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SSM Health Care

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COver STOrIeS

Healthy Living Is Catching On

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3 St. Anthony

Honors Physicians

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Barney Takes Diversity To Heart at Work, at Home

Bald is Beautiful for Cancer Supporters

SSM Health Care 1 477 N. Lindbergh Blvd. I n SLouis, MO 63141 St. I d E V I E W www.ssmhc.com

New Name, New vision, New Hospital

By Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, FSM

2 Changing the world...one small difference at a time 3 Computer Skills Put to Test

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID St. Louis, Missouri Permit No. 2406

3 St. Clare Surgeon returns to Philippines Again and Again 3 vaughn, Harr Cancer Ambassadors 4 red Bud regional Partners with SSM 4 Management Change at villa Marie Facility 4 PBS Documentary Features SSM 4 Schoenhard Assumes ACHe Leadership 4 Friedman Named Baldrige Judge 5 Hospitals Bridge Language Gap 5 employees' Pension Secure 5 Jobs Web Site Adapts to resumes 8 volunteer Turns Double Play 8 Two SSM rehab Units In St. Louis Area Close 8 Week in May raises Awareness About Corporate responsibility 9 Being Neighborly 9 Wireless Heart Device Implanted To Allow For remote Monitoring 9 SSM Stirs Up Trans Fat-Free Cooking 9 Medic, St. Marys Share Medal 12 Is there a future doctor or a nurse in the house?

AROund ThE SySTEM

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PEOPLE

Oklahoma

New Beacons Shine Light on St. Anthony Who Knew a Kidney Transplant Could Win You a New Car? employees Stay Connected

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Illinois

St. Francis Unit Knows Its Mission St. Mary's/Good Samaritan Introduce Morning Yoga Construction Continues at St. Francis

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Missouri

Ads Broadcast St. Mary's Healing Mission SSM WorkHeALTH Saves Business Wealth Heart Walk Champion Winning Battle Bald is Beautiful for Cancer Supporters New Partnership Adds Weekend Psychiatrists Study Seeks Tumors Tiny as rice

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Wisconsin

St. Clare Digs Deep to Offer Help Community Programs Win National Attention Prevention Key to Heart Failure Clinic President Called to Principal's Office volunteer Celebrates Milestones

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Sharing Ideas to Advance Our Common Mission

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Giving respect

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feel like I'm carrying on Mother Odilia's work in going out to those in need." ­ Sr. Thelma Mitchell, FSM, a volunteer at the Little Flower Clinic in Oklahoma City and employee health nurse at St. Anthony Hospital.

Learn more about the Little Flower Clinic on pages 6 and 7.

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Healthy Living Is Catching On

ll over SSM Health Care, we've been jogging our imaginations in pursuit of Healthy Living. We've composed a meditation, to release workplace frustration. Encouraged using the stair, so exercise isn't so rare. Put out a newsletter, so we would feel better. We're organizing the employee health fair, to show we care. And that's just some of the ideas members of the Healthy Living Steering Team have thought up since the systemwide Healthy Living initiative was announced last year. At St. Marys Hospital Medical Center in Madison, over 350 employees, volunteers and family members are walking their way to fitness with "Move to Improve." The program uses pedometers, logbooks and incentives to reach interim goals toward one million steps per person. At SSM St. Mary's Health Center in Richmond Heights, Mo., employ- Above Mary Lococo, St. Mary's ees have lost more than 550 pounds collectively since Jan. 16 in the "Think Health Center finance direcLite Challenge." The weight-loss competition challenged groups of three tor, received a "fruit" cake on her recent birthday from to four employees to lose weight for a three-month period. About 300 teammates in the "Think Lite employees are participating. Challenge." The cake was When St. Mary's Director of Finance Mary Lococo celebrated her birth- concocted by administrative day recently, her challenge teammates baked up an idea. They presented her assistant Karen Sue Loretto. Below, Barbara roberts (right), with a "fruit" cake. director of food and nutrition "We want people to learn that losing weight and having a healthy life- services at St. Mary's, weighs style is easier than they realize, especially when your friends and coworkers in members from the "Peaches are cheering you on," said LuAnn Swehla, director of clinical nutrition and `n' Cream Team": (from left to right): Jerri Judy, Amy leader of St. Mary's Healthy Living team. Lancaster, Jackie White and

Daphne Stallings. All work in the cardiology department.

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New Name, New vision, New Hospital

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IRKWOOD, Mo. -- SSM Health Care's soon-to-be-built hospital in southwest St. Louis County now has a brave, new name to match its bold, new vision: SSM St. Clare Health Center. The name was unveiled at a March 20 ceremony at SSM St. Joseph Hospital of Kirkwood. Groundbreaking is set for June 8. St. Clare Health Center is named for Saint Clare of Assisi. The Franciscan saint is known for her profound faith, courage and enduring compassion in the service of others. For centuries, her love of Christ and prayer and her compassion for the sickest and poorest have been a source of inspiration. References to light, radiance and enlightenment are commonly associated with her. The new hospital's vision statement was previously announced: "We will fundamentally reinvent the health-care experience, from the ground up for patients, physicians and staff to achieve breakthrough results in satisfaction, patient safety, clinical outcomes and operating performance." St. Joseph President Sherry Hausmann called Saint Clare "a perfect guide for us to follow as we begin this new chapter in our health-care ministry." Ron Levy, president/chief executive officer of SSMHC-St. Louis, noted the convergence of events that day. The day before had been the Feast of St. Joseph and, on March 20, 1212, Clare had left her life of luxury behind to profess her vows to Jesus Christ. "We intend to raise the bar to new levels," said Levy, whose unveiling of the new name was met by applause. "So it is only fitting that our Continued on page 2

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InSIdE VIEW

S S M H e al th C ar e

Changing the world...one small difference at a time

ometimes when I read Network, I notice recurring themes. One issue might highlight technological advancements in our hospitals; another might feature awards and honors. This issue, however, I noticed a recurring theme that goes straight to the heart of who we are here at SSM Health Care. That theme is giving. I've always known that the employees who make up SSM Health Care are some of the most generous and compassionate people you'll find anywhere. You've committed your lives to caring for others, so it shouldn't seem that unusual to see a number of articles about giving. But what I found so remarkable, beyond your tremendous capacity for giving, is the variety of ways you give. On pages six and seven, we have current and former employees from St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City, who volunteer their time and clinical expertise at the Little Flower Clinic, so that people without health insurance can receive needed care at little to no cost. Then there is Dr. Renato Faylona from St. Clare Hospital & Health Services in Baraboo, Wis., who, for the past four years, has traveled on medical missions to the Philippines to help care for people without resources. We also have Bill Schoenhard, SSM's Chief Operating Officer, who was installed as the chair of the American College of Healthcare Executives, an international professional society of more than 30,000 health-care executives. Sr. Mary Jean ryan, FSM In another example of leadership service, Paula Friedman, SSM's corporate President/CeO vice president for strategy & systems improvement, became one of nine people nationwide selected to serve as a judge for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. In Around the System, you'll find that several SSM employees in St. Louis recently had their heads shaved to raise money for children's cancer research. And then there are the Healthy Living friends and teammates of Mary Lococo of SSM St. Mary's Health Center in "You've committed Richmond Heights, Mo., who made her a nutritious "fruit cake" stick with her diet. your lives to caring for her birthday so she could missions, leadership service, raising Volunteering, medical money for a cause, moral support: though very different, these are for others." all forms of giving in which an individual recognized a need and did everything they could to make a difference in the world. Anne Frank, the Jewish girl who kept the diary while in hiding from the German occupation during World War II, once said, "How lovely to think that no one need wait a moment; we can start now, start slowly changing the world." Here's a special thanks to those who have already started. Thanks to the volunteers in Oklahoma who helped change the world for patients who can't afford medicine. Thanks to the Wisconsin physician who removed a tumor from a woman in the Philippines, saving her life. And thanks to Paula and Bill who freely give their time and talents to serve as national role models. And also, a special thanks to those within SSM Health Care who do not appear in these pages of Network ­ all of you who give 110% for our patients every day. Through your talent, compassion and generosity of spirit, you indeed change the world for our patients. Thank you and God bless.

Network © is published bimonthly by SSM Health Care for employees, physicians and friends. Corporate Office: 477 N. Lindbergh Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63141 Phone: (314) 994-7800 Fax: (314) 994-7900 Dixie L. Platt Senior Vice President Mission & External Relations Suzy Farren Director-Corporate Communications Lorraine Kee Corporate Publications Manager Annice West Distribution & Editorial Assistant How to Contact Us Send questions, comments, or suggestions for future

issues of SSM Network to Lorraine Kee, Editor, at (314) 994-7918, [email protected] Media Inquiries Permission is granted to quote any material in Network, if source is cited. Reporters seeking additional information should contact Lorraine Kee at (314) 994-7918. Contact names and phone numbers are provided in Network to facilitate networking and information sharing among employees and physicians of SSM Health Care and its entities. SSM Health Care provides equal employment opportunities, without regard to race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, veteran status, or disability to all qualified applicants and executives.

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By Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, FSM

Mission Statement Core Values

Through our exceptional health care services, we reveal the healing presence of God. In accordance with the philosophy of the Franciscan Sisters of Mary, we value the sacredness and dignity of each person. Therefore, we find these five values consistent with both our heritage and ministerial priorities. · Compassion · Respect · Excellence · Stewardship · Community

Developed by SSMHC employees systemwide in 1999.

SSM health Care

Exceptional health Care Services

Exceptional Clinical Outcomes Exceptional Patient, Employee and Physician Satisfaction $ Exceptional Financial Performance

Look for symbols on Network stories to link actions with our focus areas.

SSM Health Care is sponsored by the Franciscan Sisters of Mary. Look for SSM Network Online at www.ssmhc.com and the SSMHC intranet.

Network is printed on recycled paper that is recyclable. A web printing press is used, making four-color economical.

New Name, New vision, New Hospital

Continued from cover new hospital will have a new name as well, a name that honors, and builds upon St. Joseph's proud heritage of service and mission." The 158-bed hospital near Fenton will be the cornerstone of a 54-acre campus featuring a patient-focused, healing environment inside and out. The facility, slated to open in late 2008, will provide the latest clinical technology and information systems to support a full range of services. It will have a 24-hour emergency department, comprehensive medical and surgical services, and an outpatient care center with one-stop service. A Heritage & Spiritual Team has been set up to keep alive St. Joseph's 51-year heritage and integrate a spiritual presence on the new campus, Hausmann said. The team's co-chairs are Fr. Jim Krings and project director Bob Porter. For additional information, go to www.ssmstclare.com.

Cover Faces In the cover masthead of each issue of Network, we feature faces of people mentioned in the issue. This issue features Bibi Mohammad, Rose Martinez, and Thomas Ceja.

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Computer Skills Put to Test

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St. Anthony Honors Physicians

n an age of ePayroll and electronic health records, SSM Health Care wants to make sure employees have the basic computer skills to get their jobs done. Toward that end, the Operations Council has made assessments of employees' basic computer skills mandatory in 2006. The assessments begin in April and are to be completed by September. "SSM Health Care is moving quickly toward a systemwide, computer-based environment," said Lynne Schroeder, change management specialist at the SSM Information Center. "If the basic computer skills an employee needs to access e-payroll or the Kronos time and attendance system are not there, we want to provide those skills," Schroeder said. Employees will be assessed and some will be required to complete basic computer skills training by year's end. "The training will not only give employees some basic skills that they can use almost every day in this information age, it will also help managers better understand how employees' skills levels affect their work," Schroeder said.

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KLAHOMA CITY -- St. Anthony Hospital recently recognized its physicians for their exceptional patient satisfaction. Physicians were honored with trophies and newspaper advertisements (shown below) touting them and their work. They have earned a "Top 10% in the Nation in Patient Satisfaction" designation by Press Ganey surveys. (By Annie Harlow)

St. Clare Surgeon returns to Philippines Again and Again

By Karen Bankston

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ARABOO, Wis. -- In a single day on a medical mission to the Philippines this winter, Dr. Renato Faylona witnessed the despair and hope that exist side-by-side in a far-flung island nation with too few doctors and hospitals to care for its poorest citizens. In January, Faylona examined a woman in her 30s or 40s with an abdomen swelled by ovarian cancer. "Her tumor was too far advanced for surgery, but I asked her, `Did you know that you have cancer?'" recalled the surgeon who has practiced for 34 years at St. Clare Hospital and Health Services. "She said, `Yes, I've known it for three years.'" The woman could have undergone surgery at the local charity hospital, but the hospital requires patients to pay 500 pesos or about $8 in American currency, for supplies. She could not afford even that. "A few hours later, we saw a woman who had similar symptoms, but we were able to perform the surgery and remove a tumor the size of a basketball," Faylona said. "I realized again and again that people here in the United States are very lucky to have the level of health care they enjoy." Faylona, born in Manila, is a member of the Society of Philippine Surgeons in America. Each winter, for the past four years, he travels with other physicians and nurses to that country's poorest areas. Government officials arrange for medical teams' use of local hospitals and lodging. In January, the accommodations for Faylona's group of 40 did not include access to hot water. "We took cold showers all week," he said. His group included a plastic surgeon from Canada and an obstetrician from Ireland "who can speak the local dialect better than I can," said Faylona with a laugh. Some of the medical professionals were with spouses, who served as support personnel for the mission. On the recent week-long trip to Calbayog City, located in the province of Samar on a remote island about 300 miles from Manila, the society arranged to have six ophthalmological surgical residents from a Philippine medical school travel with them. The surgical residents performed 75 cataract operations. Physicians conducted 548 surgeries, 266 of them considered major. Physicians don't charge for their services and pay their own way and for some medical supplies. Some supplies are donated by their home hospitals, but it costs about $100 per box to ship them to the Philippines. On the last trip, the group shipped 82 boxes. Despite the challenges, Faylona will go again next December. "We didn't even put a dent in the number of cases," he said.

* Based on Press Ganey Patient Survey results

vaughn, Harr Cancer Ambassadors

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St. Clare doctor renato Faylona took this photo of residents of a Filipino village lining up to see the physicians on a medical mission.

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wo SSM employees have been chosen by the American Cancer Society to represent their local communities in pressing Congress for more support for cancer research and prevention. Chosen as ambassadors for "Celebration on the Hill 2006" were Teri Harr, health education coordinator and patient advocate at St. Francis Hospital & Health Services in Maryville, Mo., and Vicki Vaughn, director of community health at St. Mary's/Good Samaritan Inc. in southern Illinois. The event is set for Washington, D.C. on Sept. 19-20.

A bimonthly publication for employees, physicians and friends

March/April 2006

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ThE nEWS

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red Bud regional Partners with SSM

By neil Kiesel and Stacey Thomson

PBS Documentary Features SSM

$ By Suzy Farren SM Health Care is the topic of an hour-long documentary to be aired by PBS stations across the nation beginning in April. The program, "Good News ­ How Hospitals Heal Themselves," will air in the St. Louis area on KETC Channel 9 on May 7. The program will air on various dates in local markets. The documentary challenges the conventional wisdom that the nation's health-care system is irrevocably broken. It highlights the successes of SSM and a group of Pittsburgh hospitals in dramatically improving care to patients. The documentary describes both groups' focused efforts to improve every aspect of health care. Through interviews with a variety of physicians, clinicians and administrators from SSM, including CEO Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, the documentary explains how SSM uses quality improvement processes to keep patients safe and to give consistently better care. Documentary title page Sr. Mary Jean and others also describe how SSM used Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria to focus efforts to improve. In 2002, SSM became the first health-care organization in history to receive the Baldrige Award, the nation's most prestigious honor for quality. Also featured in the documentary is former U.S. Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill, who increased safety dramatically as head of Alcoa by using Toyota automobile manufacturing methods. In 1997, O'Neill introduced these ideas to the Pittsburgh hospitals with significant results. The documentary was produced by CC-M Productions, the same organization that produced the three-part public television series "Quality or Else,", the Deming Library of videos and other quality management resources originating with the NBC documentary "If Japan Can, Why Can't We?"

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ED BUD, Ill. ­ Red Bud Regional Hospital, a member of Community Health Systems, has signed an affiliation agreement with SSM Health Care-St. Louis. The move brings a broader range of specialized health-care services to the community of Red Bud, along with continuing medical education for physicians and staff. A cardiologist from SSM St. Joseph Hospital of Kirkwood, Dr. Stuart Higano, has staffed a cardiology clinic at Red Bud since January. At a signing ceremony in March, Red Bud Regional Chief Executive Officer Bob Moore said the clinic has been wellreceived by patients and physicians alike. Red Bud Regional Hospital is a 35-bed acute care community hospital and critical access hospital. It also operates the Red Bud Nursing Home licensed for 115 beds. "We believe strongly that collaboration is essential to preserving and expanding access to convenient, high-quality health care services," said Ronald J. Levy, president of SSMHC-St. Louis. "We look forward to working with the hospital's board, physicians and staff to determine where the needs are, and how we can best help Red Bud meet those needs," Levy said. Other SSMHC-St. Louis affiliates in Illinois include Pinckneyville Community Hospital and Washington County Hospital in Nashville. Madison Medical Center in Fredericktown, Mo. is also an affiliate.

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Management Change at villa Marie Facility

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EFFERSON CITY, Mo. ­ A 31-year veteran of local nursing home management took over operation of the Villa Marie Skilled Nursing Facility on March 1. St. Mary's Health Center and SSM Health Care reached an agreement with Otke Communities to assume full management and shared ownership of Villa Marie. The locally owned Otke Communities owns five other nursing and retirement homes, serving about 500 residents. Villa Marie is a 120-bed, long-term care facility built in 1982. "Tom Otke takes personal pride in making sure residents receive the care and comforts they need to enjoy quality of life," St. Mary's President Betsy Aderholdt said. "That kind of commitment is what we were looking for in a partner to continue our high standards of care." Under the new partnership, SSM and St. Mary's will continue as a 20 percent co-owner of Villa Marie, while Otke Communities becomes majority owner. Otke expected a seamless transition, employing existing staff.

ill Schoenhard, executive vice president and chief operating officer of SSM Health Care, became chairman March 27 of the 30,000-member international American College of Healthcare Executives. At the annual Council of Regents meeting during ACHE's 49th Congress, Schoenhard spoke about the various challenges facing health-care leaders especially access to care for the nation's 46 million uninsured. "We must work to ensure that health-care access is recognized as a basic human right in the United States," he said. "As leaders who care about our country, we owe it to those who have given us the opportunity to serve our country to stand with those who have no voice." Schoenhard also talked about providing safe and higher quality care to patients; about making sure that health-care professionals are board certified; and supporting the Organ Donation Breakthrough Collaborative sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Schoenhard has been SSM's chief operating officer since 1986.

Friedman Named Baldrige Judge

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aula Friedman, corporate vice president for strategy & systems improvement for SSM Health Care, has accepted an invitation from U.S. Secretary of Commerce Carlos M. Gutierrez to serve as a member of the judges panel for the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award. The judges panel was established to "ensure the integrity of the award selection process," wrote Gutierrez in a letter Jan. 31. "I am extremely enthusiastic about the Award's contribution in helping the United States reach the highest quality objectives." Judges vote on which applicants merit site visits by examiners and recommend award recipients. The panel consists of between 9 and 12 appointed members from the manufacturing, education and health-care industries. Friedman's federal appointment is for a three-year term.

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SSM Health Care Celebrates Diversity

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n February, we tasted food and admired attire made around the world. Learned about cultures and faiths other than our own. Danced to different beats. An appreciation of diversity is neither new at SSM Health Care, nor is it restricted to just one month. The Franciscan Sisters of Mary, SSM's sponsor, opened the first Catholic hospital for African-American patients and caregivers in this country in 1933. And SSM continues that commitment through its hiring, by caring for all and in selecting its business suppliers. Last fall, St. Francis Hospital and Health Center in Blue Island, Ill. began offering caregivers beginners and advanced Spanish classes. The hospital Groups showed off their heritage durpays for texts for the 10-week courses and reimburses the $200 tuition if the ing Diversity Awareness Week at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical caregiver attends at least eight classes. Center. A display (above) shows "It's wonderful to see non-Hispanic, American-born colleagues reaching out items traditionally used for Jewish and doing their best to provide the best to our patients," said Steve Oster, a clini- worship: a Torah scroll, candlesticks and prayer shawl (tallit). Irish danccal nurse manager at St. Frances who teaches the Spanish courses. ers from St. James the Greater School "Direct communication with our patients is essential to meeting their in St. Louis (below, left) performed needs and the best way of doing that is understanding their language," and Bibi Mohammad (center), who works in environmental services at Oster added. Yvonne Tisdel, SSM corporate vice president for human resources and Cardinal Glennon, wore attire of her native Afghanistan. Below, SSM De system diversity, applauded efforts to "respect the wonder of every human Paul Health Center cafeteria aides being" year-round. Brenda ross, Loretta Burkes, Othella "We support and encourage all of the many activities that are sponsored Johnson and social worker Frances Thomas wore African-heritage clothby the entities to build a more inclusive ing for Black History Month. organization for our patients, employees and customers," Tisdel said.

employees' Pension Secure

By darren A. Owens

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n today's economy, most people will have to manage at least some aspect of their long-term financial security. The good news is, once an employee is vested at SSM Health Care, his or her pension is secure. "Because SSM has diligently contributed to our pension trust, our plan is sound," said Steve Barney, senior vice president for human resources. "If SSM were to close the doors today, we could cover our entire pension obligation." As a benefit, SSM offers two kinds of retirement savings: defined benefit and defined contribution. A significant difference between the two is that SSM assumes all the risk under the defined benefit plan. Under the defined contribution plan, employees make their own investment choices, decisions that are ultimately responsible for how much retirement money is earned. "SSM has periodically evaluated employee preferences and pension options and each time concluded that continuing the current plan is the best choice," said Kris Zimmer, SSM's senior vice president for finance. "We continue to face the challenges of rising costs for the care of the uninsured, and the costs of capital and technology needs, but we have not been willing to reduce retirement benefits to pay for these needs," Zimmer said.

Jobs Web Site Adapts to resumes

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Hospitals Bridge Language Gap

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T. LOUIS -- Suzanne Schmidt never has set foot in the United Nations -- unless traveling the hallways of SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center counts. Schmidt is director of registration services for Cardinal Glennon. In her job, she has overheard migrant workers, refugees and immigrants ask questions of staff members in languages ranging from Spanish to Vietnamese. Last year staff received help in communicating basic information on financial assistance in those languages for the convenience of non-English-speaking patients. The initiative began in early 2005 in St. Louis. Registration directors at each entity were contacted to determine the most common foreign languages spoken. SSMHC-St. Louis then contracted with a local service to translate the financial information on who is eligible for aid, how to apply for it and how to fill out an application. The brochures were placed in areas where registration and financial counseling are offered. The translation service also helped develop signs for posting in areas where foreignlanguage patients and visitors might seek aid. Financial assistance bro"It's important to reach out to all people within the community chures have been translated into we serve who are in need of financial assistance," Schmidt said. Spanish, Bosnian and vietnamese. They can be found at www.ssmhealth.com under "That means mirroring our population's cultural diversity and charity care and billing policies. making them aware of services we offer with respect for their language and cultural needs."

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id you know that about 70 percent of the job applications to SSM Health Care come over the Internet? SSM's Employment Opportunities Web Site has been updated to reflect new rules by the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs. The updated site, a joint project by the Corporate Office Human Resources Department and the SSM Information Center, went live March 10. The new rules were prompted by a nationwide increase in resumes sent over the Internet versus applications filled out online, said Lynn Widmer, corporate vice president for human resources. The resumes may not have specified particular jobs being sought or contained information required by the Human Resources Department and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The rules now require that resumes and applications be handled in the same manner. Among the changes to the SSM employment Web site: · Individuals submitting resumes on the Internet will be asked to provide additional information for uniform tracking by the Human Resources Department and the EEOC. · A note informs Web site visitors that SSM Health Care only accepts resumes and applications for posted jobs. · The direct e-mail link to recruiters was removed so resumes can no longer come through without applicants providing tracking information.

March/April 2006

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Respect Excellence Stewardship Compassion Community Respect Excellence Stewardship Compassion Community Respect Excellence Stewardship Compassion Community Respect Excellence Stewardship Compassion Community Respect Excellence Stewardship Compassion

A Tradition of Respect

$ SSM Health Care traces its roots to 1872, when Mother Mary Odilia Berger and four other sisters came to St. Louis from Germany, after caring for sick and wounded soldiers during the Franco-Prussian War. When they arrived in St. Louis on November 16, 1872, they had but $5 among them, and they began caring for people in their own homes. And when a smallpox epidemic hit St. Louis that winter, the sisters cared for the sick and dying.

At Little Flower Clinic, the line forms early on Tuesdays and Wednesdays for the free medical care. Volunteers here say they mostly treat patients for diabetes and high blood pressure, besides the usual flu and colds. The clinic opened in June 1990 in the house (pictured below) where patients waited on the porch for the clinic to open. Last fall, the clinic moved into new quarters a short walk away.

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We honor the wonder of the human spirit

KLAHOMA CITY ­ By the time Rose Martinez pulled Paulino Sanchez, 64, came to get his prescription refilled. up in her car on a waning weekday afternoon, a line has Without the clinic, Sanchez said in Spanish through an formed outside the Little Flower Clinic. interpreter, he couldn't afford medical treatment or medicine. Folks stood. They sat. They waited for the door to He doesn't go to the big hospitals in Oklahoma City open. Most came without health insurance and couldn't because he doesn't have the money. And though he lives afford the price of medication. No one is turned away with his family, it would be hard to ask his children for though -- whether or not they have the $10 suggested help, he added. donation for treatment. "Right now I'm not working," Sanchez said. "I have The clinic is operated by the nearby Little Flower back problems." Catholic Church and has served a largely Hispanic Maria Becerra, 59, said through a translator she has community since it opened in 1990. To stay open, the neither a doctor nor insurance to pay for one. She said clinic depends on the kindness of donations and volshe didn't know what she would do without the clinic. unteers. For instance, St. Anthony Hospital, a member She was just grateful for it. of the SSM Health Care system, donated thousands of "My husband makes $5.50 an hour and sometimes Rose Martinez said she will dollars in 2005 for pharmaceuticals. And several of its volunteer at the clinic "as long he doesn't work 40 hours a week," Becerra said. "I'm volunteers have ties to St. Anthony. Martinez, a retired as God lets me" because the very thankful because everybody treats me very nice and, need is so great. nurse from St. Anthony, manages the clinic. thanks to the clinic, I have medication."

Ed Waller, 52, gets checked out by St. Anthony Hospital physician Laura Kamugisha.

Paulino Sanchez, who came to the clinic to get a prescription filled, signs in. Everyone receives a physical assessment before being seen by a doctor.

Community Benefits

St. Anthony Hospital served this community in 2005 by donating:

$ 8,500 in pharmaceuticals $ 8,718 in time* $ 17,218 total 664 patient visits 108 new patients

The clinic asks for a $10 donation per person but no one is turned away from treatment. Sr. Thelma Mitchell started working at the clinic about 15 years ago after spotting a newspaper ad seeking volunteers. 6

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Many of the pharmaceuticals at the clinic are donated.

*staff and medical resident hours

The clinic depends on the kindness of volunteers such as Dr. Philip Maguire, a retired gynecologist who has been at the clinic since the beginning.

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volunteer Turns Double Play

By Beth Cross

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Week in May raises Awareness About Corporate responsibility

fresh logo and campaign will roll out in May to remind everyone of their "Corporate Responsibility." The campaign coincides with the national, weeklong celebration May 21-27 of corporate responsibility. Some SSM Health Care entities will hold activities to raise awareness. "It's every employees' responsibility to make sure we're doing everything in an ethical, legal manner and in compliance with regulations," said Barbara Briggs, SSM Health Care's vice president for Corporate Responsibility. "We do that at SSM Health Care through the Corporate Responsibility Process," Briggs added. Under the CRP process, employees are required to report possible or known violations of policy, law or regulations. You can report to supervisors, to a CRP contact at each entity, to Briggs or to a CRP Help Line at 1-877-4CRP-ASK.

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T. LOUIS ­ When it comes to St. Louis Cardinals baseball, longtime SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center volunteer Wayne Zeugin has seen it all, and he wouldn't miss it. Major League Baseball's season opened April 2, with the Cardinals' first home game on April 10 in the newly rebuilt Busch Stadium. An event manager for the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team, Zeugin has been in the stadium for big wins such as the 1982 World Series championship, and big losses, such as the death of team announcer Jack Buck. "That stadium has a lot of memories," he said referring to the old Busch Stadium. "The AllStar game, when the Beatles performed, Ozzie Smith's big home run in the playoffs, and the Jack Buck memorial service. I saw them all." Last year, the team presented Zeugin with a National League championship ring ­ a gem adorned with 33 cut diamonds and a ruby redbird. And at the final regular season home game in 2005, Zeugin was one of the longtime employees the team recognized on the field. He has worked more than 3,000 games. To the team at Cardinal Glennon, Zuegin is an MVP. Zeugin, who worked his way up in the Cardinals organization from usher to event manager, volunteers in physical therapy and occupational therapy at Cardinal Glennon. He has logged more than 1,700 hours volunteering. Zeugin said he is inspired by the patience and dedication of the therapists at Cardinal Glennon. "Wayne is here for all the right reasons," said Marlene Gravat, clinical director of rehab services. "He's a very dedicated volunteer, and he does this all between working at the stadium."

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Barney Takes Diversity To Heart at Work, at Home

By Lorraine Kee

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Two SSM rehab Units In St. Louis Area Close

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SM Rehab announced April 5 the closing of its inpatient rehabilitation units at SSM DePaul Health Center in Bridgeton, Mo., and SSM St. Joseph Hospital of Kirkwood. Starting April 10, all inpatient rehabilitation admissions will be directed to SSM Rehab's two other inpatient units at SSM St. Mary's Health Center in Richmond Heights, Mo., and SSM St. Joseph Health Center in St. Charles. This will require a reduction in staff for the units that are closing. About 90 employees are affected. Over the last few months, SSM Rehab's units at both hospitals, as well as at SSM St. Mary's Health Center and SSM St. Joseph Health Center, have experienced a 25% drop in patient admissions. This is a result of changes within Medicare that have redefined the type of patients who qualify for inpatient rehabilitation.

teve Barney might have been a banker like his dad or perhaps fulfilled his high school aspiration of being a journalist. Instead, for almost 30 years, he's called SSM Health Care his employer. And he can't think of any place he'd rather work. "Hospitals have a humanness that no other organization ­ that I have ever been a part of ­ has," Barney said recently. Barney is senior vice president for human resources at SSM. He is known for his progressive thinking on employee policies, a penchant for fine fountain pens and a fondness for his family. Two family portraits ­ including more than a dozen children and grandchildren posed ­ sit in frames behind his desk. He grew up in Wisconsin. He studied journalism One of two family portraits in Steve Barney's office. at the University of Wisconsin and went to work at the Wisconsin State Journal as an editorial writer and reporter, eventually covering such colorful political figures as Republican newcomer Richard Nixon and civil rights activist Roy Wilkins. "Journalism dominated my career until I was 29," he said. That's when an Associated Press reporter asked if he was interested in moonlighting in public relations for St. Marys Hospital Medical Center in Madison. Eventually he was made full-time. When The Lighter Side of ... Steve Barney the hospital's personnel director left, Barney was Senior vice President for Human resources asked what he knew about personnel. Where's your hometown? "Well, I can spell it," the quick-study and Horicon, Wis., on the banks of a large wildlife refuge, adaptable Barney said. is where I went to high school. But I lived for eight He was appointed interim personnel director days after my birth at Little Willows Home for Unwed and went back to school to get a master's degree Mothers in Kansas City, Mo., before being adopted. in hospital administration. After earning his What is your proudest accomplishment? master's, he was named associate executive direcFinding and marrying my wife, Karen, ranks at the very tor at St. Marys. He left SSM to be commissioner top. We've been married 41 years in July. Karen Barney of the state of Wisconsin's hospital rate-setting is chair of the department of occupational science and commission and later worked for a Kentuckytherapy at St. Louis University. Next comes four chilbased HMO. dren who, in part, represent a tradition of adopted and But, in 1988, he came back. non-adopted kids. "I've seen the regulatory side, the for-profit What was your first car? side, the not-for-profit side," Barney said. "I A used, yellow Ford Falcon my father helped me get in came back to the not-for-profit. It was not poscollege. sible to replace that sense of mission." What was the last concert you attended? (This is one in a series of features on SSM The Rolling Stones in January. executives.)

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Being Neighborly

hospital Sells Property to Make Way for unique housing

By Kelly Cheramy $

SSM Stirs Up Trans Fat-Free Cooking

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ADISON, Wis. -- Preservation of the neighborhood in the midst of a $174 million hospital expansion was behind St. Marys Hospital Medical Center's sale of properties in its backyard. The hospital reviewed proposals to increase owner-occupied and affordable housing in the neighborhood in exchange for the removal and relocation of homes that made way for the expansion. The result is the sale of more than a dozen properties to Aboretum Cohousing, an organization that plans to develop the area into a new kind of neighborhood. Homes that were built between the late 1800s and the 1930s will be refurbished or demolished as a 40-unit cohousing development takes shape. The development will include a mix of townhouses, accessible flats and existing singlefamily homes. Cohousing is a concept that encourages interaction and collaboration among residents who also share common spaces, such as a commercial-grade kitchen, large dining area, children's play room, wood shop and guest rooms. "We're absolutely thrilled to be part of this," said Barb Miller, vice president of operations at St. Marys. "It's an exciting opportunity for more people to live and work in our neighborhood. And cohousing makes a lot of sense for our socially and Last fall, architect Lou Host-Jablonski explained the features of the environmentally conscious city." development planned for the St. Marys neighborhood.

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Wireless Heart Device Implanted To Allow For remote Monitoring

By debra Robbins LUE ISLAND, Ill. -- Due to breakthrough "wireless" technology, patients at St. Francis Hospital & Health Center with congestive heart failure can rest easier. Their physicians are now just a mouse-click away. Physicians at St. Francis recently implanted the new device into an 80-year-old woman. The patient, who had been gravely ill, was responding well. The device is a cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator. Unlike typical pacemakers or defibrillators, this device uses a third lead wire that is carefully placed on the left side of the heart (the main pumping chamber). It improves quality of life by resynchronizing the heart and protecting a patient from potentially life-threatening arrhythmias. "In procedures on patients Cardiologist Sean Tierney, a heart rhythm specialist at St. Francis, performed the first implant at St. Francis. with congestive heart "This device can save a physician valuable time during an implant procedure," he said. "In procedures on failure, every minute we patients with congestive heart failure, every minute we save during a procedure save during a procedure can improve the patient's outcan improve the patient's come significantly." allows a patient's condition to be The device also remotely monitored by a physician. outcome significantly." How it works: Once the patient receives the implanted device in the hospital, they are sent home with a small wireless transmitter which can be placed on a nightstand; a wireless scale; and a wireless blood pressure cuff. The transmitter picks up a patient's heart rhythm within 10 feet of the transmitter. When a patient weighs himself once a day, and uses the cuff to check his blood pressure, that information is also picked up by the transmitter. The transmitter sends all of the information to the Internet for the physician to monitor. The device, Renewal 3RF, is manufactured by Guidant. "Not only will it help improve a patient's quality of life, but it also gives physicians vital diagnostic information 24 hours a day, seven days a week, to help treat the patient's overall heart failure condition," Tierney said.

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round SSM Health Care, our facilities are dishing up healthier food choices in their cafeterias. And, over the past year or so, many of them have moved to using trans fat-free cooking oil for the health of patients and employees. They include: SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, St. Louis SSM DePaul Health Center, Bridgeton, Mo. SSM St. Joseph Health Center, St. Charles, Mo. SSM St. Joseph Health Center-Wentzville (Mo.) SSM St. Joseph Hospital of Kirkwood (Mo.) SSM St. Joseph Hospital West, Lake St. Louis, Mo. SSM St. Mary's Health Center, Richmond Heights, Mo. St. Anthony Hospital, Oklahoma City St. Clare Hospital and Health Services, Baraboo, Wis. St. Francis Hospital & Health Center, Blue Island, Ill. St. Mary's/Good Samaritan Inc. (southern Illinois) St. Mary's Health Center, Jefferson City, Mo. St. Marys Care Center, Madison, Wis. St. Marys Hospital Medical Center, Madison, Wis.

*St. Clare Meadows Care Center in Baraboo, Wis., does not deep-fry any foods at its facility. Bone & Joint Hospital in Oklahoma City is currently field testing a trans fat-free cooking oil.

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Medic, St. Marys Share Medal

By Kelly Cheramy

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ADISON ­ A Wisconsin Army National Guard medic with family ties to St. Marys Hospital Medical Center is sharing an honor with the hospital. Security officer James Doran served in Iraq from November 2004 to November 2005. Besides the Defender of Freedom medal, he also received a team medal that he could give to a supportive individual or organization. He chose St. Marys. "They made it seamless for me to leave my job, serve in the Guard and come back to work at St. Marys," said Doran who has twice left St. Marys for active duty. His team medal is on display in the hospital's main lobby. Doran's grandmother was a nurse in maternity for nearly five decades at St. Marys. His mother, also a nurse, retired after nearly 40 year there; and his sister once worked in labor and delivery.

March/April 2006

A bimonthly publication for employees, physicians and friends

9

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AROund ThE SySTEM

PEOPLE

Oklahoma New Beacons Shine Light on St. Anthony

OKLAHOMA CITY ­ St. Anthony Hospital added two new guiding lights to the east side of its campus. The structures now sit atop the newly constructed east entrance of the hospital and incorporate St. Anthony's well-known blue cross into the contemporary design of the beacons. Joe Hodges, president of St. Anthony, was the speaker at the Jan. 24 lighting ceremony.

Missouri

Honors and Authors

Sr. Mary Jean ryan, FSM, SSM Health Care President/CEO, was named one of the St. Louis region's "Influentials" by the St. Louis Business Journal. Barbara Briggs, corporate vice president for corporate responsibility, and Dick Chamberlain, director of program development, spoke to the Medical Group Management Association. ron Levy, president and CEO for SSM Health Care-St Louis, was featured in a St. Louis Commerce Magazine article. Dr. Patrick Harr, St. Francis Hospital and Health Services, was interviewed on "NBC Nightly News." Dr. Stephen J. Kelly, SSM St. Mary's Health Center, spoke to the Team for Regional Excellence in Energy and Environmental Design. SSM DePaul Health Center's Weight-Loss Institute and Dr. roger de la Torre were recognized as an American Society for Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence. Joan eberhardt was elected president of the Missouri State Council of the Emergency Nurses Association. Four photographs of flowers taken by Pat Guichet, manager of design and construction at SSM St. Joseph Health Center in St. Charles, were featured on the November cover of Healthcare Design magazine.

Who Knew a Kidney Transplant Could Win You a New Car?

OKALAHOMA CITY ­ A longtime patient at St. Anthony Hospital, Roland Edmonds, was chosen to receive a new Saturn this year. Edmonds received a kidney transplant in 2003 and decided to attend college to become a transplant social worker.

In photo, edmonds is pictured second from left with Saturn dealership executives.

Appointments

Dr. Mary Ann Hollman was named medical director for SSM WorkHEALTH, a new occupational health service. SSM Information Center's Project Beacon management team was completed: Dr. richard vaughn was named medical director and chair of the medical infomatics committee; Theresa eckman project manager SSM of Wisconsin implementation; Dick Chamberlain project manager collaborative build project; Joe rocklage physician practice (clinical) project manager. SSM St. Mary's Health Center in Richmond Heights welcomed William Jennings as executive vice president, COO. Drs. Darren Wethers was named president of the medical staff and Mary McLennan its president-elect. Registered nurse Anitra Galmore was promoted to labor and delivery manager for SSM DePaul Health Center Women's Services. rachel Farthing was promoted to director of physician development and relations for SSM St. Joseph Health Center, SSM St. Joseph Medical Park and SSM St. Joseph Health Center-Wentzville; Katy Cushing director of physician development and relations for SSM St. Joseph Hospital West; and Chrissi Blake director of imaging and operations for SSM St. Joseph Medical Park. Michael Mueller, who served previously as clinical service line director of cardiovascular services for SSM St Joseph Hospital of Kirkwood has been named its vice president for patient care services/chief nurse executive. eric Carmichael was welcomed as area director of strategy and business development; Maribeth Keeven promoted to director of revenue integrity management; and Timothy C. Simmons director of cardiopulmonary diagnostic services. Jeff Hunter was named manager and market leader for the new Dardenne Prairie site for SSM rehab.

A car is given away annually to a deserving Oklahoman as part of a joint venture by the Oklahoma Blood Institute, Bob Moore Saturn car dealership, and LifeShare Transplant Donor Services of Oklahoma. "We chose to nominate Roland because he didn't take his disease process as a disability," said Mani Mayandie, a registered nurse and clinical renal transplant coordinator at St. Anthony.

employees Stay Connected

OKLAHOMA CITY ­ Employees' lives inside and outside St. Anthony Hospital are highlighted in a newly, redesigned newsletter called "The Saints Connection." For instance, it offers tips on healthy living and contains a weekly calendar of events.

A new intranet site was also launched recently. Employees can find daily, weekly and monthly newsletters, photos from employee events, the cafeteria menu and patient comments ­ all meant to keep them in touch with each other and their workplace. Right: Example of a Saints Connection screensaver and elevator poster.

Illinois St. Francis Unit Knows Its Mission

BLUE ISLAND ­ Congratulations to the surgical intensive care unit (SICU), which won the Heart Month Poster Contest at St. Francis Hospital & Health Center. The hospital's Mission Awareness Team sponsored the February contest, which drew entries from 29 departments and was judged by 182 employees. The unit received a lunch certificate as contest winner. Second place went to surgery, third place to surgical recovery. Pictured in the photo are nurses Cora Guerrero (left), who is in charge of the first-place surgical intensive care unit, and Susan DelMonte.

Illinois

Appointments

David Petasnick joins St. Francis Hospital & Health Center as cardiac services director; Patti Gomez as emergency department director; and Mark Dembski as planning director.

St. Mary's/Good Samaritan Introduce Morning Yoga

Last fall, St. Mary's/Good Samaritan Inc. hosted a low-impact yoga session during its monthly Healthy Hearts Club. Nearly 100 people attended. Such enthusiasm has led to a new wellness program, Friday Morning Yoga. To encourage healthy lifestyles and fitness, the low-impact yoga session is offered Fridays from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Rolland Lewis Community Building. The class is a partnership between St. Mary's/Good Samaritan and the Mt. Vernon City Park. Due to the response, a second class is being considered. For information, call (877) 241-5596.

Oklahoma

Appointments

Bone & Joint Hospital welcomed robert Shapiro as director of quality and risk management.

Wisconsin

Honor and Authors

Sandy Anderson, president of St. Clare Hospital and Health Services, has been named president of the Wisconsin Hospital Association Southern District and secretary/treasurer of the Rural Wisconsin Hospital Cooperative Board. Dave Macmaster, drug and alcohol counselor, has been appointed to the Intervention and Treatment Committee of the governor's state Council on Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse. St. Marys Hospital Medical Center received the 2006 Founders Award from the Safe Community Coalition of Madison and Dane County for community safety and injury prevention activities.

Construction Continues at St. Francis

BLUe ISLAND -- Air flow units arrived at St. Francis Hospital in Blue Island March 22, as part of a multi-million-dollar construction project to expand the hospital's cardiac electrophysiology lab. electrophysiology is the study of the heart's electrical system. It is used to determine what is causing a disturbance of the normal rhythm of the heart and provides vital information for cardiologists to determine the best treatment.

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Appointments

At St. Clare Hospital and Health Services, Jason Stelzer was promoted to director of human resources and Julie Stietz director of patient care coordinators and staffing. Marsha Gahagan's role expanded to information services manager of infrastructure and support for St. Marys Hospital Medical Center.

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Missouri Ads Broadcast St. Mary's Healing Mission

JEFFERSON CITY -- A new campaign with a difference has focused central Missouri on the unique, faith-based mission of St. Mary's Health Center. "Let the Healing Begin" is a series of advertisements for radio, TV and print media spotlighting the hospital's healing mission, rather than focusing on technology and equipment. The commercials aired through March and were produced internally with direction from Patrick Walker, St. Mary's marketing and public relations coordinator, and Tom Barry, SSM Media Services manager.

SSM WorkHeALTH Saves Business Wealth

HAZeLWOOD -- Local businesses have a new way to reduce their health expenses -- they can develop healthier workplaces, thanks to the new occupational health service launched by SSM Health Care-St. Louis and SSM rehab. SSM WorkHeALTH has opened its first site in north St. Louis County, and more sites are planned. WorkHeALTH offers businesses a full range of services to manage workplace health and safety, including state-of-theart, web-based programs and other communications tools. For information, call (314) 731-WOrK.

Heart Walk Champion Winning Battle

ST. LOUIS -- Thomas Ceja, a fun-loving 12-year-old boy full of life, is SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center's honorary champion for the St. Louis Metro Heart Walk on May 6 in Forest Park. In 2005, SSM Health Care led St. Louis-area groups by raising $143,697. After years of migraines, Thomas came to Cardinal Glennon for an echocardiogram. A narrowing of the main artery was then discovered. The blockage, coarctation of the aorta, causes blood pressure to rise in the arms and head, and fall in the legs, seriously straining the heart. "After two months in the hospital, Thomas made remarkable progress," said Dr. Saadeh Jureidini, pediatric cardiologist. Ceja (right in photo) is reunited with Dr. Saadeh Jureidini (left) and two of his transitional care unit nurses, Clint Koerkenmeier and Kira Gordon.

Bald is Beautiful for Cancer Supporters

ST LOUIS -- More than 200 men, women and children went brave and bald March 4 at Helen Fitzgerald's Grill and Bar. By getting their heads shaved, they raised more than $186,000 for CureSearch Children's Oncology Group and the National Childhood Cancer Foundation. The event, sponsored by SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, has raised more than $350,000 since its inception in 2004. Dave Prickett (right in photo) shaved his head for daughter Ella, 8, who is a cancer patient at SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center.

Study Seeks Tumors Tiny as rice New Partnership Adds Weekend Psychiatrists

JeFFerSON CITY ­ Mental illness and substance abuse don't stop for weekends or vacations, despite a nation shortage of psychiatrists. St. Mary's Health Center has found a solution in a new partnership with Pathways Community Behavioral Healthcare Inc. St. Mary's offers one of the few inpatient mental health units in central Missouri, serving more than 950 patients each year. The partnership with Pathways will provide patient access to 27 additional psychiatrists to cover weekend and vacation shifts. Pathways Community Behavioral Healthcare Inc. is a not-for-profit mental health center with 31 offices in Missouri. For information, call (573) 634-3000.

ST. CHARLES -- What if a patient's lung cancer could be detected when his tumor was smaller than a grain of rice? That's the subject of a new study at SSM St. Joseph Health Center. People over 40 who are at risk for lung cancer can be scanned by computed/ tomography (CT), as part of this study by the International-Early Lung Cancer Action Program (I-ELCAP). St. Joseph

Health Center is the only facility in Missouri to participate in the study. Patients must pay $300 out-of-pocket to participate, and the cost is not covered by insurance. Typical CT scans cost between $1,300 and $1,500, said Ellen Brennan, a nurse clinician and the study coordinator. The hospital is seeking grants to help cover patients' costs.

Wisconsin St. Clare Digs Deep to Offer Help

BARABOO ­ The staffs at St. Clare Hospital and Health Services and St. Clare Meadows Care Center opened their hearts and wallets last year to serve local people in need. The Adopt-a-Family Project, coordinated by hospital nurses Chile Hamersley, Kathy Tanner and Sonia Carter, raised $3,200 for six families. The Mission Awareness Council coordinated participation with the Sauk County Giving Tree and the wishes of 200 children were fulfilled. St. Clare Campus employees also contributed $10,000 to the United Way Campaign last fall.

Community Programs Win National Attention

MADISON ­ St. Marys Hospital Medical Center is featured twice by the American Hospital Association (AHA) in a booklet titled "Community Connections: Making Communities Healthier." The two programs earning the nationwide acclaim are the Dean/St. Marys Neighborhood Asthma Clinic (which offers free screening, education and treatment for low-income residents) and the St. Marys/ABC for Health Collaboration (providing advocacy in financial and legal health care issues for uninsured families). The AHA is planning a full feature story on the Asthma Clinic in its bi-weekly newsletter, distributed nationally.

Prevention Key to Heart Failure Clinic

MADISON -- Patients at risk for heart failure now have a better chance at survival and quality of life, thanks to a new Heart Failure Program at the Dean & St. Marys Cardiac Center. In setting goals for the program's first year, the staff expects to see at least a 50 percent reduction in hospital admissions and emergency room visits by heart failure patients. The program also includes a call-back service for patients. And this year, an outpatient clinic began receiving patient referrals from cardiologists and primary care physicians. "We provide intensive education and closer monitoring of patients," said nurse practitioner Christa Raymond, who staffs the clinic under the direction of Dr. Alan Singer.

President Called to Principal's Office

MADISON -- St. Marys Hospital Medical Center received high marks on a community report card when President Frank Byrne played "Principal for a Day." Dr. Byrne got a firsthand look at public school issues and education at Nuestro Mundo Community School. The school serves kindergarteners and first-graders, many of whom live in the St. Marys neighborhood.

volunteer Celebrates Milestones

MADISON, Wis. ­ St. Marys Hospital Medical Center volunteer Ella Egstad celebrated her 94th birthday in March with her colleagues and hospital President Frank Byrne. Egstad has logged more than 9,000 volunteer hours in more than 35 years at St. Marys. She was born six months before the hospital opened in 1912.

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A bimonthly publication for employees, physicians and friends

March/April 2006

11 Back to Contents

SPOTLIghT

Is there a future doctor or a nurse in the house?

$ By Sabrina Kalleberg

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RIDGETON, Mo. -- You hear giggles first and then laughter as preteens don surgical scrubs for the first time. The youngsters can't believe the transformation after putting on surgical caps and masks. SSM DePaul Health Center surgical nurse MaryLu Rogers thoroughly enjoys this part of her job: energizing young minds to learn and consider a medical career in their future. Rogers, who has been in nursing for 29 years, has been with the program since its inception in 2001.

"The reactions are really awesome," Rogers said. "Each participant sees different things and asks lots of questions. Some are really focused on what they want to do, and others are inspired for the first time to consider what it is like to be a nurse or doctor." DePaul Health Center offers children ages 8 through 16 an opportunity to learn more about medical professions during an interactive summer learning program. The "Junior Doctor" program is designed for young people between 8 and 12. They learn how X-rays and respirators work, tour an operating room wearing scrubs and visit a patient unit. Sessions are from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. from June 15 through July 25 at the May Center at DePaul. The "Advanced Junior Doctor" program is for teen-agers between 13 through 16. It provides hands-on medical and surgical demonstrations. Sessions operate from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. June 29 and July 11. For children (between the ages of 8 and 12) interested in the nursing profession, there is a "Junior Nurse" program from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. June 15-23. Students learn basic nursing assessments, including how to take temperatures and blood pressures and to use stethoscopes. Cost per session is $15 and includes a photo. To register, call (314) 513-4444.

Surgical nurse MaryLu rogers demonstrates blood-oxygen monitoring and other vital equipment inside the SSM DePaul Health Center trauma room to seventh graders from Holy Spirit School in Maryland Heights, Mo.

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