Read Geopath Basic Workbook text version

GeoPath for Windows Basic Workbook

Revised 12 February 2003

Printed in the United States of America

GeoPath Help

You can find even more detailed information on GeoPath by selecting Help, including: · · · · · · Machining basics More Step-by-step examples Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Definitions of error or warning messages Machining tips The latest software enhancements

...and much more. You can access GeoPath Help by selecting the GeoPath icon, then selecting Help on the top menu.

You can also access GeoPath Help by selecting Help on the top menu of the GeoPath CAD window.

You can also press the F1 button at any time and GeoPath Help will automatically open with information on the current window.

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Example: To find out more information on Engraving, select Step-By-Step Examples...

...then For Lettering/Engraving

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OR select the Search button at the top of any Help window and you can search for topics.

Type in "engraving", and GeoPath finds the topic by the same name: Engraving.

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Select the Display button at the bottom of the window.

There are many sub-topics on engraving. Select Lettering/Engraving Step-By-Step Example, then the Display button.

You can also print out any of the Help topics currently displayed by selecting the Print button on the top menu.

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Table of Contents

Rev 3.0 (23 October, 2000)

Section One Getting started with Graphics Section Two Creating Intermediate Drawings Section Three Loading a CAD File Section Four Programming Cuts Section Five Chains step-by-step example Detailed Table of Contents

Page 3 Page 18 Page 22 Page 27 Page 34 Page 47

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Introduction: Purpose The purpose of this course is to give a first time GeoPath user the ability to program parts for his company with GeoPath. All one needs to begin this course, is the ability to use the Windows 95, 98 or NT operating systems. The Windows 95, 98 or NT systems disks have a tutor that you can use to gain this ability. What You Will Learn The format of this course is self-paced. It consists of a check sheet that leads you through How-to descriptions and exercises that give you hands on experience with GeoPath. When you finish this course, you will know how to: · Draw geometry in GeoPath or import a CAD file and modify it as needed. · Define tools from a blank tool info screen or selecting tools from the library and modify them as needed. · Select various types of cuts and defining them so that you can create tool-paths that will allow you to save time and get the best calculations possible. · Select geometry to cut that has been drawn/loaded and/or modified. · Use "Layers" so that geometry and cuts can be best organized simplifying the use of GeoPath and creations of cuts. · Create and modify "Chains" so cuts can be assigned for the best toolpath possible. By the end of this course you should be efficient enough to make intermediate parts with GeoPath and have a very good understanding of how to be a GeoPath user.

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Section One Getting started with Graphics

Note: GeoPath needs to be installed and an icon created before we begin.

Starting GeoPath

Once GeoPath is installed and an icon has been created double click on the icon to start GeoPath. The SolutionWare CAD/CAM screen will come up (the white screen). This is the screen where you can select a command to create a new program or change an existing one. GeoPath programs are also processed and the configuration of the system is also set up in this screen.

Viewing -- Starting A New Graphics Program

Select PROGRAM, CREATE NEW GRAPHICS PROGRAM, a window will come up asking for the file name, the extension will be entered automatically so you should only enter the name of your program and not the period (.) or the extension (GTF). At this point you may change the directory if you have a specific directory for your program or you may just enter the name and the program will be created in the current directory. When you are ready to start a new program then type the name in the "File name" field and click O.K. At this point we are just viewing the "New Graphics" window. Once you have entered the program name the Graphics screen (the black screen) will come up.

Viewing -- Changing an Existing Program

Do the following only when reviewing this option. If you have already created a program and you would like to load it into GeoPath, instead of doing the instructions above do the following; click on PROGRAM from the pull-down menu on the CAD/CAM screen, then CHANGE EXISTING GRAPHICS PROGRAM and a window will appear asking for the file name. Select the program you want to open and click "Open."

Viewing ­ Open another program

While in the Graphics screen go to MAINFILES, OPEN ANOTHER PROGRAM; in this window you can change directories to find GeoPath programs. On the middle of this window you will see a list of the programs available from the current directory, if there are none than you may change directories to the location where they are stored. On the "files of type" you will see the type of files that can be loaded into GeoPath. The files created by GeoPath are GGF (GeoPath Geometry file) and GTF (GeoPath Tooling File), both of these files are generated automatically for every program saved with GeoPath. The GGF file is our version of a CAD file. 3

The GTF file is the tooling file; this file contains the information for the tooling, machine selected, etc. When loading a GeoPath program the file extension that you need to load is GTF. Both the GGF and the GTF files have to be in the same directory prior to loading a GeoPath program. If the GTF file is missing and you load the GGF file, then you will only get the geometry information without the tooling. A CAD file can also be loaded from this window by selecting the type of file (DXF, IGES, etc.) from the "files of type" field. At this point we are just viewing the "Open another Program" window.

Getting To Know GeoPath Graphics Screen

Now you will need to start a new program, review "Viewing -Starting A New Graphics Program" as needed to start a new graphics program. Name the program "Test1". The Graphics Screen is divided into the X-axis and the Y-axis. The Xaxis travels from left to right, the vertical line divides the X-positive and X-negative sides. If you want to draw geometry on the left side of the vertical line, all the values are going to be X-negative, e.g. X-3. If you want to draw on right side the values are X-positive, e.g. X3. The Y-axis is similar to X except that the Y-axis runs from top to bottom. The horizontal line divides the positive from the negative sides. If you want to draw geometry above the horizontal line then you will be entering positive Y-coordinates, e.g. Y3. If you want to enter values below the horizontal line then the Y-coordinates will be negative, e.g. Y-3. At the very top of the GeoPath screen you will see the description of the Graphics window and the location of the file you are working on, e.g. c:\sln\gpcourse\test1.gtf. Below that you will see the pull-down menus, if you click on any of the words (e.g. Main/Files, Draw, etc.) a menu will come down with all the Menu Items for that section.

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To the left of the screen you will see gray buttons; these buttons change as you make your selections from the Pull-down Menu Items. Further examples are listed later in this course. Hit the "Esc" key on your keyboard twice, at the bottom of the screen you will see a space for the prompt; this prompt gives you instructions as you create your program (press the Esc key on the top left of your keyboard to begin display). It is very important that you read the instructions given by the prompt as you go since it prompts you for the next step. At the bottom left you will see the XY coordinates, usually your mouse position is displayed here unless you type in an X or Y value. Then it will show the current value entered.

"Draw" Pull-Down Menu

In order to create a drawing you will need to look at the "Draw" pulldown menu. This shows you the different types of objects (geometry) that can be created such as a lines, arcs, circles, shapes etc. A shape is a pattern that has several lines and/or arcs making the shape, such as a rectangle. As you can see on the example below, the rectangle has four sides and corners. The sides are made of lines and the corners are radiuses (arcs). Selecting DRAW, SHAPES, and RECTANGLE from the pulldown menu gives you the option to create rectangles. When you want to draw something, examine it, see if it is a shape or a single object, then determine how it would be best to draw it. Later in this course you will be given specific steps in creating geometry.

Paying Attention To The Graphics Interface

When you select a Draw function such as a line, arc, shape, circle etc... you need to pay close attention to the gray buttons (Action Buttons) on the left. Every time you select something from a pull-down menu the action buttons change. When selecting geometry from the screen you will also notice that the Action Buttons change, so it's not just when you select an option from the pull-down menu but also as you select geometry. Review the action buttons and notice that most of the top buttons are not active. The last four Action Buttons are active. At the bottom of the screen there is a prompt that gives you instructions as you select items from the screen. This prompt is an important part of programming since it gives you instructions as to what to do next.

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Read what the prompt says: now move your mouse around the screen and notice that your XY coordinates at the bottom left change as you move your mouse. When you enter XY locations as you draw you will be able to see what XY location has been selected.

Entering XY Locations

Select DRAW, LINE, and POINT TO POINT from the pull-down menu bar. Now pay attention to the Action Buttons, you will see that now you have "Done" and "Cancel" active. This means that you can select "Done" or "Cancel" when you finish creating your line. In the prompt at the bottom of the screen it shows "[Line Points] Select start XY". Now you can begin to create your geometry by entering the XY location for the first point. Type the letter "X" on your keyboard. A window like the one below will appear.

It says "Enter X Value for 1st point:" This means that it wants the "X" start-point. Type a value of 0 (zero) and press "Enter", make sure that it is not the letter (O) since that letter is not a number and has no value. Notice that the coordinates at the bottom left-hand of your screen have changed. The "X" is now in square brackets e.g. [X0.00000] and the "Y" is not in square brackets. The square brackets mean that the user has entered the "X" coordinate and the "Y" is not entered. If you move your mouse you will see that the pointer moves only in the "Y" direction and not in the "X". Now type the letter "Y" and enter a value of 0 (zero) and press "Enter". Look at the coordinates at the bottom left and you will see that the Y is now in square brackets.

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Now read the prompt at the bottom of the screen. It has now added "(push axis letter to change, or Enter to confirm location)". "Push axis letter to change", means that you have entered the start location, you may still change your mind and select a different start XY location for the start point, you may do so at this time by retyping the X or Y. "Enter to confirm location" means that you have selected the start XY location and you are sure that this is where you want to start your line so you must press Enter one more time to confirm the starting location of the first point of your line. After you press "Enter", the bottom prompt will now say "Select end XY". Now enter the end point of this line by typing the letter "X" on the keyboard and entering a value of 3 and clicking OK.

Now enter the "Y" location by typing the letter "Y" on the keyboard and enter a value of 3.

Once again you have entered the XY location and the bottom prompt has changed asking you to either change the current values or confirm the current XY location for the end point. Press "Enter" to confirm your location. Now you have a line that is yellow and now the prompt says "Select Start XY" at the bottom. It is now asking you to select another starting point for another line. At this time you will need to enter the starting and ending location of the lines illustrated in the drawing on the next page. The lines are all the same except that they are drawn in different quadrants. As you create the other three lines make sure that you read the prompt at the bottom of the screen so that you will stay in pace with the instructions given. Don't forget that each one of the lines

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starts at X0 Y0 and the end point is at X3 Y3 with the sign (+ or -) changing as you change quadrants.

Drawing Single Objects

In this series we will draw some lines, arcs, circles. These are single objects that can be drawn separately and placed at the correct location to make a shape. So far you have created a lines point to point. Now lets look at other single geometry.

Line Angle-Length

Select DRAW, LINE, ANGLE & LENGTH and click, a window will now prompt you for an angle. The angle can be entered by typing a numeric value or by clicking the icon on the right. Click on "45" from icons on the right; another window will appear asking for the length. Enter a value of 1, the value is measured in inches so this is one inch, now click O.K. Notice that the Action Buttons have changed and the "Angle" and "Length" buttons are now active. If we want to change the value of the length or angle, we can just click the appropriate button. If you move your mouse you will see that a ghost line (white line) is now attached to your mouse pointer. This line starts at the pointer and ends at the angle 45. When you enter the XY coordinate you will be entering the location of the pointer. Type the letter X, enter a value of 3 and click O.K, then the letter 8

Y and once again enter a value of 3 and then O.K. This will put the line at the end point of the line in the positive XY quadrant. The line is white, which means that it's a ghost line. If you look at the prompt at the bottom you will see that it's now asking you to either push axis letter to change or "Enter to confirm location". Before you confirm your location click the action button "Angle", a window will appear, change the angle to 90 degrees. This can be done by typing 90 in the field or clicking the 90 icon on the right. You will now see that the ghost line is now pointing up from the pointer. Push Enter to confirm your location. Now draw the same line on the left side (opposite X) by retyping the XY coordinates for that quadrant, the sign in X has now changed to negative (-). Once you have done the first two lines go to "Angle" and change it to 270. Now enter the XY locations for the end points of the lines on the negative side of Y. Now go to "Angle" and change it to 0, then change the length to 2. Now go to the two quadrants on the right and place the lines in the positive side of X by typing the XY location as previously shown. Then change the angle to 180 and place the lines on the negative side of X. The drawing should look like the example drawing on the left. Now go to the action buttons on the left and click save.

Line Parallel

Select DRAW, LINE, PARALLEL, a window will come up asking for the distance. Enter the value 1; this will put a parallel line one-inch away when you select the line to duplicate. Now move your mouse and click on the horizontal line in the top right quadrant of the screen. After you click on the line, two ghost lines will appear. Click on the lower ghost line, this will make it yellow. Now click on the remaining horizontal lines in the other quadrants making duplicate lines just like this one. The lines should all come out like the example on the left. Now go to the Action Buttons on the left and click save.

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Arc Center

Now you will draw an arc: select DRAW, ARC, CENTER, a window will appear asking for the radius value. Enter a value of 2 and click O.K.; this will give a radius of two inches. Now a window will appear asking for a starting angle. Since you are going to draw an arc at the end of the new parallel lines on the left, the Start Angle will be 90, make that selection and click O.K. A window will come up asking for the End Angle; enter 270. Now a ghost arc will be visible, if you move your mouse you will see that the center point is attached to the mouse pointer. Type "X" and the value of -5 then "Y" and the value of 0 as your coordinate for this arc. Press enter to confirm your location if the ghost arc is on the correct location. Now type the letter O and your arc start and end angle will be switched to the opposite direction. Type the XY location for the opposite side and confirm your location. Now go to the Action Buttons on the left and click save.

Arc Parallel

Select DRAW, ARC, PARALLEL, a window will ask you for a distance. Enter a value of 1 and click O.K., now click on either of the two 2-inch radiuses. Two ghost arcs will appear parallel to the one selected, click the outside arc. The arc will become yellow, now select the other 2-inch radius and select the outside arc. The drawing should look like the example on the left.

Arc 3 Points

Select DRAW, ARC, 3 POINTS. At the bottom of your screen your prompt is asking you to select the "Enter 1st XY". Click on the Action Button "Snap Off", a window will appear, click on "Snap Locked". Now move your mouse, you will see that the mouse pointer is snapping to all end points of your geometry. Move your mouse to the highest point of the top right quadrant. The coordinates at the bottom left of your screen should be at X3 and Y4, if this is correct then click once. Now the prompt changes to say, "Enter 2nd 10

XY". Move your mouse to the center of your screen, the coordinates should be at X0 and Y0. If this is correct, click your mouse once. Now your prompt changes to say "Enter Final XY". Now move your mouse to the lowest point on bottom right of your screen. The mouse should now be at X3 and Y-4. If this is true click your mouse one last time. Your arc should now be present. So now do the same on the left side of your screen. After you are done, the drawing should look like the illustration on the left. Now go to the Action Buttons on the left and click save.

Trim/Extend Both

Now you will need to modify some of the Geometry so that the shape can become clear. Select MODIFY, TRIM/EXTEND, BOTH. Now put your mouse on the line illustrated in the picture on the left. It is very important to position your mouse on the part of the line that you want to keep. Now click on that line. Now click on opposite side of the line as illustrated on the drawing on the left. The Geometry should come out looking like the picture on the left. If the lines did not come out exactly like the picture click the "Undo" button on the top left of your screen and do the process again until you get it right. When you have done the modification correctly do the same to the other three corners of your drawing. Your picture should look like the one below.

Now go to the action buttons on the left and click save.

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Fillet

Now we will be putting radiuses on two locations. Select MODIFY, FILLET, it will now ask for a radius value, enter a value of 2. Now position your mouse on the geometry as illustrated on the picture on the left and click once.

Now position your mouse on geometry as illustrated on the picture on the left and click once.

Your picture should come out like the drawing on the left. If your drawing did not come out like the picture on the left, then click "Undo" at the top left hand of your screen and repeat the fillet. If your drawing came out correctly, do the same to the opposite side. After you are done the drawing should look like the drawing below.

CleanUp

Now you will be filleting two more radiuses. However, before you can do that you will need to split the bigger arcs at the intersecting point. The function that will do that is "CleanUp". CleanUp splits arcs and lines at their intersecting point and it also gets rid of overlapping objects; that is objects that are using the same XYZ (duplicate objects). In this case we have two arcs that intersect at X0 Y0. Now select MODIFY, CLEANUP, a message might appear that says "There Are Overlapping Objects"; if this comes up it is warning you that there are duplicate objects and it will now get rid of them. If not, there are no duplicate objects.

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Following that, all visible (those lines and arcs which you can see on your screen) lines and arcs that are intersecting will be split at the intersecting point. In this case the two arcs will be split at X0 Y0. An eraser will appear on your pointer, "Esc" on the keyboard will cancel it. Now select MODIFY, FILLET a window will come up asking for a radius value, enter a value of 2. Position your mouse on your screen the same way it is illustrated on the picture to the left and click once. Once again it is very important that you click exactly as the drawing shows so that the fillet comes out correct. Now position your mouse on the opposite side and click once.

The drawing should look the same as the illustration on the left. If it came out correct then do the same to the bottom of the drawing and the final picture should look like the picture below.

Now go to the action buttons on the left and click save. When you are done and would like to go to the next page, select MAIN/FILES, EXIT, and SAVE AND EXIT ONLY. You have just completed the Read and Do of Section one. Now do the drawings on the following pages using the skills you have just learned. If you get stuck on any drawing refer to the sections that illustrate that function.

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Start a new Program called "Test2" and begin Drawing One. Exit and save when you have finished.

Drawing One

Hints: Use Line, Angle-Length and draw all lines then fillet your corners.

Start a new Program called "Test3" and begin Drawing Two. Exit and save when you have finished.

Drawing Two

Hints: Use 1-inch radius arcs and position them at the correct XY, then add the .25 fillet radiuses. Finally draw your horizontal lines point to point.

Start a new Program called "Test4" and begin Drawing Three. Exit and save when you have finished. 14

Drawing Three

Hints: Draw all your lines and then fillet (.25) your corners.

Start a new Program called "Test5" and begin Drawing Four. Exit and save when you have finished.

Drawing Four

Hints: Use Line, Angle-Length, at this point it doesn't matter if the lines are long enough later you can trim/extend. The starting point is the most important thing. Once you have enough lines at the correct starting point then MODIFY, TRIM/EXTEND opposite lines so they meet at the corners.

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Section Two Creating Intermediate Drawings

You have now learned enough about drawing that you should be able to enter XY coordinates and draw some simple geometry. The following will get you to the next level. That is being able to draw some geometry that requires more attention to detail.

Drawing Circles

Start a new program called "Test6". Select DRAW, CIRCLE, DIAMETER, CENTER, a window will ask you for a diameter value, enter 1 and click O.K. The prompt it will ask you to enter the XY location for the center of the circle. Enter "X1" and "Y1" for your coordinates. Then enter the same coordinates with the sign modified so that the four quadrants have

equally spaced circles. Now select DRAW, CIRCLE, DIAMETER, BLEND 2 ITEMS, a window will appear asking for a diameter value, enter 2 and click O.K. Now click on the top left circle once and then the top right circle, you will now see four ghost circles. The locations of all the ghost circles are the possibilities for blending a 2-inch circle to the two 1-inch circles. Select the circle at the highest point by clicking it once. The drawing should now look like the picture on the left.

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Do the same to the remainder of the circles; your picture should look like the one below. Now that you have all your circles in place you will need to split them. CleanUp can do this very nicely, along with splitting and removing overlapping objects CleanUp will also split full circles.

Select MODIFY, CLEANUP, a window will appear asking "Split Full Circles?" click "Yes". Now you have an eraser as your pointer. Click on the geometry that is not needed so that you end up with a picture like the one below.

What Is A Shape

A shape is number of objects positioned together to make a pattern. A rectangle is a shape; it contains lines and maybe arcs. A bolt circle is also a shape; it contains circles or points equally spaced and around a point of rotation. There are a number of patterns that can be created as a shape. For a list of them, look under DRAW, SHAPES. You can also create a shape by drawing individual objects and placing them at a precise location, a shape always has all objects linked together by start point and/or end point of the individual objects. Go to Main/Files> Close Program / New Program; GeoPath will ask you if you want to save, click "Yes" and give it a name. This will start a new program. 17

Creating A Bolt Circle

Select DRAW, SHAPE, BOLT-CIRCLE, a window will appear asking "How Many Holes?" Enter 5 and click O.K. A second window will appear asking for the "Bolt-Circle Diameter" enter 3. Now a third window will appear asking the "Hole Diameter?" Enter .25, and finally a fourth window will appear asking for the "Starting Angle Of First Hole?" enter 90. Now the prompt will ask "Enter XY", type your coordinates "X3" and "Y3" then confirm your location. A bolt circle will appear on the top right quadrant of your screen. Now type the XY locations for the remainder of the quadrants changing the sign for the XY locations as needed. Your drawing should look like the picture illustrated on the left.

Creating XY-XY Line of Points

On the same drawing Select DRAW, SHAPES, XYXY LINE OF POINTS, a window will appear asking "How Many Holes?" enter 5. Then a second window will appear asking "Hole Diameter", enter .5. The prompt will now ask "Select Start XY", type X6 and Y-6 for the starting point and confirm your location. Now the prompt will ask "Select End XY", type X6 and Y6 for your end point and confirm your location. Now do the same on negative side of X. When done your drawing should look like the picture illustrated

on the left.

Creating Angle Line of Points

Select DRAW, SHAPES, ANGLE LINE OF POINTS. It will ask how many holes, enter 3, then it will ask you for the hole diameter enter .125, then it will ask you for the angle of line of holes enter 0 and finally it will ask for the distance between holes enter .5. Now enter the coordinate of X1 Y0 and confirm the location. Now go to the action buttons and click on angle, change the angle to 90 degrees and type in the coordinate of X0 Y1 and confirm the location. Continue to change the angle and the XY coordinates so that the hole pattern looks like the drawing.

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Creating a Grid of Points

Select DRAW, SHAPES, GRID OF POINTS, it will first ask you "Hole Diameter" enter .25. Then it will ask you how many holes in the X direction, enter 3. Then it will ask you how many holes in the Y direction, enter 3. Then finally the prompt at the bottom will ask you to select start XY, enter X ­2 and Y 5 for the starting location and confirm the location. Then the prompt will ask you to select the opposite XY, enter X2 and Y7 and confirm your location. Now do the same in the Y negative so that the your drawing looks just like the one below.

Creating a Rectangle

Select DRAW, SHAPES, RECTANGLE, it will first ask you for a Radius Value, this radius will be the corner radius, enter .5. The prompt will now ask you for Start XY, enter X-7.5 and Y-8 then confirm the location. The prompt will now ask you to select the opposite XY, enter X7.5 and Y8 then confirm the location. The drawing should now look like the one illustrated on the left.

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Section Three Loading a CAD File and using its layers Ways of Loading a CAD File

There are several ways to load a CAD file. The first way may not be the best way but it is the fastest way. This would work if you have a disk with a file or a file somewhere in your computer. Once GeoPath is loaded select PROGRAM, CHANGE EXISTING GRAPHICS PROGRAM, a window will come up. Change your directory to the location of your CAD file (\SLN directory). Now Select "Files of type" as illustrated below and select the CAD type that you want to use (e.g. DXF). The blank area in the middle will display all the files of that type. Select the Milldemo.dxf file and click Open and it will automatically load it into GeoPath. Once in GeoPath you may start programming it.

I don't recommend that you follow this method because it loads the file directly from its location and it keeps the files needed (GGF, GTF, NC etc.) to make the GeoPath program in the same directory or disk. You might also have to rename the file. If you loaded the file from a disk you will find that working from a disk is a very slow process. You are better off keeping your files in the hard drive. Now go to MAIN/FILES, EXIT, QUIT, when it asks you if you are sure you want to exit answer yes.

Loading a CAD File from Graphics

This method of loading a CAD file is a more efficient method. Once GeoPath has been activated go to PROGRAM, CREATE NEW GRAPHICS PROGRAM and click. Here you can select the drive, directory, and file 20

name you wish to use for your program, this way you will not have to change it at a later time. In the "Find Name" field enter "PART1" as the name of the program. Once you are in the graphics screen go to MAIN/FILES, LOAD CAD, a window will open like the one below.

Go to the "Files of type" field and select DXF, this will display the CAD files in the white area as illustrated above. In the "Look in" field to SLN folder if not already there; that is where the CAD file for this exercise may be found. Click on the MILLDEMO.DXF file and then click "Open". The CAD file will be loaded automatically. Now you will see the drawing on the left, in your graphics screen.

Using Layers from a CAD File

It is apparent to someone who uses layers that the file in its current view may not be programmed efficiently. There are notes on the screen that are not necessary to create a program, but are useful for information purposes. We will examine the CAD file so that we know what type of objects we have and figure out an efficient way of programming it. Let's examine the layers in this file; go to LAYERS, SET, this brings up the Layer List window. This is the window where you may choose a layer to work on.

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Notice the "Layer Name" on the top left; the field below is the layer list. Each layer may have a number and a name. In this case we have four layers, each has a number and a name. To the right of each layer are two 4 boxes, the first one is the "Visible" box, removing the 4 will make the layer invisible. Keeping the 4 will make the layer visible. Visible or invisible is determined by having the 4 in the box as well as having the layer highlighted as layer 0.0 shows. Not having the 4 in the box will make it invisible unless the layer is highlighted. The second one is the "Selectable" box, this one will allow you to make the layer not selectable, meaning that if the layer is visible and the 4 is not in the selectable box (not selectable) then it will not allow you to erase or modify the geometry in that layer.

Selecting a Layer

In order to activate a layer, the layer has to be highlighted as illustrated on layer 0.0 on the layer list. This layer is the current layer, if you wanted to draw geometry, the geometry would go into the layer that is highlighted, in this case layer 0.0. In the Visible boxes remove the 4 from each of the boxes who's layer is not highlighted. This will make the other layers invisible and the current layer visible, this will allow us to look at the geometry that exists in the current layer, click O.K. and lets see what is in there. What you see is nothing, now press the "Esc" on your keyboard and it will show you the following at the bottom prompt "# of objects=72, Displayed=0".

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Let's go back to the LAYERS, SET, and now highlight layer "1.EDGE" by clicking it as illustrated below and now make layer 0 invisible then click O.K.

Now when you look at the graphics you will see the geometry to mill, all the circles are now invisible. Press the Esc key once, now the prompt shows "# of objects=72, Displayed=33". So you now begin to see the effects that can be created with layers. Now go back to LAYERS, SET, and highlight layer "2 DRILL250" and make the rest invisible. You now see that the .25 holes are visible and the rest are invisible. The prompt shows "# of objects=72, Displayed=16". Now lets go back to LAYERS, SET, and highlight layer "3. Drill125", make the rest invisible and click O.K. Now the prompt will show "# of objects=72, Displayed=23". Now that you have an idea as to how to use the Layers with a CAD file, go to LAYERS, SET, on the bottom you will see a "ALL VISIBLE" button, click it. All the Visible boxes will now be checked (4) visible; make sure that the Selectable boxes are also checked (4), click O.K.

Now you will move the notes from their current layer to a layer that you will create. First go back to LAYERS, SET, and make sure all layers are visible and click O.K.

Creating a Layer

Go to LAYERS, MAKE LAYER, a window will come up asking to Enter Layer Name, enter "NOTES" as the name and click O.K. Now a window "Color Selection" will appear. Click on the color White and click Select. Now look at the XYZ Layer display, you will see that "Layer 4 "notes"" is now the current layer. Go to LAYERS, MOVE ALL DIM/NOTES INTO CURRENT, a window will appear telling you 8 objects moved, click O.K.

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Now go to LAYERS, SET, highlight layer "1" and make the rest invisible then click O.K. Now the contour geometry will be visible without the notes. We are ready to start cutting a part. At this point go to the action buttons on the left and click on the SAVE button. Now go Section Four so you may program this file.

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Section Four Programming Cuts Getting Started

There are five simple steps to creating the first cut on any program. 1. Select the machine you will be programming the part for. 2. Select a material to cut. 3. Select a tool to use and define the tool information. 4. Select the type of cut and define the cut information. 5. Select the geometry to cut. This is a very simple process; just keep in mind that the selections are done one step at a time.

Step One, Selecting a Machine

Create a new program called "Part2". Now lets look at the first step: go to the pull down menu bar at the top and click on TOOL/CUT. A pull down menu will come down; here you will find any option related to cuts or tools. The first option is MAKE NEW TOOL AND/OR CUT, click on it and a window will come up. This is the "Program Info" window; this window will come up only once, when you select this option for the first time. On the left of the window you will see a field with a description "Machine Name". The machine name field is the area where the description of the post processors is listed. So, if you had two machines with different controls each control would be listed here as a machine. Each post processor has the ability to create the G-Code needed for each machine. So you can have two machines with two different types of code, one post processor would handle one type of g-code and the other post processor would handle a different type of code.

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Definition for Post Processor: Post: Process:

A prefix meaning after or following. To treat or prepare by some particular process, as in manufacturing. -or ­ a suffix meaning a person or thing that does something.

What is a Post Processor:

There are two files to look at; the first is the post processor data file. This data file can be customized to give different types of output for different machines such as Fanuc, Haas, Fadal, etc. The second is the universal post processor; this file is a program in its self. This file is not userconfigurable; this file is a part of the GeoPath program. So, the universal post processor is a computer program (executable program) that takes data entered into a GeoPath graphics programs and translates it into g-code using a post processor data file. The data file is the configurable source that allows the post processor to create different g-code for the CNC Machines.

Step Two, Selecting a Material

At this point you have the option of selecting a material and all relative feed rates. If you do not select a material from the tool library, there would not be any tools available to select from and feed rates would also not be automatically set for you. In the middle of the "Program Info" window you will see a long gray button called "Select Tool Library/Technology Table". Click on it and a window will come up with a materials list. This list allows you to select different materials; when you select a type of material the feeds and speeds get automatically added to your tool and cut information. Click on Aluminum and then click "Select". The material list may be modified so that you can add more materials, modify or subtract any unused materials.

Program Identification

At this point you will be back in the "Program Info" window. You can choose to put in a Program Identification name. This is usually the long file name given at the bottom right hand of most prints. This is not needed at this time, when done click O.K.

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Step Three, Selecting a Tool

A window with the tools available for this material will be displayed for you. You can scroll down to find tools of different diameter or description. Because the tool library may be large there is a "Find:" field. This field will help you find tools easily and right away. Follow these simple steps in order to select a tool using the Find field. 1. Click inside this "Find" field until you see your cursor blinking. 2. Now type a short description of the tool you are looking for: type "EM.25", this will automatically display all tools that start with this description. 3. Once you have found the tool you are looking for, you may click in the tool you want. Select "EM.25X5/8C", by clicking on it with your mouse once until highlighted.

4. Click "Select", this will open the Tool Info window.

Define a Tool

The "Tool Info" window is activated after selecting a tool from the tool library or when you click on the "Not in Lib" button on the tools available window. If you choose the "Not in Lib" option, the "Tool Info" window will not have any information relative to any tool or material. However, if you choose a tool from the tool library it will import information for the tool and the type of material selected. Review the Tool Info window illustrated below and each of the definitions listed after that.

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Tool ID Name:

Brief descriptions of the tool like "1/4 drill". This will also generate a toolpath layer for this tool after generating cuts. This allows a long description of the tool like "1/4 D X 5/8 LOC REG SNG-END". This can be modified to describe your tool. The tool library may also be modified for your personal description.

Tool Description:

Tool Number:

This number is the tool number to use on the NC machine. This is the register number to use for tool-length compensation, e.g. G43 H1. This is the diameter of the tool in decimal or fraction. (.25 or 1/4)

Tool Length Compensation Number:

Tool Diameter:

Number of Flutes:

This must be 1 or greater. If the tool was selected from the tool library the number of flutes will have an effect on the Feed Rate, and it is used for chip-load calculations This takes effect when cutting surfaces. A ball-mill would be half the tool diameter or a bull nose radius may be less than half the radius of the tool. When cutting 3D surfaces a radius will have to be entered.

Radius on Corner:

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Tool Change Position X Y:

This allows you to move the table or tool to a location at which tool change will take place. Some machines don't allow a home position for a tool change; this can be used to move the tool away from the part. "@" Signifies the current location for the tool change (a straight move up to change the tool at this XY).

Spindle Speed RPM/SFM:

You can enter a number in RPM (Revolutions per Minute) or in SFM (Surface-feet/Minute). Enter only one number, the other will be calculated by GeoPath. If you wish, you can enter your rpm's as surface feet per minute and feed-rates as chip load per tooth. GeoPath will automatically calculate the rpm based on the tool diameter and the feed-rate based on number of flutes and rpm. For example, if you have a ½ -inch diameter mill and enter 800 as the surface feet per minute, GeoPath with convert this to 6112 rpm. If this same mill has 2 flutes and you enter a chip load of 0.002 at the above 6112 rpm, GeoPath will convert this to 24.45 inches per minute. Yes or No: this allows you to output an M3 or an M4. You may set up your post processor to output your different M-codes for the coolant. By default Flood will give you an M8, Mist M7 and Off M9. Flood / Mist / Air / Other / Off Rapid Plane Height: Rapid plane is the Z at which rapid moves occur between operations.

Reverse Spindle: Coolant:

Clearance Above Surfaces:

Clearance is the distance above the part that you want the tool to move to between cuts (entered in Cut Info later). It is also a relative move from where your tool will begin to feed down to cut.

Tool Kind:

Tool kind is either Mill or Drill/Tap/Bore/Ream or Chamfer/Center-Drill. The following Angle, Minimum Diameter and Tip Length are necessary when using a center drill, spot drill or just drilling through with a drill.

Angle:

This allows you to include the angle of Center-Drill or Chamfer tool (typically 82 or 90 degrees). This is useful if you want GeoPath to figure 29

out how deep to put your tool when drilling through or just chamfering a hole.

Minimum Diameter: Tip Length:

Tip diameter of Center-Drill or bottom-flat diameter of Chamfer tool. Tip length of Center-Drill. Now that you have selected a tool and reviewed the tool information you may make the appropriate changes to the tool information such as RPM, Rapid Plane Height, etc. Otherwise use the values that have automatically been entered. Once done, click "Do It".

Select the type of cut

Select the type of cut to be made from the Select type of cut menu, and click the "Do it" button. (More on this section forthcoming)

Define the cut information

Enter the Cut Information, and click on the "Do it" button. (More on this section forthcoming)

Select the geometry to use

Once the Cut Information has been entered, select the geometry to be cut by clicking on the geometry on the screen, then click on the "Done" button. A window will appear asking you to "Select Which Side to Place Cutter On." The choices are: "Left" (climb cut), "Right" (conventional cut), "No Comp" (centerline), "No Comp (Left)" (centerline, with G41), or "No Comp (Right)" (centerline, with G42). Use the mouse to click the side you want your cutter on and click on the "Do It" button. GeoPath will display the toolpath on screen and a window will appear asking you "Is this the cut you want?" Click on "Yes" if the cut is correct. If the cut is not click "No" to change any of the Cut Information already entered. (More on this section forthcoming). Now do the Step-By-Step Example for milling in GeoPath Help

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Section Five: Chains step-by-step example What Is A Chain

A chain is series of objects (lines and arcs) linked together to make one unit (a chain). The chain has a start point and an end point it also has a side and a direction for a cutter to follow. It knows what layer it is in and how many objects it has.

Chain Defined

A connected series of objects. Objects in a chain are treated as a group. If the objects are points (or a series of circles) for drilling holes, etc, then they of course are not connected, but are treated as a group.

Creating geometry to chain

Create one rectangle three by three inches starting at X0 Y0. Go to TRANSFORM, RELATIVE (INCREMENTAL), click on the `Everything' button in the action buttons. This will prompt you to an "XYZ" dialog box, enter four 4 inches in the X field and click "OK". Now it will prompt you for number of copies, enter 4, then it will prompt to leave originals click "Yes". AutoFit your screen and five rectangles should be visible. These rectangles will be used to create chains and then modify them. Your screen should look like the one below. Now go to the action buttons on the left and click save.

Chaining While Cutting

Chains are created in two ways, one way to create a chain is to create a new cut and then select the geometry to cut and assign a side for the cutter. Most of the cuts that you have generated up to now have been this way. And that is just fine. However, if you have geometry that is not correct, you may have to cancel the cut in order to modify the geometry then come back to re-cut it.

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However, if you create the geometry then create the chains, when it's time to cut your geometry the cuts will be done faster and more efficiently because you will have resolved any problems with your geometry and chains.

Chaining Without A Cut

Do not start chaining until you reach the instruction on the next paragraph. To create a chain go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CREATE NEW CHAIN (LINK), then select the start of your chain and either select the geometry around the part or click `AutoChain' on the action buttons. Selecting geometry for your new chain is simple, just keep in mind that if your first object is a line, you will have to click the line on the end where you want the beginning of the chain to be. If you make a mistake, go to the action buttons on the left and click on "UnDo". Instructions: Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CREATE NEW CHAIN (LINK), the prompt now says "[Link] Select first object". You will now create a chain on the first rectangle; starting point will be the bottom of the vertical line on the left. This will make the chain start at X0Y0. Follow the instructions as illustrated in the next two pictures. Notice that the cursor is at the bottom of the vertical line; this will be the beginning of the chain, if your screen display looks the same click once. The chain will now follow the direction to the top and around to the right as illustrated on the next picture Notice that the start of the chain is now marked with an "X" and the cursor is at the top of the rectangle guiding the direction of the chain. This will ensure that the cut goes up and around making this a climb cut as the cutter follows the outside of the rectangle. Chain the rest of the rectangle and click DONE. IMPORTANT: WHENEVER YOU FINISH SELECTING GEOMETRY WHEN CHAINING EITHER IN THE MIDDLE OF A CUT OR JUST CREATING A CHAIN, YOU MUST CLICK DONE IN THE ACTION BUTTONS WHEN YOU ARE FINISHED SELECTING YOUR GEOMETRY. THIS ENSURES THAT GEOPATH PROMPTS YOU TO THE NEXT STEP. Before you continue, go to VIEW, AUTOFIT. Then go to VIEW, HALF this will make the graphics half the size. This is important because when you are ready to review the chain data, you will be able to see the chain viewer window on the left and the chain in your screen. 32

Chain Info

When modifying cuts the chain information is very important because you will want to review the chain data to make sure that it's the right chain to modify. When there are other chains overlapping the one that you want to change, you will not be certain the chain selected is the correct one unless you examine the properties.

Chain Viewer Explained

Select INFO, CHAIN DATA, notice that the action buttons changed and now the "By Number" and "Preview" buttons are active. Click on the chain that you just created, a window will appear on the left side of the screen. That is the Chain Viewer window. This is the number given to the chain for identification. Each chain has a number. It is usually created in sequence; all tool paths are also created in chains, so if you create tool paths they will also be assigned a number in the sequence that they were created. Kind: There are four main types of chains. a. Point Chain - This type of chain is used for drilling, tapping, mill c-bore. b. Mill Chain - In the picture on the left it identifies the chain as "Chain". This is a Mill Chain; this type of chain is used for milling. c. Surface Chain ­ This type of chain is used when cutting 3D surfaces. d. ToolPath Chain ­ And finally a tool path chain. This is the chain that is generated with your toolpath

Chain #:

# in chain:

This tells you how many objects are in your chain. A square is made of four lines, but this rectangle has 5 objects. That is because when a rectangle from the Shapes menu is created it automatically splits the horizontal line of the first XY coordinate entered.

Layer #:

This tells you what layer this chain is in, this will help when you are trying to find the chains that were created in separate layers. You can also move a chain to a layer of your choice so that you can work on the modifications without other geometry using the same space.

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This tells you what side the cutter is on. If the cutter is on the left side the field will display "1,0". If the cutter is on the right side the field will display "-1,0". And if the cutter is on the center-line the field will display "0,0".

Lft/Rt,NoComp:

Used by tools:

This field shows you what tools are using this chain and also what cuts in that tool are assigned to this chain. You may have multiple tools using this chain along with many different types of cuts. Finally, at the bottom of this window you will see the Previous, Next, and Done buttons. If you have more than one chain you may go sequentially back and forth from one chain to another revealing the properties. Now create a chain on rectangle number 3, the start point will be the top horizontal line as shown in the following illustration. Chain the rest of the rectangle and click DONE.

Chain Colors

After creating the chain, go to INFO, CHAIN DATA, click on the action button "By Number". Notice that the chain you have just created is Cyan/light blue. This color means that this is the current chain, the last chain used, the chain that is assigned to the number in the "Enter Chain Number" window, and the chain that will be displayed on the Chain Viewer. Click O.K.; notice the "Previous" button at the bottom. Click it and notice that the color changed on the rectangle and that the first rectangle is now cyan and the third rectangle is now red. Red means that the chain is not the active one in use but the geometry has been linked. It also means that this chain maybe in use but not by the current tool. Let's say that you have three tools, each tool has three cuts. The current tool is tool #3. The last chain used is cyan. At this point all chains used by a different tool will be Red along with any chains that are not in use.

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So, what about the two chains used by the current tool that is not either Red or Cyan? Well, they are Magenta this is the color used to show a chain that is not the current chain but is in use by the current tool. See color chart below:

RED Linked into a chain. YELLOW Unlinked, unused objects. DASHED Currently selected objects about to be operated upon. MAGENTA (purple) Chains used by current tool. Light BLUE Temporarily used to show the current chain you are working on. Dark BLUE Temporarily used to show that Geopath is calculating a tool-path for those objects. WHITE Used to show objects that are currently being created but not completed yet. Now go to rectangle number 5 and make a chain starting from the top right vertical line.

Color Function

Now chain the remainder of the rectangle keeping in mind that you are chaining clockwise and the starting point is the top Right, click DONE when finish selecting the geometry. Go to INFO, CHAIN DATA and click on the action button "Preview", notice that two other buttons appear. This will allow you to select the chain that you want without having to figure out which number chain you want to work on or with out having to click on any chain. Click on "Previous" and you will see that the last chain is now Red and the previous chain is now the current chain (light blue). Now click "Done" and the information of the current chain is now in the Chain Viewer. Play with these functions on your own and get good feel for what they do.

Closed Chains

A Closed Chain is a chain that would be created when cutting a circle for milling on the inside or outside. This would also apply when cutting around a rectangle. So when the start of a chain is the same as the end of the chain it is considered a closed chain. 35

Open Chains

An Open Chain is a chain that would be created when cutting an arc that is not 360 degrees or a rectangle that would only have three sides cut. In other words the start of the chain is not the end of the chain.

Append to End of Existing Chain

This gives you the ability to add geometry to the end of a chain not included in the chain originally. The new geometry end or start point has to touch the end of the chain. For example, if you have an open chain such as a rectangle that has three sides linked into one chain. Then you can select the chain that you want to append to by clicking on the chain with your mouse pointer. Two other ways of selecting your chain would be by clicking on the "By Number" button if you know what number the chain is or by clicking on the "Preview" button then the "Previous" or "Next" button and clicking DONE when your chain is highlighted. Once you have selected the chain you can click on the geometry you want to append and you will see that the chain links the new geometry. Now create a new chain on the second rectangle starting at the bottom of the left vertical line and link it clock wise to the bottom of the right vertical line as illustrated on the drawing below. Click "Done" when the three sides are in a chain.

Now we will go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, APPEND TO END OF EXISTING CHAIN. Read the prompt at the bottom, first it wants you to select which chain to append to, click on the chain you have just created on rectangle number two. Now the prompt tells you to select the next object, click on the object you want to add to the end of the chain as illustrated in the example below.

Now select the final object and finish your chain so that it's now a closed chain.

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Now that you have linked the remaining geometry notice that the "UnDo" action button is active. Click on it once and notice that the chain is now undoing one segment of the chain. Do not continue to the last line since it will unlink the whole chain and you will have to re-link it. Undo one more segment and then re-link the remainder so that it is once again a closed chain.

Add to Start of Existing Chain

This gives you the ability to add geometry to the start of a chain not included originally. The new geometry start or end point has to touch the start of the chain. For example, if you have an open chain such as a rectangle that has three sides linked into one chain. Then you can select the chain that you want to add to by clicking on the chain with your mouse pointer. Two other ways of selecting your chain would be by clicking on the "By Number" button if you now what number the chain is or by clicking on the "Preview" button then the "Previous" or "Next" button and clicking done when your chain is highlighted. Once you have selected the chain you can click on the geometry you want to add and you will see that the chain begins to link. Now create a new chain on the fourth rectangle starting on the left of the top horizontal line and link it clock wise down to the left side of the bottom horizontal line as illustrated on the drawing below. Click "Done" when the three sides are in a chain.

Now we will go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, ADD TO START OF EXISTING CHAIN. Read the prompt at the bottom, first it wants you to select which chain to add to, select the chain you have just created on rectangle number four. Now the prompt tells you to select the next object, click on the object you want to add to the start of the chain as illustrated in the example below.

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As you select the left vertical line you will see that the start point for this chain has just shifted to the bottom left. Since you have just added to the start of the chain the natural effect is that the start of the chain is moved to the start of the object that has just been added. Now you can click on the "UnDo" button and you will see that the chain begins to undo itself by one object. Do it one more time and a new segment is released from the chain. Now link you geometry so that it is a closed chain. Go to the action buttons and click on "Done", this is to end the action of Adding to the end of a chain.

Escape and Cancel

At the bottom of your screen the prompt should say, "Select a Function". If this is not the case, look at your action buttons and click on "Cancel". Now you your prompt should say, "Select a Function". The "Esc" key can also be used as cancel on just about all functions. Cancel or escape may be used after any action has been initiated. Cancel or Escape may be used when you are done with whatever action you were working on. Creating a chain, or selecting geometry while creating a cut will require that you click the "Done" button.

Reviewing Chains with Cuts

Create a cut with a .25 end mill; the tool information other than the tool diameter is not important in this exercise. The contour cut information is also not very important at this point but the depth should be -.5 and only one peck. Once you click "Do It" on the cut information window notice that the action buttons are very similar to those that come up when linking geometry with the Create a New Chain function in the Modify pull down menu. One of the action buttons is "Pick Chain", click on that and you will see that the "By Number" and the "Preview" buttons become available. The prompt should say, "Select which object chain". This is asking you to select the chain you want to cut. At this point we can select the chain in three different ways. (a) You can click on the chain you want. (b) You can click on the "By Number" button and give it the number of the chain. (c) You can click on the "Preview" button and then click on "Previous" or "Next".

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Since we only have one chain in rectangle number one, we will just click on it once. A prompt will immediately prompt you to select a side to place the cutter on. Select the "Left" side and click on "Do It". Now it should show you your tool path and a prompt will ask if it is the cut that you want. Click "Yes". Go to INFO, CHAIN INFO and click on the button "By Number", and enter the chain number for rectangle number one (that would be chain 1). The Chain Viewer will appear and you will see that the information for the chain is now available. To see the rectangle clearly, remember that your screen should be in AutoFit and then Half size. Notice that the chain displays an X at the start of the chain. This lets you know where the start point is as illustrated below.

Your tool path will be visible on the outside of the rectangle and the direction that it follows is clockwise.

Change Start of Chain

Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CHANGE START, the prompt should ask "Select Which Chain". Now click on the top horizontal line of the first rectangle. Notice that the chain start point has just shifted to the top. Go to the pull down menu TOOL/CUT, SHOW PATH, ALL TOOLS and you will see that the cut is now starting on the top of the rectangle. Go back to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CHANGE START and this time select the vertical line on the right of the first rectangle then run the tool path again. Now put back the Start Point at the bottom of the left vertical line before you go to the next step.

Reverse the Chain

Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, REVERSE, the prompt will say "Select which chain". Click on chain number one only once, if you do it more than once you will reverse it back and get no effect. After clicking it once show your path and notice that the tool direction has changed and is now going counter clockwise. Go back to Modify and reverse the chain so that it goes back to the original direction. Follow the instructions again if you run into any difficulty.

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Change Side of the Chain

Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CHANGE SIDE, the prompt will say, "Select which chain". Click on chain number one, a Change Side window will appear and you will have to select which side you want the cutter on. Select "Right" and click Do It. Now run the tool path one more time and you will see that the cutter is on the inside of the rectangle. Go back MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, CHANGE SIDE and return the cut to the left side.

Chains Exercise

Using the discussed above Change Start, Reverse and Change Side I want you to create a cut on the third rectangle using the existing chain. This cut will have to be on the outside going clockwise with the cutter on the left. Then I want you to change the cut to be on the inside going counter clockwise (cutting left on the inside).

Delete Entire Chain

This function will remove any chain that is not use by a cutter. If you have a cut associated to the chain that you're trying to delete, Delete Entire Chain will not remove the chain. Delete Entire Chain will delete the chain as well as the geometry associated. Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, DELETE ENTIRE CHAIN, click on rectangle number two. Go to VIEW, REDRAW and notice that the chain is gone as well as the geometry.

Unlink Entire Chain

This function will make the geometry no longer chained together that is not used by a cutter. If you have a cut associated to the chain that you're trying to delete, Unlink Entire Chain will not remove the chain. Unlink Entire Chain will delete the chain but it will not delete the geometry. Go to MODIFY, EDIT CHAIN, UNLINK ENTIRE CHAIN, click on rectangle number four. You will now see that the geometry did not get deleted but the chain did.

Unlink One Object

This function allows the user to unlink certain objects of an existing chain. It is mostly used for point machining operation (Drill, Tap, Counter Boring, etc.). If you chain a certain number of holes to drill then, decide that one or 2 holes should not be part of the chain, then you can remove those objects from the chain by simply selecting "Unlink One Object" and selecting that object/shape.

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This could also be used in Milling where you want to unlink the beginning or end of a mill chain. And for unlinking surface chains where multiple surfaces are used in one projection cut.

Break in Two

This function will split an existing chain into 2 separate chains. It will automatically create the other chain for you.

Join

This function will allow you to join two chains into one. The end of the first chain will have to touch the beginning or ending of the second chain.

Fix Up

This will perform various operations on the chain to fix it up; it will improve tangency if rounding-errors were introduced, and a number of other operations. This may be able to fix the problems if you can not seem to cut a contour that looks ok to you.

Optimize Path

With this, you can automatically re-arrange a point-chain into a faster sequence.

Offset

This will create a new contour-chain a specified distance away from an existing chain. For example, to make a wall around an entire shape.

Auto-Fillet

With this, you can add corner-break radii or fillets to an entire existing chain.

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Detailed Table of Contents

GeoPath Help --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I Table of Contents ----------------------------------------------------------------------------1 Introduction: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 Purpose -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------2 Section One -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------3 Getting started with Graphics --------------------------------------------------------------3 Starting GeoPath -----------------------------------------------------------------------------3 Viewing -- Starting A New Graphics Program ------------------------------------------3 Viewing -- Changing an Existing Program-----------------------------------------------3 Viewing ­ Open another program ---------------------------------------------------------3 Getting To Know GeoPath Graphics Screen ---------------------------------------------4 "Draw" Pull-Down Menu-------------------------------------------------------------------5 Paying Attention To The Graphics Interface---------------------------------------------5 Entering XY Locations----------------------------------------------------------------------6 Drawing Single Objects ---------------------------------------------------------------------8 Line Angle-Length---------------------------------------------------------------------------8 Line Parallel ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------9 Arc Center----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10 Arc Parallel --------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10 Arc 3 Points--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 10 Trim/Extend Both -------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11 Fillet------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 12 CleanUp ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 12 Drawing One-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 14 Drawing Two ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 14 Drawing Three------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 15 Drawing Four ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 15 Section Two--------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16 Creating Intermediate Drawings --------------------------------------------------------- 16 Drawing Circles ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 16 What Is A Shape --------------------------------------------------------------------------- 17 Creating A Bolt Circle--------------------------------------------------------------------- 18 Creating XY-XY Line of Points --------------------------------------------------------- 18 Creating Angle Line of Points------------------------------------------------------------ 18 Creating a Grid of Points------------------------------------------------------------------ 19 Creating a Rectangle----------------------------------------------------------------------- 19 Section Three ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 20 Loading a CAD File and using its layers ----------------------------------------------- 20

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Ways of Loading a CAD File ------------------------------------------------------------ 20 Loading a CAD File from Graphics ----------------------------------------------------- 20 Using Layers from a CAD File----------------------------------------------------------- 21 Selecting a Layer--------------------------------------------------------------------------- 22 Creating a Layer---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 23 Section Four -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25 Programming Cuts ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 25 Getting Started------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 25 Step One, Selecting a Machine----------------------------------------------------------- 25 Definition for Post Processor: ------------------------------------------------------------ 26 Post: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 26 Process: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 26 What is a Post Processor: ----------------------------------------------------------------- 26 Step Two, Selecting a Material----------------------------------------------------------- 26 Program Identification--------------------------------------------------------------------- 26 Step Three, Selecting a Tool-------------------------------------------------------------- 27 Define a Tool ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 27 Tool ID Name: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 28 Tool Description: --------------------------------------------------------------------- 28 Tool Number: ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 28 Tool Length Compensation Number:---------------------------------------------- 28 Tool Diameter: ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 28 Number of Flutes: -------------------------------------------------------------------- 28 Radius on Corner: -------------------------------------------------------------------- 28 Tool Change Position X Y: --------------------------------------------------------- 29 Spindle Speed RPM/SFM: ---------------------------------------------------------- 29 Reverse Spindle:---------------------------------------------------------------------- 29 Coolant: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 29 Clearance Above Surfaces:---------------------------------------------------------- 29 Tool Kind: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- 29 Angle: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 29 Minimum Diameter: ----------------------------------------------------------------- 30 Tip Length: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 30 Select the type of cut ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 30 Define the cut information ---------------------------------------------------------------- 30 Select the geometry to use ---------------------------------------------------------------- 30 Section Five: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31 Chains step-by-step example ------------------------------------------------------------- 31 What Is A Chain---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 31 Chain Defined ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 31 Creating geometry to chain --------------------------------------------------------------- 31

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Chaining While Cutting ------------------------------------------------------------------- 31 Chaining Without A Cut ------------------------------------------------------------------ 32 Chain Info ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33 Chain Viewer Explained ------------------------------------------------------------------ 33 Chain #: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33 # in chain:------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 33 Layer #: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 33 Lft/Rt,NoComp: ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 34 Used by tools: ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34 Chain Colors -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 34 Color Function ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 35 Closed Chains ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 35 Open Chains -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 36 Append to End of Existing Chain-------------------------------------------------------- 36 Add to Start of Existing Chain ----------------------------------------------------------- 37 Escape and Cancel ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 38 Reviewing Chains with Cuts ------------------------------------------------------------- 38 Change Start of Chain --------------------------------------------------------------------- 39 Reverse the Chain-------------------------------------------------------------------------- 39 Change Side of the Chain ----------------------------------------------------------------- 40 Chains Exercise ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40 Delete Entire Chain ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 40 Unlink Entire Chain ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 40 Unlink One Object ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 40 Break in Two ------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Join ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Fix Up --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Optimize Path------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Offset ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41 Auto-Fillet ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 41

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Geopath Basic Workbook

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