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MAKING THE BUSINESS CONNECTION TO AIRPORT SUSTAINABILITY OVERVIEW

Summary Statement Sustainability embraces business practices that promote the continual improvement of a healthy environment, economy, and community. The Salt Lake City Department of Airports (SLCDA) is achieving numerous sustainable outcomes as a result of proactive stewardship and holistic management of business operations that serve a strong community of families, a growing volume of destination and business travelers, and a local business economy influenced by tourism. In the last several years, sustainability has become globally accepted to include initiatives like, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, use of alternative fuels, short-term payback for investments, recycling and reuse, waste management and so forth. Carter & Burgess, Inc prepared this report based upon findings from onsite assessments of physical assets and interviews with SLCDA staff to holistically evaluate the business case for sustainability and present fact-based findings developed from the assessments. Summary of Approach and Purpose The intent of the assessment performed by Carter & Burgess for SLCDA was three-fold: 1. Conduct interviews and perform assessments with three SLCDA business units: environmental, facility systems (maintenance) and operations, and use the findings from the assessments to develop an inventory of SLCDA's current business practices, policies and specific programs that are influenced by environmental sensitivity and managed holistically to deliver positive economic outcomes. 2. Identify practical recommendations that could present immediate, short-term and longterm improvements and opportunities for SLCDA. 3. Enhance SLCDA's current public outreach program through the development of educational tools that depict the factual outcomes from the assessments, and demonstrate the airport's commitment to a holistic business model guided by sustainable principles. In evaluating the findings from the assessments, a number of positive outcomes identified were expected based upon good business practices that are typical with many airports. SLCDA's business model was noted for managing business decisions holistically rather than to meet a minimum requirement or satisfy a singular outcome. This approach characterizes holistic management which is the cornerstone of achieving sustainable outcomes. The results of the program assessment demonstrate that SLCDA has implemented a number of business practices, policies and specific programs that are being monitored and measured and which meet the expectations of sustainable outcomes. Most of these have been implemented within the past five years and based upon the assessment findings SLCDA demonstrates continuous improvement and innovation in how they manage their business to achieve these outcomes.

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Summary of Findings and Outcomes The SLCDA Sustainability Program Assessment identified the following findings. · · Five (5) sustainability practice areas* which frame SLCDA's sustainable elements identified from the assessment findings 150 sustainable elements* comprising business practices, policies and specific programs managed holistically by SLCDA o o o o 42 sustainable elements that support environmental management 52 sustainable elements that support facility systems management 56 sustainable elements that support airport operations and management Four (4) sustainability dimensions* holistically managed by SLCDA

*Definitions for report terminology used to organize the findings: sustainability practice areas, elements and dimensions, begin on Page 4, "Sustainability Program Assessment Terminology". As more programs are implemented, SLCDA can apply baselines to benchmark and measure the progress and improvements achieved. The following SLCDA outcomes resulting from the sustainability program assessment represent the types of metrics that are meaningful in supporting sustainable management practices. Since 2001, SLCDA business practices, policies and specific programs have produced the following outcomes demonstrating economic viability, operational efficiency, natural resource conservation and social responsibility: · · · · SLCDA has converted over 12 acres to water-conserving landscapes resulting in a savings of 197 million gallons of water. SLCDA has upgraded and retro-fitted lighting systems in response to occupancy needs, resulting in more than $14,000 of energy savings per year. SLCDA has installed water-conserving plumbing fixtures in all public restrooms resulting in a 50% reduction in water usage as compared with water used with previous fixtures. SLCDA has utilized 175,000 gallons of compressed natural gas (CNG) to fuel the Airport's fleet of buses, resulting in a reduction of 10,000 pounds in emissions output per year. In recognition of this, SLCDA received 80 alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) credits from the EPA. SLCDA has recycled more than 230 tons of plastic items, newspapers and office paper resulting in estimated savings in disposal fees that exceed $5,000.00. SLCDA has reused more than 80% of construction material from civil projects, resulting in savings of approximately $800,000 in disposal fees. SLCDA has resold cardboard material resulting in a savings of approximately $15,000 per year. SLCDA has recovered and sold approximately 142,000 gallons of glycol to a secondary market resulting in profits that partially offset the recycling plant operation and maintenance costs. SLCDA has retrofitted existing heating boilers with new cleaner burning elements resulting in meaningful reductions of NOX and SO2 emissions.

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SLCDA has installed a Building Automation System to manage and conserve energy consumption throughout the airport property resulting in improved operational efficiency and reduced operating costs.

SLCDA SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ASSESSMENT INTRODUCTION

Industry Perspective Airport Sustainability is best achieved through deliberate coordination and optimization of crossfunctional practices and business decisions. However, there continue to be challenges for the industry in the areas of planning and development. Often, sustainability does not drive the priority for strategic decisions and as a result, planning horizons are not long enough to effectively integrate sustainability into the Airport's business model. As a result, airports and their partners are confronted with meeting capacity demands which adds to the existing cost structure and holistically evaluating the payback for "greening" a project or program. Regulatory compliance can also affect the airport's desire to progress in the areas of innovation and improvement. It is not unusual for airports to become conditioned to seek recognition for merely meeting compliance ­ which can hinder a holistic viewpoint. Making the business case for sustainability begins with understanding how airports can holistically apply sustainable practices to their business. In 2005, the Airports Council International ­ North America (ACI-NA), formed a working group of airport managers and consultants to develop the principles and values that frame the definition of "Airport Sustainability". In concert with formalizing this definition, the working group developed a comprehensive index of Airport Sustainability Best Practices (included in the Appendices). The index was utilized to guide the interviews and research conducted in support of the SLCDA program assessment. An additional outcome produced by working group's efforts resulted in the development of a business model for airport sustainability that can be characterized as one that: · · · · Clarifies the mission as holistic Requires strategic leadership Embraces total cost of ownership Values natural resources, human resources, financial resources and social resources

Salt Lake City Department of Airports In 1998, Salt Lake City government pledged its alliance with the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse emissions by 21 percent by 2012. By the end of 2005 - seven years early - the city already had exceeded its Kyoto goal, avoiding 84,192 tons of CO2 emissions. Under the leadership of Salt Lake City's Mayor, Rocky Anderson, the city has consistently placed its focus on initiatives that can improve the environment. In 2002, Mayor Rocky

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Anderson and his team of leaders formalized a number of "green" initiatives into a program called "Salt Lake City Green". Since its inception, Salt Lake City Green has received national recognition and numerous awards for it innovative approaches and pro-active commitment to successfully engaging the residents and businesses in supporting green practices. Salt Lake City Department of Airports (SLCDA) operates and manages three airports serving the Salt Lake City community. Salt Lake City International Airport serves as a destination hub for tourists as well as business travelers, along with two reliever airports, Salt Lake City Airport II, and Tooele Valley Airport. As a transportation hub serving approximately 22 million passengers annually, and a major employer for the region, SLCDA is recognized as a steward of the environment, economy, and community. It is this stewardship role for airports of all sizes that has introduced a new and broader definition of sustainability to address the unique opportunities that exist for their business. SLCDA embraces the spirit of the City's green practices, and applies many of the principles and dimensions of Airport Sustainability as a way of doing business. Leveraging its unique opportunities as a transportation business, SLCDA has integrated the environmental policies and practices, business operations and asset management functions to ensure that sustainability is managed holistically with a view toward practicality and social responsibility. Sustainability Program Assessment Terminology In developing the findings from the assessments, specific terminology is used to help organize the data and communicate its significance. The terminology is defined to ensure clarity and understanding of application within the assessment report as follows: Sustainability Practice Areas Sustainability practice area refers to a grouping of sustainable elements based upon the intended outcomes (e.g. conservation, waste minimization, quality initiatives), or the business unit which implements and/or manages the elements (e.g. management practices, planning and development). The five practice areas are: 1. Management Practices describe SLCDA policy-driven sustainable elements and those implied through SLCDA practices and programs directed at reducing the environmental footprint. 2. Conservation Initiatives describe sustainable elements intended to conserve the use of natural resources (e.g. water, energy) through specific programs and business practices. 3. Waste Minimization describes sustainable elements intended to reduce the waste stream through programs and practices that involve recycling and reuse of materials and resources. 4. Planning and Development describes sustainable elements that support current development projects, are planned in support of future development projects, that produce benefits characterized by social, economic and environmental outcomes.

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5. Quality Initiatives describe sustainable elements intended to promote continuous improvement and demonstrate innovation. Quality initiatives characterize a fundamental philosophy and commitment to consistently seeking better outcomes. Sustainable Elements Sustainable element refers to the practices, policies or programs which were identified during the assessments. This term is applied when considering all sustainable efforts for the three business units. Business practices, policies and specific programs tend to be integrated with one another; therefore, one term to generically describe all of these was useful. For example, three elements are described when discussing SLCDA's environmental policy to meet compliance with ISO 140001 (element one) that provides the impetus for the landscape program to conserve water (element two) and the xeriscape program that the airport has implemented in concert with ongoing development projects (element three). Airport Sustainability Dimensions Sustainable outcomes are characterized by four complementary dimensions. These dimensions (EONS) are accepted and promoted within the aviation industry as enabling a holistic approach to airport sustainability. Incorporating the sustainability dimensions into SLCDA's business practices, policies and programs, ensures consideration of these across the business functions of the airport organization. Economic Viability o Provides positive return on investment within a reasonable timeframe o Creates strategic opportunities for future development or funding o Promotes innovation and continuous improvement of the organization Operational Efficiency o Improves operational outcomes through documented policies, guidelines and procedures o Reduces costs while preserving social, economic or conservation benefits o Improves workforce effectiveness through the use of tools and technology Natural Resource Conservation o Minimizes waste through effective management o Conserves resources through process change and innovative practices o Focuses on preserving nature within an economic framework Social Responsibility o Improves and manages the environmental qualities that promote healthy living o Focuses on social awareness and responsibility within the community o Considers community needs and practical initiatives.

1 The ISO 14000 family is primarily concerned with "environmental management". This means what the organization does to: minimize harmful effects on the environment caused by its activities, and to - achieve continual improvement of its environmental performance. http://www.iso.org/iso/en/iso9000-14000/understand/inbrief.html

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SCOPE OF WORK

In October 2006, Salt Lake City Department of Airports selected Carter & Burgess to develop and deliver a baseline assessment of sustainability practices and policies. Figure 1 illustrates the framework used to create the baseline and evaluate the integration of SLCDA's sustainability practice areas among the four sustainability dimensions. The key objectives of the Salt Lake City Airport Sustainability Program Assessment were to: ·

Figure 1 Integrated Outcomes Matrix

Operational Efficiency

·

Identify the current sustainable initiatives that are managed by the Airport in three business units: o Environmental Management: Management practices, policies and specific programs relevant to the scope of environmental concerns Facility Systems: Cursory assessment of building systems and performance management programs that impact energy and environmental outcomes

ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES AND POLICIES

MANAGEMENT CONSERVATION INITIATIVES WASTE MINIMIZATION/RECYCLING PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT QUALITY INITIATIVES

FACILITY SYSTEMS PRACTICES AND POLICIES

BUILDING OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CONSERVATION/WASTE MINIMIZATION INITIATIVES PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT QUALITY INITIATIVES

o

AIRPORT OPERATIONS PRACTICES AND POLICIES

MANAGEMENT CONSERVATION WASTE MINIMIZATION/RECYLING

o

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT Operational QUALITY INITIATIVES Management: Management practices, policies and procedures relevant to passenger mobility, procurement and airside/landside operations)

· · · ·

Organize the initiatives to achieve a baseline. Research and provide documentation for potential funding sources for airport projects and programs. Provide recommendations that are economically justifiable and socially responsible. Create a public awareness campaign that will promote the Airport's Sustainability Program to the public-at-large, and position the Airport for funding of special development and pilot programs that are sustainable and promote a life-cycle approach in the stewardship of assets.

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Social Responsibility

Economic Viability

Assess environmental, facility systems (maintenance) and operational business units based upon visual observations, interviews and/or documentation provided for Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City Airport II, and Tooele Valley Airport.

Natural Resource Conservation

Methodology Approach The Carter & Burgess project team met with Salt Lake City Department of Airports stakeholders on October 26 and 27, 2006 to initiate the Airport's Sustainability Program Assessment. The project team members were: · · · · · Loy Warren, P.E., Project Principal Kim Arnold, PMP, ASQ-CMQOE, Project Manager Julie Kenfield, P.E., Environmental Assessment Leader Scott Martin, R.A., Operational Assessment Leader Bill Poole, P.E., CEM, LEED, Facility Systems Assessment Leader

Initiation of the project included a group discussion of the project's purpose, expectations, deliverables and schedule with SLCDA's identified stakeholders. Field interviews and assessments with various Salt Lake City International Airport (SLCIA) departments were completed on October 26 and 27. These assessments included a tour of the SLCIA property and specific facilities relevant to the scope of work. As previously mentioned, the ACI-NA Sustainable Initiatives Index was used as a guideline for discussions to ensure that a wide range of sustainability practices were discussed. Both regulatory compliance and best practice measures were discussed. Items were quantified to the extent possible during the interviews, with follow-up conversations and e-mails on additional questions and quantification. The Carter & Burgess Team developed and utilized an integrated approach in the application of the sustainability dimensions to the findings produced from the three key assessment areas. Specific interviews and assessment details are further discussed in the "Methodology" segment of each assessment section. U.S. Airport Sustainability Practices Phone interviews and/or email exchanges were conducted with the following airports to understand the lessons learned from sustainability programs which have been nationally recognized for contributions to the environment and community. Carter & Burgess contacted the following airports and documented the information provided: · · · · Denver International Airport Port of Seattle Port of Portland Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Peer Review*

*Mr. Rusty Hodapp, Vice President Energy and Transportation Management, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport participated in a peer review session with SLCDA stakeholders on January 8, 2007.

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Additionally, the websites for each of these airports were invaluable resources for documentation that each has developed in the course of implementing and managing its sustainability program. Relevant documents are provided in the "Appendix" section. Funding Source Review After reviewing current grants and funding programs from a number of agencies, projects with the greatest potential for funding are those that focus on energy efficiency, air quality and conservation. In reviewing the recipients of awards in 2006, a significant number included state universities. Three actions to be considered include: 1. Create a partnership with a local state university who would be interested in working with the airport to accelerate a conservation project or initiative. To this end, SLCDA should baseline and monitor performance on all sustainable programs to demonstrate stewardship and document facts related to improvements over time. 2. Utilize Transportation Research Board (TRB) funds that can be applied for through the Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) synthesis projects. Synthesis projects can provide valuable research to help the airport with cost/benefit analysis when considering investments in future projects and capital development programs. 3. Perform an ongoing review of funding opportunities should be an objective of an SLCDA sustainability program committee. The committee should regularly review funding requirements that align with sustainability targets which have been defined by SLCDA. Funding sources were reviewed at the federal, state and local levels to determine potential benefit to SLCDA projects and initiatives. These included: US Department of Agriculture · 2007 Conservation Innovation Grants US Environmental Protection Agency · Smart-way Transportation Partnership · Heat Island Reduction Activities · Cool Roofs Initiative · Energy Star Program US Department of Energy · Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewal Energy (EERE) · Tax Incentives Assistance Project (TIAP) · Clean Cities Program State of Utah · Energy Performance Contracting · Demand Side Management · Renewable Energy Tax Credit · Public Utility Commission · SEP Formula Grant

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· · ·

Clean Fuel Vehicle and Loan Program Clean Fuel Vehicle Tax Credit Wasatch Front Regional Council Transportation Improvement Program

ACEEE · Transportation Program ­ Travel Demand Management Strategies Federal Energy Legislation · S 2401 ­ Alternative Energy Extender Act · Renewable Portfolio and Energy Efficiency Resource Standards Federal Highway Programs · Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) · Surface Transport Program (STP) Transportation Research Board · Airport Cooperative Research Program FY08 Synthesis Projects

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FINDINGS AND OUTCOMES

The Salt Lake City Department of Airports (SLCDA) is achieving numerous sustainable outcomes as a result of proactive stewardship of public assets and management of business operations that serve a strong community of families, a growing volume of destination and business travelers, and a local business economy influenced by tourism. The assessment identified sustainable outcomes comprised of 150 business practices, policies, and specific programs being managed by SLCDA. To simplify the organization of 150 various elements, these have been organized within five (5) sustainability practice areas. As stated previously, sustainability practice area refers to a group of sustainable elements based upon either the common intended outcome (e.g. conservation, waste minimization, quality initiatives), or the business unit which implements and/or manages the elements (e.g. management practices, planning and development). These elements have been grouped under the following headings and are illustrated in greater detail in Figure 2. The number (#) represents how many sustainable elements occur within each of the five practice areas: · · · · · Management Practices Conservation Initiatives Waste Minimization Planning and Development Quality Initiatives

Findings from the assessment interviews are organized within the report by assessment type: environmental, facility system and operational. Within each of the findings sections, are sustainable elements representing business practices, policies and specific programs. Organizational Integration of Sustainability Practice Areas Organizationally-speaking every business function can be fundamentally linked to achieving sustainable outcomes. From marketing to risk management and human resource management to supply-chain management, sustainability has a role to play in guiding the decisions and supporting the business strategies of these various functions. For each function, the opportunities and risk should be analyzed based upon feasibility and value across the four dimensions of sustainability. Approximately three thousand companies throughout the world voluntarily issue annual reports on sustainability. Results from a 2005 Price Waterhouse survey of 1,000 CEO's in 43 countries indicate that 79% believe sustainability is vital to profitability and numbers in these areas continue to grow. For airports throughout the world, annual reporting on sustainability is a growing trend. As an example, the Port of Portland issues an annual environmental report demonstrating measurable outcomes in support of their sustainable objectives. These are further discussed in this report in the section entitled, "U.S. Airport Sustainability Practices". Integration among the four sustainability dimensions enables holistic management of sustainability. Because sustainable outcomes are holistic in nature, integration is necessary to support the business case for sustainability. Integration among the dimensions ensures that

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trade-offs are evaluated when considering the implementation of sustainable policies and practices.

SLCDA 150 SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS CATEGORIZED BY SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICE AREA

23% 30%

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (35) CONSERVATION INITIATIVES (36) WASTE MINIMIZATION (19) PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (15) QUALITY INITIATIVES (45)

10% 13%

24%

Figure 2 Five sustainability practice areas used to organize 150 sustainable elements.

SLCDA BALANCE OF SUSTAINABILITY DIMENSIONS AMONG THE 150 SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS

ECONOMIC VIABILITY (90%) OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY (95%) NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION (91%) SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (75%)

Figure 3 Sustainability dimension percentage of occurrence among the 150 sustainable elements Carter & Burgess, Inc. 014792.012 Page 12 Salt Lake City Department of Airports Airport Sustainability Program Assessment

Salt Lake City Department of Airports has achieved a balanced program for sustainability that manages its practices and policies both comprehensively and holistically. Figure 3 illustrates a healthy balance among the four sustainability dimensions. The percentage (%) represents the occurrence of each dimension among the 150 sustainable elements. Figures 2 and 3 demonstrate the achievement of three important objectives requisite for meeting sustainable outcomes: 1. 2. 3. Practical application in SLCIA business units (environmental, facility systems and operations) where short-term success is most probable and can be leveraged for educating and informing other airports and business units within SLCDA. Evidence of top management support indicated through commitment to continuous improvement and innovation demonstrated in the quality initiatives and planning and development practice areas. An integrated approach to evaluating trade-offs and measuring on all sustainable programs, policies and business practices that have been implemented.

Economic Viability Economic viability is recognized when a business practice or policy positively promotes one or more of the attributes associated with, return on investment (ROI), innovation and continual organizational improvements, and expectation of future benefits. Economic benefits are not only financial in nature but consider the organizational elements of best practices, process optimization and strategic planning. Economic viability includes both quantitative and qualitative metrics. These metrics can range from the implied savings resulting from proactive management of indoor air quality and its impacts to employee productivity, to waste management practices that can be measured in terms of actual dollars saved. Economic viability was addressed for each of SLCDA's assessment areas based upon information obtained from the assessment process. On average, 90% of the150 sustainable elements promote economic viability as defined for airport sustainability. Figure 4 illustrates the percentage of economic viability occurrences for each assessment area. Examples of SLCDA sustainable elements achieving economically viable outcomes include: · · · · Recycling programs Use of technology to manage systems and processes System performance initiatives Quality initiatives

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SLCDA SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

ECONOMIC VIABILITY METRICS

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (73%) FACILITY SYSTEMS SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (92%) OPERATIONAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (100%)

Figure 4 SLCDA Economic Viability Occurrences per Assessment Area

Operational Efficiency Life cycle cost methodology and total cost of ownership epitomize the management practices that promote operational efficiency over the life of an asset. Operational efficiency is recognized when the effective management of systems and processes and use of innovation and technology are integrated to yield improved long-term outcomes. These outcomes are often used as benchmarks for measuring performance over time. Operational efficiency is also demonstrated when management has developed and documented processes which promote consistency, communication and collaboration among various functional areas Operational efficiency was addressed for each of SLCDA's assessment areas. On average, approximately 95% of the 150 sustainable elements promote operational efficiency as defined for airport sustainability. Figure 5 illustrates the number of operational efficiency occurrences for each assessment area. Examples of SLCDA sustainable elements achieving operationally efficient outcomes include: · · · · Documented policies and processes Asset management program Procurement practices Quality initiatives

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SLCDA SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY METRICS

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (93%) FACILITY SYSTEMS SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (92%) OPERATIONAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (100%)

Figure 5 SLCDA Operational Efficiency Occurrences per Assessment Area

Natural Resource Conservation Conservation programs reduce soil erosion, enhance water supplies, improve water quality, increase wildlife habitat, and reduce damages caused by floods and other natural disasters. SLCDA conservation efforts help sustain agricultural productivity and environmental quality while enabling continued economic development, recreation, and preservation of the region's scenic beauty. SLCDA's conservation of natural resources is achieved through management practices and policies that systematically minimize waste, persistently apply innovation to meet the challenges associated with resource conservation and exercise practicality in balancing the cost and benefits of preserving natural resources within the financial constraints of a business. Natural resource conservation was addressed for each of SLCDA's assessment areas. On average, 91% of the 150 sustainable elements promote conservation as defined for airport sustainability. Figure 6 illustrates the number of natural resource conservation occurrences for each assessment area. Examples of SLCDA sustainable elements achieving natural resource conservation outcomes include: · · · · Landscape/xeriscape programs Recycling programs Use of technology to reduce paper Environmental Management System

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SLCDA SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION METRICS

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (80%) FACILITY SYSTEMS SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (92%) OPERATIONAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (100%)

Figure 6 SLCDA Natural Resource Conservation Occurrences per Assessment Area

Social Responsibility Social responsibility is motivated by the desire to do good things for the right reasons. Social responsibilities extend beyond the building envelope and footprint and into the community it serves. Because social responsibility is not financially-driven or enacted purely as a response to regulations or compliance requirements, it is typically the most challenging dimension in making the business case for sustainability. SLCDA embraces social responsibility as a fundamental business philosophy. Business practices are evaluated in consideration of passenger comfort and convenience, workplace excellence, community needs and expectations and in partnership with local businesses, airline tenants and concessions. As a result, the operational assessment revealed the highest percentage of social responsibility occurrences. Social responsibility was addressed for each of SLCDA's assessment areas. On average, 75% of the 150 sustainable elements promote social responsibility as defined for airport sustainability. Figure 7 illustrates the number of social responsibility occurrences for each assessment area. Examples of SLCDA sustainable elements achieving socially responsible outcomes include: · · · · Conservation Initiatives and Recycling Programs Planning and Development Programs to enable Inter-modal Transportation Alternative Fuel Incentive Programs Voluntary Participation in Noise Control Programs

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SLCDA SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY METRICS

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (73%) FACILITY SYSTEMS SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (58%) OPERATIONAL SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS (93%)

Figure 7 Number of Social Responsibility Occurrences per Assessment Area

RECOMMENDATIONS

SLCDA manages its business practices holistically to achieve sustainable outcomes. As the airport progresses in its management of sustainable outcomes, strategy-based recommendations are offered to further institutionalize sustainability as a business model for SLCDA. Recommendations also include opportunities identified from the assessments or through discussions with other airports. These are considered to be reasonably feasible with one or more of the SLCDA airports based upon the simplicity of the practice and/or a successful outcome that has been realized through an existing implementation. Opportunities may also be those identified through industry knowledge of practices at airports with similar operations. Finally, opportunities may be those practices which based upon Carter & Burgess' technical expertise reveal themselves as practical and economically-sound for SLCDA.

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ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

Salt Lake City Department of Airports Airport transportation serving the Salt Lake City community is operated and managed by the Salt Lake City Department of Airports, (SLCDA) a department of Salt Lake City Corporation. Salt Lake City's Mayor, the City Council and a nine-member advisory board of citizen volunteers oversee its affairs. In addition to Salt Lake City International Airport (SLCIA), the department also operates Tooele Valley Airport located in Tooele County and Airport II located in West Jordan, general aviation/reliever facilities funded by revenues generated by Salt Lake City International Airport. An enterprise fund of Salt Lake City Corporation, the Department of Airports is a self-liquidating organization requiring no funding from property taxes, general funds of local governments, or special district taxes. Capital requirements are met from earned surpluses, revenue bonds, passenger facility charges and Federal Aviation Administration grants under the Airport Improvement Program. The stated mission of the SLCDA is, "to manage, develop and promote airports that provide quality transportation facilities and services". The mission of SLCDA embodies the practical philosophy that has guided the management and development of the Airport since 1911. Salt Lake City International Airport The history of commercial aviation is directly linked with the history of Salt Lake City International Airport. Airmail service in the United States began on May 15, 1918, over a single route between Washington, D.C., and New York City with a refueling stop in Philadelphia. Over the next two years, routes were expanded to include Chicago, Cleveland, and Omaha. The last leg of a developing transcontinental route linked Omaha with San Francisco via North Platte, Cheyenne, Rawlins, Rock Springs, Salt Lake City, and Reno. This route was opened on September 8, 1920. At that time, Salt Lake City offered little more than a safety landing strip that had been purchased in 1911 and a refueling stop during the first months of the airmail run. In 1920, Salt Lake City purchased approximately 100 acres surrounding the landing strip. On December 21, 1920, "Woodward Field" was dedicated at 22nd West and North Temple. At the suggestion of Salt Lake City Mayor Clarence Neslen, the new facility was named after John P. Woodward, a local airmail pilot who was killed November 6, 1920, when his plane crashed in a snowstorm in Wyoming. At that time, Woodward Field was one of the largest of the 15 U.S. airfields used by the United States Postal Service. In 1930, Woodward Field was renamed "Salt Lake City Municipal Airport." It consisted of 400 acres, 11 hangars and two gravel runways. The airport was used as a military training base in the 1940s, and became a commercial jet center with the addition of two new runways in the 1950s. Western Airlines began using the airport as a hub in 1982, and it continues in that role after the merge of Western with Delta Air Lines in 1987. Salt Lake City International Airport (SLCIA) is located five miles northwest of downtown Salt Lake City. The airfield consists of three air carrier runways and a general aviation runway.

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SLCIA is comprised of two terminals, an international facility, five concourses (A-E) and 70 aircraft gates. Delta Air Lines and SkyWest Airlines operate from Terminal Two. All other airlines serving SLCIA use Terminal One. General aviation facilities including fixed base operators are located on the east side of the airfield. Cargo companies are clustered south of the complex with the exception of DHL and United Parcel Service, which is north of the terminal buildings. The Airport reports passenger volumes at an average of 23,000,000 annually and annual operations including commercial, cargo, general aviation and military of approximately 456,000. Salt Lake City Airport II Salt Lake City Airport II (SLC Airport II) is owned by Salt Lake City Corporation and operated by the Salt Lake City Department of Airports. It is the principal general aviation reliever airport for Salt Lake City International Airport. The airport is located in West Jordan City and encompasses an area of 920 acres. At the present time, there are 235 based civil aircraft with an estimated 72,000 annual operations. The recommended maximum number of civilian aircraft that can be based at SLC Airport II is 400. SLC Airport II is comprised of two Fixed Base Operator (FBO) facilities, located at the north and south points of the terminal area. Personnel and equipment from Salt Lake City International Airport also support maintenance personnel when necessary. The Utah National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility located at the south end of Airport II houses the 1st Battalion, 211th Aviation Attack Helicopter Unit, 2nd Battalion, 211th Aviation Utility and Cargo Helicopter. In August 2006, a Master Plan update was completed to determine the development requirements of the airport to meet projected aviation demand through the year 2020, providing an airport that is safe, reliable, and consistent with FAA planning guidelines. In addition, recommendations for land use within the airport boundary and in the vicinity of the airport have been formulated to maximize the use of airport property while maintaining compatibility with surrounding development. The plan also addresses the airspace in the vicinity of the airport and the airport noise environment. Tooele Valley Airport Tooele Valley (Bolinder Field) is a public airport that was acquired in 1991 by Salt Lake City Corporation. The airport is funded by revenue generated by the airlines that use Salt Lake City International Airport. The Tooele Valley airport serves the communities in the Tooele Valley as well as general aviation from the Salt Lake Valley and surrounding areas. The airport is located 21 miles from Salt Lake City International Airport and 17 miles from Airport II. Tooele Valley Airport is not affected by the Salt Lake City Class B airspace and is used extensively for pilot training activities. Although not officially designated by the FAA as a reliever, Tooele Valley also serves as a reliever airport for Salt Lake City International Airport. There are 16 based civil aircraft. The Tooele Valley has an estimated 55,000 annual operations. The airport has the potential for a possible based capacity of 500 civilian aircraft.

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Salt Lake City Department of Airports Airport Sustainability Program Assessment

SUSTAINABLE FINDINGS AND OUTCOMES

Environmental Assessment Methodology Initial research of SLCDA's environmental business functions focused on information available on the City's and Department of Airports' websites as well as information provided by the Department of Airports for this assessment. Information included: · · · · · · · · · · · · Airport overview and general information about the airports Airport Layout Plans for SLCIA, Airport II and Tooele Valley SLCIA construction projects SLCIA operational statistics SLCDA Elevations and Centerline newsletters Airport maps and aerial photographs SLCIA Noise Compatibility Study Measures and Noise Exposure Maps Airport II Master Plan Update Working Draft Overviews of the SLCDA Recycling Program, Environmental Program, and Noise Monitoring SLCDA Instructions for a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Engineering/Construction contract Special Conditions Review of SLCIA ISO 14000 Environmental Management System

Sustainable initiatives were identified, inventoried, and assessed through a site tour of the facility and interviews on October 26 and 27, 2006. The assessment team held a group meeting with representatives from the following SLCDA divisions: · · · · · · Planning and Development Environmental Programs Properties Engineering Operations (landside and airfield) Maintenance

Environmental assessment interviews were conducted with: · · · · Steve Domino, Director Planning and Environmental Tim Gwynette, Environmental Programs Manager Patty M. Nelis, Environmental Specialist Daniel Spader Jr, Airport Architect

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The ACI Sustainable Initiatives Index was used as a guideline for discussions to ensure that a wide range of sustainability practices were reviewed. Both regulatory compliance and best practice measures were considered, as well. Items were quantified to the extent possible during the interviews, with follow-up conversations and e-mails on additional questions and quantification. The findings consider the airport as a business that interacts with the environmental elements of its community. To achieve appropriate context, the findings, which represent various initiatives and practices, are grouped together under a heading that best describes the common characteristics of the initiatives. Because many of the practices discussed in the environmental area overlap with the other business areas within the SLCDA, the assessment team compared findings to eliminate duplications, identify additional follow-on questions, and identify unique elements. Environmental Assessment Findings and Outcomes SLCDA has achieved significant results through its pro-active management and effective integration of 42 sustainable elements. The outcomes are summarized in a matrix located at the conclusion of this section, and identify each initiative's relevance with one or more of the four sustainable categories. The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) defines the "environmental audit" as: "The systematic examination of the interactions between any business operation and its surroundings. This includes all emissions to air, land, and water; legal constraints; the effects on the neighboring community, landscape and ecology; and the public's perception of the operating company in the local area. Environmental audit does not stop at compliance with legislation. Nor is it a 'green-washing' public relations exercise. Rather it is a total strategic approach to the organization's activities. " Although the environmental assessment did not focus on environmental compliance for SLCDA, the approach, findings and recommendations embrace the spirit of the ICC definition. Figure 8 illustrates the environmental assessment elements by grouping.

SLCDA ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 42 SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS

19% 33% 10%

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (14) CONSERVATION INITIATIVES (8) WASTE MINIMIZATION (8) PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (4) QUALITY INITIATIVES (8)

19% 19%

Figure 8 illustrates the number (#) of sustainable elements for each sustainability practice area. Carter & Burgess, Inc. 014792.012 Page 22 Salt Lake City Department of Airports Airport Sustainability Program Assessment

Management Practices (14) 1. Environmental Management System (EMS): An informal EMS, which integrates environmental management into overall management activities, is under development for SLCIA. The EMS is ISO 14001 compliant, meeting the international standard for environmental management. The informal EMS development process has been used by the Department of Airports to identify deficiencies and improve environmental management procedures. 2. The Environmental Programs Group is on-call 24/7 with mobile equipment for emergency response for hazardous materials releases at all three airports and to assist emergency response personnel, fire fighters and tenants in spill containment, clean up, hazardous material disposal, and State and Federal notification requirements. 3. In the early 1990s, the SLCDA worked with local environmental and regulatory groups to design, create and manage a 465 acre wetlands mitigation site to compensate for natural wetlands impacted by runway construction. 4. Environmental monitoring and reporting is conducted for storm water discharges across SLCIA. 5. Voluntary noise monitoring is also conducted at the airport. 6. SLCDA employs sustainable principles to storm water management both in response to regulatory requirements and in the interest of good stewardship. On the airfield alone at SLCIA, the SLCDA must manage runoff from 1,230 acres of asphalt and concrete runways, taxiways, and aircraft parking aprons that discharge into public waterways. Techniques include erosion and sedimentation control; monitoring the rates and quality of runoff, and treatment of runoff. 7. SLCDA maintains a storm water discharge permit for all three airports under the Utah Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, in compliance with the Utah Water Quality Act. At SLCIA, there are five outfall points, all of which are monitored monthly for pH, petroleum constituents, and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) which indicates the presence of deicing constituents. 8. Storm drains and outfalls are monitored daily at SLCIA to identify specific pollutants and quickly remedy the situation should pollutants be identified. The outfalls are also sampled one to two days following a storm event to check for oil, grease and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Five auto-samplers have been installed and will be used to sample the outfalls at irregular times (such as night-time storm events) when personnel cannot conduct the sampling. 9. Protection of ground water is ensured through semi-annual sampling of the Airport's Ground Water Quality Discharge Permit for Airport Deicing Operations, Storm Water Detention, and Reclamation Facility. Samples are taken from four (4) ground water monitoring wells in the vicinity of the detention basins at SLCIA. 10. At SLCIA, deicing pads are designed to capture fluid during storm events, reducing the collection of storm water and the potential discharge of deicing fluid into the surrounding waterways. The collected fluid flows to the glycol recycling plant through designated piping. 11. No de-icing takes place at Airport II or Tooele Valley Airport. 12. Underground storage tanks (located at SLCIA) are double-walled and monitored by the building automation system to detect leaks and avoid soil contamination.

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13. Sustainable landscape ordinance for landside improvements have been adopted from the City's landscape guidelines, with some modification. The City has allowed a variance in the tree requirement to the SLCDA in recognition that trees can create a bird attractant that is a safety hazard in the airport environment. Like the City, a primary goal of the SLCDA's landscaping policy is to promote the prudent use of water and resources. 14. SLCDA utilizes best management practices to maintain and improve air quality in accordance with their state air quality permit and to make improvements where possible. Conservation Initiatives (8) 1. The Landscape Architect responsible for the current airport landside design conducted a study to determine if alternate water sources could be utilized in place of potable (drinking) water. The study concluded that potable water was the most feasible and cost effective. However, the study did show that water from other sources may be viable options in the near future, including the surplus canal and reclaimed water from a near by treatment facility. 2. The SLCDA is transitioning to xeriscape at SLCIA with the new terminal roadway project and other ongoing maintenance work. Plantings utilize native vegetation, rock cover, rock swales, and mulches, incorporating drip irrigation. Water use is being monitored by the Airport, and after establishment of the plantings, water usage is expected to decrease dramatically from that experienced with the former lawn-based landscaping. 3. Landside landscaping at the airport has been reduced to 250 acres that include 9% seeded area, 9% bark mulch, 3% stone mulch; the remaining area is pavement. 4. Rock mulch was used to enhance appearance, reduce plantings, water usage and achieve lower maintenance costs. The use of the rock mulch reduces watering needs and minimizes the need for pesticides and herbicides. 5. Bark mulch used on the landside is created from a recycled wood product that is dyed and maintains its color better then traditional mulch products. The recycled wood mulch is more expensive than non-recycled products however these costs are outweighed by the resultant environmental benefits. 6. Drip irrigation system delivers water where it is needed and avoids evaporation and unnecessary watering of non planted areas. The system is connected to a weather station that monitors humidity, rain fall and soil moister to determine the optimum watering times and conditions, delivering only the required amounts of water. 7. The landside irrigation system can detect leaks and assist the maintenance staff in locating the leak which saves time, resources and water. 8. The use of xeriscape has reduced mowing and associated emissions from small gasoline-powered equipment used for mowing and trimming vegetation. Waste Minimization (8) The SLCDA supports extensive day-to-day recycling in its airport facilities, and as a part of construction, to encourage recycling and to minimize unnecessary use of new materials and resources.

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1. A 2004 program goal was identified to increase the amount of material recycled by 5% in two years. The percentage of recycled cardboard, office paper, newspaper and plastic has increased by 28% between 2005 and 2006. An additional 5% increase is expected in 2006. The airport also resells its cardboard, resulting in a $15,000 savings per year. 2. The Airport's Recycling Efforts are estimated at 150 tons of plastic items and newspapers over the past three years. An additional 89 tons of office paper has been diverted from the landfill, as has more than 900 tires, 660 batteries and 250 tons of scrap metal. Airlines and construction workers at the airport have started participating and are realizing the environmental and money-saving impacts of the program. 3. SLCIA has encouraged participation in recycling with both the airlines and construction crews. As participation has improved, SLCIA has tracked the benefits resulting from these collaborative efforts 4. Plant materials removed during construction at all of the three airports are chipped or shredded for use as mulch. The SLCDA maintains mulch stockpiles for use as needed to control erosion and conserve irrigation water. 5. SLCDA provides waste oil containers to general aviation pilots at each of the three airports for collection of waste engine oil. These containers are collected by an outside contractor for reuse on various construction projects.

70,000 60,000 Cubic Yards of Material 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2003 2004 2005 Asphalt Concrete Soil and Plant Materials

6. De-icing fluid (glycol) is also Figure 9 SLCDA Construction Materials Recycling 2003 - 2005 Source: Salt Lake City Department of Airports records, captured from the SLCIA's 19 October 2006 primary and four secondary deicing pads and pumped to the recycling plant for storage and recovery. The SLCDA began glycol recycling in the 2002/2003 winter season, removing excess water and recovering approximately 142,000 gallons of glycol for sale on the secondary market. The savings from recycling partially offset the operation and maintenance costs associated with the recycling plant. Water that is a by-product of the distillation process is discharged to the sanitary sewer. In 2003/2004 the Airport added a glycol recovery vehicle (GRV) to collect additional fluid from the de-icing pads, improving recovery. 7. Demolished concrete and asphalt are salvaged and stockpiled for re-use as road base or stabilization material at the three airports; SLCIA, Airport II and Tooele Valley. 8. Construction contractors are urged to recycle construction materials on all airport projects. The SLCDA and contractor identify potential reusable or recyclable materials prior to initiation of construction. Storage for recycled construction materials is provided on the airport properties. Contractors are required to document the quantities and types of materials that are recycled. Figure 9 illustrates the success of the program, based on this documentation.

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Planning and Development (4) 1. In August 2005, SLCDA completed a wet-lands delineation for the entire SLCIA property. It identified 1,095 acres of wetlands within the airport property boundary. This is being used to plan and coordinate with regulatory agencies, for mitigation of future impacts associated with projects in the capital improvement program. Early coordination and partnership with regulatory agencies and environmental groups ensures that adequate, high quality mitigation can be identified or created when needed in advance of Airport expansion. 2. Within the Development Program, the Engineering Division anticipates working with the Environmental Division to define sustainability goals for the future facilities to be able to obtain Silver Certification for the SLCIA terminals under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) under the City's High Performance Buildings Initiative. 3. The SLCDA requires construction contractors to complete and operate under a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which outlines means and methods for incorporating storm-water detention, sediment controls, soil stabilization, slope protection, drain inlet protection, storm-water outlet protection, spill prevention and response, storm water treatment, clearing limits, and construction access requirements. These measures are required to minimize sediment transport from construction sites and protect water quality downstream. 4. An existing bird habitat near SLCIA currently creating a hazard is being planned for relocation. The SLCDA is working with the Department of Agriculture and other agencies with a goal of establishing wetlands to which the bird habitat can be relocated. Ongoing coordination with agencies ensures that a good solution can be identified and implemented in a timely manner to maintain safe airport operations. Quality Initiatives (8) The SLCDA has taken an active role in assessing and communicating noise exposure around its three airports to maintain compatible land use in the airport environs. 1. The SLCDA has participated in the FAR Part 150 Noise Compatibility Planning program, a voluntary program sponsored by the FAA, to assess aviation related noise at SLCIA. The program uses detailed computer analyses of flight tracks, fleet, and time of day to assess noise created by aviation in the airport environs. The program also identifies incompatible land uses, and recommends measures to abate noise or mitigate its effects. 2. The SLCDA has published maps identifying areas exposed to noise of Day-Night Level (DNL) 60 and higher and also other areas subject to over-flights so that developers and buyers can be aware of these conditions. These maps are available on the Department of Airports website for SLCIA. The SLCDA worked with the City of West Jordan on creation of an Airport Overlay Zone which identifies areas subject to noise around Airport II and Tooele Valley. 3. The current noise exposure maps for SLCIA identify one (1) area of incompatible land use within the area exposed to Day-Night Level (DNL) 65 and higher, the federallyrecognized level of significance for noise. There are no known schools, hospitals or religious facilities within the area exposed to DNL 65 and higher around SLCIA.

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4. The SLCDA is working with the City to try to minimize development of incompatible land uses in the northwest sector, northwest of SLCIA. 5. The SLCDA has provided comment to FAA on development of defined flight paths within the valley, known as Area Navigation (RNAV) procedures. These procedures can help limit noise exposure to specific areas through defined arrival and departure heading and altitude guidance to aircraft. 6. Airport II and Tooele Valley Airport help to direct noise away from inhabited areas by moving the general aviation air traffic away from the urban center. 7. Wildlife management techniques are environmentally friendly. Birds present the primary wildlife challenge to aviation in the Salt Lake City environs. Techniques used to discourage birds and geese from stopping on SLCIA include automated (solar powered) noise machines, and driving into the area to divert the birds away. Awards and Recognition · Excellence in Paving Awards from the Utah Chapter of the American Concrete Paving Association and the Utah Department of Transportation in recognition of the high quality of engineering performed and reuse of construction materials on the Taxiways M and H Reconstruction projects. Utah Pollution Prevention Association recognized the Salt Lake City Department of Airports with the 2004 Achievement Award in Pollution Prevention. This honor recognized the airport's water conservation program and its conversion of non-native grass and ornamental trees to native drought tolerant vegetation. Since 2001, over 12 acres have been converted to water-conserving landscapes with a savings of 197 million gallons of water. The Recycling Coalition of Utah awarded the Salt Lake City Department of Airports with the Local Government Recycling Program of the year in 2005. This award is presented to individuals and organizations demonstrating creativity and passion in the commitment to recycling programs.

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ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT INTEGRATED OUTCOMES (ABRIDGED LIST OF ELEMENTS)

Salt Lake City International Airport

N atura l R e so u rce C o nservatio n

Salt Lake City Municipal Airport II

N atura l R e so u rce C o nservatio n

Tooele Valley Airport

N atura l R e so u rce C o nservatio n

O p era tio n al E fficien c y

O p era tio n al E fficien c y

O p era tio n al E fficien c y

S ocial R espo n sib ility

S ocial R espo n sib ility

ENVIRONMENTAL PRACTICES, POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

Environmental Management System Emergency Response Teams Wetlands Management Monitoring and Reporting Storm Water Management Ground Water Management Landscape Maintenance Guidelines Air Quality Management

CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

Landscape Design/Xeriscape

WASTE MINIMIZATION (RECYCLING)

Environmental Recycling Programs

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Strategic Planning Wetlands Coordination with USDA Permits and Policies

QUALITY INITIATIVES

Noise Control and Management Wildlife Management

Figure 10 Environmental Assessment ­ Integrated Outcomes

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S ocial R espo n sib ility

E co no m ic V iab ility

E co no m ic V iab ility

E co no m ic V iab ility

Facility Systems Assessment Methodology A tour of the Airport was conducted for the CB team, in order to allow members to gain an overall appreciation for the scope of the facility. The Central Utility Plant (CUP) was observed briefly as a part of the tour. Meetings were held with various SLCIA staff on October 26 and 27, 2006, to review the sustainable accomplishments, particularly relating to energy conservation and atmosphere quality. Those interviewed included: · · · · · · · · · Wade Coon, Electrician Ron Dallinga, Fleet Manager William H. Ernst, Superintendent Electrical Support Byron Gray, Superintendent of Technical Services Tim Gwynette, Environmental Programs Manager Kirk Gundersen, Senior Maintenance Supervisor Peter L. Higgins, Director of Airport Maintenance Patty M. Nelis, Environmental Specialist Daniel Spader Jr, Airport Architect

Information was obtained from the interviews with these individuals regarding their current operations, planned improvements and analysis of historical data, when available. Information was requested in alignment with Airports Council International (ACI) Draft Sustainability Initiatives Index. The ACI Index is an all-inclusive compendium of sustainable elements and practices within the airport industry compiled from a number of various sources. Respective to the area of energy and atmosphere, this resource captures the scope of LEED publications, ASHRAE publications, and certain building code requirements related to energy. The scope of the ACI document encompasses environmental quality, energy efficiency, decreased O & M costs, and waste minimization. After identifying applicable elements with the SLCIA personnel, further information was obtained either by verbal interview, or subsequently via emails between Carter Burgess and SLCIA once specific data was compiled. While hard data on energy records was not specifically analyzed, certain initiatives with documented energy savings are noted. Examples include lighting upgrades with resulting savings, and energy management initiatives. The Building Automation System (BAS) control station was observed, and representative control screens are provided in a separate document labeled, "SLCDA Sustainability Program Assessment Appendix I". The energy practices associated with the BAS capability are noted in the main report. Of great significance is the fact that SLCIA BAS demonstrates advanced intelligence, which is being used to control many parameters typically unseen in such a facility. The BAS controls energy consuming equipment to optimize usage based on temperature,

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resets, scheduling, and operational mode control. The result is substantial energy savings and corresponding reductions of atmospheric pollutants attributable to energy production. Aspects of the SLCDA operations which have direct impact on energy and atmosphere, such as the capture and recovery of de-icing glycol are also noted. Facility Systems Assessment Findings and Outcomes SLCDA has made great strides in implementing at least 52 sustainable elements in support of the management of its assets while meeting the diverse, unique requirements and demands of a transportation hub and destination airport. In general, buildings currently consume more than one-third of all the energy and two thirds of all the electricity used in the United States. "Typical" buildings consume more resources than necessary, negatively impact the environment, and generate a large amount of waste. Further, buildings are a major source of the pollution that causes urban air quality problems, and the pollutants that contribute to climate change. They account for 49 percent of sulfur dioxide emissions (SO2), 25 percent of nitrous oxide emissions (NOX), and 10 percent of particulate emissions, all of which damage urban air quality. Buildings produce 35 percent of the country's carbon dioxide emissions--the chief pollutant blamed for climate change. Traditional building practices often overlook the interrelationships between a building, its components, its surroundings, and its occupants. Annually, SLCDA investigates and researches at least two new procedures or products aimed at improving present energy conservation efforts, and proactively managing these interrelationships. Results of recent efforts are documented within the report. Figure 11 illustrates the facility systems elements by the program assessment's practice areas.

SLCDA FACILITY SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 52 SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS

33% 42%

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (Building Operations and Maintenance) (17) CONSERVATION INITIATIVES (6)

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (7)

QUALITY INITIATIVES (22)

12% 13%

Figure 11 illustrates the number (#) of facility systems' elements for each sustainability practice area.

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Management Practices (Building Operations and Maintenance) (17) A sophisticated Building Automation System (BAS) at SLCIA controls major energy consuming components within the terminal buildings as well as in support facilities. This system significantly reduces energy consumption throughout the facility. Examples of the system's automatic capabilities include: 1. Automatic control of lighting ­ shut-off in unoccupied areas and day-light harvesting are used to control lights when ambient sunlight can provide adequate lighting. 2. Reset of heating water temperature to more efficient temperatures in mild winter conditions. 3. HVAC temperature reset control for non-occupied areas. 4. Control of the radiant heaters at skycap curb-side check-in stations. 5. Control of exhaust fans. 6. Control of heating equipment in maintenance garage areas. This feature also is interlocked with the garage doors to prevent heater operation when doors are open. 7. Other energy control features at SLCIA exclusive of the BAS capability are: 8. An energy conservation mode in the Airfield Lighting Control System allows the air traffic controllers to shut off the west airfield lighting each night after all major operations have ceased. 9. Site lighting controls to control exterior lighting, including parking garage lighting and surface parking lighting. Equipment upgrades have been accomplished with energy reductions resulting. These include: 10. Chilled Water primary pump motors were retrofitted with Variable Frequency Drives, to allow pump speed reduction for summer air conditioning chilled water 11. Cooling Tower fan motors are equipped with Variable Frequency Drives, which are used to control the condenser water temperature returning to the chillers. This increases chiller efficiency and capacity. 12. New light fixtures in public restrooms and other areas utilize electronic ballasts and high efficiency fluorescent lamps. 13. High-efficiency replacement. motors are specified whenever existing large motors require

14. Occupancy sensors control lighting in Customs and storage areas that are intermittently occupied. Energy savings attributable to this initiative are $3,000 per year. 15. 500-watt halogen lamps have been replaced with 72-watt fluorescent accent lamps at the fire station. This resulted in significant energy savings and a reduction in labor required to replace frequently burned out halogen lamps. Energy savings have been realized by further actions implemented by the Airport, including: 16. Re-zoning electrical lighting circuits to allow increased control and shut-down. In the International Terminal, this was paired with placing the new circuiting on the SLCIA

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Building Automation System for computer controlled scheduling. As a result, large numbers of lights are off for 14 hours each day, which has saved more than $11,000 annually in energy costs. 17. Installing film on Terminal exterior glass to reduce solar heat load. Conservation Initiatives (6) The Airport maintains a pro-active energy conservation program the details of which are presented in the following items: 1. Equipment upgrades, computerized control of energy usage, optimized scheduling, air quality monitoring of ventilation systems, water reduction measures, and recycling measures have been implemented to promote conservation. Conservation strategies and initiatives are planned annually. 2. Water conserving plumbing fixtures have been installed in public restrooms. These fixtures result in more than 50% water savings compared to the former fixtures. The fixtures are equipped with electronic flush sensors which further reduce total water usage. Since these fixtures operate "hands-free", added benefits include improved sanitary conditions and ease of use for airport patrons. Several initiatives at SLCIA reduce energy consumption, improve energy performance, decrease atmospheric pollutants, and utilize alternative energy sources. These initiatives help minimize the extraction of natural resources, and reduce pollution impact. Specific initiatives to reduce atmospheric pollutants include: 3. Three existing chillers have been replaced with new chillers since 1997. These chillers utilize refrigerant R-134a. The refrigerant has much less ozone depletion and greenhouse effect potential. Chiller # 4, a 920 Ton R-11 Trane chiller circa 1984, is the oldest chiller in the central utility plant (CUP). It is typically used only as a standby chiller for operation on days above 80 degrees. All chillers are equipped with variable frequency drives (VFDs) on the chiller motors. This increases the efficiency of the chillers. 4. Existing heating boilers have been retrofitted with new cleaner burning elements to lower NOX and SO2 emissions. 5. Self-contained pre-conditioned Air (PCA) is utilized for commercial aircraft parked at ramp. This reduces energy usage by separating this intermittent energy use from the CUP. 6. Floor drains in vehicle maintenance areas discharge into an oil-water separator, which captures oil and other contaminants. The separator is periodically pumped, and the oil processed for recycling.

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Planning and Development (7) 1. Presently, SLCIA is considering replacement of 3-way chilled water control valves with 2-way valves at HVAC air handling units. This will reduce the quantity of chilled water pumped throughout the building circulation loop, and thus save pumping energy. Prior to current VFD technology, chilled water flow was a constant quantity of water in a typical system, regardless of the cooling load. With the application of VFDs on the chilled water pumps, the three-way, constant flow volume valves can be replaced with 2way valves which will throttle the chilled water flow to match the actual cooling load. 2. A 500,000 btu/hr hot water heating boiler will be installed before summer 2007. This unit will operate in the summer when the main boilers which primarily provide winter heating, are idle. By having a separate dedicated boiler for domestic hot water production, an 11,000,000 btu/hr boiler can be idled. This reduces stand-by and cycling energy losses. 3. Presently SLCIA is conducting a lab experiment to ascertain which manufacturer has the best LED lighting system for the Airport's 250 lighted signs, and indirect accent lighting. In the long-term, SLCIA will replace the existing central utility plant due to its age. At this juncture, additional energy efficiency improvements are anticipated, potentially in the following areas: 4. Ultra high efficiency condensing boilers 5. Domestic hot water pre-heating via heat pump loops which simultaneously heat domestic water while producing a portion of the chilled water at the plant. 6. Re-zoning plant pumping for improved zone control and hydraulic efficiency. 7. Integrating additional controls into the plan equipment for increased energy management potential. Quality Initiatives (22) 1. SLCDA has adapted a policy to utilize alternative fuel vehicles and to encourage use of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) by non-airport owned vehicles. A CNG fueling system is present at SLCIA for airport-owned vehicles, and is also available to public vehicles. 2. SLCDA has an extensive CNG program in place. There are two CNG fueling stations on-site. One is accessible to the public, and utilized by public vehicles such as hotel shuttle buses. Airport-owned fleet buses are fueled by this alternative fuel. As a result, the Airport has reduced its regulated emissions output by more than 10,000 pounds per year. 3. Airport vehicles are monitored by a computer system that alerts the user when the vehicle requires maintenance or inspection and limits the amount of fuel dispensed to that vehicle until the servicing or inspection is completed. 4. Ground transportation maintenance and service vehicles are all powered by CNG or electricity. The Department is investigating expanding their use of electric powered vehicles that service the landside operation to further reduce air emissions. 5. In 2000 a public/private CNG fueling station was installed at the airport, funded in part by the DOE State Energy Program, Clean Cities Special Projects grant solicitation. In 2001 the airport's fleet of 80 light-duty and 16 buses consumed 166,000 gallons of CNG, compared to 42,000 gallons in 1999.

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6. In 2002 that amount increased 5% to 175,000 gallons. Positioned to accommodate the airport's fleet and private ground transportation providers, the station includes a "time-fill" component, along with the standard fast-fill. 7. In total, the vehicle fleet fuel usage is approximately 55% CNG, with conventional gasoline and diesel fuel comprising the balance of the vehicle energy use. The airport has recently added hybrid (electric / gasoline) fueled vehicles to their operations and maintenance vehicle fleet. Indoor environmental quality influences health, productivity, and quality of life. These sustainable initiatives include air quality, illumination, acoustics and temperature control. At SLCIA, these initiatives include: 8. Outdoor ventilation air intakes are located away from potential contaminant sources 9. Ventilation requirements of applicable codes and standards are followed. 10. Smoking in public areas is prohibited. 11. Designated smoking areas with separate exhaust ventilation systems are provided. 12. CO2 monitors are utilized in baggage handling rooms where air-side vehicles are present, to activate exhaust systems for air quality control. 13. Baggage conveyor tunnels are ventilated to maintain air quality. 14. Low volatile organic compounds (low-VOC) are specified for adhesives, field-applied paints and coatings, and in carpet installations. 15. A paint booth with filters is utilized for painting operations associated with maintenance department work. 16. A tail-pipe exhaust collection system at vehicle maintenance operations collects tailpipe exhausts when vehicles are being serviced. 17. Air conditioned and heated areas are provided for support personnel such as skycaps. 18. Building light levels are correlated to adjust with flight schedules. 19. All temporary lighting utilizes light emitting diode (LED) systems. 20. Permanent shading structures at building exteriors reduce solar exposure to patrons. 21. Solar day-lighting is utilized for partial interior lighting at ticketing lobbies and on passenger concourses. 22. Laminated glazing (window glass) reduces sound transmission into the building. Awards and Recognition The Aviation Committee of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America ­ 1996 Air Carrier Lighting Award for enhancement of general aviation airport safety based on superior achievement through excellence of design, construction, and inspection. · · In 2001 Salt Lake City and the Department of Airports was a recipient of the DOE Clean Cities Special Projects grant to purchase heavy-duty CNG vehicles.2 Salt Lake City Department of Airports received the 2004 Clear Air Promotion Award presented by the Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition. The award recognized the airport's

2 Source: www.doe.gov

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significant contributions to clean air through its promotion and/or use of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles which reduce regulated emissions by more than 50% compared with those resulting from vehicles using fossil fuels. · The airport's voluntary bio-diesel program deserves mention. Since July 2001, all diesel equipment at the airport has run on B20 a bio-diesel fuel that produces reductions in greenhouse gas emissions of approximately 20%. During 2002, the airport used approximately 37,000 gallons of B100, also a bio-diesel with recorded greenhouse gas emissions reductions of 75% and earned nearly 80 Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) credits.

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FACILITY SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT INTEGRATED OUTCOMES (ABRIDGED LIST OF ELEMENTS)

Salt Lake City International Airport

N a tu r a l R e s o u rc e C o n s e r v a tio n

Salt Lake City Municipal Airport II

N a tu r a l R e s o u rc e C o n s e r v a tio n

Tooele Valley Airport

N a tu r a l R e s o u rc e C o n s e r v a tio n

O p e r a tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

O p e r a tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

O p e r a tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

S o c ia l R e s p o n s ib ility

S o c ia l R e s p o n s ib ility

FACILITY SYSTEMS PRACTICES, POLICIES AND PROGRAMS+A60

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (BUILDING OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE)

Building Automated Controls Systems Lighting Controls - Airfield & Exterior HVAC Equipment Upgrades Lighting Retrofit and Upgrade Initiatives Heat Reduction Initiatives

CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

Water-conserving Plumbing Fixtures Day-lighting Energy System Performance Improvement Initiatives

QUALITY INITIATIVES

Alternative Fuel Initiatives - Airport Fleet Indoor Air Quality Initiatives Indoor Noise Control Initiatives

PLANNING & DEVELOPMENT

Innovative R&D Programs

Figure 12 Facility Systems Assessment ­ Sustainable Outcomes

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S o c ia l R e s p o n s ib ility

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Operational Assessment Methodology Interviews were conducted with SLCIA terminal operation staff, airline operation staff and consultants either in person or by phone to obtain information about their operations. Emphasis was given to identifying procedures and practices aimed at environmental stewardship, operational efficiency and social responsibility. The Airports Council International (ACI) Draft Sustainability Initiatives Index was used as a guide during the interviews to identify various airport initiatives that resonate with those managed by SLCDA. Upon identifying sustainable practices in use at SLCIA, additional follow up interviews were conducted to gain greater insight and detail regarding implementation and outcomes. New "green" and sustainable ideas, policies and practices not currently in place, but potentially feasible and cost-effective for future implementation were discussed and investigated during the interview process. Interviews were conducted with: · · · · · · · · · · · · · General Aviation Airports ­ Steve Jackson Landside Landscaping ­ Jan Striefel and Hugh Holt, Landmark Design Ground Transportation ­ Larry Bowers ­ Landside Operations Manager Construction Practices (Buildings) ­ Dan Spader Concessions Programs ­ John Buckner Custodial / Janitorial Services ­ Victoria Tucker Airside Operations ­ Al Stewart Environmental Programs Manager - Tim Gwynette Environmental Specialist - Patty M. Nelis SkyWest Airlines Salt Lake City Hub Director ­ David Katsilas Delta Air Lines Environmental Coordinator ­ Tom Brothers Delta Air Lines Baggage System ­ Kevin Thompson Southwest Airlines Station Manager ­ David LaPlant

Operational Assessment Findings and Outcomes Salt Lake City Department of Airports manages an evolving process to implement socially conscious, environmentally responsible, and economically practical business decisions at Salt Lake City International Airport, Tooele Valley Airport and Airport II. SLCDA Leadership provides a strong framework that promotes sustainable stewardship as a business model that is practical and embraces total cost of ownership.

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It is apparent in identifying at least 56 sustainable elements, that business decisions advancing sustainability are integrated throughout the organization and supported at every level. The operations business function supports sustainability in part through the use of formal policies and administrative procedures that are frequently evaluated for improvement, thus allowing the opportunity for innovation and collaboration with business partners. Figure 13 illustrates the operational assessment elements organized by groupings.

SLCDA OPERATIONAL ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 56 SUSTAINABLE ELEMENTS

7% 27%

MANAGEMENT PRACTICES (4) CONSERVATION INITIATIVES (22) WASTE MINIMIZATION (11)

39% 7%

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT (3) QUALITY INITIATIVES (14)

20%

Figure 13 illustrates the number (#) of operational elements for each sustainability practice

Management Practices (4) 1. The SLCDA incorporates sustainable principles into its procurement, information sharing, and contracting practices. Although written policies are not in place to govern these activities, sustainable principles are continually encouraged. 2. Both the City and the SLCDA maintain active DBE programs which encourage utilization of small and minority businesses in airport contracting to facilitate growth and development of these firms. The City also runs an employee retention program. 3. Local vendors and suppliers are preferred to minimize travel and response time for contracts in which quick response and frequent on-site presence are anticipated to be needed. 4. An Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) system is used to monitor commercial vehicle access to the curb front and to bill those users on a per-trip basis. This helps to regulate traffic along the curb front, discouraging unnecessary trips and resulting in a more efficient operation through minimization of air emissions due to vehicle travel and idling.

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Conservation Initiatives (22) 1. Inter-departmental information is shared electronically through the City's IT server, reducing paper use. 2. Request forms, work orders and other types of paperwork forms that need to be filled out at Tooele Valley and Airport II have been converted to an electronic format to reduce paper waste. 3. To minimize the need for excessive printing, bid documents are provided on CD to interested bidders. Where printed sets of construction drawings are necessary, printing of half-size sets is encouraged. 4. Requests for proposals are posted on the City's web site to minimize printing and mailing. Development program, planning, and other information of public interest are posted on the Airport's website. 5. The ground transportation system that is currently in place promotes sustainability through efficient operation, use, and maintenance of ground transportation resources. The following programs represent efficient utilization and potential opportunities for the expansion of ground transportation resources. 6. The ground transportation department requires that solar-powered temporary mobile way-finding signs be used along the roadways or in parking areas during construction or when additional temporary signage is required. 7. SLCIA specifies the use of solar-power for all flashing barricades. This includes those provided and utilized by contractors. 8. Ground transportation vehicle inspection reports and maintenance records are maintained electronically to minimize the use of paper. 9. Electric vehicles are utilized within the terminal and concourses at SLCIA to transport special-needs patrons. Emergency "ambulance carts" for the terminals are also electric powered. 10. SLCIA facility maintenance and custodial services utilize electric vehicles. SLCIA is testing hybrid gas electric vehicles to determine if they are acceptable alternatives to gas powered vehicles. 11. Water used during training at the ARFF facility "burn pit" at SLCIA is reclaimed and used on the landscaping. 12. SLCDA consistently installs a more efficient airfield light each time the old lights are replaced. 13. Taxiway centerline lights are being replaced with LED lights that require less power and last longer. 14. West side airfield lighting at SLCIA is turned off during night operations to conserve power, however, the airport maintains lighting on the east and center runways allowing cargo carriers and general aviation aircraft to land and depart. 15. The exterior lighting at Airport II and Tooele Valley are controlled by light sensors that turn off lights during daylight hours and run for a timed period once the sun has set. 16. Runway and taxiway lighting at Tooele Valley Airport and Airport II are activated by the pilot and remain on only for a short period of time to conserve energy.

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17. Runway and taxiway lighting removed or replaced at SLCIA is salvaged and reused at Airport II or Tooele Valley Airport. Airfield lighting removed from these two reliever airports is salvaged and sent to other Utah airports. 18. The Aircraft Rescue and Firefighter Training Center (ARFF) simulation burners were converted from diesel fuel to propane fuel in 1999. This has resulted in the avoidance of burning more than 500,000 gallons of diesel fuel. The training fires are instead fueled by significantly cleaner burning propane. 19. Minimal commercial traffic at the two reliever airports results in a more homogeneous mix of General Aviation traffic. This minimizes engine idle time that would occur if the small general aviation aircraft had to wait for take-off when operating with faster jet traffic, and vice versa. 20. Mobile fueling trucks at Tooele Valley Airport and Airport II are required to park in a catch basin that can retain 110% of the total fuel being stored on that vehicle. 21. The majority of ground equipment in use at the reliever airports is Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) or Bio-diesel. 22. Temporary flashing barricade lights are solar powered and operate with rechargeable batteries to reduce waste from disposable batteries. Waste Minimization/Recycling (11) 1. In 2003, the Airport introduced the concourse recycling program. The Airport collects and recycles newspaper and plastics from 40 recycling stations utilized by the traveling public throughout the two terminals. 2. The airport is studying the type, quantity and distribution of recycling bins with the passenger areas. They plan to increase the number of recycling bins throughout the airport. 3. All the Fixed Base Operators (FBO) at all three airports have programs in place to recycle oil and solvents. 4. The SLCDA provides collection points for recycling of paper, cardboard, and waste engine oil for SLCDA staff and airport tenants. Paper and other recyclables (classified as recyclables in the City's plan) can be collected in boxes provided by SLCDA, then transferred to large collection bins (also provided by SLCDA) for pick-up by the City's recycling contractor. Two compactors are provided in the terminal area for recycling of cardboard. These are conveniently located adjacent to the trash compactors. Tenants have been enthusiastic participants in this recycling effort. 5. Surplus and salvaged fencing from SLCIA is reused and installed at Tooele Valley Airport or Airport II. Any fencing that is replaced at either reliever airports is salvaged as scrap material for recycling. 6. Soap dispensers throughout the airport have been changed this past year to units that dispense soap foam versus liquid soap. The soap foam reduces the amount of product being dispensed. 7. Automatic paper towel dispensers in restrooms throughout the airport have replaced Cfold style paper towel dispenser. This change has reduced the amount of paper products required in restrooms by 20% and decreased the amount of trash created. The roll type paper towels dispensed from the automatic units are made from recycled paper products and minimize the need to refill the paper towel dispenser. The change has

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reduced janitorial services required in the restroom by nearly eliminating paper towels that end up on the floors. 8. Unused paint is donated to the Salt Lake City graffiti removal program. 9. Aluminum can recycling has been extremely successful, with participation from SLCDA staff, tenants, and airlines, which collect and recycle aluminum cans from flights. 10. The Airport collects and stores aged computer equipment, flight display monitors, and LED signage for recycling at community e-waste recycling events. 11. Printer and toner cartridges are collected and recycled through the supplier. Planning and Development (4) 1. Social, environmental, and economical sustainability are applied to the construction practices currently in place. With the use of these various policies brings the prevention of excessive waste, the use of locally produced resources, efforts to further reduce emissions and maintain compliance, while increasing awareness. 2. Roadway and terminal planning has incorporated anticipated light rail access through reserving rights-of-way and designing the new roadway system with overpasses at future rail lines. The future rail lines will terminate at the Airport. 3. The new parking lot design consolidates multiple employee parking lots into a single lot reducing the distance travel by buses and the quantity of shuttle buses needed to serve those lots. 4. The new landside roadways and parking areas under construction are designed to minimize driving distances for buses while maximizing passenger convenience with frequent stops. The design also minimizes the turns buses have to make reducing tire wear. Quality Initiatives (15) 1. SLCDA parking includes a convenient Park and Wait queuing area for vehicles awaiting arriving passengers. The Park and Wait area reduces engine running time and emissions. 2. The Mayor's office has recently requested that the Airport display signs at the Park and Wait lot to discourage car idling. The Airport is considering language for the signs cohesive with public messages related to environmental and social practices. 3. SLCIA recently contracted with a new janitorial service that has vast experience with "green" janitorial services at other airports like Denver International Airport. They brought this experience to SLCIA to improve the sustainability at the airport using simple but effective changes to the products used and way in which areas are cleaned. 4. SLCDA provides janitorial cleaning products for use by the cleaning service contractor. The use of aerosol cleaning products for janitorial services has been eliminated at the airport. The airport replaced three, "non-green" cleaning products with a single "green" cleaning product for use by its janitorial service contractor. This change to a single "green" cleaner lowers the amount and types of chemicals entering the sanitary waste system that have to be treated at a waste water facility. The change to a single cleaner

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minimizes the number of containers to be disposed and reduces the number of deliveries required improving air quality. 5. SLCDA has adopted a policy of purchasing "bio renewable" or "green" products for use in janitorial services. 6. Airport II provides a general aviation aircraft wash area that utilizes biodegradable soap. 7. Concentrated cleaning chemicals are stored in special areas, and appropriate ventilation is provided. 8. Janitorial equipment used inside buildings is selected carefully to minimize the impact to interior air quality. Where ever possible electric equipment is used in favor of CNG powered equipment. The majority of cleaning with power equipment is accomplished during off hours to allow benefit from less expensive off peak hour electricity and avoid conflicts with passengers. 9. The SLCDA limits the use of solvents at all three of its airports. By limiting their use, it is unlikely that those chemical will return in the form of hazardous materials that require disposal or penalties and fees for exceeding allowable limits. 10. SLCDA has an incentive program in place at SLCIA for companies that purchase and operate alternate fueled vehicles. The program reimburses the company up to $3,600 on the purchase price of an alternative vehicle through reduced AVI fees. 11. SLCDA is in the process of replacing the existing bus fleet at SLCIA with new larger buses that are powered by CNG. The advantages of the new buses are greater passenger capacity and less air pollution. The greater passenger capacity means fewer trips to service the same number of passengers creating less air pollution. The CNG power provides a cleaner burning fuel that generates fewer emissions. 12. Commercial vehicles that operate at SLCIA are inspected twice a year by airport ground transit maintenance staff insuring the vehicles are properly maintained with minimal vehicle emissions. 13. Bus performance and routes at SLCIA are monitored through the Automatic Vehicle Identification (AVI) system to verify performance and fuel economy. By monitoring performance, engine problems can be detected early and corrected. Maintaining a high standard for engine performance ensures air pollutants are kept to a minimum. 14. The consolidated rental car facility at SLCIA is directly across from the terminal buildings and requires no bus service, since passengers can easily walk to it. The proximity to the terminal has been translated into a savings of 300,000 miles not traveled by rental car buses and has the added benefit of reducing air pollution, noise pollution and traffic at the curbside in front of the terminals. 15. The incinerator used for garbage removed from an aircraft coming to SLCIA from a foreign country has been discontinued in favor of using an off site vendor to dispose of the waste. Awards and Recognition · · JD Power customer service ranking in the top 10 for many years. Salt Lake City International Airport was the most on-time airport in the nation for departures in 2005 and second for arrivals according to United States Department of Transportation annual statistics.

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DBE Advocate and Partner Award, FAA Northwest Mountain Region was presented to Paul Marshall in June 2005. The award recognizes advocacy for disadvantaged business enterprises (DBE). Airport Revenue News awards: Best Concessions Management Team in the medium hub airport category Best Customer Service Airport-wide (2nd place) Airport with the Best Overall Concessions Program (3rd place) Best Redeveloped Concessions Program (2003)

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The Airport's four canine explosive detection teams at Salt Lake City International Airport completed their annual certification evaluations with the highest collective scores ever achieved in the history of the program. The Utah Office of Tourism named the Salt Lake City Department of Airports a winner in three categories in its inaugural Utah Tourism Advertising and Marketing Contest. The airport was recognized for its newsletter, billboard campaign and bus signs. The contest celebrates excellence in Utah-related tourism advertising, marketing and promotion. The airport's print advertising campaign was given high honors in the Airport Council International-North America's Excellence in Airport Marketing and Communications Awards contest.

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OPERATIONAL ASSESSMENT INTEGRATED OUTCOMES (ABRIDGED LIST OF ELEMENTS)

N a tu ra l R e s o u rc e C o n s e rv a tio n

N a tu ra l R e s o u rc e C o n s e rv a tio n

N a tu ra l R e s o u rc e C o n s e rv a tio n

O p e ra tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

O p e ra tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

O p e ra tio n a l E ffic ie n c y

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AIRPORT OPERATIONS PRACTICES, POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

MANAGEMENT

Procurement Practices Curb-side Management Practices DBE/Supply Chain Management

CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

Business Technology Ground Transporation Way-finding Airfield and Runway Lighting Ramp Management

WASTE MINIMIZATION/RECYLING

Operations Based Recycling Programs Water-Conserving Fixtures in Public Areas

PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Light rail transportation Parking Structures Roadway Development

QUALITY INITIATIVES

Bio-degradable Cleaning Products Ground Transportation Incentives for Alternative Fuels

Figure 14 Operational Assessment ­ Integrated Outcomes

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SLCDA Concessions Practices SLCDA and concessionaires have undertaken extensive socially minded, environmental conscious and economical sustainable programs aimed at the consumer. Many of the concessionaires manage recycling and conservation programs that extend beyond those recommended by the airport. These programs serve to increase passenger awareness about conservation. Airport administration is continually expanding its knowledge base about concession "green" initiatives by attending conferences and seminars that lead to a free exchange of information with their counterparts at other airports about how to improve, implement and sustain environmentally friendly programs. Airports across the country are making a conscious decision to lead the way by working with concessionaires to share the effort and benefits associated with recycling and conservation-minded efforts. · · · SLCIA maintains two cardboard compactors on the airport property to assist concessionaires with recycling of cardboard. The airport is in the process of adding additional paper and plastic recycling bins throughout the airport that will redirect tons of garbage away from landfills. Squatters Brew Pub located at the airport utilizes WindStar electrical power exclusively. The pub has made the social commitment to use electrical power generated by wind turbines located in Wyoming, even though it is move expensive per kilowatt hour. Squatters Brew Pub has committed to using recycled products almost exclusively in their restaurants. They recycle paper, cardboard, glass and grease used at their locations. Squatters Brew Pub has taken recycling to a higher level by recycling their fryer grease. The grease is collected in storage tanks until it can be removed to a recycling center where it is converted into Bio-diesel fuel. In exchange for the raw material (fryer grease) Squatters is provided free fuel for their delivery trucks. Host donates unused prepackaged food to local shelter and food banks. During the last renovation of their kitchen area Host donated and installed all of their used kitchen equipment to the Sorenson Multi Cultural Center.

· ·

· ·

SLCDA Airline Interviews Interviews with Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines and SkyWest Airlines were requested during the assessment period. SKYWEST POINT OF CONTACT: · · · DAVE KATSILAS,

SkyWest Airlines uses single-engine taxiing between the gate and the runway conserve fuel and reduce emissions. The airline recycles all aluminum cans and magazines use on flights. Once the engines are started, the aircraft taxis within a very short period of time to conserve fuel.

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Aircraft parking at the gates minimize idling at the gates to reduce emissions. Planes are hooked up to the 400Hz power as soon as possible to avoid running the auxiliary power unit (APU) on board the aircraft saving fuel, reducing air pollution and noise pollution. The baggage system used by SkyWest airlines is shut down at night, and even between flight banks to minimize power consumption.

·

DELTA AIR LINES

POINT OF CONTACT: TOM BROTHERS, ENVIRONMENTAL COORDINATOR AL HILLE, CUSTOMER SERVICE AGENT

Mr. Al Hille was interviewed based upon his twelve years as Environmental Coordinator for Delta Air Lines at Salt Lake City International Airport. Mr. Hille no longer serves in that role; his current position is customer service agent. Environmental Management System Delta Air Lines ISO 14000 Environmental Management System (EMS) was tailored to the environmental footprint of the Salt Lake City station. Three main departments impact the station's environmental footprint: · · · Ground service equipment (GSE) shop Line maintenance Customer service

Mr. Hille stated that the EMS is used to systematically manage the processes and procedures that support reducing the station's environmental footprint. Examples provided include: · Regular inspections to ensure consistency and quality with procedures related to: o o o · Fuel spills and handling of hazardous materials Aircraft, hangar and building maintenance Storm-water management (Delta's biggest footprint)

Follow up with appropriate personnel and management involving education to define corrective actions for training gaps and/or operational deficiencies identified during the inspections. Mandatory responses for all corrective actions to be received by a specified deadline.

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Current Practices · Recycling of paper products is managed in cooperation with SLCDA.

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Newspapers, magazines (which account for 4 tons/month) and aluminum cans are collected on the aircraft by flight attendants and separated for recycling. All proceeds from the recycling go to Habitat for Humanity. Unused food goes into the waste stream. Delta tried in the past to donate unused food to homeless shelters but encountered difficulties with the Food and Drug Administration that made the effort impractical. Delta recycles all used oil cans as scrap metal. Once a can of oil has been emptied, it is drained for 24 hours and crushed. 100% of this metal is diverted from landfills. Delta uses single-engine taxiing between the gate and the runway conserve fuel and reduce emissions. Delta recycles aircraft tires, turbine oil and batteries. Indoor GSE is electrically powered to reduce emissions. Some gasoline and diesel equipment is also used in the bag room. Modifications to the HVAC system were implemented to improve air quality. Delta uses low sulfur diesel for heavy equipment licensed for public roads, to reduce emissions.

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SOUTHWEST AIRLINES POINT OF CONTACT: · DAVID LAPLANT, STATION MANAGER

Southwest flight attendants separate aluminum and paper products used in-flight for recycling. Proceeds from recycling are used to fund a catastrophe fund for Southwest employees affected by catastrophic events. Southwest cargo facilities collect aluminum cans for recycling. Southwest donates unused blankets and pillows to charity organizations that most recently include the Ronald McDonald House. Southwest has recently completed a purchase for new fuel trucks which were described as "much cleaner" than the 30-year old vehicles they will replace. Southwest shuts down baggage system operations at night to minimize power consumption.

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The following summary of SLCDA airline business practices are common among many domestic and international carriers and are offered for further evaluation by SLCDA. Summary of SLCDA Airline Findings AIRLINE BUSINESS PRACTICE Utilizes single-engine to taxi from the runway to the gate, can minimize fuel and decrease air emissions. Recycles many items such as magazines, aluminum cans, glass, and plastic. Electrically-powered GSE is utilized. Donates unused blankets, pillows, headphones and food charitable organizations. Aircraft maintenance recycles tires, turbine oil, skydrol, engine oil, carpet, and glass and metal from light bulbs into their daily activities. Airline Practices Sustainability within the airport environment is enhanced through synergistic opportunities with airline partners. Mutual benefits are achieved through learning, collaborating and cooperating. As an example, the SLCDA has studied the economic impact to the airlines of requiring the airlines to switch from diesel ground service equipment (GSE) to GSE powered by alternative fuels. Although the economics do not currently justify the change and there is no regulatory requirement to do so at this time, the study recommendations could be implemented when the time is right. Industry research indicates that airlines are actively pursuing sustainable outcomes to improve their operational efficiency, safety and service to passengers. The following list provides areas for further exploration with the cooperating airlines at SLCDA. AIRCRAFT · · · · · · · · Single engine taxi Recycle magazines Recycle aluminum cans Recycle plastic water bottles Donate blanks and pillows Recycle headphones Recycle glass bottles No deicing at the gates SLCDA AIRLINES Delta Skywest Southwest

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· · · · · ·

Proper disposal of sewage Donate unused food Separate plastic cups and other items for recycling Keep records electronically Send manifest to the plane electronically Use a temperature control to automatically shut off pre-conditioned air (PCA)

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE · · · · · · · · · · Recycle tires Recycle turbine oil Recycle skydrol Recycle engine oil Scrap/salvage metal parts Recycle carpet Recycle glass and metal from light bulbs Maintain electronic records Use cloth rags to cut paper use or use recycled paper if cloth rags are cost-prohibitive Refillable bulk storage container for oils

GROUND SERVICE EQUIPMENT · · · · · · · · Recycle tires Recycle engine oil Recycle batteries Maintain electronic records Push back tugs ­ use lighter equipment that utilizes the weight of the plane De-icing trucks ­ use bio-diesel Catering trucks ­ use bio-diesel LD3 Storage Containers ­ Salvage for Scrap

RAMP CONTROL TOWER Casework · · FIDS ­ shut off the unit during the night when there are no flights BIDS - shut off the unit during the night when there are no flights

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CARGO · · · Mail Fish, Flowers, and Dead Bodies Pets

LINE MAINTENANCE · · Hazardous Materials SRS (storage and retrieval system) o Flat floor

UMS UNACCOMPANIED MINORS WHEEL CHAIR PUSHERS · · Automatic Sliding Door Storage for the Chairs Near the Door

CABIN SERVICE · Trash and miscellaneous items

CSC CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTERS COMMUNICATIONS ROOMS · Raised Floor

SPD ­ SMALL PACKAGE DELIVERY BAGGAGE STORAGE · · · · Lockable Storage Shelving CMU Room Bars at all HVAC Vents Entering and Exiting the Room Card Swipe on the Entry Door

Cashier

CREDIT UNION · One way mirror from managers office looking into the lobby

RAMP SERVICES BUILDING MAINTENANCE

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GROUND EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE · Welding Areas

IN-FLIGHT MEDICAL DRUG TESTING · Waiting area o o o o · Seating TV Drinking fountain Magazine rack Computer work station Sink for washing hands Adjacent to restroom Storage / Counter space for urine samples Toilet Secured plumbing chase for blue chemicals No sink within the restroom. Sink should be located just outside the door

Testing Area o o o o

·

Restroom o o o

UNION OFFICES MAINLINER ­ COMPANY STORE FACILITIES PLANNING GROUP ROOMS CLUB ROOMS (RED CARPET ROOM) 100,000 MILE ROOM (1K) VIP ROOM FIRST CLASS LOUNGE FUELERS · Generally are separated from other ramp serviceman due to the smell of fuel

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AFTA (AIR FRIEGHT TRANSFER AREA) · · Mail sort Training

DELTA DASH · · · Break rooms Group rooms Employee cafeteria

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U.S. AIRPORT SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES

The airport community facilitates advancement in best practices through continuous sharing of lessons learned. The participant airports are among those that have been nationally recognized for leadership in sustainability, and provided their knowledge which was considered in the development of the assessment findings and outcomes. Phone interviews and/or email exchanges were conducted with the following airports to understand the lessons learned from sustainability programs which have been nationally recognized for contributions to the environment and community. Carter & Burgess contacted the following airports via telephone and documented the information provided. · · · · Denver International Airport Port of Seattle Port of Portland Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Peer Review

Additionally, the websites for each of these airports were invaluable resources for documentation that each has developed in the course of implementing and managing its program. Relevant documents are included in the "appendix" section.

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PEER REVIEW - DALLAS/FORT WORTH INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

WWW.DFWAIRPORT.COM

Attendee: Email: Phone:

Rusty Hodapp, P.E., CEM, LEED [email protected] 972.574.8470

On January 8, 2007, a meeting was held in SLCDA administration offices to review the assessment report. Mr. Rusty Hodapp, Vice President of Energy and Transportation with Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport participated as an invited peer airport during this meeting. Other attendees included: SLCDA · · · · · · · Mr. Russ Pack, Interim Executive Director Steve Domino, Director Planning and Capital Programs Peter L. Higgins, Director of Airport Maintenance Kevin Robins, Director of Engineering Al Stuart, Superintendent of Airport Operations (for Randy Berg) Tim Gwynette, Environmental Programs Manager Patty M. Nelis, Environmental Specialist

Carter & Burgess · · · Loy Warren, Project Principal Kim Arnold, Project Manager Andrew Gemperline, Salt Lake City Office Manager

The purpose of the informal peer review discussion was to facilitate the sharing of lessons learned that would help SLCDA manage their program externally and internally to achieve maximum benefit. Mr. Hodapp offered the following salient points based upon his review of the final draft report and discussions with the peer review attendees: · A significant contributor to the success of SLCDA's sustainability is unified leadership and top-down commitment that encourages effective collaboration among all of the airport's divisions. SLCDA has a unique and very important story to tell in the industry. SLCDA should use relevant opportunities in industry organizations to promote what they are doing as "responsible stewards of public assets."

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DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

WWW.FLYDENVER.COM

Point of Contact: Email:

Ms. Janell Barrilleaux [email protected]

With respect to implementing a sustainability program with concessionaires, the following lessons learned were provided by Ms. Barilleaux: · "It involved moving a mountain rock by rock. Success takes perseverance and patience. Do not bite off too much at a time and always put yourself into the other person's shoes." Top management support is very important.

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The Department of Aviation, which operates the Denver International Airport (DIA) is committed to protecting the environment in which it operates. The purpose of this policy is to support the city and County of Denver's Goals and the Department of Aviation's Objectives, Vision, Mission and to safeguard and enhance the public's investment in the airport. To implement the Airport's Vision, the department will: · · · · · · · Systematically manage its environmental aspects to pursue continual improvement; Comply with all applicable regulations; Maximize its material and energy efficiency and pursue pollution-prevention opportunities; Foster environmental stewardship at all levels within the organization; Promote sustainability best management practices Engage all business partners to support the DIA environmental commitment, and Recognize and take advantage of opportunities to drive business value through improved environmental performance.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THE APPENDIX SECTION · · · Denver International Airport Environmental Policy Denver International Airport Environmental System Guide Denver International Airport Environmental Guidelines

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PORT OF PORTLAND, PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

WWW.PORTOFPORTLAND.COM

Point of Contact: Email: Phone:

Ms. Cheryl Koshuta, Director of Environmental Affairs [email protected] 503.944.7236

Ms. Koshuta stated that the most significant action the Port has taken toward managing sustainability has been the implementation of an Environmental Management System (EMS). The EMS is used to support impact analysis which drives annual sustainability targets for the Port. Six objectives frame the Port's decision model for identifying targets. These are: · · · · · · Minimize impacts to air quality Minimize impacts to water resources Reduce waste generation and hazardous materials use Minimize impacts and seek opportunities to enhance natural resources Reduce energy consumption Purchase electric energy from sustainable sources

Ms. Koshuta attributes the success of their program to using cross-functional teams. The teams are guided by environmental specialists to ensure environmental requirements and impacts are understood. The teams are responsible for establishing annual business-based targets and budget requirements. To ensure innovation, the planning of targets includes identifying "stretch targets" intended to push beyond what is easily or moderately achievable. Engaging tenants and customers in the program is the Port's biggest challenge. "It's a matter of what do we enable vs. what do we control." The Port's approach is to lead by example, and use incentives to make it easy for them to participate and cooperate. For example, the Port assumes all utility costs for the terminals and consistently seeks to identify ways to reduce energy consumption and cost. Consequently, during a tenant remodel, the Port suggested to a tenant that this would be a good time to consider more energy efficient lighting for their space. At first, the tenant was opposed to this believing that the lumens would be insufficient for retail use. The Airport responded with a workshop for tenants that facilitated a learning opportunity for them with respect to energy-efficient lighting systems and their outputs. As a result, the tenant was informed and realized that energy-efficient lighting could meet their retail lighting needs. Some examples of sustainable practices at the Port of Portland are: · · The Port also passes energy tax credits (for which they are ineligible as a government business) to their concessions. Food Waste Programs ­ 100% participation by concessionaires, flight kitchens and onsite hotels.

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Coffee ground recycling from aircraft and concessions used for composting. Magazine recycling ­ international flight magazines are mailed to various teachers and universities throughout the state who use foreign language magazines as teaching tools. This costs the airport a few thousand dollars per year, and the goodwill is immeasurable.

Finally, the Port offers the following for consideration: · Positive press is important, and especially for customers and tenants. Make the most of every opportunity to promote what your partners are doing in support of sustainability. Keep social responsibility important. The Port performs cost-benefit analysis on each annual target it sets, and sometimes these cost dollars that are not recovered, as in the case of the foreign language magazines. Small investments like this have significant return in terms of public perception. Measure everything you do to ensure you have defined the value stream to the business and community.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THE APPENDIX SECTION · · · Port of Portland Environmental Plan 2006/2007 Objectives and Targets Port of Portland 2004 ­ 2005 Environmental Annual Report Port of Portland 2005 ­ Strategic Plan

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PORT OF SEATTLE, SEATTLE-TACOMA AIRPORT

WWW.PORTOFSEATTLE.ORG

Point of Contact: Email: Phone:

Mr. Doug Holbrook, Manager, Utilities & Business Management [email protected] 206.433.4600

Mr. Holbrook began managing the Airport's sustainability program in 2001. Since that time, Seattle-Tacoma Airport's Sustainability Program has supported two key initiatives: Recycling and Utility Conservation. The Airport's primary interest in sustainability is to promote a positive image with the community, which is one of the Airport's seven key business strategies. A secondary and significant benefit of the sustainability program is the positive economic impacts. RECYCLING · · · · Recycling has increased "1000%" since 2001 1200 tons per year are recycled Recycling creates $150 ­ 180k in annual savings Recycled materials include: o o o o o o Aluminum cans Glass bottles Cardboard Coffee grounds3 Cooking oil4 Food products5

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THE APPENDIX SECTION

· · ·

Port of Seattle "Green Works" Environmental Programs Port of Seattle Design Guidelines Port of Seattle Rules and Regulations

3 An estimated 10 ­ 12 tons of coffee grounds/month is recycled. Sea-tac pays $20/ton for collection vs. $125/ton for transport to land-fill. Grounds are taken to regional compost. The airport purchases compost from this provider. 4 1000 gallons of concessions' cooking oil is converted to bio-diesel/month. Collection of oil is free. Collection units and caddies were purchased by the airport and concessions. The airport purchases bio-diesel from this vendor. Savings to the airport is approximately $.04/gallon. 5 200 ­ 500 pounds of packaged food delivered to food banks/week

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RECOMMENDATIONS

SLCDA manages their business practices holistically to achieve sustainable outcomes. As the airport progresses in its management of sustainable outcomes, the following recommendations are offered for consideration in support of the airport's strategic objectives. SUSTAINABILITY GOALS AND STRATEGIES · Define a sustainability mission and policy statement for SLCDA. Incorporate these as appropriate into all relevant collateral and administrative documents. Ensure consistent visibility through appropriate internal and external communication mediums. Integrate sustainable practices and outcomes with SLCDA strategic planning to ensure that business objectives have been vetted to produce sustainable outcomes whenever practical. Establish a baseline of current practices and metrics to ensure values are communicated in terms of economic, social and natural resource conservation outcomes. Participate in the ACI-NA sustainability working group to learn and share best practices with other airports and improve the industry's performance. Utilize SLCDA's Environmental Management System leadership team to form an SLCDA internal sustainability working group. The working group should provide guidance, identify acceptable metrics, and report on outcomes. The working group should regularly review funding requirements that align with sustainability targets which have been defined by SLCDA. Consider utilizing Transportation Research Board (TRB) Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) funds for synthesis projects which can provide valuable research to help the airport with cost/benefit analysis when considering investments in future projects and capital development programs. Incorporate City purchasing policy to purchase sustainable products into SLCDA purchasing. Analyze cost/benefit outcomes to ensure that economic viability is maintained for environmentally-sensitive products. Identify current practices and programs that can be easily implemented at Airport II and Tooele Valley Airport. Incorporate sustainability metrics and outcomes and consider publishing an annual sustainability report. Review standard language within various contracts, solicitations, and agreements that encourages cooperation with SLCDA's sustainability practices. Review current contractual language to ensure SLCDA's standard specifications defining sustainable requirements are clearly stated.

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Collaborate with airline partners and concessionaires defining feasible goals and outreach strategies that yield sustainable outcomes that can be leveraged. Publish sustainability program highlights and champion sections in airport publications. Release sustainability milestones as they develop to the media and publish them in appropriate airport produced media.

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Opportunity: Evaluate and implement as appropriate, electronic posting of contract documents for secure distribution to bidders, contractors, and others during procurement and permitting to reduce paper use. Incorporate a new terminal-wide announcement that introduces the recycling program to travelers and invites them to participate while in Salt Lake City. Evaluate the use of electronic documents and controlled access to the airport's website for continued reductions in paper use. Incorporate sustainable principles into procurement and lease documents. Communicate these principles for competitive bids.

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

FACILITY SYSTEM ASSESSMENT Opportunity: Replace two older existing chillers with high efficiency chillers as part of the Capital Development Program.

OPERATIONAL ASSESSMENT Opportunity: Collect coffee grounds and filters from food and beverage concessionaires and aircraft for composting and use on the landscaping. Evaluate ASTM standards, warranty impacts and the benefits associated with collection, storage and recycling fryer grease for resell in a secondary market.

Opportunity:

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Opportunity:

Work with Salt Lake City's permitting department to evaluate the use of incentives as a way to reduce building permit fees or expedite the issuance of permits for contractors with managed recycling programs. The airport should continue to offer incentives (as they do with the AVI program), to ground transportation providers and business partners who choose to utilize alternative fuel vehicles and/or low-emission vehicles. Incorporate the airport's sustainable objectives and targets into the preconstruction conference materials. Evaluate opportunities for greater partnership in sustainability initiatives with airlines through airline use agreements. Provide discount parking passes or premium parking spaces to employees that car pool. Consider an awareness campaign to promote the overall benefits of car-pooling. SLCDA provide premium parking spaces as an incentive for corporate and frequent airport parkers to establish electronic parking accounts. Consider using a magnetic card that would register the vehicle upon entering and exiting the parking area. Billing would be electronically debited from the users account and a receipt sent via email each month. This system would provide a service to passengers that would be appreciated by both customers and airlines; reduce printed paper tickets, receipts, and servicing of ticket printers, as well as potentially reduce the amount of staff required. In anticipation of future airport development, the airport may require or recommend that all new and replacement airline equipment be electric powered to reduce vehicle emissions. Consider including incentives in airline use agreements that promote use of electric power for all GSE and vehicles. Evaluate the impacts and benefits of utilizing wind-power as a renewable energy source.

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

Opportunity:

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