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S C H O O L O F T H E M U S E U M O F F I N E A R T S , B O S T O N

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PHOTO: TONY RINALDO

atto

DEAR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS,

Kim Berman (Master of Fine Arts `88) said during her commencement speech last spring that art changes people's lives. She spoke about an unemployed rural woman who participated in a papermaking project at Berman's studio in Johannesberg, South Africa. Rosina told Berman that papermaking--making something beautiful out of rubbish--gave her life purpose. Six years later, living with HIV and having lost both of her children to AIDS, Rosina continues to make art and inspire everyone around her. Many artists--including a great number of our alumni--find that studios and gallery walls are just gateways to bringing art making into communities around the globe. They teach others the beauty, mystery, and self-discovery involved in creating photographs, prints, illustrations, and works in other media. In doing so, they achieve remarkable things for themselves and for others in their encounters with creative work. As you'll discover on the following pages, Museum School alumni focus on communities as diverse as their media. Helen Donis-Keller (Master of Fine Arts `01) teaches drawing to mechanical engineers to help develop their visual vocabulary and communication skills. Teny Gross (Bachelor of Fine Arts `94) helps troubled youths refocus anger and overcome their sense of hopelessness through drama and artistic expression. Guillermo Srodek-Hart (Bachelor of Fine Arts, Diploma `03) brings his photography skills to ghetto children in Argentina, providing them with a bridge to more promising lives. Art heals and celebrates, educates and empowers. The art and work of alumni reaches inner cities, suburban college classrooms, tattoo parlors, archaeological sites, rural coal mining towns, children's libraries, and poverty-ravaged villages around the world. Our alumni enable others to experience the power and joy of creating art. Sometimes their art making reaches entire neighborhoods. Often, the effect is on a smaller, individual scale. Always, the goal is to make the lives of the people they touch better and more interesting.

DEBORAH H. DLUHY DEAN, MUSEUM SCHOOL DEPUT Y DIRECTOR, MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON Tattoos on cover and this page by Fat Ram, 2003

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toos

Accessible Art

Ram Hannan's artwork moves--through supermarkets, bookstores, bars, and courtrooms. His canvas? The body. His collectors? Moms, lawyers, doctors, street punks, executives, and the occasional dominatrix. Tattooing is one of the oldest known forms of artistic expression and it's one of the most accessible, says Hannan (Attended 1989­92), owner of Fat Ram's Pumpkin Tattoo in Jamaica Plain, MA. Its allure, he speculates, could be the absence of ritual in modern society and the need for people to acknowledge their individuality. Or maybe it's the thrill of wearing an indelible piece of art. "It's low-brow art, an art of the people," Hannan says. "You take it with you. You take it to the grave." Hannan hasn't gone a month without making a tattoo since he first etched ink into flesh sixteen years ago, putting his total somewhere near five thousand. "I'm in demand and you gotta work," he says. "And, I do love doing tattoos." Hannan is so committed to doing his best work that he enrolled at the Museum School in 1989 and spent much of the next four years taking classes in drawing, painting, film, and photography to further refine his skills as a tattoo artist. The best class was anatomy of drawing, he says, because its old-school style of training forced him to learn the basics. "Being able to draw is crucial," says Hannan, who also sculpts, paints, and does woodcarving. "It's the cornerstone of my technique." Hannan specializes in custom tattoos but will draw whatever his clients wish: a house cat named Ed, serpents, or bejeweled skulls. He also does covers, or turning an existing image into something new. Once he transformed a bunny with a shotgun into a mechanized, techno rabbit. "Everybody gets a tattoo for their own really unique reason," Hannan says. Some people want one to remember an event, a person, or a moment in time, "even if that moment is just when they got the tattoo," he says. Others collect them for their own mobile art galleries. Occasionally he'll see his tattoos pass by on the street, but given the weather in New England, his artwork remains under wraps most of the year. Hannan estimates he has twenty-five or thirty tattoos on his own body. "It's a collection," he says. "It's all melding together to be one image." There's no single theme but he does have a preferred tattoo: skateboarders on his shin, based on a drawing his son made when he was four. "It's pretty primitive, but it's one of my favorite tattoos," Hannan says of the work done by Fred Smith III, the tattoo artist with whom he apprenticed. "Getting a tat makes the body your living room, your road map," Hannan says. "It's a more conscious, decisive way of documenting your life."

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Marcela Juarez, ph15 paticipant

Eugenio Alfonso, ph15 participant

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A GLOBAL VILLAGE

ALUMNI ART MAKING ENRICHES LIVES AND STRENGTHENS COMMUNITIES

Art Against AIDS (detail), Paper Prayers Project, 2001.

A painting hangs on Teny Gross's office wall, a portrait of sorts made by a former street gang member. "It's half good guy, half bad guy," says Gross (Bachelor of Fine Arts '94), the executive director of the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence in Providence, RI. "The bad half is a skull dripping with blood." The artist, now a high school student and Gross's intern, made the painting as a present for his mentor. "It's chilling," Gross says, as much about the painted image as the good versus bad reality of life for inner city kids. But the painting also represents the positive byproduct of bringing art making to troubled youth and other disenfranchised communities. "Art is a vehicle to be heard and to express yourself," says Gross. And, he says, it allows people to present their own views of life and forces them to make choices. Gross and other Museum School alumni influence the way the world interacts with art--through teaching, exhibitions, and their commitment to bring art making skills to others. Their work reaches new audiences and brings the possibility of art to places it never existed. Those communities are as diverse as a playground full of city kids, destitute women with AIDS in South Africa, and troubled youth in Rhode Island. Art making serves as teacher, therapist, healer, entertainer, and guidance counselor.

"Art can, through engagement with the creative process, change the way people think and behave," Kim Berman (Master of Fine Arts '88) told Museum School graduates last spring. "Art helps others see the world in a way that inspires a shift in consciousness." Berman provides work space and resources for talented printmaking and papermaking artists at Artist Proof Studio in Johannesburg, South Africa. She also helps run Paper Prayers, an AIDS awareness program that shows how powerful a tool the creative process can be for overcoming adversity. Berman calls it a "magical" process, when people who never thought they could draw or make art realize that they can create something beautiful. Paper Prayers has evolved into a program that includes teaching mostly rural women embroidery and handicrafts that can be sold to provide a sustainable livelihood. Their income supports food gardens, feeding programs, and other poverty-relief efforts. "Introducing the concept that every person can be part of a solution--instead of feeling powerless--does change lives," Berman says. Guillermo Srodek-Hart (Bachelor of Fine Arts, Diploma '03) works with the ph15 Project, which brings photography to the slums of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The ph in the name stands for photography, or writing with light. The 15 represents the neighborhood's name: Ciudad Oculta or Hidden City. SrodekHart's alliance with ph15 keeps him connected to the language of photography and allows him to contribute to cultural development in his home country. "It also fascinates me to be able to merge art with social change," he says.

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Kim Berman calls the process "magical" when people realize they can create something beautiful.

THE ARTIST AS TEACHER

Glynnis Fawkes and Helen Donis-Keller use unconventional vehicles--Cypriotic ruins, mechanical engineering, or genetic theory--to help somewhat atypical audiences see their own worlds a little bit differently. Donis-Keller (Master of Fine Arts '01) is a cardcarrying human geneticist. She's also a PhD, a painter, and a professor of biology and art--yes, art--at Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering in Needham, MA.

"Art is a core part of one's education," Donis-Keller says. "Engineering was a very narrow discipline where people became technicians but were unaware of the richness of cultural life of the world," she says. "Art is about our lives. It's about expressing yourself." Seeing and Hearing, Donis-Keller's course in digital photography, video, and audio media, develops communication and perception skills. Visual Thinking and Responsive Drawing employs visual exercising, freehand drawing, and working from life.

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Art should "inspire, raise controversies, raise consciousness, influence socio-political change"

MOLELEKI LEDIMO

Art Against AIDS (detail), Paper Prayers Project, 2001.

ph15 is the creation of fellow Argentinian photographer Martin Rosenthal (Attended '82­'83). It costs $150 a month to support the workshop for all twenty of the current students ages 13 to 23. But the goal, Srodek-Hart says, is to find financial support to expand enrollment by another twenty-six children. The program's impact, he says, has been remarkable. When the participants started to show their work at art centers and other venues, they would isolate themselves in a corner, scared to be judged or interact with people who lived outside of the slum. But as they showed their work more and the program gained exposure, something changed. "Suddenly you would find the kids at the opening starting to interact with curators, judges, intellectuals, writers, philosophers, sociologists, and other photographers," Srodek-Hart says. "They would stand in front of their pieces on the wall and fluently describe aesthetic aspects of the photograph and the ideas and circumstances behind it. They would start addressing issues such as context and process. What had [changed] was the fear of being judged and discriminated [against]." Julia Clinker (Bachelor of Fine Arts '94) found horrific examples of discrimination and injustice in her own backyard: Rhode Island's public schools. With millions slashed from the school budgets, no art or music will be taught in Providence middle and high schools and in some of the elementary schools this fall. "A lot of times we think extreme poverty and societal neglect are conditions that occur outside our country," says Clinker, a documentary photographer. "In South Providence you have kids who aren't provided a place to dream, or given an outlet for their creativity." For two years, up until last summer, Clinker was program director for Providence City Arts for Youth, a free arts program for children ages 8 to 14. The goal is to have an economic and racial mix, but the program is targeted to underserved middle school students from mostly Spanish-speaking families. City Arts teaches five hundred kids each year to make art and ask questions without necessarily finding the answers, Clinker says. Depending on the professional artists involved in the program, summer students learn everything from ceramics to industrial and interior design. This summer a landscape architect helped them pour concrete for raised garden beds and they grew an edible garden based on food from each child's culture.

Clinker's recently published book, Keep Coming Back, provides a rare glimpse into the economic plight of coal miners in West Virginia. Now she's working on projects that document the effects of lead paint on children, and the lives of people struggling at the poverty line. Her own photography sheds light on often hidden worlds and helps with important advocacy efforts, but Clinker says her drive to bring art making to children has more vital and tangible rewards. City Arts builds stronger communities and offers a preventative step to urban violence, she says. It enhances literacy, developmental skills, critical thinking, and self-esteem. "This lets you master materials and have an end product that you created and that you can control," Clinker says. And for the city's poorest children, having control over anything in their lives can keep hopelessness at bay. Moleleki Ledimo (Master of Fine Arts '94) agrees that art has the power to change lives through empowerment and activism. As director of the art galleries at the University of Witwatersrand in South Africa, he sees a growing pool of artists who have moved from being "creators of enchanting art" to being "socio-cultural" activists. Now they bring their art and art making to new audiences through their involvement in community issues such as HIV/AIDS awareness projects that incorporate art and music. Ledimo says he works on a "macro level as a cultural activist" while continuing his own printmaking. "I believe that this medium is accessible if explained to the public," he says. "The process of printmaking is used in everyday things they come across--money notes they pay with, magazines, food and product packages." Art, he says, should "inspire, raise controversies, raise consciousness, influence socio-political change, and contribute to the heritage of a country." And artists "can improve the quality of the life of those around us." Many art school students believe that art is something very personal, and studying art is all about personal growth and development, says Berman. And it is all of those things. "But art also does have a power beyond the creative process," she says. "It is important to look at ways people use their creativity and skills and how they can share it to have an impact on change. Get it into the social realm." And that, Berman says, is an important message to share about art making.

Last fall, some of her students made selfportraits on the first day of class and repeated the exercise at the end of the course. "They surprised themselves how their viewpoints had changed," she says. "Their skills did, obviously, but also what they wanted to say about themselves instead of just drawing their faces." This new awareness, Donis-Keller says, helps students express their more technical work better and see beyond the traditional views of engineering.

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Her own paintings, based on human genetics, improve access to science and change a few opinions about art along the way. "I hope to pique someone's interest so they go and find out more," Donis-Keller says. She also hopes her work expands the ken of her colleagues in the scientific community to include more contemporary fare.

Helen Donis-Keller. Genotype: Phenotype, 2001. Dimensions variable

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Fawkes (Master of Fine Arts '99) has a similar approach. Inside a book of her drawings, Cartoons of Cyprus, you'll find cat-fighting goddesses and Odysseus attempting to sail a ship made out of cheese. You won't see this type of creative expression in scholarly journals. And that's Fawkes's point. By combining history, archaeology, ancient culture, and a dash of humor, her art brings information about longdead civilizations to a much broader audience.

While at the Museum School, Fawkes did a series of paintings, constructions with paper pop-ups, and cartoons that all employed subject matter from antiquity. Her pop-up figures included people from her own life and mythological characters. Now studying for her doctorate in creative art at the University of Wollongong, just south of Sydney, Australia, she hopes to produce another series, this time on Crete. "As the Minoans did in ceramic and wall painting, I'll make in paper pop-up towns and the people who live there," she says.

Glynnis Fawkes, from Cartoons of Cyprus, 2000

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Chevirika Collective, Government Tender Embroideries, AIDS Pledge, Paper Prayers Project. 2001

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ALU M N I

Elizabeth DaCosta Ahern (Dip `78) had a painting in "Landscapes Seen and Imagined: Sense of Place, Part II" at the DeCordova Museum (Lincoln, MA) in Spring/Summer 2003. She exhibited paintings at Alpers Fine Art Gallery (Andover, MA) in its "Summer 2003" exhibition and had a solo show at Carla Massoni Gallery (Chestertown, MD) in September/October 2003. Karen Ami (BFA `85, FY `86) completed a large-scale mosaic mural for the Knapp Children's Center in Chicago and held a solo exhibition of sculptural mosaics, "Heart Conditions," in Chicago's ARC Gallery in September 2003. John C. Anderson (MFA `84) had a one-person exhibition of his new work at the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art in April/June 2003, and exhibited several sculptures as part of a group exhibition at Cherry Stone Gallery in Wellfleet, MA, in July 2003. Jan Arabas (Dip `83) exhibited at Amsterdam Whitney Gallery in Chelsea, NY, and at Galerie Gora in Montreal, Canada. She was also in the following group juried exhibitions: Cambridge (MA) Art Association's "National Prize Show," "Dimensions" in Winston-Salem, NC, Long Beach (NJ) Foundation's "National Digital Art Show," and the Westmoreland, PA "Art Nationals." Tom Ashburn (Dip `82) was a scenic painter on the films "Love Song for Bobby Long," "Runaway Jury," and "Unchain My Heart." He is working on The Walk of Shame, a series of ceramic shoes. Tonia Falconer Barringer (BFA `84) is a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution developing exhibitions and traveling shows. She is the mother of twin 6-year-old boys. Myrna Beecher (Dip `89, FY `91) had paintings in the Clark Gallery (Lincoln, MA) summer exhibition, June­August 2003. Laura Blacklow (Photography faculty) led the Museum School AIDS Walk Team, which raised more than $800 for the AIDS Action Committee. She also has work in "Photoplay" at the Art Complex Museum in Duxbury, MA, through November 2, 2003; "Design and Photography" at the Art Institute of Boston (MA) through November 2, 2003; "Under Cover: A Book Arts Exhibit" at the St. Louis (MO) Artists' Guild through October 22, 2003; and the Benefit Auction at Boston's Photographic Resource Center in October 2003. Gail Bloom (Attended '75­`76) has been working in Fitchburg, MA, as a White House-designated Millenium Community Artist combining her knowledge of the arts with marketing and arts promotion. She recently received her broker's license as a Realtor, and works with the Freedom's Way Heritage Association. Jennifer Burkin (BFA `92), a Museum Studies graduate student at Harvard University, is teaching the Artful Adventures programs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and is designing a line of handbags. Joseph Capachietti (Dip `55) is pursuing his art career and working on drawings for an upcoming exhibition. He is also traveling and adding works to his private collection. Edward Cating (Dip `02) created the poster for "The Factory Revealed: A Guided Interpretive Tour of Dover's Historic Cocheco Mills," an interactive reenactment of historical vignettes from the Dover, NH, textile mills. Paula DeStefanis Christensen (Attended '86­`87) has her own design studio, Paula's Palette, and specializes in hand-painted wearables and mixed-media paintings. She is also the visual arts director for North Shore (WI) Academy of the Arts and teaches at the Milwaukee Art Museum.

Sally Dean (BFD `82) was appointed the education coordinator of the Art Complex Museum in Duxbury, MA, in October 2002. Ann Deluty (BFA Art Ed `67) is teaching a wood and stone carving course at the DeCordova Museum School (Lincoln, MA) in Fall 2003. Leah DePrizio (Dip `85, FY `87) has sculptures on view at the Print Center in Philadelphia through November 1, 2003. She exhibited in group shows at the "North American Print Biennial 2003" at Boston University's Gallery 808 and "Works by Women" at the Boston Public Library in April/May 2003. She also showed prints and papier-mache sculptures at New England Biolabs in Beverly, MA, from April to June 2003. May DeViney (Attended '96­`99) took part in "Art from Detritus," featuring work made from discarded materials, at John Jay College in New York in April/May 2003. She was in a summer exhibition at the Fine Arts Building Gallery in Chicago and has a solo show at Viridian Gallery in New York in October 2003. Jasmin A. Espada-Zimmatore (Attended '89­`90) is the vice president for public relations at Mission Renaissance, which is the world's largest fine art program for children, and vice president for Renaissance Publications. She took part in the collective art show at Whittier Art Gallery in November 2002. Nicole Phungrasamee Fein (CD `96) took part in the group exhibition, "Paper," at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco in July/August 2003. Claudia Flynn (Attended '88­`89) is co-curator for "American Democracy Under Siege," an exhibition at the Hera Educational Foundation and Gallery in Wakefield, RI, on view through November 8, 2003. Betsy Fuchs (Dip `67) exhibited her gravestone and petroglyph photographs at the Boston Public Library in August 2003. Ivana George (MFA `02) extends an invitation to Museum School alumni to join the Great Critiques Club (GCC), an artists' forum in the Greater Boston area to present work and receive critical feedback. For application information, e-mail [email protected] Judy Haberl (MFA '84) displayed large-scale Polaroids of frozen scultures and new tiny Polaroids at Gallery Kayafas in Boston in September 2003. Ellen Hardy (Attended '78­'80) had "April in Paris," a one-woman show of black-and-white documentary images of Paris, at Essex Camera Gallery and Cultural Center in Salem, MA, in April 2003. She is currently director of design at Phillips Academy. Megan Hinton (Post Bac `00) took part in an exhibition at the South Wharf Gallery in Nantucket, MA in June/July 2003. Ann Holstrom (BFA Art Ed '95) works in the office of Educational Partnerships and Learning Technologies at the University of Washington in Seattle. Katherine Jackson (Dip `98) was part of the two-person show, "Handwriting on the Wall 2," at the OH+T gallery in Boston in June 2003. Dinora Felske Justice (GD `99) exhibited at S.E. Fineman Gallery in Soho (New York) and at Kennedy Gallery in Provincetown, MA. In October 2003, she has a solo exhibition at Kantar Fine Arts Gallery in Newton, MA. David Kelley (Dip `70 and Foundations and Drawing faculty) was part of "Adventures in Abstraction," a group exhibition at Judy Ann Goldman Fine Art in Boston in June 2003. Hiroko Lee (Dip `91, FY `94) was the winner of the 2003 Frances Roddy Competition from the Concord (MA) Art Association and had a solo exhibition at the Habitat Wildlife Sanctuary in Belmont, MA, in April 2003. Marja Lianko (Dip `72, FY `73) had a solo show of new painting and sculpture at Pepper Gallery in Boston in September 2003 and was invited to become a fellow of the Ballinglen Arts Foundation LTD in Ireland. Sarah Malakoff (MAT `97) was one of the featured artists in the Portland (ME) Museum of Art Biennial from April to June 2003. Heidi Marston (BFA `97, Dip `02, FY `03) began the graduate program at Savannah College of Art and Design in September 2003. She took part in "New England Photographers" at the Danforth Museum in Framingham, MA; "Star Search 2003" at the New England School of Photography at Suffolk University; and "Drawing, Not Drawing" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Robin Masi (BFA `83) worked with the Fitchburg (MA) Museum of Art and a composer to create an exhibition of "Birdsongs of the Mezazoic." John Matassa (Dip `67, FY `68, BFA `73, MFA `74) is the resident artistinstructor at the Casablanca American School in Morocco for fall 2003. He distributed nationally a catalogue of thirty-five limited-edition fine art prints, and was recently listed in Who's Who in American Art. Corrie McCallum (Attended '37­`39) won the 2003 Lifetime Achievement in the Arts award from the South Carolina Arts Commission.

NEWS

Carol Odell, Compass Mirage, 2003. Oil on panel, 32 x 24 inches Gay P. Cox, Eve Rising (detail), 2002. Oil, 60 x 108 inches

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Debra Claffey (BFA `81) was included in the group show "On the Table" at Coolidge Center for the Arts in Portsmouth, NH, in June 2003. Gay P. Cox (Dip `88) had an exhibition at the Provident Bank in Amesbury, MA, from May to July 2003. Heather Cox (MFA `98) was featured in "Brooklyn on 57th Street," a group exhibition at Nohra Haine Gallery in New York, NY in July/August 2003. Isa Dean (MFA `99) moved to Portland, OR, and participated in "Living Units," a group show at Triple Candie in New York, NY in June/July 2003.

KEY

Attended B FA B FA A r t E d BFD CD CE Dip FY GD M AT M FA Post Bac AT T E N D E D T H E M U S E U M S C H O O L BAC H E LO R O F F I N E A RT S B AC H E LO R O F F I N E A RT S I N A RT E D U C AT I O N B AC H E LO R O F F I N E A RT S A N D D I P LO M A B AC H E LO R O F F I N E A RT S A N D B AC H E LO R O F A RT S C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N D I P LO M A F I F T H - Y E A R C E R T I F I C AT E G R A P H I C D E S I G N C E R T I F I C AT E M A ST E R O F F I N E A RT S I N T E AC H I N G I N A RT E D U C AT I O N MASTER OF FINE ARTS P O S T - B A C C A L A U R E AT E C E R T I F I C AT E

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With honoree Jeff Koons in attendance, the 8th annual Medal Award gala was a huge success, raising more than $225,000 toward scholarship aid for Museum School students.

Irving Moskowitz (BFA Art Ed `70) is enjoying a one-man show of his work at the Morris Graves Museum in Eureka, CA, on view through November 30, 2003. He also had a retrospective exhibition of his paintings at Studio Eclips in Arcata, CA, in July 2003. Carol (White) Odell (BFA `67) exhibited her large oil paintings at the Cape Museum of Fine Arts (Dennis, MA) and the Southern Vermont Art Center (Manchester, VT). Her monotype Stacking Press was awarded first prize at an exhibit of the Monotype Guild of New England. She exhibits at Rice Polak Gallery (Provincetown, MA) and Shaw Cramer Gallery (Martha's Vineyard), and welcomes all alumni to her studio/gallery. Colin Owens (Dip `94, BFA `98) is working for the European Union's Training Foundation in Turin, Italy, helping to manage design, brand, and Web. Robin Paine (MFA `95) has a solo exhibition of her Zapotecan portraits at Circolo Gallery in Manchester, MA, on view through November 23, 2003, and won a full fellowship to the Vermont Studio Center for December 2003. She is based in Paris and Mexico. Kim Pashko (Dip `84, FY `87) took part in "Gone Fishin'" in Boston's Allston Skirt Gallery in June 2003. Robin Radin (BFA `83) received a 2003 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant in Photography. Ellen Rich (Dip `88, FY `89) had a solo show of her new work at Genovese/Sullivan Gallery in Boston, MA, (September 2003) and took part in a group show, "Southenders2," at Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts from July through September 2003. Judy Riola (Dip `93, FY `94) exhibited new paintings this summer at the Massachuetts Cultural Council in Boston and had a solo show at May Snow Gallery in early 2003. Jo Ann Rothschild (MFA `80) exhibited her prints and paintings at the Experimental Graphic Workshop in Havana, Cuba, in May 2003. Ida Ruzsits (BFD `85, FY `87) won Best of Show in "Homage to James McNeill Whistler" at the Whistler House Museum of Art (Lowell, MA) in Summer 2003. A.E. Ryan (MFA `92) took part in Brookline (MA) Artists Open Studios in May 2003. Mark Schafer (Attended `98) displayed "Imaginary Maps, Imagined Landscapes" at the Newton (MA) Free Library Main Hall in July 2003. His opening reception included a slide lecture, "Making New Worlds with Paper, Paste, Scissors, Needle and Thread." Elizabeth Schippert (Attended '72­73) is the director of the Open Your Eyes workshops, which runs painting trips to France, Japan, Maine, Monhegan Island, and Ft. Lauderdale. For more information, e-mail [email protected] Mardy Sears (BFA `87) participated in "The Chicago Solutions Show" at Gallery on Lake, IL, in February/March 2003. She received the People's Choice Award for her artist book in "Animals in Art 2003" at the Anti-Cruelty Society in May 2003. Peggy Shapiro (CE '85­`86) was in the "8th Invitational Great Woo Wu Show" at the Edison Eye Gallery in Edison, WA, in summer 2003. In September 2003, she was in a group show, "Drawing the Figure," at the Allied Arts Gallery in Bellingham, WA. Leslie Sills's (Dip `73) ceramic teapot is part of the Gloria and Sunny Kamm Collection on view at the Sculpture, Objects, and Functional Art (SOFA) exhibition in Chicago, October 16­19, 2003. Nancy Simonds (Dip `77, FY `78) exhibited at New Art `03 at Kingston Gallery in Boston, the Tangent Gallery's "Group Show 2003" in San Francisco, and is included in a collection at Harvard Law School in 2003. Jolie Stahl (Dip `72) had "The Genie's Out of the Bottle," a solo exhibition of her recent watercolors and collages, at Lori Bookstein Fine Art in New York in September/October 2003. A catalogue accompanies the show. Laurie Quigley Sweet (Attended `97) is a graphic designer for Inkredible Stuff Marketing and an art teacher for Wamogo Regional High School in Litchfield, CT. She was recently married. Margaret B. Tittemore (Dip `91, FY `92) participated in "Multiple Memorials" at Viridian Gallery in New York, presenting a proposal for a temporary labyrinth near Ground Zero to commemorate the attacks on September 11, 2001.

S M FA . E D U 7

Elizabeth DaCosta Ahern, Aqui, 2003. Acrylic, 58 x 55 inches

May DeViney, Our Lady of the Bisquick, 2003. Mixed media, 33 x 13 x 3 inches

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Edith Twining (Dip `77) is a senior designer in an architectural firm specializing in retail and restaurant design, including the children's bookstore Barefoot Books in Porter Square, MA. Alice Whealin (Attended '81­`84) had exhibitions at the offices of WI/PR and Legg Mason in Baltimore, MD. Susan White (Dip `90) attended the MacDowell Colony for non-fiction writing in November/December 2002 to work on her new book, Objects and Their People. Her article "Mistaken Identity" was published in Psychiatric Services, a journal of the American Psychiatric Association, together with her cover art in April 2003. Peggy Wilson-Morgan (Dip `56, BFA Art Ed `57) recently retired from her silversmithing shop in Lumbarton, NC, and is exhibiting her paintings in Winston-Salem, NC. She is 72 and has three grandchildren. Yoshiko Yamamoto (Dip `72, FY `73, BFA Art Ed `84, Metals faculty) participated in "SOFA Expo Chicago" in October 2002 and "SOFA Expo New York" in May/June 2003; "Craftforms" at the Wayne Art Center (PA) in December 2002/January 2003; "The Ring" at the Tuthin Craft Center in Wales, UK, in April/May 2003; and "Art for the Ear" and "Japanese Metalwork and Jewelry" at the Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA, in June/July 2003. She also taught workshops in North Carolina and California in April and June 2003, and participated in the 9th International Enamelist Conference and "On the Edge" exhibition at Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA, in August 2003. Sue Yang (Post Bac '00, Dip `01) exhibited work in "Circumambulation: Digital Images by Sue Yang" in the project room of the New England School of Art and Design at Suffolk University in June/July 2003.

GROUP SHOWS

Suzanne Adelman (Attended '92­`93) and Keith Walsh (MFA `92) exhibited work in "Relocation" at Bliss in Pasadena, CA, during June/July 2003. Walsh's sculpture was also shown with Los Angeles' London Street Projects at Stray Show Chicago in May 2003. Aparna Agrawal (CE `92), David Columbo (BFD `86), Anne Corrsin (BFA `91), Kathleen Finlay (Dip `67), Carol Greenwood (Dip `94), Laura Hughes (BFD `85), Marja Lianko (Dip `72, FY `73), Robert Reyes (Attended `92), Sheila Rice (CE '85­`89), and Brenda Star (BFA `65, MFA `77) took part in the 26th annual Vernon Street open studios in Somerville, MA, in May 2003. Steve Aishman (MFA `01), Brad Collett (BFA `99), Elaine Corda (Dip `90), Nan Freeman (Drawing and Post-Baccalaureate faculty), Thomas Gustainis (MFA `03), Kathy Halamka (Post Bac `02), Guillermo Srodek-Hart (BFD '03), E. Tian Lim (BFD `03), Heidi Marston (BFA `97, Dip `02, FY `03), Morgan Schwartz (MFA `02), Amy Sharp (MFA `01), and Josh Winer (Attended '00­`01) included their work in "Photos from 3rd Space," a photography exhibition juried by Aishman at [email protected] in Malden, MA, in June/July 2003. Hannah Barrett (Dip `92) and Heather Hobler-Keene (BFA `85, Dip `96) were included in the 2003 DeCordova annual exhibition in Lincoln, MA, from June through August 2003. Lorey Bonante (Dip `92), Ken Hruby (Dip `87, FY `88, Sculpture and Foundations faculty), Joyce McDaniel (MFA `82, Sculpture and Foundations faculty), Ellen Wetmore (Post Bac `97, MFA `99), and Dan Wills (Sculpture and Foundations faculty) exhibit in "Collection Connection: Boston Sculptors at the Art Complex Museum" in Duxbury, MA, on view through January 11, 2004. Evelina Brozgul (MFA `00) and Amy Morel (Post Bac `98, MFA `01) exhibited their work with that of other Joan Mitchell Grant recipients at Cue Art Foundation (New York), June­August 2003. Cree Cruins (Dip `01, FY `02) and Rachel Perry Welty (Diploma `99, FY `01) participated in "4 to look at" at the Barbara Krakow Gallery in Boston, July­September 2003. Stefanie Klavens (Dip `88, FY `89, BFA `90) and Guillermo Srodek-Hart (BFD `03) took part in "New England Photographers `03" at the Danforth Museum of Art in Framingham, MA, May­September 2003. Klavens, Srodek-Hart, and Neeta Madahar (MFA `03) also participated in the Photographic Resource Center's (Boston) members exhibition in June/July 2003.

Hiroko Lee, Nostalgia (detail), 2001. Mixed media, 41 x 32 inches

IN MEMORY

Maggie Fitzpatrick (BFA `76, MFA `80, Graphic Design faculty) Ernest Morenon (Sculpture faculty) Ralph Rosenthal (Dip `35) Wilson Smith (Attended `70, Photography faculty)

8

Kim Pashko, Suite # 1­4 (detail), 2003. Acrylic on plastic, 2 x 2 inches each on aluminum shelves

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Megan Hinton, Subway Street, 2002. Oil on canvas, 42 x 36 inches

Thank you! With support from alumni around the country and the world, our annual fundraising totaled more than 1 million dollars, meeting its FY `03 goal and providing much-needed support for Museum School students.

Alumnus Mark Feldman Reveals Generous Commitment to Museum School

In the 1960s, Mark Feldman (Bachelor of Fine Arts, Diploma `69) applied to the Museum School--and was rejected--eight times. But the ninth time was the charm, and in 1964 Feldman entered the School with the help of scholarship aid. "The Museum School made me what I am," says Feldman, "and if I didn't get that scholarship, I wouldn't be where I am today." After a successful career as a commercial artist, Mark and his partner, Corey Warn, opened an antiques business. Today, they are among the country's leading dealers in Art Deco paintings and decorative arts. Forever grateful for the Museum School education that changed his life, and for the financial aid that made it possible, Feldman and Warn have decided to leave their shared estate to the School. "There is no doubt that Mark's generous initiative and gift will be transforming for the Museum School," said Deborah Dluhy, Dean of the School. "It is testimony both to his extraordinarily generous spirit and to the power of the Museum School experience." This multi-million dollar estate will be the largest gift in the School's 133-year history. With his thoughtful and magnanimous estate planning, Feldman has ensured that generations of future students will have the same opportunities that he had to grow and flourish at the Museum School. For more information on how planned gifts can benefit the Museum School, contact George Rogers at 617-369-4295 or [email protected]

David Kelley, Lingo (Blanc) # 6, 2003. Oil and gouache on canvas, 18 x 14 inches

S M FA . E D U 9

PHOTO: TONY RINALDO

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DECEMBER 2003

SALE

S U B M IT YOU R ART WOR K

Each work sold benefits the artist and student financial aid

W H AT TO D O P R E PA R AT I O N T I P S

DECEMBER SALE T H U R S D AY , D E C E M B E R 4 , 12 ­ 8 P M F R I D AY , D E C E M B E R 5 , 12 ­ 6 P M S AT U R D AY , D E C E M B E R 6 , 12 ­ 6 P M S U N D AY , D E C E M B E R 7 , 12 ­ 6 P M

Drop off your work Thursday, November 13, 10 am­6 pm Friday, November 14, 10 am­6 pm Saturday, November 15, 10 am­1 pm

I N F O R M AT I O N S E S S I O N S

Price to sell: $100­$500 was last year's best-selling price range Information is knowledge: attach a business card, résumé, or artist's statement to each piece Impress with presentation: professionalism counts whether your work is shrink-wrapped, framed, or 3-D

QUESTIONS

Thursday, October 30 12:30 or 6 pm Museum School

E-mail: [email protected] Phone: 617-369-3204 Web: smfa.edu, click on "Exhibitions"

K E E P U S U P D AT E D

We want to hear from you! Tell us at which longitude and latitude art intersects your life. Share stories about your art making, careers, travels, and projects. Send us your exhibition announcements, slides of your work, and other news of your world. Check here if this is a new address.

NAME

Y E A R G R A D UAT E D

PROGRAM(S)

ADDRESS

CITY

STAT E

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HOME PHONE

WORK PHONE

E-MAIL

VI S IT U S AT S M FA.E DU E-MAIL: ALU M N [email protected] M FA.E DU

NEWS (SIXTY WORDS OR FEWER)

Return completed form by December 1 to Alumni Relations Office, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 230 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02115

School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 230 The Fenway Boston, MA 02115 smfa.edu

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. PO STAG E PAID BOSTON, MA P E R M I T N O . 5 8 010

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