4 5 22 24 25 29 About This Report About SHRM About SHRM Research About the Author Acknowledgments Introduction Methodology Key Findings Survey Results An HR Prospective A Look Ahead: Strategic HR Management Demographics SHRM Survey Reports

SHRM Research

About This Report In June 2006, the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) conducted the Strategic HR Management Survey, which asked HR professionals to what extent their HR department strategically contributed to the organization and used metrics and analytics to measure specific organizational functions. The survey also looked at potential barriers that limit the ability of HR to more effectively contribute to the organization's bottom line and what organizations can do to develop the strategic HR skills of their HR staff. This report discusses the results of the survey by exploring the differences between HR departments with and without a formal strategic plan in place. Interpretations about current applications and future trends are presented at the end of the report in the sections titled "An HR Prospective" and "A Look Ahead." About SHRM The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is the world's largest association devoted to human resource management. Representing more than 210,000 individual members, the Society's mission is to serve the needs of HR professionals by providing the most essential and comprehensive resources available. As an influential voice, the Society's mission is also to advance the human resource profession to ensure that HR is recognized as an essential partner in developing and executing organizational strategy. Founded in 1948, SHRM cur-

rently has more than 550 affiliated chapters within the United States and members in more than 100 countries. Visit SHRM Online at www.shrm.org

About SHRM Research SHRM Research, as part of the Knowledge Development Division supporting SHRM, produces high-quality, leading-edge research and provides expertise on human resource and business issues. It acts as an advisor to SHRM for the purpose of advancing the HR profession and generates and publishes cutting-edge research used by human resource professionals to develop their knowledge and to provide strategic direction to their organizations. As leading experts in the field of HR, SHRM Research works closely with leading academics, policy makers and business leaders. About the Author Shawn Fegley is a survey research specialist for SHRM. His responsibilities include designing, conducting and analyzing surveys on HR-related topics. He has worked in survey research for the past seven years. Acknowledgments This report is the culmination of a team effort. Steve Williams, Ph.D., SPHR, director of Research, provided valuable expertise adding to the content of the survey report. Deb Cohen, Ph.D., SPHR, chief knowledge officer; Steve Miranda, SPHR, GPHR, chief human

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resources and strategic planning officer; and Jessica Collison, director of strategic planning, provided valuable expertise adding to the content of the survey instrument. Jennifer Schramm, manager of the Workplace Trends and Forecasting Program, contributed by providing insight on future trends, and Nancy Lockwood, SPHR, GPHR, manager of HR Content Program, contributed by providing insight on practical application. Strategic HR Management Survey was developed by the SHRM Survey Program. The SHRM Organizational

Development Special Expertise Panel (specifically Maggie Aldrich, SPHR, Charlotte H. Anderson, SPHR, Fernán R. Cepero, Patricia A. Miller, SPHR, GPHR, and David Rock), SHRM HR Consulting/Outsourcing Special Expertise Panel (specifically Tom Kelley, David Kippen, Jim Nys, PHR, Don Packham, SPHR, and Mary-Jane Sinclair, SPHR) and SHRM Workforce Staffing and Deployment Special Expertise Panel (specifically Tom Darrow, Becky Strickland, SPHR, and Dorothy J. Stubblebine, SPHR) provided valuable insight and recommendations for the survey instrument.

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Introduction

I

n recent years, the field of human resources has experienced a significant transformation and redefinition. In the past, HR was heavily inundated and responsible for personnel and transactional activities. In many organizations, HR has moved from merely an administrative role to that of a strategic partner and facilitator. Today, organizations are realizing HR's potential to positively affect a wide range of activities such as budgeting, talent management, succession planning, analysis of trends and forecasting, executive-level compensation, and corporate social responsibility programs. For an organization to be successful in today's highly competitive and changing international business environment, it needs targeted strategic initiatives that are integrated throughout the entire organization. Many successful organizations are realizing that their HR department is a resource that provides a competitive advantage. These organizations have recognized the value of addressing human resource and business functions from a strategic perspective that can ultimately be linked with overall business strategy. Currently, HR helps already successful organizations further distinguish themselves from their competitors.

Strategic human resource management is a term that is being used to describe an assortment of strategic initiatives HR professionals use to effect bottom-line objectives. The HR function in many organizations has been segmented into two areas: one that focuses more time on operational functions and the other--on strategic activities. Even though HR has advanced extensively over the last 20 years, the profession still faces considerable barriers, such as the legacy of being an administrative contributor and still having the responsibility for dealing with many operational functions, that prevent many HR professionals from focusing on strategic initiatives. This report explores to what extent HR strategically contributes to specific functions within organizations, examines how often HR uses metrics and analytics to measure specific organizational functions, looks at potential barriers that limit the ability of HR to more effectively contribute to the organization's bottom line and discusses what organizations can do to develop the strategic HR skills of their HR staff. The report also examines the differences between HR departments with and without a formal strategic plan in place.

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Methodology

A

sample of HR professionals was randomly selected from SHRM's membership database, which included approximately 210,000 individual members at the time the survey was conducted. Only members who had not participated in an SHRM survey or poll in the previous six months were included in the sampling frame. Members who were students, consultants, academics, located internationally or had no e-mail address on file were also excluded from the sampling frame. In June 2006, an e-mail that included a link to the Strategic HR Management Survey1 was sent to 3,000 randomly selected SHRM members whose titles were HR manager and higher. Of these, 2,530 e-mails were successfully delivered, and 427 HR professionals responded, yielding a response rate of 17%. The survey was fielded for a period of two weeks, and four e-mail reminders were sent to sample members in an effort to increase the response rate. Notes and Caveats Analysis: Throughout this report, analyses by respondents' organization staff size, HR department size and the existence of a formal strategic plan are presented and discussed, when applicable. For the purposes of this study, strategic HR is defined as the process of taking a long-term approach to human resource management through the development and

implementation of HR programs that address and solve business problems and directly contribute to major long-term business objectives. Operational HR is defined as focusing on the day-to-day approach to human resource management through policies, practices and processes. Throughout this report, the terms "HR function" and "HR department" both refer to the HR department within an organization. Differences: Conventional statistical methods were used to determine if observed differences were statistically significant (i.e., there is a small likelihood that the differences occurred by chance). Therefore, in most cases, only results that were significant are included, unless otherwise noted. Generalization of results: As with any research, readers should exercise caution when generalizing results and take individual circumstances and experiences into consideration when making decisions based on these data. While SHRM is confident in its research, it is prudent to understand that the results presented in this survey report are only truly representative of the sample of HR professionals responding to the survey. Number of respondents: The number of respondents (indicated by "n" in figures and tables) varies from table to table and figure to figure because some respondents did not answer all of the questions. Individuals may not have responded to a question on

1This survey instrument is available upon request by contacting the SHRM Survey Program at [email protected] or by phone at 703-535-6301.

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the survey because the question or some of its parts were not applicable or because the requested data were unavailable. This also accounts for the varying number of responses within each table or figure. Confidence level and margin of error: A confidence level and margin of error give readers some measure of how much they can rely on survey responses to represent all of SHRM members. Given the level of response to the survey, SHRM is 95% confident that responses given by all responding HR professionals can be generalized to all SHRM members with a margin of error of approximately 5%. For example,

49% of HR professionals reported that their organization had in place an established method to measure the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics. With a 5% margin of error, the reader can be 95% certain that between 44% and 54% of SHRM members would report that their organization presently measures the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics. It is important to know that as the sample size decreases, the margin of error increases, and therefore the margin of error for each individual question will vary depending on the number of responses to that particular question.

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SHRM Research

Key Findings

T

hree-quarters of HR professionals indicated that their organization had a strategic business plan in place. Among these respondents, more than two-thirds indicated that the plan had been articulated and communicated throughout the organization. More than one-half of HR professionals indicated their HR department had a strategic plan in place. Among respondents that reported that both their HR department and their organization had strategic business plans in place, the vast majority indicated that HR's strategic plan was aligned with the delivery of the organization's strategic plan. Almost one-half of HR professionals reported their organization had in place an established method to measure the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics. The functions HR depart-

ments used most frequently with metrics or analytics were recruitment and selection processes, performance management, compensation management/ reward programs, benefits management and employee relations. HR departments with a strategic plan in place were more likely than those without a strategic plan to have established methods of measurements in place and were more likely to indicate that their HR department was involved with various aspects and functions within their organization. The most frequently cited barriers that limited the ability of the respondents' HR department to more effectively contribute to the organization's bottom line were their department's strong focus on administration and the inability to directly measure HR's impact on the bottom line.

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Survey Results

I

n this very competitive global marketplace, it is difficult for an organization to reach its full potential without a well-conceived strategic business plan that focuses on the organization's short- and long-term visions, goals and objectives. An organization is at a competitive disadvantage if it is weighed down by short-term matters, because without a longterm focus as the source for a vision, an organization will likely be inundated with immediate concerns and not sufficiently prepared to anticipate opportunities. Overall, 75% of HR professionals indicated that their organization had a strategic business plan in place. These data are depicted in Figure 1. As shown in Tables 1 and 2, large organizations (500 or more employees) and HR departments with 10 or more employees were more likely to have a strategic business plan. This may be due to the complexity of these organizations, which brings about the need to have a strategic business plan.

Figure 1

(n = 426)

Organizational Strategic Business Plan in Place

Not sure 7%

No 18%

Yes 75%

Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 1

Organizational Strategic Business Plan in Place (by Organization Staff Size)

Overall (n = 412) 75% Small (1-99 Employees) 66% Medium (100-499 Employees) 74% Large (500 or More Employees) 84% Differences Based on Organization Size Large > small

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by organization staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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Table 2

Organizational Strategic Business Plan in Place (by HR Department Size)

Overall (n = 416) 75% 1-4 Employees 69% 5-9 Employees 80% 10 or More Employees 92% Differences Based on HR Department Size 10 or more employees > 1-4 employees

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by HR department staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

To ensure success, an effective strategic business plan should clearly communicate and articulate what the organization wants to achieve. This plan should be presented to every individual who will be affected in the organization. Such communication makes the entire organization aware of the plan's rationale and applications and, as a result, helps provide the best opportunity for a business plan to succeed. Among respondents from organizations that had a strategic business plan in place, 68% indicated that the plan had been articulated and communicated throughout the organization. These data are depicted in Figure 2. Every business unit or department within an organization should have a plan that is supported by and associated with the overall strategy of its organization. As illustrated in Figure 3, overall 56% of HR professionals indicated their HR department had a strategic plan in place. Once again, large organizations (500 or more employees) and HR departments with 10 or more employees were more likely to have a strategic plan. These data are depicted in Tables 3 and 4.

Figure 2

(n = 319)

Strategic Business Plan Articulated and Communicated Throughout the Organization

Not sure 8%

No 24%

Yes 68%

Note: Only employees who indicated that their organizations had a strategic business plan in place were asked this question. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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Table 3

HR Department With a Strategic Plan in Place (by Organization Staff Size)

Overall (n = 412) 56%

Small (1-99 Employees) 43%

Medium (100-499 Employees) 59%

Large (500 or More Employees) 64%

Differences Based on Organization Size Large > small

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by organization staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 4

HR Department With a Strategic Plan in Place (by HR Department Size)

Overall (n = 416) 75% 1-4 Employees 51% 5-9 Employees 54% 10 or More Employees 76% Differences Based on HR Department Size 10 or more employees > 9 or fewer employees

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by HR department staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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The most effective way for HR to deliver strategic initiatives is through the alignment with the overall strategic business plan of an organization. Among respondents who reported that their HR department had a strategic plan and their organization had a strategic business plan in place, the vast majority (96%) indicated that HR's strategic plan was aligned with the delivery of the organization's strategic plan (see Figure 4). HR should be an active participant in the development and implementation of business strategy; if HR is not aligned with business initiatives, then it is almost impossible for HR to strategically contribute and enhance business-related initiatives. Figure 3

(n = 421)

In many organizations HR is required to perform a variety of roles that could vary from operational to strategic in nature. Even though the HR function has evolved in the last 20 years from providing administrative support to acting as a dynamic strategic provider, in some organizations HR is still fighting to gain recognition from its colleagues. Tables 5 and 6 examine the gap between how HR professionals view their roles and the role of their departments compared with how they feel employees perceive these roles. Overall, the majority of HR professionals indicated that they considered their own role (73%) and the role of their HR department (75%) as a combination of strategic and operational functions. However, while Figure 4

(n = 212)

HR Departments With a Strategic Plan in Place

Not sure 4%

HR Strategic Plan Aligned With the Organization's Strategic Plan

No 2% Not sure 2%

No 40%

Yes 56%

Yes 96%

Note: Only employees who indicated that their HR department had a strategic plan and their organization had a strategic business plan were asked this question. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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Table 5

Role of the HR Professional

Primarily Strategic Primarily Operational 37% Combination of Both 60%

Respondents' perception of how employees view the role of HR professionals in the organization (n = 426) Respondents' view of their own role in the organization (n = 422)

Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

4%

12%

15%

73%

Note: Excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Percentages are row percentages and may not total 100% due to rounding.

Table 6

Role of the HR Department

Primarily Strategic Primarily Operational 59% 16% Combination of Both 39% 75%

Respondents' perception of how employees view their organization's HR department (n = 413) Respondents' view of their HR department's role in the organization (n = 423)

2% 9%

Note: Excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Percentages are row percentages and may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

the majority of HR respondents (60%) perceived that employees viewed the role of HR professionals as a combination of strategic and operational functions, 59% felt that employees perceived their HR department as mainly having an operational role. HR professionals were provided with 21 organizational functions and were asked to indicate to what extent they thought HR departments could contribute to each function in general. As illustrated in Figure 5, 89% of HR respondents indicated that HR could contribute to a large extent through employee relations

and recruitment and selection processes. This was followed by benefits management (86%), compensation management/reward programs (85%), diversity practices (83%), employee communication programs (80%), performance management (80%) and retention programs (76%). These findings are not surprising since functions very commonly believed to be associated with or driven by HR were the most frequently noted, while functions not perceived as being closely related to HR, such as analysis of trends and forecasting (57%) and budgeting (37%), were less frequently cited.

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Figure 5

To What Extent HR Departments Can Strategically Contribute to Specific Organizational Functions

Employee relations (n = 424) Recruitment and selection processes (n = 425) Benefits management (n = 421) Compensation management/reward programs (n = 423) Diversity practices (n = 421) Employee communication programs (n = 419) Performance management (n = 423) Retention programs (n = 420) Leadership development (n = 423) Employee engagement initiatives (n = 417) Human capital measurements (n = 408) Work/life programs (n = 414) Talent management initiatives (n = 417) Succession planning (n = 417) Skills development initiatives (n = 422) Health, safety and security programs (n = 426) Employment brand strategy/employment branding (n = 408) Retirement planning (n = 421) Corporate social responsibility programs (n = 416) Analysis of trends and forecasting (n = 415) Budgeting (n = 419)

89% 89% 86% 85% 83% 80% 80% 76% 74% 72% 72% 70% 69% 69% 68% 65% 64% 63% 60% 57% 37%

11% 11% 13% 15% 16% 20% 19% 22% 24% 27% 25% 26% 28% 25% 30% 34% 33% 33% 37% 40% 61%

0% 1% 1% 0% 1% 1% 1% 2% 2% 1% 3% 4% 3% 6% 2% 2% 3% 5% 3% 3% 2%

To a large extent

To some extent

To no extent

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. This figure is sorted in descending order by the percentage of respondents who answered "to a large extent" and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

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Tables 7a, 7b and 7c examine the 21 organizational functions that were rated in Figure 5, but from the perspective of strategic contribution to each function by the HR department at the respondents' organization. Overall, 70% of HR professionals indicated their HR department strategically contributed to a large extent through employee relations. This was followed by Table 7a

recruitment and selection processes (68%), benefits management (65%), performance management (54%) and compensation management/reward programs (48%). These data are depicted in Table 7a. There were virtually no differences between the rankings of how HR professionals believed HR in general could contribute to these functions and the extent to which

To Which Extent the Respondents' HR Department Could Strategically Contribute to Specific Organizational Functions (Overall)

To No Extent (but this is an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 5% 5% 5% 7% 11% 11% 12% 18% 19% 20% 14% 28% 21% 19% 28% 27% 24% 31% 25% 23% 29% To No Extent (unlikely an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 0% 1% 3% 2% 1% 1% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 3% 6% 3% 4% 4% 8% 7% 9% 6% 7%

(n = 406) Employee relations Recruitment and selection processes Benefits management Performance management Compensation management/reward programs Employee communication programs Health, safety and security programs Diversity practices Employee engagement initiatives Retention programs Leadership development Work/life programs Retirement planning Skills development initiatives Talent management initiatives Human capital measurements Employment brand strategy/employment branding Succession planning Corporate social responsibility programs Budgeting Analysis of trends and forecasting

To a Large Extent 70% 68% 65% 54% 48% 45% 45% 45% 38% 38% 37% 32% 30% 29% 29% 29% 29% 29% 27% 17% 15%

To Some Extent 25% 27% 27% 38% 40% 43% 41% 34% 41% 40% 47% 38% 44% 49% 40% 39% 39% 34% 39% 55% 49%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure" or "not applicable." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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their individual HR department strategically contributed to these functions. Tables 7b and 7c examine the differences between respondents from departments with a strategic plan in place and those without such plan. HR profesTable 7b

sionals from departments with the existing strategic plan were significantly more likely than those without a strategic plan to report that their HR department strategically contributed to a large extent within these functions. HR departments with a strategic plan in place were very likely to have these plans aligned with

To What Extent the Respondents' HR Department Could Strategically Contribute to Specific Organizational Functions (by HR Department With a Strategic Plan)

To No Extent To No Extent (unlikely an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 0% 0% 3% 1% 1% 1% 1% 2% 0% 1% 1% 4% 4% 2% 3% 2% 5% 4% 6% 2% 4% (but this is an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 3% 2% 4% 4% 7% 13% 8% 12% 9% 105 12% 23% 23% 17% 20% 12% 14% 20% 18% 23% 19%

(n = 236) Employee relations Recruitment and selection processes Benefits management Performance management Compensation management/reward programs Diversity practices Employee communication programs Health, safety and security programs Leadership development Employee engagement initiatives Retention programs Work/life programs Succession planning Talent management initiatives Human capital measurements Skills development initiatives Retirement planning Employment brand strategy/employment branding Corporate social responsibility programs Analysis of trends and forecasting Budgeting

To a Large Extent 78% 76% 69% 61% 57% 56% 54% 49% 48% 47% 46% 40% 38% 37% 37% 36% 36% 36% 34% 22% 19%

To Some Extent 19% 22% 24% 35% 35% 30% 38% 37% 44% 41% 41% 38% 35% 44% 40% 51% 45% 40% 42% 54% 58%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure" or "not applicable." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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the overall strategic business plans and were usually larger-sized organizations. There are many ways that an HR department can contribute to its organization. HR professionals were provided with a series of statements and were asked Table 7c

to rate the extent to which their HR department was involved with various aspects and functions in their organization. As illustrated in Table 8b, HR professionals from departments with a strategic plan in place were more likely than those without a strategic plan to rate their function as being involved to a larger ex-

To What Extent the Respondents' HR Department Could Strategically Contribute to Specific Organizational Functions (by HR Department Without a Strategic Plan)

To No Extent To No Extent (unlikely an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 0% 2% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 6% 2% 3% 4% 6% 4% 6% 7% 15% 14% 7% 11% 7% 13% (but this is an area in which my organization can contribute more strategically) 7% 8% 7% 10% 13% 16% 15% 24% 31% 31% 22% 30% 30% 38% 37% 30% 35% 43% 41% 29% 39%

(n = 170) Employee relations Recruitment and selection processes Benefits management Performance management Health, safety and security programs Compensation management/reward programs Employee communication programs Diversity practices Retention programs Employee engagement initiatives Leadership development Retirement planning Skills development initiatives Work/life programs Human capital measurements Employment brand strategy/employment branding Corporate social responsibility programs Talent management initiatives Succession planning Budgeting Analysis of trends and forecasting

To a Large Extent 59% 58% 58% 45% 39% 35% 33% 30% 28% 26% 22% 22% 19% 19% 18% 18% 16% 16% 16% 13% 6%

To Some Extent 35% 33% 32% 42% 46% 48% 50% 39% 40% 41% 52% 41% 47% 37% 38% 37% 35% 34% 32% 51% 43%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure" or "not applicable." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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tent on all 12 subjects that were addressed. The aspects that were rated the highest by HR professionals from departments with and without a strategic plan in place included the following: 1) HR works closely with senior management in implementing organizational strategies (68% for HR departments with a strategic plan in place and 38% for HR departments without a strategic plan in place); 2) HR works closely with senior management in creating organizational strategies Table 8a

(n = 406) HR works closely with senior management in implementing organizational strategies HR works closely with senior management in creating organizational strategies HR has achieved a level of respect that is comparable with other departments in the organization Senior management realizes that investments in HR make financial sense HR implements strategies and processes to drive business results HR is involved in the communication of the business goals HR is involved in the alignment of the business goals The role of HR is increasingly more focused on strategic interests HR involvement is essential in all major business activities and decisions HR creates strategies and processes to drive business results HR is involved in the development of the business goals HR is involved in monitoring the achievement of business goals

(56% and 27%); 3) HR has achieved a level of respect that is comparable with other departments in the organization (49% and 26%); 4) senior management realizes that investments in HR make financial sense (47% and 27%); and 5) HR implements strategies and processes to drive business results (46% and 19%). These findings reveal that having an HR department with a strategic plan in place is important to the level of contribution that HR can offer.

Extent of HR's Involvement in the Organization (Overall)

To a Large Extent 56% 44% 40% 39% 35% 33% 32% 31% 28% 25% 24% 21% To Some Extent 39% 45% 51% 50% 52% 48% 49% 50% 56% 56% 52% 49% To No Extent 6% 11% 10% 12% 13% 19% 19% 19% 16% 19% 24% 30%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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Table 8b

(n = 236)

Extent of HR's Involvement in the Organization (by HR Departments With a Strategic Plan)

To a Large Extent 68% 56% 49% 47% 46% 46% 43% 42% 36% 36% 31% 30% To Some Extent 29% 38% 45% 47% 49% 41% 49% 49% 57% 54% 55% 49% To No Extent 3% 6% 6% 6% 6% 14% 8% 10% 7% 10% 14% 21%

HR works closely with senior management in implementing organizational strategies HR works closely with senior management in creating organizational strategies HR has achieved a level of respect that is comparable with other departments in the organization Senior management realizes that investments in HR make financial sense HR implements strategies and processes to drive business results HR is involved in the communication of the business goals The role of HR is increasingly more focused on strategic interests HR is involved in the alignment of the business goals HR involvement is essential in all major business activities and decisions HR creates strategies and processes to drive business results HR is involved in the development of the business goals HR is involved in monitoring the achievement of business goals

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 8c

(n = 170)

Extent of HR's Involvement in the Organization (by HR Departments Without a Strategic Plan)

To a Large Extent 38% 27% 27% 26% 19% 18% 18% 17% 14% 13% 10% 10% To Some Extent 52% 55% 54% 58% 57% 55% 51% 57% 51% 48% 58% 48% To No Extent 10% 18% 20% 15% 24% 27% 31% 26% 35% 39% 32% 42%

HR works closely with senior management in implementing organizational strategies HR works closely with senior management in creating organizational strategies Senior management realizes that investments in HR make financial sense HR has achieved a level of respect that is comparable with other departments in the organization HR implements strategies and processes to drive business results HR involvement is essential in all major business activities and decisions HR is involved in the alignment of the business goals HR is involved in the communication of the business goals The role of HR is increasingly more focused on strategic interests HR is involved in the development of the business goals HR creates strategies and processes to drive business results HR is involved in monitoring the achievement of business goals

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "to a large extent" for each statement and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Percentages within each category may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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Metrics and Analytics

Organizations should closely examine a vast array of information before making any recommendation or decision. Metrics and analytics are critical measurement tools that help uncover opportunities, identify problems, measure progress and help recognize differences between performance and expectation. These measures should be linked closely to the organization's strategic business plans and goals. As illustrated in Figure 6, 49% of HR professionals reported their organization had in place an established method to measure the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics. As shown in Tables 9 through 11, large organizations (500 or more employees), HR departments with 10 or more employees and organizations with an existing strategic plan within the HR department were more likely to have an established method of measurement in place. Many organizations have a wealth of internal data available that could be used to measure and evaluTable 9 Figure 6

(n = 423)

An Established Method to Measure the Effectiveness of HR Strategy Through Metrics and Analytics

Not sure 3%

No 48%

Yes 49%

Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

An Established Method to Measure the Effectiveness of HR Strategy Through Metrics and Analytics (by Organization Staff Size)

Overall (n = 412) 49% Small (1-99 Employees) 31% Medium (100-499 Employees) 48% Large (500 or More Employees) 66% Differences Based on Organization Size Large > small

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by organization staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 10

An Established Method to Measure the Effectiveness of HR Strategy Through Metrics and Analytics (by HR Department Size)

1-4 Employees 39% 5-9 Employees 57% 10 or More Employees 78% Differences Based on HR Department Size 10 or more employees > 4 or fewer employees

Overall (n = 416) 49%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by HR department staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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ate a wide range of traditional and nontraditional activities. HR professionals should look into ways to use these data to strategically contribute and show value. HR professionals from organizations with established methods in place were asked how frequently their HR department used metrics or analytics in conjunction with specific HR activities. As seen in Table 12, the majority (59%) indicated that their HR department frequently used metrics or analytics in association with recruitment and selection processes. This was followed by performance management (52%), compensation management/reward programs (51%), benefits management (51%) and employee relations (49%). Less traditional functions such as corporate social responsibility programs (17%) and employment brand strategy/employment branding (21%) were less often linked with these measurement systems.

measure HR's impact on the bottom line and lacked an established method for measuring the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics. It is not surprising that focus on administrative duties and lack of measurement processes were the most commonly cited barriers. HR professionals could overcome administrative burdens by outsourcing some of these functions or hiring staff dedicated specifically to strategic initiatives, thus providing their HR department a better opportunity to focus on strategy. It is very difficult for HR to add value without the ability to measure the direct impact of HR initiatives; however, at the same time, HR does not have consistent measurement systems to assist in this process. These measurement systems are continuously becoming more sophisticated, and great advancements are being made in this area every year. In due time, refined measurements will be available that will provide HR professionals with the data they need to help their organizations run more effectively and will aid HR in measuring its direct impact on the bottom line. In the meantime, HR professionals should strive to perfect their HR-related metrics and attempt to utilize any available data that could be used in conjunction with organizational and human capital measurement issues. Another factor that could hinder the strategic progression and development of an HR department is related to its proximity to the organization's chief executive officer (CEO)/president. HR professionals were asked to whom the person overseeing the HR department directly reported. The closer HR is associated with

Barriers

Although the field of HR has evolved in recent years to become a more strategic entity in organizations, HR still encounters significant barriers that limit its ability to more effectively contribute business results that are related to the bottom line. In this section, HR professionals were asked to rate to what extent various factors may limit their HR department's ability to more effectively contribute to the organization's bottom line. As illustrated in Figure 7, 86% of the respondents felt that their department's focus on administrative duties rather than on strategy limited their ability to contribute either to a large or to some extent. Additionally, 78% of HR professionals reported that their department was not able to directly Table 11

An Established Method to Measure the Effectiveness of HR Strategy Through Metrics and Analytics (by HR Departments With and Without a Strategic Plan in Place)

HR Department With a Strategic Plan 66% HR Department Without a Strategic Plan 29% Comparison by HR Departments With and Without a Strategic Plan in Place With > without

Overall (n = 406) 49%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents who answered this question using the response options provided. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

17

Table 12

How Often Metrics or Analytics Are Used With Specific Organizational Functions

Frequently Sometimes 31% 41% 34% 34% 31% 39% 38% 40% 44% 42% 43% 45% 51% 37% 38% 39% 53% 44% 41% 40% 38% Rarely 10% 8% 15% 15% 20% 18% 23% 25% 23% 26% 27% 26% 21% 35% 36% 35% 27% 33% 37% 39% 45%

Recruitment and selection processes (n = 197) Performance management (n = 196) Compensation management/reward programs (n = 199) Benefits management (n = 192) Employee relations (n = 194) Health, safety and security programs (n = 193) Budgeting (n = 189) Retention programs (n = 191) Employee communication programs (n = 185) Diversity practices (n = 188) Employee engagement initiatives (n = 180) Analysis of trends and forecasting (n = 180) Leadership development (n = 187) Human capital measurements (n = 175) Retirement planning (n = 169) Talent management initiatives (n = 176) Skills development initiatives (n = 192) Work/life programs (n = 171) Succession planning (n = 174) Employment brand strategy/employment branding (n = 161) Corporate social responsibility programs (n = 156)

59% 52% 51% 51% 49% 43% 40% 35% 34% 32% 31% 29% 28% 28% 27% 26% 21% 23% 22% 21% 17%

Note: Percentages are row percentages and may not total 100% due to rounding. This table is sorted by percentage of respondents who responded "frequently" for each function and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure" or "not applicable." Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

the C-suite, the more the organization will expect from it. As illustrated in Figure 8, the majority (63%) of HR professionals indicated that the individual overseeing HR directly reported to the CEO/president. This was followed by the vice president (11%) and the chief operating officer (COO) (8%) positions. As illustrated in Table 13, HR departments from

smaller-sized organizations (1-99 employees) were significantly more likely than those from larger organizations to have their head of HR report directly to the organization's CEO/president. It is important that all levels of HR professionals reinforce and improve their business acumen, strategic HR knowledge and competencies. Further develop-

18

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM Research

Figure 7

Factors That Limit HR From Contributing to the Organization's Bottom Line

HR department lacks an established method for measuring the effectiveness of HR strategy through metrics and analytics (n = 406) HR department focuses more on administrative duties rather than strategy (n = 411) HR department has limited involvement with the board of directors (n = 399) HR department is not able to directly measure HR's impact on the bottom line (n = 405) HR department is not able to set and focus on a small amount of central priorities (n = 400) HR department lacks HR professionals trained in business strategy (n = 411) HR department spends an insufficient amount of time on business management matters (n = 399) HR department is too focused on people management issues (n = 405) HR department does not outsource enough administrative functions (n = 396) HR department lacks HR professionals trained in HR strategy (n = 413) HR department does not receive respect from senior management (n = 404) HR department is not aligned with the organization's business strategy (n = 390) HR department is not willing to take chances (n = 404) HR department is reluctant to adopt new technology (n = 408)

35%

43%

22%

31%

55%

14%

27%

36%

38%

24%

54%

22%

19%

48%

32%

16%

47%

37%

16%

55%

29%

14%

52%

34%

13%

36%

50%

13%

41%

46%

11%

40%

49%

7%

31%

62%

6%

37%

57%

5%

22%

73%

To a large extent

To some extent

To no extent

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. This figure is sorted in descending order by the percentage of respondents who answered "to a large extent" and excludes respondents who indicated "not sure." Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

0

20

40

60

80

19

100

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Figure 8

(n = 410)

80% 80 70% 70

To Whom the Person Overseeing the HR Department Directly Reports

63%

60 50

40% 40 30% 30 20% 20 10% 10 0% 11% 8% 7% 50%

60%

4%

2%

2%

3%

nt

nt

B dir oard ec o to f rs

G ma ene na ral ge r

O

O

r

ide

ide

CO

CF

rec

es

es

O/

pr

Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 13

CE

To Whom the Person Overseeing the HR Department Directly Reports (by Organization Staff Size)

Overall (n = 410) Small (1-99 Employees) 75% 7% 5% 7% 4% 0% 3% 1% Medium (100-499 Employees) 60% 8% 12% 8% 4% 4% 1% 4% Large (500 or More Employees) 59% 16% 7% 6% 6% 3% 2% 3% Differences Based on Organization Size Small > medium, large

CEO/president Vice president COO Chief financial officer Director General manager Board of directors Other

Vic

e

pr

63% 11% 8% 7% 4% 2% 2% 3%

Note: Sample size is based on the actual number of respondents by organization staff size who answered this question using the response options provided. Blank cells in the comparison column indicate that no statistically significant differences were found. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

20

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Di

Ot

he

to

r

0

SHRM Research

ment within these areas enables HR professionals to increase and improve their skills. Ultimately, this could lead to the advancement of the strategic HR function within various elements in the organization. As illustrated in Figure 9, 92% of HR professionals indicated their organization provided development opportunities for its HR staff. Among these respondents, almost two-thirds (63%) offered professional development opportunities. This was followed by memberships in business professional associations (53%) and individual informal mentoring (44%). These data are depicted in Table 14.

Figure 9

(n = 427)

Strategic Developmental Opportunities for HR Staff

No 8%

Yes 92%

Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

Table 14

(n = 394)

Ways Organizations Develop the Strategic HR Skills of Their HR Staff

Yes 63% 53% 44% 32% 31% 30% 27% 7% 9% No 37% 47% 56% 69% 69% 70% 73% 93% 91%

Professional development opportunities Memberships in business professional associations Individual informal mentoring Attending a strategy conference Participating in teams focused on HR strategy and/or business Assisting a senior HR leader in strategy initiatives Participating in strategy meetings for exposure Shadowing a senior HR professional who works on HR strategic initiatives Participating in a formal mentoring

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding. Source: SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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SHRM Research

An HR Perspective

By Nancy R. Lockwood, SPHR, GPHR, M.A., Manager, HR Content

I

n today's competitive environment, effective communication strategies are at the heart of strategic planning. According to this survey report, 80% of HR professionals see employee communication programs as an area to which HR can strategically contribute (see Figure 5). The best place to begin is to establish a communications strategy for all internal and external stakeholders. For example, employee communication programs in organizations serve important strategic functions, such as 1) supporting organizational success and sustainability; 2) retaining talent/ employee engagement; 3) rolling out new HR and/or organizational initiatives; 4) gathering feedback; and 5) sharing information. Without question, energizing the organization through improved communication is an HR strategic contribution. New organizational initiatives present an excellent opportunity for HR to strategically contribute to the company's goals through employee communication programs. To maintain a competitive edge, many companies today are taking a closer look at the perception of their products and services as well as the company reputation overall. Utilizing their interpersonal communication skills, HR

professionals can help set organizational strategy and effectively communicate change management initiatives, thus providing important value-add around key initiatives--such as branding, talent management, corporate social responsibility and diversity--to keep employees engaged and focused, promote productivity, strengthen employee commitment and encourage a respectful employer-employee relationship. In addition, HR professionals are uniquely placed to support management and employees alike through employee communication programs. In general, topdown and bottom-up employee communication programs allow for more effective communication and promote well-informed decisions. HR can facilitate opportunities to ensure good communication between management and employees by establishing a variety of employee communication programs to keep staff informed, thus casting a wide net for all parties to inform and become informed on issues of importance to both the organization and the workforce. Thoughtfully selecting the best medium for the message is an important strategy to effectively get the message across. Employee attitude surveys, focus groups, management report

cards, employee suggestion programs and employee communication boxes are examples of bottom-up communication programs. In addition, the HR function can provide strategic support to the organization through employee communication programs with face-to-face presentations that convey a message of partnership between management and employees as well as emphasize company values. Face-to-face meetings are important because they offer the opportunity for employees to ask questions. Broader communication programs--such as monthly company-wide meetings, staff briefings, round-table luncheons with cross-departmental groups, lunch with the CEO, HR and all-staff e-mails, and a company intranet--are top-down employee communication programs that reach out to many employees and provide a sense of inclusiveness that helps generate good will, respect and trust. Finally, in addition to the recommendations above, HR can also strategically contribute to the organization by 1) assessing, evaluating and measuring the effectiveness of current employee communication programs; 2) thoroughly understanding the goals of initiatives in advance

22

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM Research

of sending out communications to staff; 3) carefully crafting communications with clear language; and 4) finding innovative ways to communicate. Ultimately, employer communication programs can strategically promote a workplace environment of trust and respect, keeping the communication channels open.

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

23

Strategic HR Management

By Jennifer Schramm, M.Phil., Manager, Workplace Trends and Forecasting When SHRM invited a group of HR leaders in 2005 to discuss the future of strategic HR, there was general agreement that progress in achieving the vision of strategic HR will, to a great extent, involve changing perceptions among senior business leaders on the HR's contribution to the development and implementation of business strategy. Doing so requires elevating the field in a number of different ways, including developing a common set of definitions that help HR speak the language of strategy, creating common and effective tools, metrics, analytics and consistent methodologies that demonstrate the effectiveness of HR strategies, working to align expectations between the C-suite and HR, and creating and maintaining higher standards for entry into the profession. When it comes to implementing strategy, two important forces are emphasizing the need for HR's involvement. The first is simply the recognition that as businesses come to rely on the knowledge, innovation and creativity of their workforce to create value and remain competitive, the implementation of strategic business plans must inevitably involve HR processes. Secondly, as HR metrics improve, the ability to see the impact of specific human resource practices on the performance of individual employees, teams and the organization as a whole will underscore the necessity of effective HR in meeting strategic business objectives. It will also mean that implementing strategy will involve creating a broader awareness among employees of what this strategy is, requiring There does seem to be a growHR to build effective channels of ing awareness among business communication between busileaders--increasingly supported ness leaders and employees. by research findings--that HR's Finally, HR will also be responsiinvolvement is an important part of ble for implementing the policies the strategic planning process. This and processes in the workplace survey report indicates that curthat give employees the ability to rently HR is focused more on imple- use this information to consider mentation than on the creation of long-term implications while also strategic business plans, but future effectively responding to today's developments could further height- challenges. en the importance of HR not only in implementing strategy but also in In addition to the implementation creating strategic business plans. of business strategy, HR's role in the strategic planning process is also evolving. The growing complexity of both the workforce and the business world create a challenging environment in which to plan and implement strategy. This complexity may mean that in order to better envision potential future issues that could influence the intellectual and productive capacity of their organizations' workforce, HR professionals will need to gather much more information about the current workforce and the business environment, as well as the trends that could influence both, and may be increasingly expected to act as leaders in their organizations' internal discussions about the future of the organizational human capital.

A Look Ahead:

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SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM Research

Demographics

HR Role

(n = 427) Oversee the HR function/department Work in the HR department at the organization

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Approximate Amount of Time Devoted to Administrative/ Operational HR Issues

(n = 419) 59% 41% 1%-25% 26%-50% 51%-75% 76%-100% 10% 22% 26% 42% 1%

Approximate Amount of Time Devoted to Strategic Business/Tactical Issues

(n = 421) 1%-25% 26%-50% 51%-75% 76%-100% None

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

None

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

59% 25% 10% 2% 5%

Years in the HR Profession

(n = 420) 1-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20 or more

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

10% 21% 27% 16% 26%

Job Title

(n = 420) Manager Director Vice president/chief Senior director Other

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

HR Professional Certification(s) Held

51% 28% 12% 2% 6% (n = 427) Professional in Human Resources (PHR) Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) Global Professional in Human Resources (GPHR) Other None 47% 24% 1% 5% 47%

Note: Percentages do not total 100% because multiple responses were allowed.

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

25

Individual the Respondents Directly Report To

(n = 421) CEO/president Head of HR Another HR staff person (who is not the head of HR) CFO COO Vice president Director General manager Other

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Census Region

(n = 409) 37% 20% 11% 9% 7% 6% 4% 1% 5% Midwest (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin) South (Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia) West (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming) Northeast (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

34% 28%

23% 23%

Organization Staff Size

(n = 412)

Highest Level of Education Completed

(n = 420) No college degree Associate degree B.A. B.A. with a concentration in HR B.S. B.S. with a concentration in HR B.B.A. B.B.A. with a concentration in HR MBA MBA with a concentration in HR Masters in non-HR-related field Masters in HR-related field Law degree Ph.D. in HR-related field Other

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Small organization (1-99 employees) Medium organization (100-499 employees) 15% 15% 6% 15% 7% 3% 2% 6% 3% 9% 15% 1% 1% 1% 1% (n = 421) Privately owned for-profit organization Publicly owned for-profit organization Nonprofit organization Government Other

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

28% 43% 30%

Large organization (500 or more employees)

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Organization Sector

47% 24% 22% 5% 2%

26

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM Research

HR Department Staff Size

(n = 416) 1-4 5-9 10-24 25-49 50-99 100 or more 65% 16% 12% 3% 3% 2%

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

Organization Industry

(n = 421) Health Services (profit) Manufacturing (durable goods) Services (nonprofit) Wholesale/retail trade Finance Manufacturing (nondurable goods) High-tech Construction and mining/oil and gas Insurance Educational services Government Telecommunications Transportation Newspaper publishing/broadcasting Utilities Other

Note: Percentages may not total 100% due to rounding.

15% 15% 11% 9% 8% 6% 6% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 1% 1%

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

27

SHRM Research

SHRM Survey Reports

Available to members and the public

1. SHRM/CareerJournal.com 2006 Workplace Romance Poll Findings (17 pages, January 2006) 2. SHRM/CareerJournal.com 2005 U.S. Job Recovery and Retention Survey Report (40 pages, November 2005) 3. Organizational Communication Poll Findings (24 pages, June 2005) 4. Workplace Productivity Poll Findings (17 pages, January 2005) 5. SHRM/CareerJournal.com Workplace Privacy Poll Findings (47 pages, January 2005) 6. SHRM/CareerJournal.com 2004 U.S. Job Recovery and Retention Poll Findings (33 pages, November 2004) 7. Employee Trust and Loyalty Poll Findings (21 pages, July 2004) 8. Job Negotiation Survey Findings (41 pages, April 2004) 9. Job Opportunities Survey (39 pages, September 2003) 10. Job Recovery Survey (28 pages, August 2003) 11. Job Opportunities Poll (39 pages, April 2003) 12. Job Satisfaction Poll (74 pages, December 2002) 13. HR Implications of the Attack on America (23 pages, September 2002) 14. Corporate Credibility and Employee Communications Survey (14 pages, August 2002) 15. Job Opportunities Poll (30 pages, August 2002) 16. Workplace Romance Survey (24 pages, February 2002) 17. School-to-Work Programs Survey (16 pages, January 2002) 18. HR Implications of the Attack on America: Executive Summary of Results of a Survey of HR Professionals (13 pages, October 2002) 19. Negotiating Rewards Poll (14 pages, October 2001) 20. Search Tactics Poll (8 pages, April 2001)

Available to members only

1. Manufacturing Industry Findings on Human Resource Topics (47 pages, July 2006) 2. 2006 Benefits Survey Report (80 pages, June 2006) 3. 2006 Job Satisfaction Survey Report (57 pages, June 2006) 4. 2006 Succession Planning Survey Report (33 pages, June 2006) 5. 2006 Executive Compensation Survey Report (33 pages, May 2006) 6. 2006 Access to Human Capital and Employment Verification Survey Report (34 pages, March 2006) 7. 2006 Talent Management Survey Report (30 pages, January 2006) 8. 2005 Disaster Preparedness Survey Report (48 pages, October 2005) 9. 2005 Workplace Diversity Practices Survey Report (40 pages, October 2005) 10. 2005 Offshoring Survey Report (51 pages, October 2005) 11. 2005 Fair Labor Standards Act Survey Report (22 pages, August 2005) 12. 2005 Benefits Survey Report (72 pages, June 2005) 13. 2005 Future of the U.S. Labor Pool Survey Report (58 pages, June 2005) 14. 2005 Job Satisfaction Survey Report (52 pages, June 2005) 15. SHRM/Catalyst Employee Development Survey Report (36 pages, April 2005) 16. 2005 HR Technology Report (37 pages, March 2005) 17. 2005 Rewards Programs and Incentive Compensation Survey Report (38 pages, March 2005) 18. The Maturing Profession of HR: Worldwide and Regional View Survey Report (33 pages, February 2005)

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

29

19. Reference and Background Checking Survey Report (41 pages, January 2005) 20. Job Satisfaction Series Survey Report (193 pages, August 2004) 21. Generational Differences Survey Report (41 pages, August 2004) 22. Employer-Sponsored Investment Advice Survey Report (60 pages, July 2004) 23. Human Resources Outsourcing Survey Report (40 pages, July 2004) 24. 2004 Benefits Survey Report (76 pages, June 2004) 25. Health Care Survey Report (40 pages, June 2004) 26. SHRM/CNNfn Job Satisfaction Series: Job Satisfaction Survey Report (52 pages, April 2004) 27. SHRM/CNNfn Job Satisfaction Series: Job Compensation/Pay Survey Report (36 pages, February 2004) 28. The Maturing Profession of Human Resources in the United States Survey Report (48 pages, January 2004) 29. Workplace Violence Survey (52 pages, January 2004) 30. SHRM Eldercare Survey (40 pages, December 2003) 31. SHRM/CNNfn Job Satisfaction Series: Job Benefits Survey (57 pages, December 2003) 32. Undergraduate HR Curriculum Study (45 pages, October 2003) 33. SHRM Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Survey (10 pages, October 2003) 34. Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Survey (20 pages, August 2003) 35. SHRM/SHRM Foundation 2003 Benefits Survey (81 pages, June 2003) 36. SHRM Job Satisfaction Series: Job Security Survey (41 pages, June 2003) 37. SHRM/NOWCC/CED Older Workers Survey (53 pages, June 2003) 38. March 2003 Current Events Survey (28 pages, May 2003)

39. 2003 FMLA Poll (20 pages, April 2003) 40. 2003 Business Ethics Survey (48 pages, April 2003) 41. Employer Incentives for Hiring Individuals With Disabilities (66 pages, April 2003) 42. Fun Work Environment Survey (56 pages, November 2002) 43. Aligning HR With Organizational Strategy (53 pages, November 2002) 44. Recruiter Cost/Budget Survey (30 pages, October 2002) 45. 2002 SHRM/Fortune Survey on the Changing Face of Diversity (16 pages, October 2002) 46. Workplace Demographic Trends Survey (37 pages, June 2002) 47. Global Leadership Survey (36 pages, June 2002) 48. SHRM 2002 Benefits Survey Results (57 pages, April 2002) 49. A Study of Effective Workforce Management (36 pages, February 2002) 50. Resource Strategies, Stages of Development and Organization Size Survey (46 pages, January 2002) 51. Job Security and Layoffs Survey (76 pages, December 2001) 52. World Events Survey-Impact on Global Mobility (4 pages, November 2001) 53. Religion in the Workplace (58 pages, June 2001) 54. Employee Referral Programs (40 pages, June 2001) 55. Impact of Diversity Initiatives on the Bottom Line (41 pages, June 2001) 56. 2001 Benefits Survey (59 pages, April 2001) 57. 2000 FMLA Survey (51 pages, January 2001) 58. Workplace Privacy Survey (51 pages, December 2000) 59. Performance Management Survey (43 pages, December 2000) 60. Impact of Diversity Initiatives Poll (5 pages, October 2000) 61. 2000 Retention Survey (40 pages, June 2000)

30

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

SHRM Research

62. RM Cover Letters and Resume Survey (39 pages, May 2000) 63. 2000 Benefits Survey (52 pages, April 2000)

www.shrm.org/surveys

SHRM 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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ISBN 1-58644-089-6

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SHRM® 2006 Strategic HR Management Survey Report

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