Read Microsoft Word - Kirkorian HDFS 766 Syllabus Spring 2011 text version

Current Issues: Media, Children, and Families Human Development and Family Studies 766 ­ Spring 2011 Instructor: Heather Kirkorian Office: 330 MiddletonBuilding (1305 Linden Drive) Office Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:30am10:30am or by appointment Mailbox: Middleton Building, 3rd floor mailboxes Phone: (608) 2634020 Email: [email protected] Class Meetings: Thursdays 1:00PM ­ 3:30PM, Middleton 368 Course Description: This seminar examines child development in the context of mass media (primarily television). Topics include the following: history of children's media; how children use, understand, and respond to television; the effects of media on cognitive and social development, children's health, and family processes; and the application of theory and research to media policy and production. Course Format: A combination of lecture, class discussion, student presentations, and video material will constitute our class time. Required Readings: The required reading for this course is a collection of research, theoretical, and popular articles from the following two sources: S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The BlackwellHandbook of Children, Media, and Development. Blackwell: Boston, MA. (available as PDFs from UW library) HDFS 766 Course Reader (to be distributed as PDFs on course website; see references below) Evaluation Method and Grading Scale Grades are based on the number of points earned. Points will be distributed as follows: Attendance and participation Reflections on readings Presenting research articles Television program critique/presentation Literature review and research proposal 10 points 10 points 10 points 20 points 50 points

Total points 100 points Grades will be assigned according to the following scale A AB B BC C D F = = = = = = = 93100 points 8992 points 8388 points 7882 points 7077 points 6069 points 059 points

Course Requirements Class attendance and participation: Students are expected to attend each class, to have read the assigned chapters/articles in advance, and to participate in class discussions. If you need to miss part or all of a particular class, please let me know in advance. A student's good participation (i.e., active listening, participation in discussion that is informed by readings) will be considered in assigning a final grade: Not participating in class discussion can result in a substantial reduction in your final grade for the course even if you attend every class meeting. (10% of grade) Reflections on readings: Written reflections are due by the start of class for each new topic. They should be between one half and one full (doublespaced) page. Reflections should not summarize readings; rather they should demonstrate your thinking about how each paper or chapter relates to the other parts of the seminar, to the larger issues of child development and/or families, or to questions raised in your mind by the reading. The reflections should be on the readings as an assigned group (i.e., chapter and supplemental articles) rather than on each reading individually. Reflections will be evaluated based on completeness and thoughtfulness. (10% of grade) Presenting original research papers: Each student will facilitate discussion for two different topics this semester. For each topic, students will find a recent, original research paper (i.e., published in a reputable, peerreviewed journal no earlier than 2005) and present a summary to the class. Research presentations will be evaluated based on appropriateness of the article (i.e., quality and relevance to topic) and clarity/brevity of summary. (10% of grade) Television program critique and presentation: The formal presentations will take place on April 7, 2011. This presentation will focus on a children's television program (or possibly computer program or website). The presentation will include background information (e.g., premise, target audience, educational goals), a brief video excerpt of the program, and a critique based on the seminar and larger considerations of child development. Each presentation should last 2030 minutes (including 5 minutes for discussion). Specific evaluation criteria will be distributed and discussed in class. (20% of grade) Literature review and research proposal: The final paper can be on any topic relevant to the seminar; you will clear the broad topic with me by February 24. The paper will have two components: a literature review and a research proposal. The paper should be of scholarly quality and conform to APA guidelines. The literature review should delve into original research articles as opposed to the summary chapters that constitute most of the assigned readings in this seminar. Your literature review should integrate 8 to 10 empirical journal articles. Use your literature review to inform your proposed research idea. For example, what are the existing gaps in the literature based on your review? What questions remain unanswered? You will give a brief, informal presentation of your preliminary research idea in class on April 21, 2011; we will allow for 510 minutes of discussion per student. The final writeup of your literature review and proposed study will include a description of participants, design, protocol, analysis plan, and hypotheses/research questions. Your ideas should be well supported by your literature review. For example, your hypotheses should be well supported by existing research. The final paper should be 810 pages (68 for literature review and about 2 for proposed study) and is due on the last day of class. Specific requirements and grading criteria will be distributed and discussed in class. (50% of grade)

Jan. 20 Jan. 27

Introduction; theories of media effects History of electronic media; media time use Wartella, E., & Robb, M. (2008). Historical and recurring concerns about children's use of the media. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 726). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 1) Scantlin, R. (2008). Media use across childhood: Access, time, and content. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 5173). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 3) Rideout, V., & Hamel, E. (2006). The media family: Electronic media in the lives of infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their parents. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.

Feb. 3

Media and the family Sign up for two article topics. Alexander, A. (2008). Media and the family. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 121140). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Ch. 6) Kirkorian, H.L., Pempek, T.A., Murphy, L.A., Schmidt, M.E., & Anderson, D.R. (2009). The impact of background television on parentchild interaction. Child Development, 80, 1350 1359. Pempek, T.A., Demers, L.B., Hanson, K., Kirkorian, H.L., & Anderson, D.R. (2011). The impact of baby videos on parentchild interaction. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 32, 1019.

Feb. 10

Attention and comprehension MEET IN MIDDLETON 302 Barr., R. (2008). Attention and learning from media during infancy and early childhood. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 143165). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 7) Anderson, D.R., Lorch, E.P., Field, D.E., & Sanders, J. (1981). The effect of television program comprehensibility on preschool children's visual attention to television. Child Development, 52, 151157. Pempek, T.A., Kirkorian, H.L., Richards, J.E., Anderson, D.R., Lund, A.F., & Stevens, M. (2010). Video comprehensibility and attention in very young children. Developmental Psychology, 46, 12831293.

Feb. 17

Learning from educational media MEET IN MIDDLETON 302 Kirkorian, H.L., & Anderson, D.R. (2008). Learning from educational media. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 319 360). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 9) Anderson, D.R., Huston, A.C., Schmitt, K.L., Linebarger, D.L., & Wright, J.C. (2001). Early childhood television viewing and adolescent behavior. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 68(1), Serial No. 264, 119134. (summary chapter only) Crawley, A.M., Anderson, D.R., Wilder, A., Williams, M., & Santomero, A. (1999). Effects of repeated exposure to a single episode of the television program Blue's Clues on the viewing behaviors and comprehension of preschool children. Journal of Educational Psychology, 91, 630637.

Feb. 24

Cultivation theory, race, gender, stereotypes Share topic of research paper. Greenberg, B.S., & Mastro, D.E. (2008). Children, race, ethnicity, and media. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 7497). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 4) Hust, S.J.T., & Brown, J.D. (2008). Gender, media use, and effects. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 98120). (Chapter 5) Wilson, B.J., Martins, N., & Marske, A.L. (2005). Children's and parents' fright reactions to kidnapping stories in the news. Communication Monographs, 72(1), 4670.

Mar. 3

Violence and aggression Wilson, B.J. (2008). Media violence and aggression in youth. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 237267). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 11) Huesmann, L.R., MoiseTitus, J., Podolski, C., & Eron, l.D. (2003). Longitudinal relations between children's exposure to TV violence and their aggressive and violent behavior in young adulthood: 19771992. Developmental Psychology, 39, 201221. Sestir, M.A., & Bartholow, B.D. (2010). Violent and nonviolent video games produce opposing effects on aggressive and prosocial outcomes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 934942.

Mar. 8

Field trip to Vilas Prosocial effects and fear responses NOTE TUESDAY MEETING 3/8 Guest lectures by Louise Mares and Karyn Riddle in the Communication Arts Department. They will talk to us about their areas of expertise with respect to children and media (prosocial effects and fear responses, respectively). Meet in Middleton 368 at 1pm. Mares, M., Palmer, E., & Sullivan, T. (2008). Prosocial effects of media exposure. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 268289). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 12) Vaulkenburg, P.M., & Buijzen, M. (2008). Fear responses to media entertainment. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 334352). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 15) Articles TBA

Mar. 17 Mar. 24 Mar. 29

SPRING BREAK! Television program critique presentations; wrapup fear responses and prosocial effects Parasocial relationships NOTE TUESDAY MEETING 3/29 Hoffner, C. (2008). Parasocial and online social relationships. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 309333). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 14) Krcmar, M. (2010). Can social meaningfulness and repeat exposure help infants and toddlers overcome the video deficit? Media Psychology, 13(1), 3153. Lauricella et al., in revision TBA

Apr. 7

Health Vandewater, E.A., & Cummings, H.M. (2008). Media use and childhood obesity. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 355 380). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 16) Harrison, K., & Hefner, V. (2008). Media, body image, and eating disorders. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.). The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 381 408). (Chapter 17) Borzekowski, D.L.G.,, & Strasburger, V.C. (2008). Adolescents and media messages about tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 432452). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 19)

Apr. 14

Marketing and advertising Brief, informal presentation of research proposal ideas. Young, B. (2008). Media and advertising effects. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 407431). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 18) Institute of Medicine (2006). Food marketing to children and youth: Threat or opportunity? Washington, DC: National Academy Press. (executive summary only) Roberto, C.A., Baik, J., Harris, J.L., & Brownell, K.D. (2010). Influence of licensed characters on children's taste and snack preferences. Pediatrics, 126, 8893.

Apr. 21

Producing children's television Truglio, R.T., Lovelace, V.O., Segui, I., & Scheiner, S. (2001). The varied role of formative research: Case studies from 30 years. In S.M. Fisch & R.T. Truglio (Eds.), G is for growing: Thirty years of research on children and Sesame Street (pp. 6179). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. Anderson, D.R. (2004). Watching children watch television and the creation of Blue's Clues. In H. Henderson (Ed.), Nickelodeon Nation: The history, politics, and economics of America's only TV channel for kids (pp. 241268). New York: New York University Press. Segal, L., Cole, C.F., & Fuld, J. (2002). Developing an HIV/AIDS education curriculum for Takalani Sesame, South Africa's Sesame Street. Early Education and Development, 13, 363 378.

Apr. 28

Policy interventions Calvert, S.L. (2008). The children's television act. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 455478). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 20) Schmidt, M.E., Bickham, D.S., Branner, A., & Rich, M. (2008). Mediarelated policies of professional health organizations. . In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 503526). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 22) American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) (2010). Media education. Pediatrics, 126(5), 1012 1017.

May 5

Parent and school interventions Literature review and research proposal due. Chakroff, J.L., & Nathanson, A.I. (2008). Parent and school interventions: Mediation and media literacy. In S.L. Calvert & B.J. Wilson (Eds.) The Blackwell Handbook of Children, Media, and Development (pp. 552576). Blackwell: Boston, MA. (Chapter 24) Mendelsohn, A.L., Dreyer, B.P., Brockmeyer, C.A., BerkuleSilberman, S.B., Huberman, H.S., & Tomopoulos, S. (2011). Randomized controlled trial of primary care pediatric parenting programs: Effect on reduced media exposure in infants, mediated through enhanced parent child interaction. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, 165(1), 4248. Nathanson, A.L., Wilson, B.J., McGee, J., & Sebastian, M. (2002). Counteracting the effects of female stereotypes of television via active mediation. Journal of Communication, 52(4), 922 937.

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