Read Microsoft PowerPoint - Vehicle Extrication and Airbags v2.0 text version

Vehicle Extrication

3/5/2007

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Overview

· What is Vehicle Extrication? · First Responders role in extrication · The different groups involved in vehicle extrication · Hazards involved in extrication · Types of extrication · Airbags

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Vehicle Extrication

· The process of removing patient(s) from a vehicle who have been involved in an accident

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Vehicle Extrication

· Why is vehicle extrication an important skill?

· Since NO TWO accidents are the same, it is important to possess the knowledge required to extricate patients quickly and safely

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Remember...

· The important thing when approaching a motor vehicle accident (MVA) is:

PERSONAL SAFETY!!

DO NOT put yourself in a position where you can be injured!!

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Role of the First Responder

· Remember, use what resources are available to you! · If you are alone on scene, your FIRST PRIORITY is you and your patients safety!!

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Role of the First Responder

· Once scene safety has been determined, several things must be accomplished:

­ Assess Scene ­ Assess Vehicle Damage ­ Attempt to gain access to patient ­ Provide treatment to patient ­ Control Scene

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Assess Scene

· · · · Ensure scene safety!! Determine mechanism of injury Determine number of patients involved Is there a need for additional resources:

­ Additional ambulances ­ Fire Department (EMO) ­ Police

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Assess Vehicle Damage

· Damage to the vehicle, is an effective to determine what injuries a patient may have received · For example, if most of the damage is to the driver's side door, what injuries will the patient likely have?

­ ­ ­ ­ Fractured Pelvis Fractured Ribs Spinal Injuries Extremity Injuries

· Assessing vehicle damage is especially important, if the patient is unconscious or you have a small child who is unable to communicate

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Assess Vehicle Damage

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Attempt to Gain Access to Patient

· Vehicles which are involved in Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA), may be in any position · Before trying to access any patients, ensure the vehicle is stable, and there are no dangerous fluids leaking · If any dangers are present, WAIT for ambulance or fire department to arrive!

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Attempt to Gain Access to Patient

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Attempt to Gain Access to Patient

· If the vehicle is safe, try to reach the patient(s) via simple access · Open car doors ­ It is important to try all doors!

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Attempt to Gain Access to Patient

· Enter through windows ­ Make sure to clear away all glass from frame before entering the vehicle!

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Provide Treatment to Patient

· Once you have gained access to the patient, the first thing you should do is

CONTROL C-SPINE

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Control Scene

· If you are unable to gain access to the patient, or there is more then one First Responder on scene, it is your responsibility to ensure the scene around the vehicle is safe for the patient

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Groups Involved in Vehicle Extrication

· Police, Fire (EMO), and Ambulance work together to control the scene, extricate the patient, and provide appropriate emergency care

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Hazards Involved in Extrication

· The following list of hazards are important to be aware of, when dealing with a motor vehicle accident (MVA):

­ Vehicle ­ Traffic ­ Weather ­ Other

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Vehicle Hazards

· Several hazards can originate from the vehicle · While assessing the scene you need to watch for:

­ Leaking fluids - Battery Acid, Gasoline ­ Unstable vehicle ­ Charged Bumper ­ difficult to determine, avoid working near bumpers if possible

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Traffic Hazards

· If a Motor Vehicle Accident (MVA) occurs on a highway or any other busy road, it is important to remain as visible as possible · Wear bright clothing to increase your chances of being seen!

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Weather Hazards

· Extremes in weather can pose a serious threat to both the First Responder and the patient · Exposure to heat or cold can be a serious threat · Attempt to keep the patient and yourself as warm or cool as possible

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Other Hazards

· Structures such as power lines, gas lines etc. that have been struck by a vehicle can pose a threat to the First Responder and the patient · NEVER approach a vehicle that may be in contact with a downed line!!

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Types of Extrication

· Types of extrication are dictated mostly by either the condition of the patient, or the condition of the vehicle · There are generally two types of extrication used in the pre-hospital setting:

­ Kendrick Extrication Device (KED) ­ Rapid Extrication

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Kendrick Extrication Device (KED)

· One of the most under used pieces of spinal equipment · Although First Responders typically do not carry a KED, it is important be familiar with this device

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Kendrick Extrication Device (KED)

· First Step:

­ Maintain manual C-spine

Second Step:

Measure and place C-collar

Third Step:

Move patient forward, and insert KED

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Kendrick Extrication Device (KED)

· Fourth Step:

­ KED sides should be snug under patients armpits

Fifth Step:

If patients head is not in a neutral, inline position, place padding behind the head

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Kendrick Extrication Device (KED)

· Sixth Step:

­ Apply head and chin straps

Seventh Step:

Lift patient out of vehicle

Eighth Step:

Place patient on spine board/stretcher

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Rapid Extrication

· Is used ONLY if the patient has any lifethreatening injuries, or if factors such as the environment require a more immediate extrication

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Rapid Extrication

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Rapid Extrication

· First Step:

­ Maintain manual C-spine

Second Step:

Move patient into a neutral, in-line position

Third Step:

Measure and apply C-collar

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Rapid Extrication

· Fourth Step:

­ Place spine board under patient as far as possible

Fifth Step:

Move patient on to spine board

Sixth Step:

Maintain C-spine throughout the 3/5/2007process

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Airbags

· Typically have three sensors that detect rapid deceleration during a collision · At least two out of three sensors must be activated for the airbag to deploy

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Airbags

· First Responders and EMS practitioners need to be aware of:

­ If there is significant damage to the front end of the vehicle, and the airbag has not deployed, NEVER position yourself between the steering column and the patient

Serious injury or DEATH can occur if struck by an airbag

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Airbags · Did you know...

­ Many newer vehicles may have up to 10 airbags! ­ An airbag can generate enough force to propel a 200 pound person six feet off the ground! ­ Airbags deploy at a speed of 200 mph (320km/hr)!

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Airbags

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Airbags

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Conclusion

· What is Vehicle Extrication? · First Responders role in extrication · The different groups involved in vehicle extrication · Hazards involved in extrication · Types of extrication · Airbags

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ANY QUESTIONS?

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Information

Microsoft PowerPoint - Vehicle Extrication and Airbags v2.0

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