Read Heading 1 text version

Inpatient isolation to help prevent infection

The doctor has placed your child in isolation because he has an infection that could spread to other patients in the hospital. Isolation is used to help prevent the spread of infection. The doctor can tell you the type of bacteria or virus your child has that requires isolation. The entire time your child is in isolation, he will have a sign on the patient room door that shows the type of isolation needed. The sign will tell people coming into the room what type of personal protective equipment they need to wear while they are in the patient room.

Infection control guidelines to prevent spread of infection for all isolation types:

· The most important thing you can do for your child's health is to clean your hands often. This means either washing well with soap and water or using the alcohol gel offered outside each patient room. Cleaning your hands well is the best way to prevent the spread of infection. See "Do you know... Clean Hands" to learn the best ways to clean your hands. Everyone must wash their hands with soap and water or use alcohol gel before entering and after leaving the patient room. Be sure if you have other appointments in the hospital that you clean your hands before going to those appointments. This limits the spread of infection. You should also wear gloves when touching any soiled items in the patient room. You should wear gloves when emptying bedpans, helping the patient to the toilet, handling urine or stool, or changing diapers. You must wash your hands after removing gloves. Patients, parents, and caregivers should wash hands after using the toilet. Any food or beverages that enter a patient room must not be placed in the patient refrigerator in the Nutrition Center. If you want to bring food from outside the hospital, it can be placed in the Nutrition Center refrigerator first. Then, you can take portions to your child's room. Once food enters a patient room, the uneaten portion must be thrown away. Food in the patient's room should be thrown away after it has been open for one (1) hour. We recommend that caregivers have the patient's food delivered by hospital room service when possible to decrease the risk of infection. Food from room service will come on throwaway trays. All trash items from the patient room should be placed in the red bags used for isolation room trash. Liquids from food trays should be flushed down the toilet. Try to limit the number of personal items in the room, so all surfaces can be cleaned well by Environmental Services.

· · ·

· ·

· · · · · ·

This document is not intended to take the place of the care and attention of your personal physician or other professional medical services. Our aim is to promote active participation in your care and treatment by providing information and education. Questions about individual health concerns or specific treatment options should be discussed with your physician. Copyright © 2007 St. Jude Children's Research Hospital www.stjude.org

Page 1 of 3

Revised 11/07

Inpatient isolation to help prevent infection

· · · Only solid surface toys should be in the isolation room, and they must be cleaned before they are taken out of the room. Personal clothes should be bagged in a personal belonging bag before being taken out of the room. If possible, wash them in hot water with bleach. Before entering an isolation room, anyone who is not a parent (caregiver) must put on the required personal protective equipment that is posted on the door. Since parents are in close contact with the child for extended periods of time in the hospital, gowns, gloves and masks do not do a very good job of preventing the spread of organisms from the patient. Because of this, the hospital does not require parents to wear the same protective equipment as staff and visitors while they are in the patient's room. Parents of a child in isolation should limit trips to other parts of the hospital to avoid possibly spreading their child's infection. Parents of children in isolation should never enter other patient rooms or have close contact with other patients or their parents. Visitors who are not parents or caregivers and are not staying in the room for extended periods of time (overnight), must wear the same protective gear as hospital staff, even if they are family members. When leaving the room for testing, the patient and parent must wear personal protective equipment. This may include a gown, face mask and gloves. You will do this even if you have not been wearing these items in your child's room.

·

·

·

Four levels of inpatient isolation and the protective equipment required for each:

Strict Isolation (melon-colored sign) · Regular room may be used (air blows out from the room when the door is open) · Gown, mask, and gloves Contact Isolation (pink sign) · Regular room may be used (air blows out from the room when the door is open) · Gown and gloves Respiratory Isolation (light green sign) · Negative pressure room is required (air blows into the room when the door is open) · · · Gown, mask, and gloves Patient must wear N95 mask and gown when being transported from room. You must wear a mask in the patient room, if your child has chickenpox or shingles (varicella-zoster virus) and you are pregnant or have not had chickenpox in the past.

Special Respiratory Isolation (dark green sign) · Negative pressure room is required (air blows into the room when the door is open)

This document is not intended to take the place of the care and attention of your personal physician or other professional medical services. Our aim is to promote active participation in your care and treatment by providing information and education. Questions about individual health concerns or specific treatment options should be discussed with your physician. Copyright © 2007 St. Jude Children's Research Hospital www.stjude.org

Page 2 of 3

Revised 11/07

Inpatient isolation to help prevent infection

· N95 mask required for all people entering the patient room. See the handout "Do you know... How to Use a Particulate Mask" to learn the proper way to wear the N95 mask.

Questions?

If you have any questions about your child's stay in an isolation room, please talk to your child's doctor or nurse.

This document is not intended to take the place of the care and attention of your personal physician or other professional medical services. Our aim is to promote active participation in your care and treatment by providing information and education. Questions about individual health concerns or specific treatment options should be discussed with your physician. Copyright © 2007 St. Jude Children's Research Hospital www.stjude.org

Page 3 of 3

Revised 11/07

Information

Heading 1

3 pages

Find more like this

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

1280933