Read Tamara Drewe text version

A Sony Pictures Classics Release

Official Selection: 2010 Cannes Film Festival | 2010 Telluride Film Festival 2010 Toronto International Film Festival

Total Runtime: 111 minutes | MPAA: Rated R | Release Date: 10/8/2010 (NY &LA) East Coast Publicity IHOP Jeff Hill 853 7th Avenue, #3C New York, NY 10019 212-265-4373 tel West Coast Publicity Block Korenbrot Rebecca Fisher Melody Korenbrot 110 S. Fairfax Ave, #310 Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-634-7001 tel 323-634-7030 fax Distributor Sony Pictures Classics Carmelo Pirrone Lindsay Macik 550 Madison Ave New York, NY 10022 212-833-8833 tel 212-833-8844 fax

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SYNOPSIS

Summary Based on Posy Simmonds' beloved graphic novel of the same name (which was itself inspired by Thomas Hardy's classic Far From the Madding Crowd) this wittily modern take on the romantic English pastoral is a far cry from Hardy's Wessex. Tamara Drewe's present-day English countryside--stocked with pompous writers, rich weekenders, bourgeois bohemians, a horny rock star, and a great many Buff Orpington chickens and Belted Galloway cows--is a much funnier place. When Tamara Drewe sashays back to the bucolic village of her youth, life for the locals is thrown upside down. Tamara--once an ugly duckling--has been transformed into a devastating beauty (with help from plastic surgery). As infatuations, jealousies, love affairs and career ambitions collide among the inhabitants of the neighboring farmsteads, Tamara sets a contemporary comedy of manners into play using the oldest magic in the book--sex appeal.

Synopsis Stonefield and Winnards are neighboring farms in the lush, lovely West country of England. The farmsteads may be straight out of centuries past, but the setting is decidedly modern--the quaint village of Ewedown has become the weekend getaway for wealthy Londoners and aspiring writers seeking quiet and inspiration. Famous novelist NICHOLAS HARDIMENT (Roger Allam), celebrated for his popular "Doctor Inchcombe" crime series, presides with his wife BETH (Tamsin Greig) over the Stonefield Farm writers' retreat, where the visiting writers are treated to Beth's fabulous cooking and Nicholas's self-regarding pomposities. While Beth is busy as the tireless engine behind the idyllic retreat--juggling kitchen, parlour, garden and chickens, along with insightful editorial advice--Nicholas churns out best-sellers and indulges in extramarital dalliances. Beth is attractive in a middle-aged earthmother sort of way, but Nicholas's eye turns to younger women. The neighboring farm, Winnards, was the birthplace and ancestral home of ANDY COBB (Luke Evans), a handsome son of the soil who works for Beth as a gardener and handyman. When Andy was a boy, his hard-up family sold Winnards to the wealthy DREWE family from London as a country home, and now he lives in a cottage at Stonefield. As a local, Andy resents the newcomers playing landed gentry, but he and Beth are fond of each other and work hard together to keep Stonefield going.

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High drama livens up the writers' dinner hour one evening when they overhear a row between Nicholas and Beth, who has discovered his latest infidelity. After a few tense days, though, they are seen walking arm in arm; it's clear that they've been through these cycles of betrayal, remorse, and forgiveness before. GLEN (Bill Camp), an affable, sad-sack American academic trying to conquer writer's block and push on with his study of Thomas Hardy, despises Nicholas, not helped by his growing affection for Beth. One day, Andy and Glen hear a burglar alarm emanating from Winnards, which has been uninhabited since the death of Mrs. Drewe. The intruder is TAMARA DREWE (Gemma Arterton), who has come to look after her late mother's property. Andy barely recognizes her without her once-most distinctive feature, the large and beaky nose that, as Andy later tells Glen, he rather liked. The new, beakless Tamara is a knockout, and a minor celebrity for her column in a London paper (in which she related the details of her nose job). Andy thinks back fondly to his teenage shags with schoolgirl Tamara, but now that she is a gorgeous journalist, he considers her way out of his league--and probably too snooty and citified for his tastes anyhow. Nevertheless, Tamara frequently cajoles him over to Winnards to help fix up the place, much to the annoyance of Beth. It's not just Andy who falls under Tamara's spell, though; she has a knack for besotting anyone with her big brown eyes, flirtatious smile, and perfect nose. The only man around who seems to studiously ignore and snub Tamara is Nicholas--who watches her with binoculars when nobody's looking. Like a foul-mouthed Greek chorus, bored village teenagers CASEY (Charlotte Christie) and JODY (Jessica Barden) spy on the village goings-on. Boredom turns to frenzied excitement, however, when Tamara (whom the girls refer to as "Plastic Fantastic") brings home their rock star idol BEN (Dominic Cooper) a surly but sexy drummer newly split from his band and newly hooked up with Tamara. Screeching around town in his yellow Porsche, with his boxer dog terrorizing the neighbors' cows, Ben is a punkish fish out of water in the genteel village. When Ben and Tamara announce that they are engaged to marry, jaws drop and jealousies kindle. The stage is thus set: will Ben give up London to live with Tamara in the sleepy dales (or vice-versa)? Will Nicholas stop pretending to ignore Tamara and confess his passion? Will Glen finish his book on Thomas Hardy, and vie for Beth's love? Will Andy keep on with his barmaid sweetie, or try to win back his old flame Tamara (and perhaps get his ancestral farmhouse back in the bargain)? Will the teenage girls ever get to meet the rock drummer? And will that obnoxious boxer dog ever stop harassing those cows? 4

ABOUT THE PRODUCTION

Tamara Drewe, the character, has undeniable appeal ­ but what appealed to Director Stephen Frears about Tamara Drewe the film script and graphic novel? "The script makes me laugh, it's very, very funny, and very sexy and a very contemporary, modern film. And doing an adaptation of a comic strip is terribly liberating. You can sort of do anything; it frees you up in the most wonderful way. Comic strips are normally Superman, or about superheroes, but this is a comic strip which is also intelligent and about things you recognise. I've never made a film like this; I had to completely rethink how I do things." Producer Alison Owen recalls, "I saw the opportunity with Tamara to do an interesting independent film that had great characters, drama, comedy ­ but intelligent comedy ­ and also some social comment running through it as well." A distinct element of serendipity surrounded Tamara Drewe's genesis. "I had been aware of Posy's work and always loved it," says Alison Owen (the graphic novel first appeared as a serial in the Guardian). "But it was only when Posy's publishers had the genius idea to publish Tamara as a full graphic novel that I suddenly saw the potential and thought it would be a fantastic movie. I had seen the book that weekend and then on Monday morning I found that literary agent, Anthony Jones, had sent me a copy, obviously having the same idea in mind. He had simultaneously sent a copy to Christine Langan (Creative Director of BBC Films), and then Christine and I bumped into each other at a Marylebone delicatessen, both of us with these big Tamara Drewe books in our little handbags! Christine and I both fell in love with it and the BBC wanted to develop it so that was a very easy set up." Stephen Frears also fell immediately for the unique charm and challenges of Posy Simmonds' graphic novel: "My goodness, I knew it was original. Christine Langan sent it to me, and said, `I've got something for you.' I was flying to New York and I opened the envelope on the plane. I couldn't believe what I was looking at. It happened like that with The Snapper. You can't believe what you've been sent. Very, very nice!" This serendipity and the vibrancy of the source material continued to be an asset as Alison started to assemble her team: "Literally the first writer we sent it to was Moira Buffini and she wanted to do it. The first draft she turned in was wonderful. We did a little bit of tweaking, but pretty much sent that draft to our first choice Stephen Frears, who wanted to do it straight away. So it was one of those points where you feel like God is with you, you know, the universe is on your side." 5

"Having had the challenge over the years of putting together many and varied types of productions, it's very rare and exhilarating when the stars align like this" adds Producer Paul Trijbits. ADAPTING A GRAPHIC NOVEL Another unique selling point and challenge in adapting Tamara Drewe was the fact that the film came with a readymade storyboard, in the form of Posy Simmonds' original graphic novel. For screenwriter Moira Buffini, this was more help than hindrance: "Visually you've got so much there, you just think, `My goodness, it's a film'. She gives you so many clues to the character in her drawings. The characters are really well observed, all of them." Frears too found having Posy Simmonds' illustrations as a reference point an aid: "It was very, very liberating. Literally there was a storyboard if you chose to think about it like that. Frequently we would do things and you'd look at it in the book and say ­ `Well, I can't improve on that. It tells you everything you want to know.' Somebody before you has compressed everything down to a single image. It might be a complex image, but she's got it into one frame." Production Designer Alan Macdonald, a regular Frears collaborator, continues the theme: "It's unusual for a designer to have a readymade storyboard, which of course works in my favour and against my better interests. Often Stephen will say, "Just look at the book," and then sometimes he'll say, "Just ignore the book!" Key to the whole production team was that they didn't feel constrained to be too faithful to Posy's illustrations. Costume Designer Consolata Boyle: "You always go back to the source material because in it you find something wonderful, but obviously you need the space to interpret it as well because when the actors are cast, they are involved - their shapes, their feelings, their colouring dictate and you work around that as well. But I found the book and the illustrations a wonderful safety net." Producer Alison Owen elaborates on this theme with regards to the casting process: "That's one example of the unthinking that you had to do. Actually a number of the characters did end up looking quite like Posy's drawings. Several exceptions looked nothing like them, and then there was that thought process of, `Well, OK, we love the spirit of this person but they don't look anything like Posy's book; does that matter?

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Is it more important to capture the spirit? Can we conceive of that character in a new way, even though they're still embodying the essence of Posy's character?'" And for the cast too, the graphic novel posed its own set of challenges. Luke Evans, who plays Andy: "I flicked through it the first time I got the book and immediately knew which character I was. It was quite weird! All the cast have had the same thing, where we've scanned through and thought `blinkin' heck, I actually look quite like the character, they've done quite a good job!'... We've all got a bit of our characters in us, and that's magic, that's talent, for someone to have plucked us all out individually and found actors so accurately like our characters, physically, and to have mannerisms about us that relate to the characters." For Tamsin Greig, too, the book proved a great help: "It's brilliant for an actor because it's like being handed your own storyboard. And Posy Simmonds is so good at those tiny nuances of expression which are really helpful. It's like having a 3D script, really, you're coming at it from lots of different visual and physical angles." The form of the graphic novel also led to discussions amongst the filmmakers about how much to incorporate a comic book style in the look of the film. Alison Owen comments: "We did want to capture something of that, because there's something in the way that the material is rendered in pictorial form that has a very pleasant rhythm to it and adds an extra dimension that I wanted, if we could, to capture. Where I think Stephen has been fantastically clever ­ and I'm not nearly clever enough to analyse how he's done it ­ is that he has captured that rhythm without resorting to graphic novel devices. I thought, in my simple way, that it might be that we end up with names on the frame, or arrows, but, not `KAPOW!!'. Stephen has not used any of those devices except a little bit of split screen here and there. And yet somehow it has that different rhythm. You do definitely feel that it's been adapted from a graphic novel; that it's got that cartoony, strip feel to it, that's somehow embedded intrinsically, rather than overlaid. Stephen's caught the spirit, not just of the material but of the form and the genre, and embedded it into the movie." CASTING "I wouldn't make the film until I'd got the cast," says director Stephen Frears. "My casting director said to me, `You're casting this before you've decided to make the film.' I said, `Well, what do you think financiers do?!'" Nowhere was the casting more crucial than in finding their iconic, titular heroine. Says Frears: "When I met her, Gemma Arterton did immediately remind me of the 7

drawings because she's ­ well, she's so curvy, isn't she, she's like a sort of line drawing in her own way. She's a wonderful girl, warm and funny. I thought `Oh, I'd like to watch her for 90 minutes.' I mean ­ as simple as that, really." Producer Alison Owen: "Tamara has to be super-sexy, intelligent, a little bit lost, somewhat arch, she has to be able to play irony, and yet she has to make the audience feel empathy and want her to get together with the right guy at the end. Gemma seemed to magnificently embody all these characteristics in one. Stephen simply wouldn't make the film without her." In finding their philandering author Nicholas, as Alison Owen recalls: "Stephen felt from the beginning that it would actually be illegal to make this film without casting Roger Allam as Nicholas! I mean that was always just a given. The first time I met with Stephen he said, `Well obviously Roger's got to play Nicholas." Frears had previously worked with Roger Allam on The Queen: "He's just wonderful ­ and somehow he's like a sort of baron. He's like the wicked villain in a pantomime! He's just a brilliant actor who hasn't really ever had a chance in films. Then I found Tamsin. And it was really only when I had those three ­ Roger, Gemma and Tamsin that I thought I could make the film." In casting their Beth Hardiment, Frears veered significantly away for the first time from Posy Simmonds' depiction: "Tamsin Greig didn't fit the drawing. But in the end you needed an actress who could be that witty and that touching. It's her ability to be wonderful in the right area was what clinched it, rather than whether they look like somebody." Rounding out the triangle of Tamara's contrasting love interests are Dominic Cooper as rock musician and teen idol Ben Sergeant, and Luke Evans as Andy Cobb, the Hardiments' faithful handyman. Frears again: "We had a read-through before I agreed to do it and Dominic was so funny. And the girls just said, `Oh, no, you MUST cast Dominic Cooper.' `All right ­ whatever you say.' I just do what I'm told! He was in Mamma Mia. Teenage girls do kill for him! He's very, very believable. Luke was harder to find. And he's ­ he's wonderfully sort of rural." Adds Alison Owen: "You could absolutely understand why all the girls would be crazy about Ben (Dominic); you can understand why Tamara in her state where she's a little bit lost would be slightly taken in by the veneer of all that's glitzy and glam about his character, only to find as the relationship chips away at that veneer, that what's underneath is not what she's looking for. And that's when her thoughts 8

turn back to the guy, of course, that we've had our eye on all the way through, which is Andy (Luke), right from the first frames when he's drinking a bottle of water, we kind of know that he's the man of every girl's dreams." More unfamiliar to most audiences might be American character actor Bill Camp, a revelation as Glen McCreavy, the writers' retreat's resident Thomas Hardy scholar. Says Frears: "Two people, one of whom was my son, the other Scott Rudin, said, `Cast him ­ he's the best actor in America.' Literally, I didn't know who he was, and he hasn't been in many films, so there isn't a lot of footage that you can look at. My son says, `When I direct a play, the first thing I do is work out who Bill is going to play and then cast the other people around him.' He's wonderful. You know, some days you're lucky." STONEFIELD ­ THE WRITERS' RETREAT AND ITS INHABITANTS "Stonefield is the writers' retreat run by Nicholas and Beth Hardiment," says screenwriter Moira Buffini. "But it's really Beth's brain child. Nicholas, her husband, is an author of bestselling, rather good crime novels, and Beth's project in life is nurturing writers. She's got her little small holding farm she looks after the hens and her little goats and she also looks after writers. Stonefield attracts all sorts of different writers; there's Glen, the academic who's come to do his quite highbrow book about Thomas Hardy. And then there's other writers who are just desperate to get published, like Tess, who writes romantic fiction, Eustacia who writes lesbian crime, and Diggory who's quite a well known poet but finds it difficult getting a wider audience for his work. They're all at it with Beth looking after them, making sure they drink enough, cooking them beautiful food, and generally helping their creativity." When Tamara Drewe returns to Dorset after the death of her mother to renovate and sell their family home, she becomes the "pebble that goes into the pond and everything radiates from her arrival," comments Editor Mick Audsley. Screenwriter Moira Buffini concurs: "I think Tamara has got an idea of the person that she wants to be and she has made herself match this ideal of beauty. She's had her nose changed, she's got the hair, the clothes. She left at eighteen as an awkward, plain, angry girl and has come back in her mid-twenties as this beautiful woman no one quite recognises, no one can quite believe it's the same person. She is a bit like the cat among the pigeons who returns and things start to happen... she's trying out her new role: I'm a beautiful woman now, if I press that button what will happen there? And yet the thing that I liked about Tamara was that at heart, inside, she still 9

thinks of herself as a plain, awkward, angry girl, she still is that girl and she's experimenting. She thinks if she's beautiful everything will change and it doesn't, you know, it doesn't." "Tamara goes through life creating havoc and getting in pickles," says Gemma Arterton. "It all, sort of, centres around her nose, which is kind of a focal point for the whole film. The insecurities she has are very relevant to what happens to girls now, this whole need to fit in, the need to look beautiful, to be successful, and doing anything in order to get like that. Wanting to be loved and all the mistakes that she goes through finding that. I found that I could identify with it and I know so many people like that in my life." About his character Nicholas Hardiment, Roger Allam notes: "He's one of those men who feel that he's got the right to roam, sexually, that that is absolutely his right as what he calls `a creative mind'. I imagine he'd like to be taken more seriously as a writer. I think this is his nineteenth book and there's a sense that he is just churning them out, and that he'd like to move on. And I think that's probably all interlinked with a middle aged man wanting to reinvent himself through the eyes and the body of a much younger woman." Tamsin Greig says of her character Beth Hardiment: "Beth runs the retreat and makes it a paradise where writers (including her husband) don't have to think about feeding themselves or washing themselves. She's there to nurture them... She is an enabler, but she also wants to be an invisible servant, where things just happen, and she doesn't want to take credit for it. Her joy and her feelings of success come from the fact that she's created this place and no one knows how. She's sort of an illusionist." Screenwriter Moira Buffini adds: "Beth thinks her great talent in life is to nurture creativity in others, and I think at heart her own self-esteem is quite low. She does seem quite saintly but she's stuck in this marriage which psychotherapists would describe as `co-dependent'. Neither of them is happy in it and they're stuck in it, and they're both living out the death throes of their marriage." Bill Camp describes his character Glen McCreavy's writer's block: "Glen's in the midst of this Hardy biography which he's just stifled by, and has come here to this place because it's just so idyllic, it's so beautiful. He watches and is fascinated by what he sees and I think that stokes his excitement about being here. I think he finds it all quite titillating - Andy and Tamara and everybody throwing themselves into these romantic machinations. When Beth leads him down the road as to who he is 10

writing for and why is he doing what he's doing, she allows him to write, as he says, for her, as if he were speaking for her, which then gives him a voice." Andy Cobb is the Hardiments' handyman and gardener and the Hardy-style embodiment of rustic virtue. Simple and earthy, he and Tamara enjoyed a fling as teenagers. But as Luke Evans puts it: "He's not into all this showbiz, celebrity, journalism, newspapers... I don't think he cares what's going on in the world. Tamara comes back having had this nose job, and written about it in the newspaper, and he can't really understand why she's done it. He quite liked the old Tamara." Rock star Ben Sergeant is at times thoroughly obnoxious, with his yellow Porsche and metropolitan manners sticking out like a sore thumb in the village. But Dominic Cooper has a soft spot for his character: "Even though he's such a rancid show-off who makes massive mistakes you kind of feel empathy for him because he is so stupid he almost doesn't realise the effect he has on other people around him. He's so self obsessed but that sort of simplicity and lack of comprehension makes him mildly charming because you can't blame him." Cooper relished the chance to live out a long held fantasy in playing Ben: "Those dreams of being in a rock band coming true is something I will never achieve in real life, so it's great to get the opportunity to play in a film." Jody Long and Casey Shaw, played by newcomers Jessica Barden and Charlotte Christie, are two local schoolgirls, hanging around in the bus stop, smoking spliffs, obsessing about Ben, and therefore plotting the downfall of Tamara in any way they can. What started as minor roles seemed to grow and grow the longer production went on. Comments Alison Owen: "Posy always thought that they were the key to making it work on film and to give them a bigger voice. And they gradually grew, which is sort of the role that they have in the strip, in the graphic novel. Their role as a sort of Greek chorus, of being the ones that are commenting on what is happening, and also having their own threaded-through involvement grew in Moira's take on the script. Moira wanted to involve them more and then Stephen wanted to involve them even more, so their parts were constantly boosted. And of course, that happened even more when we cast the glorious Jessica and Charlotte." Stephen Frears comments on his and screenwriter Moira Buffini's fondness for the two girls: "Moira really loved these characters, it sort of poured out of her, all these jokes. And then we found these two wonderful girls (Jessica Barden and Charlotte Christie). It's odd: we went through a casting process, and chose them properly but I remember shooting scenes and thinking ­ I didn't quite know they were going to have to do this! Afterwards you feel faintly irresponsible and think, `Well, I didn't 11

quite realise quite what I was going to be asking of them!' You know, they would do long, sustained passages of tremendously delicate performance." THE LOOK AND FEEL OF TAMARA DREWE "The biggest challenge was finding Stonefield, the principal location for Nicholas and Beth," says Production Designer Alan Macdonald. "The house we found, Limbury, at Salwayash in Dorset is perfect as groundwork to embellish. But I felt it needed softening on the exterior. We put roses growing up the wall, we put a lot of planting around the garden, and we totally replanted a vegetable garden to hide much more formal hedges and planting. We are filming the end of the summer which we should have been filming six weeks ago! So we've had to add plastic colour everywhere, which of course works in our favour because it doesn't fade and won't wilt during the shooting. We painted the outbuildings, we've done up sheds, moved cows in, put up fencing... It's the kind of film where I feel the design is obviously very important, but at the same time I want it to have a totally naturalistic feel. The embellishment is totally harmonious with the natural foundation we found." Again, Posy Simmonds' illustrations became a major reference point for the production design: "Graphic novels don't fundamentally lend themselves to naturalism, there is a heightened reality I think. I realised that if I was going to be faithful to the graphic novel, on one hand I felt it should be founded in realism. But the other thing I noticed is that Posy often works with very defined colour palettes in her drawings. And that led me on to being very defined about colour palettes, particularly with the interiors. There's a creaminess, `Dorset cream' I call it, for the world of Stonefield. There's a lack of blue in Stonefield for example. Posy seemed to always draw Stonefield in a kind of red/brown/yellow spectrum. When we go to Winnards, where Tamara Drewe's mother lived, where Tamara grew up as a teenager and where she's returned to, that her mother's house is very strongly blue, which is how Posy drew it. But that house morphs throughout the film, because she gets Andy to do the house up. So we strip the blue away, and we go into a much more organic colour palette. Flashes of bright red arrive within the interiors when Tamara Drewe is having her affair with Nicholas Hardiment." And as always, the Production Designer's job is to make sure the design serves story and character: "The interesting thing about the world of Stonefield is that ultimately it's a construction of Beth Hardiment. There's an extreme psychosis going on here. She's on the edge, while keeping everything together `marvellously', it's an immaculate world that she's invented of cooking, cleaning, accounting, managing, 12

entertaining, hostessing... There's a control that you'll see when you go to the interiors. And I felt that Nicholas Hardiment's shed had to be the one place where he was able to express his personality. And ultimately it's the embodiment of the mind of a fifteen-year-old boy, who's never grown up. He's a man who's never grown up, a mummy's boy." The temporal duality of the film, with the echoes of Thomas Hardy filtering through this very modern story, also presented a challenge for Macdonald: "I said to Stephen that I saw the village fundamentally as the kind of village you would look for if you were doing a period film. Rather than stripping out all the 21st century elements, I wanted to embellish it. It's the modern rubbish that interested me in terms of design, like putting in a grotty old bus shelter and graffiti, and contemporary graphics ­ 30 mph signs, rubbish bins outside houses, everything that you would cringe at and want to take out of a period shoot, I wanted to put in and add to. My philosophy was ­ it's a period film, but put in all the modern rubbish." The filmmakers ended up having to use two Stonefields ­ one for the interiors, and one for the exteriors: "The proportions of the interior spaces of these 17th/18th century farmhouses are very claustrophobic. We were very lucky that in our travels, we'd been to look at one house called Blackdown, which was built on a much grander scale. It had a sort of romantic quality that I felt the interior spaces at Limbury lacked. It has a beautiful staircase, it has a marvellous kitchen/dining room which enabled us to link rooms in a much more economical way in terms of shooting. Those journeys are much easier to narratively follow." Costume Designer Consolata Boyle faced her own challenges on Tamara Drewe: "I think contemporary movies are by far the most difficult to costume. Fortunately all of the creative people involved have an overall vision to which we adhere and that places certain limitations and certain disciplines on you, which is useful because otherwise you'd have visual chaos because anyone could then wear what they like. There has to be coherence between every character, a colour scheme, an arc of how the character develops, the moods and emotions change, so that every piece of the costume is telling a part of the story and has a reason to be there. It should all work together - costume, the production design, the lighting - within the director's overall vision. And if you keep the overall in your head at all times, things slot into place and they are not indiscriminate." In the case of Tamara Drewe herself, this meant for Consolata: "Well I think she's very self conscious, she knows exactly what she's doing, she knows how seductive she is, she's very aware, so I have reflected that. Again it's in Posy's drawings, it's so 13

beautifully portrayed: there's a lot of skin exposed when she's definitely going for something or for somebody, or wants something or is manipulating someone. You can see how she dresses for that - slightly more figure hugging, more of her body exposed and when she relaxes into herself there's less of that. We did it subtly when we could, but sometimes it's quite obvious what she is doing and that is the way and the fun and complexity of the woman. You can see her ambiguity and her lack of self-awareness comes in that way; she immediately becomes this manipulative poser, while underneath there is someone deeper and more profound, gentler and thoughtful. So there are two people working at the same time. There's the public face and the private reality." And while writers are not renowned for their sartorial elegance, that in itself provided another challenge for Consolata and her team: "Dressing somebody who doesn't care how they dress is just as difficult as dressing someone who is obsessed with clothes." Composer Alexandre Desplat's question initially was a more fundamental one: "Some films call for a score because there are moments of time passing, or cavalry battles, or huge emotional scenes for a love story, or these very strong melancholic moments of a character. And in Tamara Drewe, there's an energy driven by both the dramaturgy, the choral structure of the characters, and by the humour ­ the dark humour of the film. And when I first saw it, I sensed ­ mmm, do we really need to write a score for this film?" For Desplat, his job in scoring the film was more to lead the narrative and underwrite the pauses between the action, enabling Frears and Editor Mick Audsley to skip from the darker to the lighter moments of the film, rather than to highlight the action. "It's a movie which is very much dialogue driven ­ you can ruin the balance. And if the music is too comic or too comedic, too dark or too suspenseful, suddenly you make the movie balance to the wrong side." "I let the audience appreciate the moments of emotion. I think that's what Stephen likes, that I can make space. Leave space for the acting moments and the strong emotional moments to be by themselves, without pushing with the music. It's just there, giving weight, and also a way of balancing - keeping the audience aware that we're still in a mode of comedy. It's not a drama; there's a moment of drama, yes ­ but we're not off-balancing the film into drama suddenly just because the scene has changed."

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WHAT IS `A STEPHEN FREARS FILM'? Stephen Frears' defining characteristic as a filmmaker is his ability to leapfrog from genre to genre to avoid categorisation. Once Stephen had decided to take on the film, his longtime producer Tracey Seaward began to assemble some of his regular collaborators. Tamara Drewe features a number of them - Mick Audsley (Editor), Alan Macdonald (Production Designer), Alexandre Desplat (Music), Consolata Boyle (Costume Design) and ­ from the cast ­ Roger Allam. "The interesting thing about Stephen," says Alan Macdonald, "is that it's very difficult ultimately to find out what a Stephen Frears film is. It's not like an Almodóvar film where there are scenes you see that immediately make you think `Ah, it's an Almodóvar film'. The catalyst for Stephen is the script always, and stylistically the three films I've done with him ­ The Queen, Chéri and Tamara Drewe ­ couldn't be more different from one another. I think that is exciting and challenging for both of us. I understand Stephen probably a lot better now than when I started on The Queen, but that doesn't necessarily make it any easier, because he is psychologically looking for a different approach every time. An approach that's pertinent to the location and the subject matter." Mick Audsley speculates on what it was about Tamara Drewe that he thought appealed to Frears' sensibilities: "I thought it was what I would call very Stephenlike material ­ the wry wit, and, you know, it's dark in places. The interesting thing we've discovered in cutting the film is that initially it seemed to be much lighter at the front and then there was a sort of point where it suddenly became darker, and we were always concerned that the two belonged to each other. But it's unique to this film that it has a tragedy at the end, but you were still able to laugh in a wry way throughout that, and I think that's Stephen's achievement with this film." And on his continued relationship with Frears, Audsley adds: "All the issues that you need as an editor - which are to do with being entrusted with the director's material and being able to feel free to manipulate it and offer things up - is something you can easily do for a friend. And it takes a lot of energy to strike new relationships and new collaborations, and win that trust, and we have twenty-five years and nearly twenty films or so fall back on." Producer Alison Owen agrees with what attracted Frears to the material: "His sense of humour I think. Stephen's own sense of humour is very wry, and ironic, and dry, and that's Posy's sense of humour but done in a much gentler way. So, I mean Posy's sense of humour is not sardonic ­ it's wry but it's not sardonic ­ and Stephen immediately just connected to the material and got that, I think largely because it's 15

his own sense of gently poking fun at people but in a kind way ­ that he understands. There's a humanity that underlies all the fun-poking." On the receiving end of the fun-poking in this film are writers. Tamara Drewe's screenwriter elaborates: "Glen, the Hardy academic, has got this great line about writers that they are the most self-regarding sacks of shit around, and there is something about writers that can be a little bit too self-regarding; all that stuff about `my craft', and feeling they are somehow different from the rest of population because they're observers on life and they're creative in that way and therefore they get special treatment. I mean it's not true and most writers are very humble about their work, which is a job like any other really. You get up in the morning, you make your tea and you write. But I think there's something that's so easy about taking the mickey out of just about any self-regarding writer, you know." Frears is renowned as an actors' director, with a strong track record of unearthing new stars, eliciting great performances from his cast, and creating an environment on set wherein his actors enjoy their work. Gemma Arterton discusses her relationship with Stephen and what he brings to Tamara Drewe: "Stephen's always changing his style, he's always doing things you don't expect him to do. Because it is a comedy and it's very different to what he's done before, he's the perfect guy for it because he's making it into something that's not just another British comedy. He's making it really unique and bringing some real eccentricity to it. He's brilliant because he's tapping into the deeper side of it, he's making the characters so real within that comedy that you are moved by it." Generosity is also a word that crops up frequently when the cast discuss their director. Dominic Cooper: "Stephen gives you a tremendous amount of confidence. Playing my character, in a comedy, you need to feel very confident about what you are doing and very relaxed and able to take risks with it, because you are doing something quite heightened. So you have to be prepared for it to be very wrong and to make a fool of yourself and if the set and the company feels comfortable amongst each other than you have much more range to be able to experiment, and Stephen really allows that to happen." Says Roger Allam: "He doesn't tend to interfere obsessively with the detail of the acting, but he'll often catch you in the lunch break, come and say something generous." And finally Tamsin Greig: "I think Stephen casts well and he's interested in people so you trust that what you bring is what he wants and you'll soon know if it's not what he wants. He's like a sculptor, you know, he waits till things emerge."

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Stephen Frears himself remarks on what, for him, was unique about Tamara Drewe: "I can't ever answer the question, `What kind of film is it?' I say, `Oh, it's a pastoral comedy.' Well, you know ­ A Midsummer Night's Dream is a pastoral comedy, but there aren't a lot of them around. The English don't make films about the middle classes. And when they are, they're mainly period. I suppose you'd call Tom Jones a pastoral comedy but it's because it's so drowsed in history. They just don't exist ­ contemporary films set in the English countryside like this. So you could see immediately it was unlike anything else. I'm very pleased at how funny it is ­ though I can see it deals with sort of dreadful things! And I can only apologise! I'll bet I'm the only man in the world who can do a cattle stampede in Dorset!" THOMAS HARDY AND TAMARA DREWE One of the central enigmas of Tamara Drewe is that while it is loosely inspired by Thomas Hardy's Far From The Madding Crowd and is laced with classical allusions, this tale of a 21st century media girl trying to better herself is the most modern of tales. Screenwriter Moira Buffini relished the challenge of trying to capture and reinterpret the Hardy mythology: "I loved all of that. I did Hardy at college, I re-read Far from the Madding Crowd after I read Posy's book and I loved all of her allusions to it, I thought `there's more, there's even more fun to be had.' So there's the scene when Ben Sergeant, the drummer, who is basically Sergeant Troy out of Hardy's book, seduces Tamara. And instead of doing as Sergeant Troy does with his sword play in that amazing scene in the film with Terence Stamp, I thought that would be really good fun if Ben Sergeant seduced her with his drum sticks." (In John Schlesinger's popular and romantic 1967 version, Julie Christie played the beautiful protagonist, Alan Bates the loyal rural hero, Terence Stamp the dashing but dastardly seducer, and Peter Finch the love-besotted older man.) Buffini adds: "In a general sense, Hardy makes that plot very serious and quite dark and just allows a happy ending. There's a wonderful comedy to be had if you take the same plot and just allow it slightly more comedy. Instead of all Hardy's farmers, the rural characters in the Hardy book which have dated and haven't stood the test of time, we've got Jody and Casey, the two little girls from the village who are like the Greek chorus of it all, and they too are great catalysts for action in the book." Stephen Frears feels that the contrast between past and present are at the heart of the film's comedy: "Tamara and Gemma are both very, very modern, in these rather ridiculous rural surroundings that feel a bit like they're from another period, so it's that combination of the location and the modern attitudes." But at the same time he 17

was determined not to be constrained by the allusions to Hardy: "If you make a film in Dorset, it's just there, you can't escape him, and I suppose somewhere down the line the whole thing is a sort of echo of Hardy or a pastiche of Hardy. But it's not relevant to us making the film ­ I'm not making a gloomy novel." For Arterton herself, after coming off a number of period and fantasy films, a huge part of the appeal of Tamara Drewe was precisely to do something so modern: "Having done the Hardys before (she starred as Tess in a BBC adaptation of Tess of the D'Urbervilles) and reading the book over and over again whilst filming this, it's so different actually, it's SO modern. With Hardy everything tends to be quite exclamatory and they really say what the feel is. There's this part in Far From The Madding Crowd where she says, `I'm your wife! You will love me! You will!' And it's really dramatic and Tamara would never do that! She's much more modern than that and she keeps it inside and that's really satisfying to play especially on camera. I think Hardy can be a little too much on film because they do exclaim everything." Roger Allam also felt that Hardy-esque notions needed to be in the background in order to focus on the action at hand: "You're trying to find the tone and the style all the time but you can't really think about that. You can't really think as a character, `Oh, I'm in a classic reworking, I'm a modern reworking of a classic story'. Although somewhere at the back of your mind there might be a consciousness of that but certainly not at the forefront." For Dominic Cooper, the timelessness of the plot and characters are what gives the film such universal appeal: "The themes and the things that happen and the problems, the human problems, are all things that you could relate to in any time really. But, I suppose, it's modern in how it's set and the music that surrounds it and the ideas about it, which are very much today." For Luke Evans, it was more a case of not letting himself be intimidated by the source material: "I'm aware of the influence of Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd. I've seen the film, and I've seen Alan Bates. I try not to get too overwhelmed by his performance, and to think `Oh God, I've got to try to be like Alan Bates!' But it's a great story, and you can see how it's mirrored in this film." The very first shot, of hunky Andy chopping wood while romantically backlit, wittily underscores the period/modern tension as he reaches for a plastic water bottle. The last word on Hardy comes from Tamsin Greig: "I think all stories are echoes of another tale and I try not to think about that. I just try and focus on what's happening now, but with a sense of, `You know what? We've seen this all before, 18

this is a tale well told many, many times before. Because we're human beings and we're a bit rubbish.'"

ABOUT THE CAST

GEMMA ARTERTON (Tamara Drewe) Gemma Arterton has quickly become one of Britain's most promising stars. Within months of graduation from RADA in 2007 she was making her mark on stage and television, starring as Rosaline in Love Labour's Lost at the Globe theatre and opposite Maggie Smith and David Walliams in Stephen Poliakoff's BBC drama Capturing Mary. Gemma also starred in the BBC's acclaimed adaptation of Thomas Hardy's classic novel Tess of the D'Urbervilles giving a heart rending portrayal of the heroic Tess. Gemma made her feature film debut in the remake of the classic St Trinian's, became an iconic Bond Girl in Marc Forster's Quantum of Solace, and starred in Guy Ritchie's RocknRolla and Jonathan Gershfield's Three and Out. 2010 has seen Gemma taking a number of lead roles including kidnap thriller The Disappearance of Alice Creed plus big budget epics Prince of Persia: The Sands of Times alongside Jake Gyllenhaal and Clash of the Titans opposite Sam Worthington. She has recently finished a run on the London stage alongside Rupert Friend and Tamsin Greig in The Little Dog Laughed at The Garrick Theatre. ROGER ALLAM (Nicholas Hardiment) A distinguished and Olivier Award-winning theatre actor, Roger's CV also boasts a variety of high-profile film and television roles. Since joining the RSC in 1981, Roger's roles with the company have included "Javert" in the first production of Les Miserables in 1984, "Macbeth" in Tim Albery's 1996 production of the tragedy and "Benedick" in Much Ado About Nothing. Other recent theatre roles have included "Albin" in La Cage Aux Folles (Playhouse Theatre, West End); "Bernard" in Boeing Boeing (Comedy Theatre West End), Willy Brandt in Democracy (National and West End) and "Ray" in Blackbird (Albery Theatre, West End). Nominated three times for the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Actor, Roger took the award in 2002 for his performance as "Terri Dennis" in Peter Nichol's production of Privates on Parade at the Donmar Warehouse. Roger's most recent film appearance was as "Royalton" in the Wachowski Brothers' Speedracer. Other film credits include: the Queen's private secretary "Robin Janvrin" in Stephen Frears' The Queen; "Sir John Hamilton" in Ken Loach's The Wind that Shakes the Barley; and "Adrian" in Michael Winterbottom's A Cock and Bull Story. 19

Roger's TV credits include Ashes to Ashes, Margaret, Spooks and The Curse of Steptoe. In 2007, Roger appeared for the first time as "Peter Mannion MP" in acclaimed BBC comedy The Thick of It, going on to reprise his role in the subsequent series. BILL CAMP (Glen McCreavy) American-born stage and screen actor Bill Camp is best known for his extensive theatre work both on and off Broadway. The recipient of several awards and honours, including Obie, Eliot Norton and Boston Critics Association awards, he has performed in Homebody/Kabul, The Misanthrope, Olly's Prison, Coram Boy, Heartbreak House, The Seagull, St.Joan and Jackie: An American Life to name a few. He will next be seen on stage in Tony Kushner's new play The Intelligent Homosexual's Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a Key to the Scriptures. On the big screen he has appeared in Michael Mann's Public Enemies, Deception, Rounders, In and Out, Reversal of Fortune, Love and Roadkill, The Guitar, Coach, The Dying Gaul, and Reversal of Fortune. For television Bill has played recurring roles on Showtime's Brotherhood (Hawkish), guest roles on Law & Order: Criminal Intent, Joan of Arcadia and New York Undercover. DOMINIC COOPER (Ben Sergeant) Dominic Cooper is one of the most exciting talents in the industry. Upon completion of his professional training at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA), Dominic landed a role in Mother Clap's Molly House at the National Theatre under resident director Nicholas Hytner. He then starred in the Royal Shakespeare Company's A Midsummer Night's Dream, followed by His Dark Materials and The History Boys, for which Dominic garnered wide critical acclaim. The latter production received three Olivier Awards and six Tony Awards. The History Boys was also adapted into an acclaimed feature film with the original cast intact. Dominic recently starred on stage as Hippolytus in the production of Jean Racine's Phèdre, alongside Dame Helen Mirren. On the big screen Dominic was most recently seen in Lone Scherfig's Academy Award and BAFTA-nominated An Education, and he will next be seen in Lee Tamahori's taut action drama The Devil's Double. In the film, about the life of Latif Yahia, Dominic is cast in the challenging dual roles of Latif Yahia and Uday Hussein. Dominic's other movie credits include the worldwide box-office sensation Mamma Mia!; Saul Dibb's period drama The Duchess opposite Keira Knightley; prison escape thriller The Escapist; Brief Interviews with Hideous Men, adapted by John Krasinski 20

from the best-selling short stories of David Foster Wallace; the Tom Hanksproduced Starter for Ten; Boudica; I'll Be There; and the Hughes Brothers' From Hell. Dominic has also produced a number of acclaimed performances for television, including the BBC2 drama Freefall; John Alexander's BBC adaptation of Sense & Sensibility as Willoughby; and God on Trial. Dominic has also starred in Down to Earth, Sparkling Cyanide, The Gentleman Thief, Davison's Eyes, and Steven Spielberg's acclaimed Band of Brothers. LUKE EVANS (Andy Cobb) A well-established star on London's West End circuit, Welsh actor Luke Evans has starred in number of West End plays and musicals including La Cava, Boy George's Taboo, Avenue Q, Dickens Unplugged, A Girl Called Dusty, Small Change, Piaf and leading roles in Miss Saigon and Rent. A versatile actor, Luke made his feature film debut in the Ian Dury biopic sex&drugs&rock&roll and appeared alongside Gemma Arterton for a second time in the epic Clash of the Titans playing Apollo. This was followed by Ridley Scott's Robin Hood and the upcoming thriller Blitz alongside Jason Statham and Paddy Considine. Luke just completed filming the highly anticipated action film Immortals for director Tarsem Singh in a lead role opposite Henry Cavill and Kellan Lutz, and is currently filming the remake of The Three Musketeers.

TAMSIN GREIG (Beth Hardiment) Tamsin Greig is an Olivier Award winning British actress, well known on British stage and television. She was recently seen on stage in the lead role as the Hollywood agent in The Little Dog Laughed, alongside Gemma Arterton and Rupert Friend, and previously in Gethsemene at the National Theatre, God of Carnage and Much Ado About Nothing, for which she won the Olivier Award and The Critics Choice Best Shakespearean Performance Award in 2007. Her voice is recognisable to listeners of Radio 4's long running soap The Archers, having played troubled Debbie Aldridge since 1991. Her television credits range from cult comedy hits Black Books (as Frank Katzenjammer), Love Soup (as Alice Chenery) and Green Wing (as Dr.Caroline Todd) for which she was BAFTA nominated for Best Actress, and popular dramas including the 2009 BBC series of Jane Austen's Emma and The Diary of Anne Frank. Tamara Drewe marks Tamsin's first major role in a feature film.

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CHARLOTTE CHRISTIE (Casey Shaw) Eighteen year old Charlotte Christie makes her feature debut in Tamara Drewe. She is currently finishing her A Level exams. JESSICA BARDEN (Jody Long) Seventeen year old Jessica Barden is currently treading the boards in the West End with Ian Rickson's highly acclaimed play Jerusalem and will next be seen on the big screen in Joe Wright's feature Hanna. Prior to Tamara Drewe, Jessica appeared in feature film Mrs Radcliffe's Revolution starring comedienne Catherine Tate and was a regular on ITV's Coronation Street from 2007-2008 as Kayleigh Morton. Other television credits include The Chase (BBC), No Angels (Channel 4) and My Parents Are Aliens (Nickelodeon). JOHN BETT (Diggory) A well-known figure in Scottish theatre as an actor, writer and director, John has also appeared in numerous films including The Golden Compass, Shallow Grave, Gregory's Girl and Tess. Television work includes Rebus, The Creatives, Murder Rooms, Vanity Fair and Truth Or Dare. He has also appeared in over a hundred radio programmes and written a variety of theatre and radio plays, poetry, short stories and daily serials. John's extensive theatre work includes productions at Shakespeare's Globe and the Royal National Theatre with recent parts including "The Governor" in a touring production of The Government Inspector and "Franklin" in the self-directed According to Ben at The Oran Mor Theatre, Glasgow. John's other directing credits include Macbeth on Inchcolme (Edinburgh Festival) and Oh What a Lovely War (Glasgow Citizens), and his production of The Lasses O won the 2009 Critics Awards for Theatre in Scotland for `Best Use of Music' . JOSIE TAYLOR (Zoe) Whilst finishing her training at the Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, Josie was cast as the lead in Alan Rickman's production of My Name is Rachel Corrie, playing at the Galway Arts Festival and the Edinburgh Fringe, the world's largest arts festival. Josie has gone onto a number of London theatre productions such as Product: World Remix, The Vegemite Tales, Three More Sleepless Nights/Four Play and 1936. For television she has appeared in the popular series Midsomer Murders. 22

BRONAGH GALLAGHER (Eustacia) Tamara Drewe marks Bronagh Gallagher's second collaboration with Stephen Frears, her first being Mary Reilly starring Julia Roberts in 1996. She has also worked with film luminaries Quentin Tarantino in Pulp Fiction and George Lucas in Star Wars: The Phantom Menace. Bronagh first came to attention on the big screen for her unforgettable performance as Berni in Alan Parker's The Commitments, and since then her film credits include Tristan and Isolde, Middletown, Faintheart, Last Chance Harvey, The Big I Am, Malice in Wonderland and Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes. On the small screen, her first role was in Michael Winterbottom's dramas Flash McVeigh and Island of Strangers and more recently her television work includes Holy Cross (for which she won Best Actress at the Biarritz International Festival, 2004) Poirot, The Peter Serafinowicz Show and the Bafta award winning series The Street. On stage Bronagh has worked at the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, The Royal Court in London and extensively with Simon McBurney for Theatre de Complicite. Bronagh has most recently appeared at the National Theatre, in the revival of the critically acclaimed Warhorse directed by Marianne Elliot. PIPPA HAYWOOD (Tess) Pippa Haywood is an English actress with an extensive television and theatre career. She's well known for her comedy roles on television, playing the much-putupon Helen Brittas in the BBC2 series The Brittas Empire, BBC2's Fear, Stress & Anger, and Channel 4's Green Wing, for which she took the Best Comedy Female Performance award at the 2005 Rose d'Or Television Festival in Switzerland. Her most noticeable television credits include ITV drama serial The One Game, The Bill, The Wrong Door, Dalziel & Pascoe and Office Gossip. Her recent theatre credits include Landscape with Weapon at the National, House and Garden, Private Lives, A Midsummer Night's Dream and The Winter's Tale.

ABOUT THE CREW

STEPHEN FREARS (Director) Stephen Frears is one of the UK's most critically-acclaimed directors who has worked with some of the world's best talent both in front of and behind the cameras. Most recently he worked with Michele Pfeiffer in Chéri, based on the French novel by Colette, and Helen Mirren for his award winning film The Queen, for which Helen received the Academy's Best Actress Award and Stephen was nominated for numerous directing awards around the world, including an Academy Award, BAFTA 23

and Golden Globe. The film also became a box office hit after its launch at the Venice International Film Festival. Frears began his career at London's Royal Court Theatre, where he worked with director Lindsay Anderson, and moved into the film industry in 1966 as an assistant director to Karel Reisz. In 1971 he made his directorial debut with Gumshoe, a wry homage to film noir starring Albert Finney. After several acclaimed television productions and the cult feature film The Hit, which starred John Hurt and Tim Roth, his breakthrough came in 1985 with My Beautiful Laundrette which launched the careers of Daniel Day-Lewis and writer Hanif Kureishi (who was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay). Stephen and Hanif Kureishi reteamed on Sammy and Rosie Get Laid in 1987, which like My Beautiful Laundrette looked at many of the issues that characterised Britain in the 1980s. Stephen went on to direct Prick Up Your Ears, about English playwright Joe Orton, starring Gary Oldman and Alfred Molina, and then Dangerous Liaisons written by Christopher Hampton and starring Michelle Pfeiffer, John Malkovich and Glenn Close. An adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos' caustic Les Liaisons Dangereuses, the film triumphed at the Academy Awards in 1989 winning Best Adapted Screenplay Academy Award, Best Costumes and Best Art Direction, as well as nominations for Best Actress for Close, Best Supporting Actress for Pfeiffer, Best Picture and Best Music. Stephen was again nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director the following year for The Grifters (1990) which starred John Cusack, Anjelica Huston and Annette Bening. He then made Hero, starring Dustin Hoffman and Geena Davis, Mary Reilly starring Julia Roberts and John Malkovich, and two low-budget adaptations of novels by Roddy Doyle, The Snapper and The Van. Then came The Hi-Lo Country, starring Woody Harrelson, Billy Crudup, Penélope Cruz and Patricia Arquette, and the acclaimed High Fidelity, based on Nick Hornby's popular novel and starring John Cusack, Jack Black and Iben Hjejle. He returned to the small screen in 2000 with Fail Safe starring George Clooney and Harvey Keitel, and directed Liam in the same year. In 2002, his drama-thriller Dirty Pretty Things was an arthouse and festival hit and launched the career of Chiwetel Ejiofor as well as earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. The political drama The Deal which Frears made for Channel 4 in 2003 paved the way for The Queen, and he followed that in 2005 with the historical drama Mrs Henderson Presents which starred Judi Dench and Bob Hoskins. TRACEY SEAWARD (Producer) Tracey Seaward has collaborated frequently with Stephen Frears, producing a number of highly acclaimed and Oscar nominated films, including Dirty Pretty Things, Mrs Henderson Presents, The Queen and most recently Chéri. Her other 24

credits include David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises, Fernando Meirelles's The Constant Gardener, Danny Boyle's Millions, Neil Jordan's The Good Thief and Pat Murphy's Nora. ALISON OWEN (Producer) Academy Award nominated in 1998 for Elizabeth (Working Title Films) Alison went on to win the BAFTA for Best Film and has established a reputation as one of the UK's most exciting producer talents. Under her Ruby Films banner Alison is currently shooting Jane Eyre for Focus Features and the BBC starring Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender, Jamie Bell and Judi Dench and her latest two films have made the Official Selection for Cannes 2010: Chatroom, directed by Hideo Nakata for Film4, UKFC and WestEnd, starring Aaron Johnson for Un Certain Regard and Tamara Drewe, directed by Stephen Frears for BBC, Sony Pictures and WestEnd for Out of Competition. Also through Ruby, Alison produced Sylvia in 2003 for Focus/Capitol Films starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Daniel Craig, followed by Proof for Miramax Films, starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Anthony Hopkins and Jake Gyllenhaal. In 2008 The Other Boleyn Girl released by Sony Pictures in the US and Universal in the UK, starring Scarlett Johansson, Natalie Portman and Eric Bana, took over $90m worldwide. Brick Lane produced for Film4, UKFC and Ingenious was released to critical acclaim in the UK in 2007 and the US in June 2008. Alison also acted as an Executive Producer on Shaun of the Dead, a film that earned critical acclaim and became a major success at the box office and The Men Who Stare at Goats that starred George Clooney, Kevin Spacey and Ewan McGregor. In 2008 she began Ruby Television through which she Executive Produced the award winning Small Island for BBC1 and HBO's Temple Grandin, with Claire Danes taking the title role alongside David Strathairn, Julia Ormond and Catherine O'Hara. Prior producer credits include: Hear My Song; Roseanna's Grave; The Young Americans starring Harvey Keitel and Viggo Mortensen and Moonlight and Valentino starring Whoopi Goldberg. PAUL TRIJBITS (Producer) After a six year tenure as Head of the New Cinema Fund at the UK Film Council and having previously established a close working relationship with Alison on Roseanna's Grave and The Young Americans, Paul Trijbits joined Ruby Films in 2007 as partner and executive producer managing Ruby's extensive slate of film and television projects. 25

Paul has executive produced a number of critically and financially successful British feature films, such as Paul Greengrass's Bloody Sunday, Peter Mullan's The Magdalene Sisters, Ken Loach's The Wind That Shakes The Barley, Kevin Macdonald's Touching The Void and Andrea Arnold's Red Road. Previous producer credits include: Richard Stanley`s Hardware and Danny Cannon's The Young Americans. The films have won major awards at leading festivals in the last five years, including the Golden Palm at Cannes, the Golden Bear at Berlin, the Golden Lion at Venice, BAFTA Best British Film, Toronto Discovery and the Sundance Audience Award. Paul executive produced Andrea Arnold's Fish Tank, which won the Prix de Jury at Cannes last year, Oliver Hirschbiegel's Five Minutes of Heaven (winner Best Director and Best Screenplay Sundance 2009), and Andrea Levy's Small Island. Recent productions completed at Ruby are Tamara Drewe, (Official Selection Cannes 2010, Out of Competition) directed by Stephen Frears, Chatroom (Official Selection Cannes 2010, Un Certain Regard) directed by Hideo Nakata (Ringu). Currently in production is Jane Eyre, directed by Cary Fukunaga (Sin Nombre). POSY SIMMONDS (Novelist) Posy Simmonds is best known for her weekly cartoon strip which ran in The Guardian from 1977 to 1987. The collected cartoons were published as Mrs Weber's Diary, True Love, Pick of Posy, Pure Posy and Mustn't Grumble. She was Cartoonist of the Year in 1980 and 1981 and in 1998 was overall winner of the National Art Library Illustrations Award. Gemma Bovery was published by Cape in 1999 to great critical acclaim. MOIRA BUFFINI (Screenwriter) Moira's screenplays include Jane Eyre directed by Cary Fukunaga, which is currently in production, and she is also working on a screen adaptation of her play A Vampire Story for Number 9 Films. Her latest play Welcome to Thebes opens at the National Theatre in June 2010 directed by Sir Richard Eyre. A revival of her award-winning play Gabriel opens at the Atlantic Theatre, New York in May 2010. Winner of the LWT, Whiting and Susan Smith Blackburn Prize, Moira's other plays include Dinner, nominated for an Olivier Award, Dying For It, Loveplay and Silence. She is currently writer in residence at the National Theatre Studio. BEN DAVIS, BSC (Director of Photography) Ben Davis's work as a Cinematographer could be seen most recently in Matthew Vaughan's smash hit superhero movie Kick-Ass. He also shot Vaughan's previous two films as a director ­ Stardust and Layer Cake. Other recent credits include John 26

Madden's forthcoming The Debt, Gerald McMorrow's futuristic Franklyn, Incendiary, Hannibal Rising, Virgin Territory, Imagine Me and You, Miranda, Sleeping With the Fishes, Macbeth for director Justin Chadwick, Worlds From My Father and The Certain Something. He has shot over 120 commercials. MICK AUDSLEY (Film Editor) British born Mick Audsley has been cutting films for 30 years. His first full-length feature as film editor was Bill Douglas' My Way Home and his early career included Christopher Petit's An Unsuitable Job For A Woman, Stephen Frears' TV films Walter and its sequel Walter and June, The Terence Davies Trilogy, Mike Newell's Dance With A Stranger and Sour Sweet, Comrades, and for Stephen Frears, The Hit, My Beautiful Laundrette, Prick Up Your Ears and Sammy and Rosie Get Laid. In 1988, he worked with Frears on Dangerous Liaisons, receiving a BAFTA nomination, and he later won a BAFTA for another Frears project, the TV film of Roddy Doyle's The Snapper. His collaboration with Frears has continued through The Grifters, Hero, The Van, High Fidelity and Dirty Pretty Things, on which he acted as Second Unit Director. Amongst his other credits are Lady Chatterley, Interview With a Vampire, The Serpent's Kiss, three films for John Madden - Captain Corelli's Mandolin, Proof and Killshot, Mike Newell's Mona Lisa Smile, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Love In The Time Of Cholera, and Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys. More recently his work includes Mike Newell's medieval adventure Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time. ALAN MACDONALD (Production Designer) Alan Macdonald is a regular collaborator with Stephen Frears, having previously designed The Queen and Chéri for him. His other most frequent collaborator is the director John Maybury, for whom he designed The Edge of Love, The Jacket, Love is the Devil and Remembrance of Things Fast, as well as three short films in the late 1980s and early 1990s ­ Man to Man, Tunnel of Love and Absurd. Other feature film credits include Julian Jarrold's Kinky Boots, The 51st State starring Samuel L. Jackson, Pat Murphy's Nora and Rogue Trader starring Ewan McGregor. Alan has also worked in advertising for directors including Darius Khondji and Bailie Walsh, for clients such as Coca Cola, Bouyges Telecom, Mercedes Benz, Volkswagen Golf, Levi's, Lawson's Whisky and Microsoft. He has designed promos for Boy George, Neneh Cherry, Sinead O'Connor, The Cranberries, Massive Attack and Simple Minds. In 2002 he was the Designer on Kylie Minogue's Fever tour. 27

ALEXANDRE DESPLAT (Composer) After composing the music for over 50 European films and being nominated for two César Awards, Alexandre Desplat burst onto the Hollywood scene in 2003 with his evocative score to Girl With the Pearl Earring, starring Scarlett Johansson and Colin Firth, which earned him Golden Globe, BAFTA and European Film Award nominations. His reputation was solidified by his critically acclaimed score to Jonathan Glazer's Birth and Stephen Gaghan's Syriana, produced by Steven Soderbergh, which earned him another Golden Globe nomination. The Queen, directed by Stephen Frears and starring Helen Mirren, garnered him his first Academy Award nomination. In the same year he also won a Golden Globe for his score to The Painted Veil, starring Edward Norton and Naomi Watts. In 2007, he wrote the music for Philip Pullman adaptation The Golden Compass, directed by Chris Weitz, and Ang Lee's Lust, Caution. In 2008, Alexandre's score to David Fincher's The Curious Case of Benjamin Button earned him his second Academy Award Nomination and his fourth Golden Globe nomination. In the following year, he composed the music for Nora Ephron's Julie & Julia, Stephen Frears' Chéri, Coco Before Chanel starring Audrey Tautou, Jacques Audiard's The Prophet, which was the Official French Selection for the Oscar category of Best Picture in a Foreign Language, Twilight: New Moon for Chris Weitz, and Wes Anderson's The Fantastic Mr. Fox, which brought Alexandre his third Academy Award nomination. Most recently his work featured in Roman Polanski's political thriller The Ghost Writer. Upcoming movies include Terrence Malick's The Tree of Life, The Special Relationship directed by Richard Loncraine, and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Part 1), directed by David Yates. CONSOLATA BOYLE (Costume Designer) Tamara Drewe marks Consolata Boyle's sixth collaboration with Stephen Frears, beginning back in 1993 with The Snapper, and encompassing Mary Reilly, The Van, The Queen and Chéri. Her other feature film and TV credits include The Special Relationship for Director Richard Loncraine, three films for Conor McPherson ­ Eclipse, The Actors and Endgame, The Other Man for Richard Eyre, BBC and HBO's A Number, Ol Parker's Imagine Me and You, David MacKenzie's Asylum, The Lion in Winter for Andrei Konchalovsky for which she won an Emmy Award, Stefan Schwartz's The Abduction Club, David Mamet's Catastrophe, When Brendan Met Trudy, Alan Parker's Angela's Ashes, Nora, David Mamet's The Winslow Boy, Love and Rage, This Is My Father, 28

Serpent's Kiss, Gillies MacKinnon's Trojan Eddie, Moll Flanders, Widow's Peak, Nothing Personal, The Secret of Roan Innish, The Secret Rapture, Mike Newell's Into The West, Anna Campion's Broken Skin, A Green Journey, December Bride and Troubles. DANIEL PHILLIPS (Make-Up & Hair Designer) Daniel Phillips is another regular Stephen Frears collaborator after working with him on The Queen and Chéri. He is currently working on Jane Eyre for director Cary Fukunaga. Other film credits include Richard Loncraine's The Special Relationship, John Madden's The Debt, The Duchess for Saul Dibb and The Edge of Love for John Maybury, both starring Keira Knightley, The History Boys, Venus starring Peter O'Toole and Leslie Phillips, The League of Gentlemen's Apocalypse, Anita and Me, The Four Feathers for Shekhar Kapur and Iain Softley's The Wings of the Dove. Daniel's work for TV includes Tsunami, Bleak House, The Other Boleyn Girl, Coupling and French & Saunders.

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Cast

TAMARA DREWE........................GEMMA ARTERTON NICHOLAS HARDIMENT.....................ROGER ALLAM GLEN MCCREAVY...................................BILL CAMP BEN SERGEANT............................DOMINIC COOPER ANDY COBB.......................................LUKE EVANS BETH HARDIMENT.............................TAMSIN GREIG JODY LONG..................................JESSICA BARDEN CASEY SHAW........................CHARLOTTE CHRISTIE INTERVIEWER..............................JAMES NAUGHTIE DIGGORY.............................................JOHN BETT ZOE................................................ JOSIE TAYLOR EUSTACIA...........................BRONAGH GALLAGHER TESS...........................................PIPPA HAYWOOD PENNY UPMINSTER..................SUSAN WOOLDRIDGE MARY....................................AMANDA LAWRENCE NADIA PATEL.................................ZAHRA AHMADI LUCETTA.................................CHERYL CAMPBELL JODYS MUM.......................................ALEX KELLY CAITLIN............................................ EMILY BRUNI POPPY HARDIMENT.............................LOLA FREARS VINTNER.............................................TOM ALLEN POSH HIPPY..................................PATRICIA QUINN ARMY GEEK.....................................WALTER HALL STEVE CULLEY........................................ JOEL FRY FRAN REDMOND..............................LOIS WINSTONE ,,SWIPE BAND MEMBERS................NATHAN COOPER

...................................................BENJAMIN TODD BOSS THE DOG................................ALBERT CLARK

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS EVE SCHOUKROUN FAYE WARD HANNAH FARRELL STUART RENFREW SAM KNOX-JOHNSTON POLLY HOPE GABBY LE RASLE BETH HEARN KEECH SAMANTHA GARDNER TOM RYE KARL LIEGIS ANDY BRUNSKILL JANIE DOWDING SCOTT JACOBSON LINDA DREW RYAN BOHAN JOHN TURNER CHARLIE COOMBES FIONN GROEGER JULIAN MORSON

1ST ASSISTANT DIRECTOR PRODUCTION MANAGER PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATORS ASSISTANT PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR ACCOMMODATION CO-ORDINATOR 2ND ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 3RD ASSISTANT DIRECTOR ASSISTANT TO ALISON OWEN ASSISTANTS TO TRACEY SEAWARD PERSONAL ASSISTANT TO STEPHEN FREARS KEY OFFICE PRODUCTION RUNNER KEY SET PRODUCTION ASSISTANT DORSET RUNNER LONDON RUNNER STEADICAM OPERATOR/ ,,B CAMERA OPERATOR

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FOCUS PULLER CLAPPER LOADER CAMERA TRAINEE VIDEO ASSIST OPERATOR SUPERVISING ART DIRECTOR SET DECORATOR ART DIRECTOR STAND-BY ART DIRECTOR ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR DRAUGHTSPERSON PORTRAIT ARTIST STORYBOARD ARTIST GRAPHIC DESIGNER ART DEPARTMENT RUNNER HOME ECONOMIST PRODUCTION SOUND MIXER SOUND MAINTENANCE SOUND ASSISTANT SCRIPT SUPERVISOR DIALECT COACH LOCATION MANAGER KEY ASSISTANT LOCATION MANAGER ASSISTANT LOCATION MANAGER UNIT MANAGER LOCATION TRAINEE LOCATION DRIVERS

SAM RENTON ALAN HALL WILLIAM MORRIS PACU TRAUTVETTER PATRICK ROLFE TINA JONES CHRISTOPHER WYATT KATRINA DUNN IVAN WEIGHTMAN GARETH COUSINS CHARLIE COBB TEMPLE CLARK KATIE DRISCOLL MIA SUMMERVILLE MARINA MORRIS PETER LINDSAY AMPS KATE MORATH THEOTIME PARDON PENNY EYLES PENNY DYER JONAH COOMBES JOSH YUDKIN AMIE TRIDGELL JOHN CRAMPTON FRED EVERITT ROB WICKS MAURICE ,,TEX AVERY LISSY HOLM CASTING COLLECTIVE MARION WEISE CHARLOTTE WISEMAN ROSIE GRANT SUE CASEY PAUL YEOWELL YASEMIN KASCIOGLU ANGELS THE COSTUMIERS & CARLO MANZI RENTALS SOPHIE MILLARD TAPIO SALMI BEVERLEY BINDA KRISTYAN MALLETT RAY MARSTON WIG STUDIO LINDA GREGORY DIARMUID COGHLAN JACKIE OSULLIVAN NICK GILLARD JUSTIN PEARSON DAVID SMITH SONNY BURDIS GUY MINOLI ANDREW WATSON STEVE WALSH

CASTING ASSOCIATE EXTRAS CASTING COSTUME SUPERVISOR ASSISTANT COSTUME DESIGNERS PRINCIPAL WARDROBE MISTRESS PRINCIPAL COSTUME STAND-BY COSTUME TRAINEE HIRED COSTUMES SUPPLIED BY HIRED JEWELLERY SUPPLIED BY MAKE-UP & HAIR SUPERVISOR MAKE-UP & HAIR ARTIST PROSTHETICS WIGS SUPPLIED BY PRODUCTION ACCOUNTANT 1ST ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT 2ND ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT STUNT CO-ORDINATOR STUNT DOUBLE GAFFER BEST BOY ELECTRICIANS

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GENNY OPERATOR GRIP GRIP TRAINEE PRODUCTION BUYER PROP MASTER PROPS STOREMAN DRESSING PROPS

STEWART MONTEITH TIM NEILL MIKE PARSONS TOBY PLASKITT ANDY WOODCOCK KATE VENNER ALLEN POLLEY DAVID CHISHOLM JOHN PALMER KELVIN COOK JOSH POLLEY CAMPBELL MITCHELL MITCH POLLEY TIM LANNING PALMBROKERS MAT CAMPBELL VAIDAS MACIONAS MELANIE THORPE MANEX EFREM GARRY MOORE DAVE GRAY LARA MURRAY DAN CRANDON TIM POWIS BRUCE BARNES JASON HTAY JOHN MOOLENSCHOT MARK WALLIS DAN MARSDEN STEVE DEAN JOE WILLMOTT PAUL RIGBY NICK WOOD DEAN HAWLEY BART BAILEY PHIL HAWLEY PHIL WHEELER JAMIE POWELL BILL BUSH OTIS BELL PAT HAGERTY GILLIAN CAMPBELL JODY RAYNES GINGER MCCARTHY MARTIN SMITH SCOT GILL STEVE MACHER TREVOR CAREY ROY CLARKE ENYO MORTTY ALLAN BRADSHAW MIKE BEAVEN JOHN BURDEN GARY ABBOTT SOPHIE BURDEN

CHARGEHAND STAND-BY PROPS JUNIOR STAND-BY PROPS HEAD GREENSMAN GREENERY GREENS CO-ORDINATOR GREENSMEN

SPECIAL EFFECTS SUPERVISOR STAND-BY CARPENTER STAND-BY RIGGER STAND-BY PAINTER CONSTRUCTION MANAGER WORKSHOP SUPERVISOR STUDIO SUPERVISOR CHARGEHAND CARPENTER CARPENTERS

HOD SCENIC PAINTER PAINTERS

HOD PLASTERER PLASTERER PLASTER LABOURER RIGGER SCENIC ARTISTS SUPERVISING RIGGER RIGGERS

TRANSPORTATION CAPTAIN UNIT DRIVERS

MINIBUS DRIVERS

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UNIT PUBLICISTS

EPK STILLS PHOTOGRAPHER STAND-INS

GINGER CORBETT & ELIZABETH FOLLOWS PREMIER PR TOBY REISZ ­ FEASIBLE FILMS PETER MOUNTAIN FRAZER DOUGLAS CARIDAD ANGUS JEANIE UDALL MICK HURRELL ­ JHA SAFE T A R LOCATION SERVICES ANTHONY STAGLES RODNEY DEWINTER JOHN BARNES NICKY ,,GENIE BOOM SURRESSI DEAN WILLMOTT TONY MAY KEVIN TOWELL CARL BOYCE SAFE & SOUND JILL CLARK ­ 1ST CHOICE ANIMALS GARY WEEKES ­ REEL VEHICLES ANDREW ELLIS

UNIT NURSE HEALTH & SAFETY ADVISOR SECURITY SERVICES

LOCATION SECURITY ANIMAL HANDLER ACTION VEHICLE CO-ORDINATOR VEHICLE TECHNICIAN

ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY CAMERA OPERATORS FOCUS PULLERS STEVE PARKER PETER WIGNALL SHAUN COBLEY GUY FROST OLLY TELLETT IAIN MACKAY SACHA JONES JASON DULLY TIM PHILLIPS TOM MCFARLING JENNY REID ADAM YOUNG SAM HAVELAND ZOE LIANG STUART GODFREY RONAN MURPHY DAVID MAUND GARY HUTCHINGS VIC HAMMOND GEORGE POWELL STEVE HIDEG CARRIE JOHNSON MARK SWEENEY STEPHANIE BARKER ARTHUR FENN KERRY BROWN

CLAPPER LOADERS

SCRIPT SUPERVISOR ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 3RD ASSISTANT DIRECTORS GRIPS

CRANE/ HEAD TECHNICIANS MEDICAL

SOUND STILLS PHOTOGRAPHER

ANDY SKIPSEY JOHN CAVO LAURENCE WELLS

PROPS ELLIOTT POLLEY JONATHAN DOWNING SCOTT ROGERS

GARY MARTIN JUSTIN HAYZELDEN WILLIAM WELLS

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TONY BURNES EDWARD HAYES JOHN KING RONNIE PHILLIPS

ELECTRICIANS BEN KNIGHT DANIEL BUTLER MARK PACKMAN WILLIAM BURNS

DAVID ,,JIM WALL GARY VARNEY MARTIN BLOYE DARREN HARVEY

POST PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR 1ST ASSISTANT EDITOR & VFX EDITOR TRAINEE ASSISTANT EDITOR DELIVERY CO-ORDINATOR EDITING EQUIPMENT SUPERVISING SOUND EDITOR SOUND EFFECTS EDITOR ADR EDITOR FOLEY SUPERVISOR VISUAL EFFECTS BY VISUAL EFFECTS SUPERVISOR VISUAL EFFECTS PRODUCER

ALISTAIR HOPKINS PANI AHMADI-MOORE GAZ EVANS MICHAEL WINTER PIVOTAL POST JOAKIM SUNDSTRÖM CHRISTER MELÉN PAUL WRIGHTSON JENNIE EVANS BLUFF HAMPTON MARK NELMES PIERS HAMPTON CLAIRE MCGRANE ANTONY BLUFF WILL HARDWICK PEPPER POST ADAM INGLIS SINÉAD CRONIN ALEX GASCOIGNE HELLE ABSALONSEN BEN BRADLEY NATALIE SILVER, GARRY MADDISON DELUXE LONDON CLIVE NOAKES MIKE PRESTWOOD SMITH CHRIS TREBLE ULF OLAUSSON TOM DEANE MARK APPLEBY MAYFLOWER STUDIOS, LONDON SYNC SOUND, INC., NEW YORK MARCELLA RIORDAN PEPPER SOUND JAMES GLENTON & JOHNATHAN RUSH DAVE TURNER

DIGITAL INTERMEDIATE BY COLOURIST ONLINE EDITORS SENIOR DI PRODUCER DI TECHNICAL PRODUCER 2K DATA SCANNING LABORATORY LABORATORY CONTACT SOUND RE-RECORDING MIXER ASSISTANT SOUND RE-RECORDING MIXER FOLEY ARTIST ADR RECORDISTS ADR RECORDED AT ADR VOICE CASTING SOUND RE-RECORDED AT SOUND MIX TECHNICIANS PEPPER SOUND CO-ORDINATOR

FOR RUBY FILMS BUSINESS AFFAIRS DAVID BOARETTO PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR LYNSEY MILLER FINANCIAL CONTROLLER CHRISTINA JULES PUBLICITY IAN THOMSON FOR BBC FILMS PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE JANE HAWLEY LEGAL & BUSINESS AFFAIRS MANAGER SIMON OSBORN DEVELOPMENT EDITOR BETH PATTINSON PRODUCTION & DELIVERY CO-ORDINATOR JAMES BUCKLER

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FOR WESTEND FILMS ASSISTANT TO EXECUTIVE PRODUCER KYLIE RUTKOWSKI DEVELOPMENT & ACQUISITIONS ANN PHILLIPS FOR NOTTING HILL FILMS CO-ORDINATOR MEL HOLLAND LAWYER HANNAH LEADER FOR UK FILM COUNCIL HEAD OF PREMIERE FUND SALLY CAPLAN CREATIVE CO-ORDINATORS AARON ANDERSON NICK ATKINSON SENIOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS EXECUTIVE GERALDINE ATLEE HEAD OF PRODUCTION FINANCE VINCE HOLDEN DEVELOPMENT PRODUCER CHRISTOPHER COLLINS COLLECTION ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT BY BANK FINANCE BY MADE WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF INSURANCE PROVIDED BY COMPLETION GUARANTOR LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED BY FOR LEE & THOMPSON BY ACCOUNTANCY SERVICES PROVIDED BY PAYROLL SERVICES PROVIDED BY CLEARANCES POST PRODUCTION SCRIPT CAMERA LENSES, GRIP EQUIPMENT & CRANE ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT PROP TRANSPORT CATERING FREEWAY CAM B.V. COUTTS & CO. PEPPER POST LIMITED AON / ALBERT G RUBEN KEVIN OSHEA FILM FINANCES, INC. BILLY HINSHELWOOD NATALIE USHER & REBECCA PICK STEVE JOBERNS AT SHIPLEYS SARGENT-DISC LTD. KATE PENLINGTON SAPEX SCRIPTS ARRI MEDIA ARRI LIGHTING RENTAL LAYS INTERNATIONAL BON APPETIT NEIL SAMELS GRAHAM SAMELS DANIEL EDWARDS CHRIS BARNETT TRANSLUX INTERNATIONAL PIOTR WALCZAK CHRISTINA LEDGER GEORGE FRASER PAUL HOWITT MALCOLM COOPER HENDRIK DE JONKER RICHARD MORRISON DOMINIC BUTTIMORE DEAN WARES CHARLIE CARTER

LOCATION FACILITIES

TITLES DESIGNER TITLES PRODUCER TYPOGRAPHER ROGER ALLAM PHOTOGRAPHED BY

MUSIC CONDUCTED, ORCHESTRATED AND PRODUCED BY ALEXANDRE DESPLAT MUSIC PERFORMED BY ORCHESTRA LEADER THE LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CARMINE LAURI

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SOLOISTS CELLO REBECCA GILLIVER FLUTES ADAM WALKER, SIOBHAN GREALY CLARINET CHI-YU MO HARP BRYN LEWIS PIANO DAVID ARCH DRUMS RALPH SALMINS MUSIC RECORDED AND MIXED AT MUSIC RECORDED AND MIXED BY ASSISTED BY MUSIC EDITOR MUSIC SUPERVISOR MUSIC CLEARANCES SCORE PRODUCER AURICLE OPERATOR FRENCH MUSIC PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR ORCHESTRATIONS ABBEY ROAD STUDIOS, LONDON ANDREW DUDMAN JOHN BARRETT TONY LEWIS KAREN ELLIOTT ABBIE LISTER SOLRE LEMONNIER PETER CLARKE XAVIER FORCIOLI ALEXANDRE DESPLAT JEAN-PASCAL BEINTUS SYLVAIN MORIZET NICOLAS CHARRON ALEXANDRE DESPLAT & XAVIER FORCIOLI NORBERT VERGONJANNE CLAUDE ROMANO Songs "THE FEAR" WRITTEN BY LILY ROSE ALLEN AND GREGORY KURSTIN © 2008 PERFORMED BY LILY ALLEN PUBLISHED BY UNIVERSAL MUSIC PUBLISHING LTD. AND EMI MUSIC PUBLISHING LIMITED LICENSED COURTESY OF EMI RECORDS LTD. "THIS IS A LOW" WRITTEN BY BENJAMIN TODD AND NATHAN COOPER PERFORMED BY SWIPE PUBLISHED BY COPYRIGHT CONTROL "WHERE ARE YOU NOW?" WRITTEN BY BENJAMIN TODD AND NATHAN COOPER PERFORMED BY SWIPE PUBLISHED BY COPYRIGHT CONTROL "JAIL-BAIT JODY" WRITTEN BY BENJAMIN TODD AND NATHAN COOPER PERFORMED BY DOMINIC COOPER, NATHAN COOPER, BENJAMIN TODD, AL ANDERSON AND DAVE MARKEE PUBLISHED BY COPYRIGHT CONTROL RECORDED AND MIXED AT ABBEY ROAD STUDIOS, LONDON RECORDED AND MIXED BY CHRIS BOLSTER

PROGRAMMING MUSIC PREPARATION

SPECIAL THANKS

END OF THE ROAD FESTIVAL 2009 AND LARMER TREE GARDENS, SIMON TAFFE, PHILIP WICKS, SOFIA HAGBERG, CHRIS TARREN, THE CRIME WRITERS ASSOCIATION FOR ADVICE ON THE CWA DAGGERS, CRISTALINE, CHLOE, TOWN AND COUNTRY MARQUEES,

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CHAMPAGNE LANSON, DE GRISOGONO, THE BUFFINI FAMILY, JENNE CASAROTTO, SUE GREENLEAVES, SALLY LONG-INNES, ANTHONY JONES, ST JOHN DONALD, ISABEL BEGG, LOLLY, NEIL CALDER, RUSSELL ALLEN, SINEAD MORAN, IAN ROBINSON, JUDITH CHAN AND DAVID CAMPBELL, NIGEL PALMER AND LISA MAYO, SIMON KELNER AND THE INDEPENDENT, BERNARD, SHEILA & TIM NEWMAN, THE BROWNING FAMILY, DEREK PARKES, FIONA BURKEMAN, THE WHITE HART & THE YETMINSTER COMMUNITY, NATASHA ALDERSLADE, RICHARD GREEN AND MARIA SMITH, CHRIS WITT, DUCK LANE ­ KITTY STANBROOK & BRADLEY ADAMS, SUE NEWTON AND LUCIE STODDART ­ BARBOUR, HUNTER WELLINGTONS, RUTH HAYTER, MARC STEVENS ­ THE LSO, EUPHONIX EUROPE, NUENDO UK. FILMED ON LOCATION IN DORSET, LONDON & AT PINEWOOD STUDIOS. MADE WITH THE SUPPORT OF THE UK FILM COUNCILS PREMIERE AND DEVELOPMENT FUNDS. DEVELOPED WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF THE BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION. WORLDWIDE SALES BY WESTEND FILMS LLP. THE CHARACTERS AND EVENTS IN THIS MOTION PICTURE ARE ENTIRELY FICTITIOUS AND ANY RESEMBLANCE BETWEEN THEM AND ACTUAL CHARACTERS OR EVENTS IS ENTIRELY COINCIDENTAL. NO LIVESTOCK, DOG OR ANY OTHER ANIMALS WERE MALTREATED OR HARMED IN THE MAKING OF THIS FILM. OWNERSHIP OF THIS MOTION PICTURE IS PROTECTED BY COPYRIGHT LAWS AND OTHER APPLICABLE LAWS OF THE US AND OTHER COUNTRIES, AND ANY UNAUTHORISED DUPLICATION, DISTRIBUTION OR EXHIBITION OF THIS MOTION PICTURE COULD RESULT IN CRIMINAL PROSECUTION AS WELL AS CIVIL LIABILITY. © 2010 RUBY FILMS (TAMARA DREWE) LIMITED, BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION, UK FILM COUNCIL AND NOTTING HILL FILMS LIMITED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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