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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Placement ............................................................................................................... II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Attendance Policy ................................................................................... Grading Policy ......................................................................................... Promotion K-8 ......................................................................................... Promotion 9-12........................................................................................ Retention Policy ...................................................................................... Acceleration ........................................................................................... Remediation ............................................................................................ Alternative Schools/Programs/Settings ................................................... Other Policies and Procedures................................................................

APPENDIX A ­ DEFINITION OF TERMS .............................................................. A. State B. Local

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SECTION I

FORMAL SUBMISSION STATEMENT

Include the following information in this section: FORMAL SUBMISSION STATEMENT LEA contact information a listing of the committee of educators appointed by the Superintendent a listing of the parents appointed by the School Board documentation of input into the PPP by educators/parents, and copies of the public notice of the PPP prior to approval of PPP (dates and location) The formal submission statement is a formal submission of the LEA's Pupil Progression Plan in compliance with the policies and procedures set forth by the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. It must be signed by both the LEA Superintendent and the President of the School Board.

Formal Submission Statement

Assurance is hereby made to the State Department of Education that the St. Tammany Parish Public School System's Pupil Progression Plan has been developed in compliance with the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education'sPolicies and Procedures (Bulletin 1566), (R.S. 17:24.4), with all applicable policies and standards of Bulletin 741 and Bulletin 1706, and with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. If any local policy outlined in this plan conflicts with state and/or federal guidelines and/or regulations, the state and/or federal regulations/guidelines will supersede the local policy. All documentation relative to the development of this Pupil Progression Plan shall be maintained on file by the local education agency. Assurance is thereby made that this school system shall not discriminate in the rendering of services to and/or employment of individuals because of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other non-merit factor.

W.L. "Trey" Folse, III Superintendent

Stephen "Jack" Loup School Board President

August 1, 2012 Date

August 1, 2012 Date

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PUPIL PROGRESSION PLAN LEA CONTACT INFORMATION

LEA Contact Person (Primary) ____Denise Parker_________ Telephone Number ( 985) ___898-3235_______________

E-mail Address [email protected]________________

If Applicable: LEA Contact Person (Secondary) _________Cheryl Arabie______________

Telephone Number ( 985 ) ____898-3259_______________________

E-mail Address [email protected]___________________________

__________________________________ (Primary Signature)

_____August 1, 2012______ (Date)

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SECTION II STATE AND DISTRICT POLICIES

The Pupil Progression Plan is the comprehensive plan developed and adopted by each LEA. The plan is based on student performance on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program and is aligned to state laws and BESE policies. I. Placement

A. Kindergarten and First Grade Entrance and Screening Requirements 1. Every child, as a prerequisite to enrollment in any first grade of a public school, shall meet one of the following criteria (Bulletin 741 §1107 B): a. Have attended a full-day public or private kindergarten for a full academic year; or b. Have satisfactorily passed academic readiness screening administered by the LEA at the time of enrollment for first grade. Name the academic readiness screening instrument used for those students who are entering first grade without attending a full-day public or private kindergarten for a full academic year. (This must be consistent with the instrument used for students being promoted from kindergarten.) The developing skills checklist (DSC), Richard Gentry's Spelling Assessment, DIBELS Next assessment results, letters and sounds inventory, math assessment, and portfolio contents from the previous school, if applicable, will determine the recommendation for placement in first grade or transitional first grade.

2. The minimum age for kindergarten shall be one year younger than the age required for that child to enter first grade. (Bulletin 741 §1111 C) a. The age at which a child may enter the first grade of any public school at the beginning of the public school session shall be six years on or before September thirtieth of the calendar year in which the school year begins. (Bulletin 741 §1111 D.) b. Each local educational governing authority, by rule, may provide for a child of younger age to enter kindergarten, provided that such child has been evaluated and identified as gifted in accordance with the regulations of the DOE for such evaluation. Any child admitted to kindergarten pursuant to this paragraph shall be eligible to enter first grade upon successful completion of kindergarten, provided all other applicable entrance requirements have been fulfilled. (Bulletin 741 §1111 C.1.) Describe the LEA's policy on early entrance into kindergarten for those students identified as gifted, if applicable. 3

In the rare occurrence of a gifted pre-kindergartner student's parent requesting early entrance into kindergarten, this request will be addressed as needed on an individual basis through the school's SBLC/SAT process to determine the correct placement for the student. c. Any child transferring into the first grade of a public school from out-of-state and not meeting the requirements herein for kindergarten attendance shall be required to satisfactorily pass an academic readiness screening administered by the LEA prior to the time of enrollment for the first grade.(Bulletin 741 §1111 C.2.) Name the academic readiness screening instrument used for those students from out-of-state who are entering first grade and not meeting the requirements herein for kindergarten attendance. The developing skills checklist, Richard Gentry's Spelling Assessment, DIBELS Next assessment results, letters and sounds inventory, math assessment, and portfolio contents from the previous school, if applicable, will determine the recommendation for placement in first grade or transitional first grade. 3. Each LEA shall require that every child entering kindergarten for the first time be given a nationally recognized readiness screening. The results of this screening shall be used in placement and for planning instruction. The pupil progression plan for each LEA shall include criteria for placement. (Bulletin 741 §325 C) Name the nationally recognized readiness screening instrument used for every child entering kindergarten for the first time. St Tammany Parish uses the developing skills checklist for the readiness screening instrument for kindergarten. B. Transfer Students 1. A student transferred from a state-approved school, in- or out-of-state, public or nonpublic, shall be allowed credit for work completed in the previous school. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript, showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, immunization, and the units of credit earned, shall be required. (Bulletin 741 §707) a. Records, including evaluation information for exceptional students transferring from another system, shall be reviewed by pupil appraisal and approved by the Supervisor of Special Education before the student is enrolled in a special education program. b. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the stateselected LEAP placement test.

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2. Local school officials from any state-approved school receiving a student from an unapproved school, in- or out-of-state, approved home study programs, or foreign schools will determine the placement and/or credits for the student through screening, evaluations, and/or examinations. (Bulletin 741 §707) a. The LEA may require the student to take an examination on any subject matter for which credit is claimed. b. The school issuing the high school diploma shall account for all credits required for graduation, and its records will show when and where the credit was earned. c. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the stateselected LEAP placement test. d. The LEA PPP shall govern whether exceptions to High Stakes Testing Policy will be considered for nonpublic and home schooled students who do not participate in both spring and summer administrations of the LEAP test and/or do not attend summer remediation. Describe the policies for nonpublic and home schooled students in fourth and eighth grades who do not participate in both spring and summer administrations of the LEAP test and/or do not attend summer remediation. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of the stateselected LEAP placement test. 3. Credits earned by students in American schools in foreign countries shall be at face value. (Bulletin 741 §707) Describe the policies for the placement of all students, including kindergarteners, transferring from all other systems and the provisions for awarding credit for elementary students (K­8) and secondary students (9­12), including: o Approved schools within the state (public/nonpublic) Transfer Students Intra-Parish (Grades K-8) Any child who transfers from one approved public or nonpublic school to another within the parish will be placed in the same grade from which he is transferring. This child shall have in his possession a transfer placement form and will present the form to the newly-appointed school upon first day of entry. Electronic records within the Parish will also be used. The transfer form will contain the current reading and math performance levels. It also may contain other related information needed to enroll the child. The child's former school records, a cumulative card/folder, complete reading and mathematics folders and confidential file, if applicable, will be forwarded upon request. Any consumable materials, which are in use, will be transferred with the student. Students who transfer from an unapproved school may be given the parish reading and mathematics criterion-referenced tests. The SBLC will meet to recommend grade placement if placement is to be in a lower grade other 5

than the age-appropriate grade. The principal will consider the recommendation and render a decision. Acceleration decisions will be approved by the Superintendent through application with the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. Exception: Students in grade 5 transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state approved or unapproved), any home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school shall be required to pass the English/language arts and mathematics portions of the statedeveloped LEAP placement test. Transfer Students High School (Grades 9-12) A student transferring from a state-approved school, in or out-of-state, shall be allowed equivalent credit for work completed in the former school. Equivalent credit is that credit that would be granted by St. Tammany Parish if the work completed in the former school were completed in St. Tammany Parish Schools. Granting such equivalent credit will only be considered at the request of the student/family and the student/family will be responsible for supplying all necessary documentation. Final determination of the equivalent credit will be made by the principal and may be reviewed by the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, immunization records and the units of credit earned shall be required. Transfer grades will be weighted only in the subjects weighted in the district during the year of phase-in implementation. The principal of any approved school receiving a student from an unapproved school, in or out-of-state, shall investigate carefully the composition of the unapproved school's instructional program. The principal and/or superintendent will require the student to take an examination on any subject matter for which credit is claimed. The test examiner in consultation with the designated secondary supervisor shall assign a grade of P or F. The school issuing the high school diploma shall account for all credits required for graduation, and its records shall show when and where the credit was earned. Exception: Students in grade 9 transferring to the public school system from any instate unapproved school, any home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school shall be required to pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of the state-developed LEAP placement test. o Approved out-of-state schools (public/nonpublic) Transfer Students Out-of-State, Out-of-Parish (Grades K-8) A student who transfers from an approved school out-of-state, out-of-parish will be placed in the same grade from which he is transferring. The student may be administered placement tests in mathematics and reading. The student's former school records will be requested. Students who transfer from an unapproved school may be administered the parish reading and mathematics criterion-referenced tests. The SBLC/SAT will meet to recommend grade placement if placement is to be in a grade other than the age-appropriate grade. The principal will consider the recommendation and render a decision. Any infant or toddler moving to Louisiana 6

who has an Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) will be referred to the child search coordinator who will assist the family in accessing family service coordination. The student will be evaluated to determine eligibility for Part C services in Louisiana. Exception: Students in grade 5 transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state approved or unapproved), any home schooling program or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school shall be required to pass the English language arts andmathematics portions of the statedeveloped LEAP placement test. Transfer Students High School (Grades 9-12) A student transferring from a state-approved school, in or out-of-state, shall be allowed equivalent credit for work completed in the former school. Equivalent credit is that credit that would be granted by St. Tammany Parish if the work completed in the former school were completed in St. Tammany Parish Schools. Granting such equivalent credit will only be considered at the request of the student/family and the student/family will be responsible for supplying all necessary documentation. Final determination of the equivalent credit will be made by the principal and may be reviewed by the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, immunization records and the units of credit earned shall be required. Transfer grades will be weighted only in the subjects weighted in the district during the year of phase-in implementation. The principal of any approved school receiving a student from an unapproved school, in or out-of-state, shall investigate carefully the composition of the unapproved school's instructional program. The principal and/or superintendent will require the student to take an examination on any subject matter for which credit is claimed. The test examiner in consultation with the designated secondary supervisor shall assign a grade of P or F. The school issuing the high school diploma shall account for all credits required for graduation, and its records shall show when and where the credit was earned. Exception: Students in grade 9 transferring to the public school system from any instate unapproved school, any home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school shall be required to pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of the state-developed LEAP placement test. o Home Study and Unapproved schools (public/nonpublic) Transfer Students A student transferred from a state-approved school, in or out-of-state, shall be allowed credit for work completed in the previous school. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript, showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, immunization, and the units of credit earned, shall be required. Records, including evaluation information for exceptional students transferring from another system, shall be reviewed by pupil appraisal and approved 7

by the Supervisor of Special Education. If the student has a current IEP, the student may receive special education services as per that IEP until the IEP is convened and rewritten. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English language arts and Mathematics portions of the state selected LEAP placement test. A principal receiving a student from an unapproved school, in or out-of-state school, approved home study programs, or foreign schools, will determine the placement and/or credits for the student through screening evaluations, and/or examinations.The principal and/or superintendent may require the student to take an examination on any subject matter for which credit is claimed. The school issuing the high school diploma shall account for all credits required for graduation, and its records will show when and where the credit was earned. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any instate nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of the stateselected LEAP placement test. Credits earned by students in American schools in foreign countries shall be accepted at face value. Provisions for LEAP/iLEAP Students A parent of a child in Home Study may request that the child be administered the LEAP (grades 4 and 8), and the Iowa Test in grades 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 under the following conditions: Dates of the test shall be in the spring. The parish test dates will be advertised in February. A fee of $35.00 per test will be charged to cover the actual costs of administering, scoring, and reporting the results of the test. This fee shall be refunded upon the student's enrollment and attendance in the system the semester immediately following testing. The examination shall be administered with the same instructions and under similar conditions as provided to children enrolled in public schools. Note: The request for testing must be made to the District Testing Coordinator. The fee will be collected at the same time the request is submitted. The parent will be given the information concerning the test site, testing schedule, and guidelines for testing. No child is to be tested without an admit form from the District Testing Coordinator. 8

Names of the entrance tests used to determine grade placement To determine placement for a home school student, the following assessments and criteria will be used: Home Study Student Placement Grades K-3 At the K-3 level, DIBELS will be used for assessment of the reading level or a locally developed re-entry test. The end of the book test will assess the math level. The SBLC at the assigned school will decide placement if placement is to be in a grade lower than the age-appropriate grade. The principal will consider the recommendation and render a decision. Acceleration decisions will be approved by the Superintendent through application with the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. Home Study Student Placement Grades 4 and 6 In grades 4 and 6 a Reading Lexile and an informal reading inventory will be used for assessment of the reading level. The assessment tool for math will be the end of the book test or locally developed re-entry tests. The SBLC at the assigned school will decide placement if placement is to be in a grade lower than the age appropriate grade. The principal will consider the recommendation and render a decision. Acceleration decisions will be approved by the Superintendent through application with the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. Home Study Student Placement Grades 7 and 8 In grades 7 and 8 the student will take a locally-developed re-entry test to determine placement. The SBLC/SAT at the assigned school will decide placement if placement is to be in a grade lower than the age appropriate grade. The principal will consider the recommendation and render a decision. Acceleration decisions will be approved by the Superintendent through application with the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. Home Study Mid-Year Transfers For the mid year transfer placement will be determined by the end of the book test for the prior year. The procedure used for determining Carnegie credit for high school students Home Study Students Grades 9-12 To earn Carnegie Units in grades 9-12, the student must pass local education agency developed criterion-referenced tests. If a student is entering the 9th grade, the student must pass the LEAP or the Iowa test equivalency for LEAP. List the placement test(s) administered to the above-mentioned transfer students, if applicable. Not applicable C. Transfer polices for students with disabilities 1. Districts will follow the procedures described in Bulletin 1706: Regulations for the Implementation of the Children with Exceptionalities Act for enrollment of a transferring student with disabilities. 9

a. IEPs for Students who Transfer fromPublic Agencies in the Same State. If a student with a disability (who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous public agency within Louisiana) transfers to a new public agency within Louisiana, and enrolls in a new school within the same school year, the new public agency (in consultation with the parents) shall provide a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE)to the student (including services comparable to those described in the student's IEP from the previous public agency), until the new public agency either: 1) adopts the student's IEP from the previous public agency; or 2) develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP that meets the applicable requirements in §320 through §324. (Note: refer to Bulletin 1706 §323) b. IEPs for Students who Transfer from Another State. If a student with a disability (who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous public agency in another state) transfers to a public agency in Louisiana, and enrolls in a new school within the same school year, the new public agency (in consultation with the parents) shall provide the student with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the student's IEP from the previous public agency), until the new public agency: 1) conducts an evaluation pursuant to §305 through §307 (if determined to be necessary by the new public agency); and 2) develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP, if appropriate, that meets the applicable requirements in §320 through §324.(Note: refer to Bulletin 1706 §323) c. The Interim IEP shall be developed for students who have severe or low incidence impairments documented by a qualified professional concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation according to Bulletin 1508, Pupil Appraisal Handbook. In addition:1) An interim IEP may also be developed for students who have been receiving special educational services in another state concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation; and 2) An interim IEP may also be developed concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation for a student out-of-school, including students ages three through five, who are suspected of having a disability and for former special education students, through the age of twenty-two, who have left a public school without completing their public education by obtaining a state diploma. (Note: refer to Bulletin 1530 §111) Describe the procedures for Interim IEPs. Transfer Students Within the Same State ­ In the case of a child with a disability who transfers school districts within the same academic year, who enrolls in a new school, and who had an IEP/IAP that was in effect in the same State, St. Tammany Parish shall provide such child with a free appropriate public education, include services comparable to those described in the previously held IEP/IAP, in consultation with the parents, until such time as St. Tammany Parish adopts the previously held IEP/IAP or develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP/IAP that is consistent with Federal and State Law. Transfer Students Outside the State ­ In the case of a child with a disability who transfers school districts within the same academic year, who enrolls in a new school, and who has an IEP/IAP that was in effect in another State, St. Tammany Parish shall provide such child with a free, appropriate public education, including services comparable to those described in the previously held IEP/IAP, in consultation with the parents, until such time as St. Tammany Parish conducts an evaluation pursuant to subsection (a)(1), if determined to be necessary by St. 10

Tammany Parish, and develops a new IEP/IAP, if appropriate, that is consistent with Federal and State law.

D. Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students 1. The requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 are as follows: a.Establish procedures to identify language minority students. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to identify language minority students. All new students are administered the Home Language Survey. b. Establish procedures to determine if language minority students are Limited English Proficient. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to determine if language minority students are Limited English Proficient. A LEP student is one whose home language is one other than English (as determined by a Home Language Survey), and whose English aural comprehension, speaking, reading, or writing proficiency is below the average English proficiency level of English speaking students of the same age or grade. Students will be placed in an age appropriate environment. c. Establish procedures for age-appropriate placement and determine the specialized language services or program the district will use to address the linguistic and cultural needs of the Limited English Proficient student. Describe the procedures for age-appropriate placement and the specialized language services or program the LEA will use to address the linguistic and cultural needs of the Limited English Proficient student. The proficiency level should be determined by appropriate individualized English language assessment instruments. Assessment and evaluation materials and procedures must address oral proficiency, reading and writing skills. Education program offered must be altered to address Limited English Proficient students' English language needs and instruction pertaining to the culture of the United States. Instruction for Limited English Proficient students must address English as a Second Language development in Language Arts/Reading/English and other academic courses. (Refer to Bulletin 741.) In grades K-8, placement, promotion or retention of a Limited English Proficient student must not be based upon English proficiency or lack of it. S/he should, however, be assigned grades based on cooperation, effort and participation in classroom assignments to the degree his/her English language proficiency allows. Appropriate English as a Second Language (ESL) instructional materials should be used to correlate with state grade level standards. (Refer to State Adopted Textbook list and ESL Curriculum Guide, Bulletin 1830.) 11

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Home Language Survey data must be included in student registration forms, including · First language learned by student · Language other than English spoken in the home · Language student uses most often. Upon registration the parent/guardian of the Limited English Proficient student shall complete a Home Language Survey that will identify the need followed by testing and placement at a parish registration/testing center. Upon identification and placement in an ESL program, students in grades K-12 will receive instruction in English as a Second Language classes at designated ESL centers and/or home schools. The parent/guardian may decline services. LEP student promotion at the elementary level will be considered by the School Building Level Committee/Student Assistance Team and the ESL teacher. No LEP student shall be retained solely because of limited English Proficiency. At the secondary level, ESL services are provided for students in grades 9-12 for 2 or 3hour time blocks. The LEP student may receive elective credit in ESL I, ESL II and ESL III. For the rest of the school day, LEP students are scheduled into age appropriate, nonlanguage dependent classes. Scheduling of students in grades 9-12 will be determined by each student's needs and ability to succeed in a class where English is the only language of instruction. Totally nonEnglish speaking students should be scheduled into non-highly language dependent courses (i.e. music, art, P.E.). The ESL teacher will be responsible for scheduling the LEP student being served by ESL. A totally non-English speaking secondary student may be allowed to progress without assigning a grade. When the student has acquired sufficient language competency, the teacher and the administrator may administer an exam that will measure the degree of understanding and achievement required for credit in the Carnegie unit in question. Students may be allowed to take tests with the ESL teacher. Credit will then be assigned on a Pass/Fail basis. The instructional program for the Limited English proficient secondary student will include ESL and non-highly language-dependent courses (i.e., music, art, P.E.) until s/he develops a level of competency to succeed in these required courses. Limited English students may be scheduled in courses such as reading, speech, music and courses that facilitate oral comprehension and production while at the same time allowing the student to earn Carnegie credits.

d. Establish procedures to monitor former Limited English Proficient students for two years. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to monitor former Limited English Proficient students for two years. The ESL teachers will confer with the regular teachers on the progress of the ESL students. The ESL teachers will review the interim reports and quarterly report cards to determine the success of the students. If a student is not being successful in the regular classroom, ESL services will be offered to the student. e. No LEP student shall be retained solely because of limited English proficiency. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Title VI prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, or national origin by recipients of federal financial assistance. The Title VI regulatory requirements have been interpreted to prohibit denial of equal 12

access to education because of a language minority student's limited proficiency in English.(See: Louisiana District and School Administrators English Language Learners Program Handbook) E. Review of Placement 1. Review of promotion and placement decisions may be initiated by the local school superintendent and/or parent or guardian (R.S. 17:24.4G). 2. Each local school board may adopt policies whereby it may review promotion and placement decisions, in order to ensure compliance with its local plan (R.S. 17:24.4 G). Describe the LEA's policy that addresses how promotion and placement decisions are monitored periodically to determine that the LEA's policies are being implemented uniformly across the system. Explain how, upon request, an individual, such as a parent, teacher, principal, superintendent, etc., could initiate an individual review. Parish policies for promotion and placement are monitored periodically by the St. Tammany Parish School Board Supervisory Staff to determine if policies are being implemented uniformly across the parish. A request for a change or reconsideration of decisions relative to a student's educational program, as provided for in the Pupil Progression Plan, can be made by a parent or guardian. The principal will consider the request or refer the matter to SBLC/SAT, when appropriate. The decision shall be communicated to the parents within three school weeks of the request. Parents may appeal that decision to the Assistant Superintendent or her designee. The Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction will make a recommendation to the Superintendent who will make a final decision. Such requests must be submitted in writing and contain evidence to be considered. In the case of the student with a disability, the due process procedures must be consistent with those described in the approved Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) Part B, LEA Application. Due process procedures for qualified students with disabilities must be consistent with those defined in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

II. Attendance Policy

A. Elementary students shall be in attendance a minimum of 167 six-hour days or 60,120 minutes a school year. In order to be eligible to receive grades, high school students shall be in attendance a minimum of 30,060 minutes (equivalent to 83.5 six-hour school days), per semester or 60,120 minutes (equivalent to 167 six-hour school days) a school year for schools not operating on a semester basis. 1. To receive Carnegie credit for a course, the minimum amount of time students must be present shall be as follows: a. 10,020 minutes for a six-period schedule; b. 8,589 minutes for a seven-period schedule; and c. 7,515 minutes for an eight-period or 4x4 block schedule. d. For other schedule configurations, students must attend a minimum of 7,515 minutes.(Bulletin 741 §1103. See Bulletin 741 §1103 and §1105 for policy on attendance and absences) 13

III. Grading Policy

A. No school board member, school superintendent, assistant superintendent, principal, guidance counselor, teacher, or other administrative staff member of the school or the central staff of the parish or city school board shall attempt, directly or indirectly, to influence, alter, or otherwise affect the grade received by a student from his/her teacher. (Bulletin 1566 §501 C.) B. LEAs shall use the following uniform grading system for students enrolled in all grades K12 for which letter grades are used. LEAs may use other grading scales for honors, gifted, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or other types of courses for which special grading policies exist. (Bulletin 741 §2302) Grading Scale for Regular Courses Grade A B C D F Percentage 100-93 92-85 84-75 74-67 66-0

Describe grading policies for grades/courses for which letter grades are not used. Grading Policy - KINDERGARTEN The Kindergarten Student Evaluation Report will be used to show progress to parents. Portfolios of student work and assessments shall be accumulated and shared with parents during parent conferences. Contents of the portfolio for kindergarten will include: DIAL 3 results, DIBELS results, a writing sample, a math sample, and any other pertinent information. The evaluation key to be used on the Kindergarten Student Evaluation Report Card is as follows: + Satisfactory/Meets or exceeds stated goals Progressing toward stated goals Needs Support/Emerging Emphasis will be placed on regular communication with the parents through formal and informal conferences. The teacher is responsible for completing and issuing report cards. Each teacher is to be responsible for any other markings such as behavior, work habits and attendance to class. There may be supplementary remarks added to the elementary report card as determined by the school. Students shall be promoted if they show satisfactory progress at the end of the 4 th quarter grading period. Students showing Needs Support/Emerging on all available criteria will be referred to the SBLC/SAT to determine promotion or retention, with parent permission. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. Modifications shall be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels, and this will be indicated on the report card. Grades will be given based on these accommodations. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP) or on an Individual Education Plan (IEP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the school principal or designee. There shall be no Honor Roll.

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Grading Policy ­TRANSITIONAL 1st GRADE The Transitional First Grade Student Evaluation Report will be used to show progress to parents during parent conferences. Portfolios of student work and assessments shall be accumulated and shared with parents during parent conferences. Contents of the portfolio will include: DIBELS results, vision screening, hearing screening, writing sample, spelling assessment, and math sample. The teacher is responsible for completing and issuing report cards. Each teacher is responsible for any other markings such as behavior, work habits and attendance to class. There may be supplementary remarks added to the elementary report card as determined by the school. A student who has completed transitional first grade shall be assigned to first grade. Students showing Needs Support/Emerging on all available criteria will be referred to the SBLC/SAT. Modifications shall be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels, and this will be indicated on the report card. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP) or on an Individual Education Plan (IEP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. There shall be no Honor Roll. Grading Policy - GRADE 1 The following grades will be assigned in first grade: E - Excellent/Exceeds stated goals S ­ Satisfactory/Meets stated goals N - Needs Support/Progressing toward stated goals U -Unsatisfactory/Not grasping stated goals Portfolios of student work shall be accumulated and shared with parents during parent conferences. Contents of the portfolio for first grade will include: DIBELS assessment results three times per year, writing sample, word recognition test, basal reading series assessments, math sample, Richard Gentry's spelling test, Voyager Passport Program, if applicable, and any other pertinent information. There shall be a minimum of nine assessments for each student during the grading period. During unusual circumstances, such as testing, some grading periods may be shortened. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e. portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotal records. Test items must reflect the instructional objectives of the teacher's lesson plans based on the content standards and benchmarks. Modifications shall be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels, and this will be indicated on the report card. Grades will be given based on these accommodations. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Program Plan (IPP), an Individual Education Plan (IEP), Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP) or an Individual Limited English Proficient Plan (ILEPP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. Student conduct shall not be considered when computing the quarter grade. Conduct shall be considered separately and denoted accordingly on the report card. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. Activities, projects, presentations, reports, etc., will require that specific grading scales or rubrics be developed and communicated to students and parents. The teacher is responsible for completing and issuing report cards. Each teacher is responsible for any other markings such as behavior, work habits 15

and attendance to class. There may be supplementary remarks added to the elementary report card as determined by the school. There shall be no Honor Roll.

Describe grading scales and policies for honors, gifted, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or any other type of course for which special grading policies exist. A student will receive an extra quality point for an A, B, or C earned in gifted, honors, or advanced placement class that is listed on the designated course list. The extra quality point assigned to an A, B, or C in a designated course will not be retroactive. Students may earn a one-half unit in a designated course. Students will receive an extra quality point for an A, B, or C earned in a maximum of 16 courses from the designated courses.

Designated Course List English Math English I (H) (G) Algebra I (H) (G) English II (H) (G) Geometry (H) (G) English III (H) (G) (AP) Algebra II (H) (G) English IV (H) (G) (AP) Advanced Math I (H) (G) Advanced Math II (H) (G) Calculus (H) (G) AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC

Science Physical Science (H) (G) Biology (H) (G) Chemistry (H) (G) (AP) Physics (H) (G) (AP) Biology II (AP) (H) Anatomy& Physiology (H) Chemistry II (H) (AP) Physics II (H) (AP)

Social Studies World Geography (H) (G) Civics (H) (G) Free Enterprise (H) (G) American History (H) (G) (AP) Western Civilization (H) (G) Psychology (H) (AP) American Government (H) (AP) World History (H) (G) European History (AP)

A student may schedule college level course/s with approval from the principal and the assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction. Approval must be established prior to the student enrolling in the college level course. Approved college level course/s will be awarded the extra quality point for A, B, or C.

16

C. Grading Policy for End-of-Course (EOC) Tests 1. Students enrolled in a course for which there is an EOC test must take the EOC test. a. The EOC test score shall count as a percentage of the student's final grade for the course. b. The percentage shall be between 15% and 30% inclusive, and shall be determined by the LEA. i. For students with disabilities identified under IDEA who meet the LAA 2 participation criteria prior to taking the first EOC test, the EOC test score shall count for 5 percent of the students' final grade for the course.

c. The grades assigned for the EOC test achievement levels shall be as follows

EOC Achievement Level Excellent Good Fair Needs Improvement

Grade A B C D or F

d. The DOE will provide conversion charts for various grading scales used by LEAs. (Bulletin 741 §2318) Describe the LEA's grading policy for students taking courses with EOC tests.Include in the grading policy the percentage (15% to 30%, inclusive) of the final grade that the EOC test will count. During the fourth quarterly grading period, for students who participate in the State administered End of Course tests, the assessment results must be used as the final exam and count 20% of the quarterly grade.

IV. Promotion K ­ 8

Based upon local school board policy pursuant to these guidelines, each teacher shall, on an individualized basis, determine promotion or placement of each student [Act 750, R.S. 17:24.4 (G)]. Local school board policies relative to pupil progression will apply to students placed in regular education programs, as well as to exceptional students and to students placed in alternative programs. Placement decisions for exceptional students must be made in accordance with the least restrictive environment requirements of state and federal laws. A. Requirements of the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program 1. A Pupil Progression Plan shall require the student's proficiency on certain tests as determined by the BESE before he or she can be recommended for promotion. (R.S. 17:24.4)

17

2. In addition to completing a minimum of 23 or 24 Carnegie units of credit as required by BESE, the student shall meet assessment requirements to earn a standard high school diploma. (Bulletin 741 §2318 and §2319) 3. A student who is a first-time 4thor 8thgrader must score at or above the Basic achievement level on the English Language Arts or Mathematics components of the LEAP and at or above the Approaching Basic achievement level on the other (hereafter referred to as the passing standard) to be promoted to the fifth or ninth grade.(Bulletin 1566 §701) 4. All placement and promotion requirements for 4th and 8th graders shall be aligned with current BESE guidelines as outlined in the High Stakes Testing Policy.(Bulletin 1566 §701) 5. Students with disabilities participating in LEAP must be provided with accommodations as noted in the students' IEPs.(Bulletin 1566 §701) 6. Students eligible for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 should have accommodations as noted on their individual accommodation plan (IAP). 7. Students with disabilities who participate in the LEAP Alternate Assessments (LAA 1 and LAA 2) shall have promotion decisions determined by the School Building Level Committee (SBLC). (Bulletin 1566 §505 A.) 8. LEP students shall participate in statewide assessment. The SBLC shall be granted the authority to waive the state's grade promotion policy for a LEP student. A LEP student who was granted a waiver at the 4th grade level is ineligible for a waiver at the 8th grade level.(Bulletin 1566 §707 E) Describe the function of the SBLC as it relates to student promotion and retention. An exceptional promotion as determined by the SBLC/SAT on a case by case basis may be considered where allowed by BESE policy only under any one or more of the following circumstances: if the student has been in the grade for two years if the student is two years above his age group and has been enrolled one full year in each preceding elementary grade exceptions as allowed by LEAP accountability guidelines. (Exceptions for th 4 and 8th Grade Students.) in rare and extreme cases, as allowed by law, the SBLC/SAT may recommend to the principal that a child with other extenuating conditions be promoted. If the promotion involves moving from one school to another, the principals or their designees must communicate. Following this communication and review of the case, consultation will be held with the parents and a final recommendation will be made. In cases where agreement cannot be reached, the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction will review all data and make a recommendation to the Superintendent for final approval. Describe how the SBLC determines the progression of students with disabilities participating in the LEAP Alternate Assessments. List the specific criteria that will be used by the SBLC. 18

B. High Stakes Testing Policy 1. The decision to retain a student in the fourth or eighth grade more than once as a result of his/her failure to achieve the passing standard on the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP shall be made by the LEA in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan. (See Chapter 7 of Bulletin 1566 for additional policies regarding High Stakes Testing.) Describe the LEA's procedure for determining if a 4th or 8th grade student will receive a Mastery/Advanced waiver from the High StakesTesting Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 A.) The student may be eligible for the Mastery/Advanced Waiver through the SBLC/SAT (and therefore the student can be promoted) if the student scores below the achievement level required by the State in English language arts or mathematics and scores at the Mastery or Advanced levels in the other, provided that: · the student has participated in both the spring and summer administrations of LEAP and has attended the LEAP summer remediation program; · the student has participated in the summer retest in the subject area(s) that he/she scored below the achievement level required by the State during the spring test administration; and · parental consent is granted. Describe the LEA's procedure for determining if an 8th grade student is granted the U/B waiver from the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 B.) The local school system (LEA) may override the State policy for 8 grade students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English language arts or mathematics, if the student scores at the Basic level in the other, provided that the following criteria are met: the student scored Approaching Basic or above on the Science and Social Studies components of LEAP; the student had an overall 2.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale; the student had a minimum 92% attendance during the school year; the decision is made in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan, which may include a referral to the School Building Level Committee (SBLC); the student has participated in both the spring and summer administrations of LEAP and has attended the summer remediation program offered by the LEA (the student shall participate in the summer retest only on the subject that he/she scored at the Unsatisfactory achievement level during the spring test administration); and parental consent is granted.

th

If a student meets the criteria for this override, and is promoted with an Unsatisfactory, the student must enroll in and pass a high school remedial course in the Unsatisfactory subject before enrolling in or earning Carnegie credit for English or mathematics.

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Describe the LEA's criteria for determining if an 8th grade student will receive a AB/AB waiver from the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 C.) After the summer retest, a school system, through its superintendent, may consider a waiver for an 8th grade student who has scored at the Approaching Basic level on both the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of the LEAP. The superintendent may grant the waiver in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan provided the following criteria are met: The student may be promoted to the 9th grade, provided the s/he has scored at the Approaching Basic level on both the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of the LEAP, has attended the LEAP summer remediation program offered by the District and has taken the summer retest administered at the conclusion of the summer program. The student must retake the component(s) (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) of the retest on which a score of Approaching Basic or below was attained on the spring test. At a minimum, the student shall score Approaching Basic on the English Language Arts and the Mathematics component(s) after the summer retest. Describe the LEA criteria that determine if a student is retained in 4 th grade more than once as a result of failure to score at or above the required Basic/Approaching Basic achievement level on LEAP. The decision to retain a student in 4th grade more than once as a result of failure to score at or above the achievement level required by the State in English language arts and/or Mathematics on LEAP shall be made by SBLC/SAT after reviewing the following information pertinent to each student: Age Previous retentions School performance Summer remediation program participation Attendance during the regular school year Special circumstances

Describe the criteria that determine to what grade a student will be promoted if he/she has repeated the 4th grade at least once as a result of failure to pass LEAP and if he/she will be 12 years old on or before September 30th of the next school year. (Bulletin 1566 §703 C.) Following this review, consultation with the parent will be held and a decision made. In cases where agreement cannot be reached, the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction will review all data and make the final decision. A student who has repeated 4 th grade may be promoted to the 5th grade only. Students retained in the 4th grade shall take all four components of LEAP. For promotion purposes, however, a student shall score at or above the achievement level required by the State on the English language arts and Mathematics components of LEAP only one time. 20

Describe the LEA's criteria for determining which 4th grade student(s) will be granted a Twenty Point Appeal, as outlined in the High Stakes Testing Policy. Describe the criteria used by the SBLC to grant the appeal. (Bulletin 1566 §707 D.) St. Tammany Parish, through its superintendent, may grant an appeal on behalf of individual students provided that all of the following criteria are met: The student's highest score in English language arts and/or mathematics on either the spring or summer LEAP test must fall within 20 scaled score points of the cutoff score at the achievement level required by the State. In the 4th grade, "Basic" is the required achievement level; The student shall have a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale in the subject on which he/she scored below the achievement level required by the State on LEAP; The student must have attended LEAP Summer Remediation; The student must have taken the LEAP retest given after the LEAP summer remediation program has been concluded; The student must have met State-mandated attendance regulations during the regular school year and local regulations during the LEAP summer remediation program; and The principal and the SBLC/SAT must review student work samples and attest that the student exhibits the ability of performing at or above the at the achievement level required by the State in English language arts and/or Mathematics. Describe the fourth grade transitional program required for students who meet the criteria. (Bulletin 1566 §703 B.) Transitional 4th Grade Transitional 4th is an alternative program within regular education. The program is designed to meet the needs of a specific group of students at the 4 th grade level not receiving a minimum passing score on LEAP math and/or ELA required for promotion. The curriculum will target remediation of 4th grade GLE's in areas where the student scored approaching basic or unsatisfactory combined with the 5th grade GLE's. The student will take the 4th grade LEAP during spring testing. If they score a Basic/Approaching Basic combination on the math and ELA, score Approaching Basic/Approaching Basic in Science and Social Studies, and pass district requirements for promotion. The student will be promoted to 6th grade. If the student does not meet the criteria for promotion to 6 th grade, the student's grade placement will be 5th grade. Describe the locally-mandated attendance requirements for summer remediation that are used as a criterion for exceptions to High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707) To be considered in attendance for LEAP Testing, a student cannot miss more than 3 days of absences.

C. Elementary Program of Studies Requirements 21

1. The elementary grades shall provide a foundation in fundamentals of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, Health, Physical Education, and the Arts. (Bulletin 741 §2313) 2. Each elementary school shall provide 63,720 minutes of instructional time per year.(Bulletin 741 §333) 3. Each grade level, grades one through eight, shall teach the content subject areas outlined in Bulletin 741, ensuring strict adherence to the Louisiana Content Standards and Grade-Level Expectations and the Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum or a locally-developed and approved curriculum. (Bulletin 741 §2301) 4. Each LEA should adhere to the suggested and required minimum minutes for elementary grades.(Bulletin 741 §2313) 5. Elementary schools shall offer an articulated foreign language program for 30 minutes daily in grades four through six and 150 minutes per week in grades seven and eight. (Bulletin 741 §2313) List detailed and specific LEA promotion requirements by grade level for K-8. If promotion criteria for 4th and 8th grade students exceed the state requirements of passing LEAP, list any additional requirements. Promotion: Kindergarten Students will be promoted from kindergarten to a transitional first grade or a regular first grade. The DIAL-3, Dr. Richard Gentry's Spelling Assessment, portfolio contents, teacher recommendation, and parental permission will determine recommendation for the transitional class. The criterion for promotion to first grade for kindergarten students is the successful completion of kindergarten as demonstrated by the St. Tammany Parish Kindergarten Student Evaluation Report. Children who have not attended kindergarten must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a series of academic readiness tests, letters and sounds inventory, math assessment and Richard Gentry's Spelling Assessment. Students with characteristics of dyslexia,who are served in a multisensory structured language program, follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students. Promotion: Transitional First Grade The number of instructional minutes in transitional first grade will be the same as a regular first grade as described in Bulletin 741. A student who has completed transitional first grade shall be assigned to first grade. Other grade placements shall be referred to SBLC. Students with characteristics of dyslexia who are served in a multisensory structured language program follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students. Promotion: Grade 1 If a student in first grade receives a "U" (Unsatisfactory/Not grasping stated goals) in reading or math as indicated on the fourth grading period, the SBLC/SAT shall review available data pertaining to the student's reading or math proficiency to determine promotion or retention. The reading or math proficiency of the student shall be determined by using the informal teacher assessment portfolio which includes a collection of the following: DIBELS assessment results three times per year, writing sample, word recognition test, basal reading series assessments, math sample, spelling test, Voyager Passport Program, and any other pertinent information. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e. portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotal records. Students with characteristics of 22

dyslexia, who are served in a multisensory structured language program, follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students. Promotion: Grades 2 and 3 A student shall not be promoted in grades 2 and 3 if s/he fails the following: Reading or Math or Two of these subjects: Language, Science, Social Studies, and Spelling Students with characteristics of dyslexia, who are served in a multisensory structured language program, follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students. Promotion: Grades 4, 5, and 6 A student shall not be promoted in grades 4, 5, and 6 if s/he fails the following: Reading or Math or Any two major subjects: Language, Spelling, Science, Social Studies or A combination of any one major subject and two minor subjects: Health/Physical Education, Music, Art, or other electives. Students with characteristics of dyslexia, who are served in a multisensory structured language program, follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students. A student may not be promoted to the 5th grade until s/he has scored at or above the Basic achievement level on either the English Language Arts or Mathematics component on the 4 th grade LEAP and at the Approaching Basic achievement level on the other (hereafter referred to as the Basic/Approaching Basic combination). For promotional purposes, however, a student shall score at or above the Basic/Approaching Basic combination on the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP and pass the required subjects. Promotion: Grades 7 and 8 A student shall not be promoted in grades 7, and 8 if s/he fails the following: Any two major subjects (Reading, Math, English, Social Studies, Science) or Any three minor subjects (all other subjects). or Any combination of one major subject and two minor subjects Students with characteristics of dyslexia, who are served in a multisensory structured language program, follow the same criteria for promotion as all other students.

23

A student may not be promoted to the 9th grade until s/he has scored at or above the Basic achievement level on either the English Language Arts or Mathematics component on the 8 th grade LEAP and at the Approaching Basic achievement level on the other (hereafter referred to as the Basic/Approaching Basic combination). For promotional purposes, however, a student shall score at or above the Basic/Approaching Basic combination on the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP and pass the required subjects.

Describe the elementary foreign language program for academically able students in grades 4­8. o Explain the local definition of the term "grade level" or "on grade level." A student is academically able for foreign language if recommended by the principal and the reading teacher and if s/he satisfies all of the following criteria: Scores a minimum of 75 percentile in reading on the iLEAP (or other norm-referenced test for students transferring into the system). Has a B average or higher in language arts. Has demonstrated interest in learning foreign language.

o List the model program sites. St. Tammany Parish has two programs designated with model status. They are Mandeville Junior High and Fontainebleau Junior High. o List the designated subject area(s) for foreign language. o An articulated elementary foreign language program for a minimum of 150 minutes per week in grades 7-8 shall be taught in the subject areas designated by the school for all academically able students. This program shall be optional for all others. o Parents of the academically able will be notified of student participation in the foreign language program and of the designated area for foreign language. Students in grades 4-8 who do not meet the definitions of academically able may be scheduled whenever appropriate as long as they receive a minimum of 150 minutes of instruction each week.

o

If your LEA was granted a waiver from full implementation of the elementary foreign language program, include a copy of the approval letter in the appendix.

A waiver has been requested for a foreign language program in grades 4-8.

V. Promotion 9 ­ 12

A. Carnegie Credit Time Requirements 1. Since each school shall provide 63,720 minutes of instructional time per year, the minimum amount of instructional time required for one Carnegie credit to be earned shall be as follows:(Bulletin 741 §907) a. 10,620 minutes for a six-period schedule; b. 9,103 minutes for a seven-period schedule; and 24

c. 7,965 minutes for eight-period or 4 x 4 block schedules. d. For other schedule configurations, a minimum of 7,965 minutes of instructional time must be met for one Carnegie credit to be earned. e. For credit recovery courses, follow the policy in §2324 of Bulletin 741. f. For distance learning courses, time requirements do not apply.(Bulletin 741§2395 A.2.) List detailed and specific LEA Carnegie unit requirements and promotion requirements by grade level for grades 9-12. Promotion: Grades 9-12 A student in the secondary grades (9-12) is placed on a grade level based on the number of Carnegie units earned. To meet graduation requirements, a student repeats only the required subjects failed. To earn credit in a subject, a student must be enrolled and be in attendance in a course 83 days during the semester. Classification is on the basis of the total number of units earned. The following are the grade classifications for students in St. Tammany Parish public schools: 2011-2012 Sophomore Junior Senior Graduate 5 units 11 units 17 units 24 units

Fourth year graduating seniors must enroll in a minimum of five periods on a short day schedule. Rank-in-Class will be adversely affected by a short day schedule. Each individual high school principal shall determine which athletic and extracurricular activities require graduating seniors to maintain a full seven period schedule. For athletics, dance team, student council, class/club officers, and cheerleaders, the academic requirements of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association will be the standard. All other eligibility requirements for these and other activities are at the discretion of the school. The school shall disseminate those requirements to the students and parents. Fifth year (or more) seniors follow the schedule that will complete their requirements for graduation. Local Requirements for Graduation Early Graduates After the request from the parent, in writing, for early graduation, the principal will verify the completion of all requirements for high school graduation. Commencement Participation For seniors who have not met the passing standard for GEE or LAA 2, if eligible, scores must be received from the State prior to the beginning of the St. Tammany Parish Public School System's commencement ceremonies. In order to participate in the commencement ceremonies at the high school level, a student must have completed all graduation requirements as specified by the State Department of Education, the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education, and the St. Tammany Parish School Board and be in good standing as far as discipline is concerned. In order to be in good standing, a student must be enrolled in their regularly scheduled classes at the school to which they have 25

been assigned and making satisfactory progress toward graduation. For example, a student is not in good standing if s/he is receiving instruction through Homebound, Operation JumpStart, or any other alternative services as a result of suspension, exclusion, or expulsion. English IV or Senior Applications in English Students enrolled in English IV or Senior Applications in English will be required complete all 4 parts of Senior Project MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION For incoming freshmen prior to 2008-2009, the minimum course requirements for graduation shall be the following: English 4 units Shall be English I, II, and III, in consecutive order; and English IV, Business English, or Senior Applications in English. Mathematics 3 units (Effective for incoming freshmen 2005-2006 and beyond.) All students must complete one of the following: Algebra I (1 unit) or Algebra I-Pt. 1 and Algebra I-Pt. 2 (2 units) or Integrated Mathematics I (1 unit) The remaining unit(s) shall come from the following: Integrated Mathematics II, Integrated Mathematics III, Geometry, Algebra II, Financial Mathematics, Advanced Mathematics I, Advanced Mathematics II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Probability and Statistics, and Discrete Mathematics.

Science Shall be the following:

3 units

1 unit of Biology 1 unit from the following physical science cluster: Physical Science, Integrated Science, Chemistry I, Physics I, Physics of Technology I 1 unit from the following courses: Aerospace Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Physics II, Physics of Technology II, Agriscience II, an additional course from the physical science cluster, or a locally initiated science elective. Students may not take both Integrated Science and Physical Science Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II and is an elective course. Social Studies 3 units Shall be American History, 1/2 unit of Civics or AP American Government, 1/2 unit of Free Enterprise; and 1 of the following: World History, World Geography, Western Civilization, or AP European History. Health Education Physical Education 1/2 unit 1 1/2 units 26

Shall be Physical Education I and Physical Education II, or Adapted Physical Education for eligible special education students. A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education may be used toward graduation. NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible. Electives TOTAL 8 units 23 units

2. For incoming freshmen in 2008-2009 and beyond who are completing the Louisiana Core Curriculum, the minimum course requirements for graduation shall be the following: English 4 units Shall be English I, II, and III, and English IV or Senior Applications in English Mathematics 4 units Algebra I (1 unit) or Algebra I-Pt. 1 and Algebra I-Pt. 2 (2 units) Geometry The remaining units shall come from the following: Algebra II, Financial Mathematics, Senior Applications in Math, Advanced Mathematics I, Advanced Mathematics II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Probability and Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, or a locally initiated elective approved by BESE as a math substitute. Science Shall be the following: 3 units

1 unit of Biology 1 unit from the following physical science cluster: Physical Science, Integrated Science, Chemistry I, Physics I, Physics of Technology I 1 unit from the following courses: Aerospace Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Physics II, Physics of Technology II, Agriscience II, Anatomy and Physiology, an additional course from the physical science cluster, or a locally initiated elective approved by BESE as a science substitute. Students may not take both Integrated Science and Physical Science Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II and is an elective course.

Social Studies

3 units

27

Shall be American History, 1/2 unit of Civics or AP American Government, 1/2 unit of Free Enterprise; and 1 of the following: World History, World Geography, Western Civilization, or AP European History. Health Education 1/2 unit Physical Education 1 1/2 units Shall be Physical Education I and Physical Education II, or Adapted Physical Education for eligible special education students. A maximum of 4 units of Physical Education may be used toward graduation. NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible. Electives TOTAL 8 units 24 units

3. For incoming freshmen in 2008-2009 and beyond who are completing the Louisiana Core 4 Curriculum, the minimum course requirements shall be the following: English Shall be English I, II, III, and English IV Mathematics Algebra I (1 unit) or Algebra I-Pt. 2 Geometry Algebra II The remaining unit shall come from the following: Financial Mathematics, Senior Applications in Math, Advanced Mathematics I, Advanced Mathematics II, Pre-Calculus, Calculus, Probability and Statistics, Discrete Mathematics, or a locally-initiated elective approved by BESE as a math substitute. 4 units 4 units

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Science Shall be the following:

4 units

1 unit of Biology 1 unit of Chemistry 2 units from the following courses: Physical Science, Integrated Science, Physics I, Physics of Technology I, Aerospace Science, Biology II, Chemistry II, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Physics II, Physics of Technology II, Agriscience II, Anatomy and Physiology, or a locally initiated elective approved by BESE as a science substitute. Students may not take both Integrated Science and Physical Science Agriscience I is a prerequisite for Agriscience II and is an elective course. A student completing a Career and Technical Area of Concentration may substitute a BESE/Board of Regents approved IBC-related course from within the student's Area of Concentration for the 4th required science unit Social Studies Shall be the following 1/2 unit of Civics or AP American Government 1/2 unit of Free Enterprise 1 unit of American History 1 unit from the following: World History, World Geography, Western Civilization, or AP European History 1 unit from the following: World History, World Geography, Western Civilization, AP European History, Law Studies, Psychology, Sociology, or African American Studies. A student completing a Career and Technical Area of Concentration may substitute a BESE/Board of Regents approved IBC-related course from within the student's Area of Concentration for the 4th required social studies unit. 4 units

Health Education 1/2 unit Physical Education 1 1/2 units Shall be Physical Education I and Physical Education II, or Adapted Physical Education for eligible special education students. A maximum of four units of Physical Education may be used toward graduation. NOTE: The substitution of JROTC is permissible. Foreign Language 2 units Shall be 2 units in the same foreign language or 2 Speech courses Arts 1 unit 29

1 unit Fine Arts Survey or 1 unit of Art (§2333), Dance (§2337), Music (§2355), Theatre Arts (§2333), or Applied Arts. A student completing a Career and Technical Area of Concentration may substitute a BESE/Board of Regents approved IBC-related course from within the student's area of concentration for the required applied arts unit. Electives 3 units TOTAL 24 units ADDITIONAL HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Graduation Exit Exam Students entering high school on or before the 2009-2010 school year must meet the GEE requirement for graduation. In addition to completing the minimum number of Carnegie Units as prescribed in Bulletin 741, a student shall be required to pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of GEE and either the science or social studies portions of GEE to graduate. The English language arts and Mathematics components of the GEE or LAA 2, if eligible, shall first be administered to students in the 10th grade. The science and social studies components of the GEE or LAA 2, if eligible, shall be administered to students in the 11th grade. A student with a disability, as defined by the IDEA, could be eligible to receive a diploma if the student passes all but one of the required components [ELA, math, (either science or social studies)] of the GEE or LAA 2, if eligible, meets all other graduation requirements, and has the required documentation for the waiver request, including evidence that the student participated in remediation as well as how the disability(ies) impacted the student's inability to pass the assessment. The provision for students eligible for the flexibility granted under this role applies only to graduating seniors. Remediation and retake opportunities will be provided for students who do not pass a test. Schools will inform students and parents in writing of the remediation opportunities and will document refusal of remediation opportunities. Students transferring to any high school within the school system shall be notified of the requirement of passing the Graduation Exit Exam. End of Course Tests Students entering high school in the 2010-2011 school year and beyond must meet the EOC requirement for graduation. All students enrolled in a subject, where the State has developed an End of Course Test, must take the test during the time frame as identified by the State. The end of course test results must be counted as the final exam for the course counting 20% of the fourth quarterly grading period. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA AND ENDORSEMENTS Standard Diploma For the incoming freshmen class of 2007-2008, twenty-three units are required for graduation. In addition to completing a minimum of 23 Carnegie units of credit, students must pass the English language arts and mathematics portions of the GEE and either the science or social studies portions of GEE to earn a standard high school diploma.

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Beginning with the incoming freshmen class of 2010-2011 and beyond, there are two diploma types. Students will enter one of the diploma pathways based on criteria set forth in Bulletin 741. For the incoming freshmen class of 2008-2009 and beyond, twenty-four units are required for graduation with a College/Career Diploma. In addition to completing the minimum of 24 Carnegie units of credit, students must pass either the GEE or EOC as outlined in Bulletin 741. For the incoming freshmen class of 2010-2011 and beyond, twenty-three units are required for graduation with a Career Diploma. In addition to completing the minimum of 23 Carnegie units of credit, students must pass either the EOC as outlined in Bulletin 741. For the incoming freshmen class of 2010-2011 and beyond, completion of ROTC I and ROTC II, will meet the graduation requirement for the PE and Health. For the incoming freshmen class of 2011-2012 and beyond, civics will be a full credit required for graduation. Free Enterprise will be deleted as a course with the content being incorporated in the civics course.

Academic Endorsement Students meeting the requirements for a standard diploma, and satisfying the following performance indicators shall be eligible for an academic endorsement to a standard diploma: 1. Students shall meet the current course requirements for the Tuition Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS) Opportunity Award. 2. Students shall complete one additional Carnegie unit in mathematics, science, or social studies. 3. Students shall pass all four components of the GEE with a score of Basic or above, or one of the following combinations of scores with the English Language Arts score at Basic or above: · One Approaching Basic, 1 Mastery or Advanced, Basic or above in the remaining two · Two Approaching Basic, 2 Mastery or above. 4. Students shall complete one of the following requirements: · Senior Project- The requirements for the senior project will be set forth by St. Tammany Parish School Board in accordance with BESE policy. · One Carnegie unit in an AP course with a score of 3 or higher on the AP exam- A student must complete the AP course and test prior to the senior year for the student to meet this criteria for an academic endorsement. · One Carnegie unit in an IB course with a score of 4 or higher on the IB exam · Three college hours of non-remedial, articulated credit in mathematics, social studies, science, foreign language, or English language arts. 5. Students shall meet the current minimum grade-point average requirement for the TOPS Opportunity Award. 6. Students shall achieve an ACT Composite Score of 23.

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Career/Technical Endorsement Students meeting the requirements for a standard diploma and satisfying the following performance indicators shall be eligible for a career/technical endorsement to a standard diploma: 1. Students shall meet the current course requirements for the Tuition Opportunity Program for Students (TOPS) Opportunity Award or the TOPS Tech Award. 2. Students shall pass the English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies components of the GEE at the Approaching Basic level or above. 3. Students shall complete a minimum of ninety hours of work-based learning or complete a senior project in their area of concentration with 20 hours of related work-based learning and complete one of the following requirements: · Industry-based certification from the list of industry-based certifications approved by BESE · Three college credits in a Career/Technical area that articulate to a postsecondary institution, either by actually obtaining the credits and/or being waived from having to take such hours. 4. Students shall meet the current minimum grade-point average requirement for the TOPS Opportunity Award. 5. Students shall achieve an ACT Composite Score (or SAT Equivalent) of 20 or a Silver Level on the WorkKeys Assessment.

Certificate of Achievement Criteria The Certificate of Achievement is an exit document issued to a student with a disability after s/he has achieved certain competencies and has met specified conditions. The receipt of a Certificate of Achievement shall not limit a student's continuous eligibility for services under Bulletin 1706 unless the student has reached the age of 22 by the official date that school starts for students. The student is eligible for a Certificate of Achievement if: The student has a disability under the criteria in the Pupil Appraisal Handbook. The student has participated in LEAP Alternate Assessment Level 1 (LAA-1) or LEAP Alternate Assessment Level 2 (LAA-2). The student has completed at least twelve years of school or has reached the age of 22 (not to include students younger than 16) by the official date that school starts for students. The student has met attendance requirements according to Bulletin 741. The student has addressed the general education curriculum as reflected on the student's IEP. Transition planning has been completed and documented. Describe the LEA's policy for awarding ½ unit of credit.

One-half unit of credit for all one-unit coursesshall be awarded to the students who successfully complete a semester course.

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B. High School Graduation Requirements 1. General requirements for a high school diploma and a Certificate of Achievement may be found in §2317 of Bulletin 741(revised 2012). 2. A Louisiana state high school diploma cannot be denied to a student who meets the state minimum high school graduation requirements; however, in those instances in which BESE authorizes an LEA to impose more stringent academic requirements, a school system diploma may be denied. (Bulletin 741§2317) 3. Graduation requirements for the College and Career Diploma may be found in §2318 of Bulletin 741, including the requirements for the following students: a. Students who entered the ninth grade prior to 2008-2009, b. Students entering the ninth grade in 2008-2009 and beyond who are completing the Louisiana Core 4 Curriculum, and c. Students entering the ninth grade in 2008-2009 and beyond who decide after their second year of high school to complete the Basic Core Curriculum. 4. Graduation requirements for the Career Diploma may be found in §2319 of Bulletin 741. a. Any student who is at least fifteen years of age or will attain the age of fifteen during the next school year who scored at least at the Approaching Basic level on either the English Language Arts or Mathematics component of the eighth grade LEAP test and meets the criteria established in the Pupil Progression Plan of the LEA where the student is enrolled may be promoted to the ninth grade for the purpose of pursuing a career diploma. (Bulletin 1566 §503) i. The student must successfully complete the LEAP summer remediation program in the subject area of the component of the eighth grade LEAP test on which he/she scored at the Unsatisfactory level and must take the summer retest.

ii. Acceptable Attendance Standards: For the 2009-2010 school year, students must meet the attendance requirements in the Pupil Progression Plan. For 20102011 and following, students must meet the state minimum attendance requirements to be eligible to receive grades. iii. Acceptable Behavior Standards: Students must meet the behavior requirements in the Pupil Progression Plan. iv. A student must participate in a dropout prevention and mentoring programapproved by the BESE during his first year in high school. Acceptable programs include research-based dropout prevention programs such as Jobs for America's Graduates Multi-Year Program, Graduation Coach Program, or the school district may submit to the DOE a proven-effective, research-based dropout prevention and mentoring program other than the two listed above for approval by BESE. All programs must include the following components: (a) An academic catch-up component to address all the areas of student deficiency, (b) An adult mentoring component with an emphasis on workforce awareness and readiness, (c) Work awareness and work readiness skills component, and 33

(d) A work-based learning component, such as job shadowing/job exploration/paid internships. b. Every student who seeks to pursue a career diploma shall have the written permission of his/her parent or other legal guardian on the Career Diploma Participation Form after a consultation with the school guidance counselor or other school administrator. The student and parent must be informed of the advantages and disadvantages of the different diploma pathways. The signature of the student and parent or guardian indicates that a determination has been made that the pursuit of a career diploma is appropriate and in the best interest of the student. The school principal shall also sign the form, acknowledging that appropriate counseling has taken place. (Bulletin 1566 §503) List the acceptable behavior requirements for students who are being promoted to the ninth grade in the career diploma pathway and who have not met the LEAP promotional standard for entering the ninth grade. Incoming freshmen of 2010-2011 may enter the career diploma pathway if they are in good standing as far as discipline is concerned. In order to be in good standing, a student must be enrolled in their regularly scheduled classes at the school which they have been assigned and receiving instruction at that assigned school. List any other local requirements for students entering the career diploma pathway who are at least fifteen years of age or will attain the age of fifteen during the next school year and who did not meet the promotion standard, but who score Approaching Basic on either the math or English component of the eighth grade LEAP test. St. Tammany Parish did not add any other local requirements.

5. Prior to the beginning of the school year, students may switch from the Career Diploma pathway to the College and Career Diploma pathway or vice versa, provided all requirements are met. (Bulletin 741 §2317 G. and H.) 6. All ninth graders in the College and Career Diploma pathway will be enrolled in the LA Core 4 curriculum. After the student has attended high school a minimum of two years, the student, with parental permission, may choose to complete the LA Basic Core Curriculum, provided all the requirements are met. (Bulletin 741 §2318 A.) 7. In addition to completing a minimum of 23 or 24 Carnegie credits, students must meet the assessment requirements to earn a College and Career diploma or a Career Diploma. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) a. Incoming freshmen prior to 2010-2011must pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of the GEE or LAA2 and either the Science or Social Studies components of the GEE or LAA2 to earn a high school diploma. i. Students with disabilities identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act shall be eligible for a waiver if the student meets all other graduation requirements and is able to pass two of the three required components of GEE or LAA 2,if the DOE review determines the student's disability significantly impacts his/her ability to pass the final required GEE test. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) 34

b. Incoming freshmen in 2010-2011 and beyond must pass End-of-Course Tests in the following categories: i. English II or English III ii. Algebra I or Geometry iii. Biology or American History c. Students with disabilities identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act shall be eligible for a waiver if the student meets all other graduation requirements and is able to pass two of the three required EOC tests, and if the DOE review determines the student's disability significantly impacts his/her ability to pass the final required EOC test. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) 8. Any student entering the ninth grade having scored Unsatisfactory in math and/or English on the eighth grade LEAP testmust enroll in and pass a high school remedial course approved by BESE in the Unsatisfactory subject(s) (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) before earning Carnegie credit for any other English or mathematics course.(Bulletin 1566 §503 B.) C. Scheduling 1. The purpose of scheduling within available time frames and staff resources shall be to meet the educational needs of students.(Bulletin 741 §901) a. A copy of the daily/weekly schedule of work providing for all subject areas in the curriculum shall be on file in the principal's office and shall be posted at all times. 2. Prior to student scheduling each year, each middle, junior, or high school shall provide the parent/guardian/legal custodian with a listing of course offerings, the content of each, and high school graduation requirements, where appropriate. a. By the end of the eighth grade, each student, including students with disabilities, shall develop, with the input of his family, anIndividual Graduation Plan (IGP). Such a plan shall include a sequence of courses that is consistent with the student's stated goals for one year after graduation. b. Each student's IGP shall be reviewed annually thereafter by the student, parents, and school advisor and revised as needed. c. Every middle, junior, or high school shall require that the parent/guardian/legal custodian sign his/her child's schedule form and IGP for students in grades 8-12. 3. Student scheduling shall be individually appropriate and flexible to allow entry into and exit from courses and course sequences that are available for meeting curricular requirements.

VI. Retention Policy

State the number of times a student may be retained in each grade or level. The St. Tammany Parish School Board and the Louisiana State Department of Education shall base retention of a student on the student's failure to meet the criteria for promotion as 35

established. A child is retained in kindergarten only at the recommendation of the SBLC/SAT and parent permission. A student in grades 1-8 who has been in the same grade two years may be considered for promotion by the SBLC, except where prohibited by BESE. Recommendations or requests by parents to retain students who have met Pupil Progression Plan requirements for promotion shall be referred to SBLC/SAT. The committee will study all available records on the student. If the retention being considered involves a move from one school to another, both principals must communicate prior to the final decision. Following this review, consultation will be held between the principal, teacher(s), and parent(s) and a decision shall be made. In cases where agreement cannot be reached, the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction will review all data and make a final decision. Students at the high school level can only be promoted by earning the appropriate number of Carnegie units to progress to the next grade. Describe any additional LEA policies that may determine student retention. Students who do not meet the standard for promotion, meet attendance policies, or pass the high stakes testing, where applicable, may be retained. Describe the intervention/remediation strategies to be used to prevent retention or in lieu of student retention at the lower grades. St. Tammany Parish Public Schools has developed learning experiences that are designed to address targeted literacy and numeracy skills for at risk students in the lower grades. Small group and individual instruction focusing in reading, writing and mathematics are some of the instructional structures used. Extending the school day, the school year and intervention programs during the school day provides a variety of methods for students to access content. We use Camp Read in the summer for 3rd grade students, STARS for 2nd grade students, Voyager, My Reading Coach, and FastForWord. The elementary schools also have Literacy Coaches, trained teachers, who come into the classroom to provide job embedded professional development and model teaching.

VII.Acceleration

Describe the policies and procedures that address the placement of students who demonstrate that they will benefit more from the instructional program at an advanced grade level. Address criteria for both grades K­8 and grades 9­12. The K-8 SBLC/SAT or IEP Committee is involved in the decision-making process. Standardized tests, classroom grades, evaluation results, and teacher recommendations are considered for the appropriate placement for the student. For grades 9-12, dual enrollment, honors curriculum and advanced placement classes are offered. Students progress through high school by acquiring the appropriate number of Carnegie Units for each grade level. Describe the LEA criteria for acceleration, including who is involved in the decisionmaking process, what evaluation criteria are used, and other local policies. The Student Assistance Team will be responsible for studying all available records and teacher observations on the student who is to be cross-graded. If the cross-grade placement being considered involves a move from one school to another, both principals or their designees must communicate prior to the final decision. Following this review, if cross-grade placement is merited, a conference will be held with the principals, teacher and parents. The student would attend the advanced grade which would provide an instructional program equal to his/her ability. The time spent in that grade would be determined by the subject area where acceleration is noted. If an agreement between the principals cannot be reached, the Assistant Superintendent of 36

Curriculum and Instruction will review all data and make a recommendation to the Superintendent for final approval. Describe any applicable policies and procedures for grade "skipping." The "skipping" of elementary grades generally is not advocated; however, it is permissible under certain circumstances. The name of the student under consideration will be submitted to a school level committee composed of the principal and teachers from both grade levels. The committee will study all available records on the student. Their recommendation shall be referred to the SBLC/SAT. If the promotion being considered involves a move from one school to another, both principals or their designees must communicate prior to the final decision. Following this review, consultations will be held between the principal, teacher(s), and parents and a final recommendation made and forwarded to the Superintendent for approval. In cases where an agreement cannot be reached, the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction will review all data and make a recommendation to the Superintendent for final approval. Describe any policies governing services for gifted students. In order to participate in Gifted Program classes, a student must first be classified as gifted. Students are referred by teachers or parents to the Student Assistance Teams at their schools for screening; the SBLC/SAT then refers students who have passed screening to the Pupil Appraisal Department for evaluation. Evaluation reports are completed within the 60 working days timeframe as established by the State. Once identified as gifted, St. Tammany addresses the unique needs of its gifted students through two distinctly different program options: (1) an academic program and (2) an enrichment pull-out program, KEEP (Keeping Education Exciting and Productive) in three centers across the parish. Through the IEP/IAP process, a decision is made regarding a student's placement in either the academically accelerated classes for grades preschool through 12 or the enrichment classes for grades 1 through 8. Instructional activities in both programs enhance not only the intellectual functioning of the gifted students, but also their creativity, leadership abilities, and self-concept. Additionally, both programs provide gifted students the opportunity to relate cognitively and effectively with their intellectual peers.

A. Carnegie Credit for Middle School Students 1. Students who intend to take a GLE-based course for Carnegie credit in middle school should successfully complete a seventh grade course in that content area that addresses both the seventh and eighth grade GLEs. Upon completion of the course, the LEA shall administer a test based on the eighth grade GLEs. The LEA shall publish in its Pupil Progression Plan the criteria for placement of students in the Carnegie credit course, one of which shall be the student's performance on the eighth grade GLE test. Other suggested criteria include the student's performance in the seventh grade course, standardized test scores, and teacher recommendation. All policies regarding Carnegie credit for middle school students are found in Bulletin 741 §2321. List the LEA requirements for placement of middle school students in Carnegie credit courses. Carnegie Credit Prior to High School 37

Credit earned prior to high school may receive a "P" or a letter grade. A "P" will be recorded on the high school transcript if the student has been awarded credit through passing a proficiency exam. A grade will be recorded on the high school transcript if the student received instruction from a secondary certified teacher in that content area in a State approved school and/or a transferred grade from a State approved school and pass the appropriate credit exam and take the end of course test, if applicable. Enrollment into Algebra I in the 8th Grade Placement into high school credit courses will be based on teacher recommendation, satisfactory standardized test score, academic performance in the previous grade level and passing of a GLE based assessment at 75%. Algebra I Credit at the 8th Grade Level If a junior high school plans to provide students the opportunity to earn Algebra I credit, the teacher providing the course instruction shall be certified to teach Algebra I and a student must pass the 8th Grade GLE mastery test. To receive Carnegie credit in Algebra I, a student must pass the course and must take the End of Course Test for Algebra I. The results for the End of Course Test will count for the final exam and 20% of the fourth quarterly grade. Students meeting the criteria to receive Carnegie credit at the junior high school shall receive a letter grade to be placed on their high school transcripts. The average of the first and second quarterly grades will become the first semester grade. The average of the third and fourth quarterly grades will become the second semester grade. Algebra I Credit at the Middle School Level Placement into Algebra I prior to the 8th grade will be based on teacher recommendation, exemplary performance of standardized test scores, exceptional academic performance in the previous grade level, passing of the curriculum based assessment for the 7 th grade GLE's and passing the State developed 8th grade GLE based assessment at 85%. To receive Carnegie credit in Algebra I, a student must pass the course and must take the End of Course Test for Algebra I. The results for the End of Course Test will count for the final exam and 20% of the fourth quarterly grade. Students meeting the criteria to receive Carnegie credit at the junior high school shall receive a letter grade to be placed on their high school transcripts. The average of the first and second quarterly grades will become the first semester grade. The average of the third and fourth quarterly grades will become the second semester grade. Geometry Credit for Students at the Junior High Level If a junior high school plans to provide students the opportunity to earn Geometry credit, the principal shall request authorization from the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction. The teacher providing the course instruction shall be certified to teach geometry. To be eligible to enroll in geometry, a student shall have earned Algebra I credit. The student must take the End of Course Test for Geometry. The results of the End of Course Test will count for the final exam and 20% of the fourth quarterly grade. Students meeting all criteria to receive Carnegie credit shall receive a letter grade on their high school transcripts. The average of the first and second quarterly grades will become the first semester grade. The average of the third and fourth quarterly grades will become the second semester grade. Foreign Language Credit at the 8th Grade Level

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Students enrolled in French or Spanish for two years at the junior high level will be eligible to take the high school level 1 credit exam if they: have a "B" average or higher in the course, calculated from the 1st , 2nd, and 3rd quarterly grades; and demonstrates classroom proficiency. *Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of the teacher with the approval of the appropriate supervisor. To earn high school credit in Level 1 of Spanish or French, a student must - pass the credit exam; and students meeting all criteria to receive Carnegie credit shall receive a letter grade on his/her high school transcripts. The average of the first and second quarterly grades will become the first semester grade. The average of the third and fourth quarterly grades will become the second semester grade. University Credit at the Junior High Level Students may earn a Carnegie credit from a university under the following circumstances: Be recognized and recommended to participate in university summer programs. Enroll in courses designated in Bulletin 741for middle school students eligible to earn Carnegie credit. Receive a grade equivalent of a B or higher in the coursework. Provide an official transcript/official documentation of completed coursework to the junior high school principal where the student is enrolled before the opening of the next school year. Schedule a local credit exam for the appropriate course with the designated testing agent before the opening of the next school year and receive a passing grade on the test. Students meeting all criteria to receive Carnegie credit shall receive a grade on their high school transcripts. When principals of junior high schools receive an official transcript from students as outlined above and also receive the results of the credit exam from the designated testing agent, they will inform in a written format the awarding of a Carnegie unit to the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction and to the high school principal. Students meeting all criteria to receive Carnegie credit shall receive a "P" grade with no quality points on their high school transcripts. B. Early Graduation 1. Each LEA shall develop an early graduation program allowing students to accelerate their academic progress, complete all state graduation requirements, and receive a high school diploma in less than four years. a. The early graduation program may include distance education (§2395), dual enrollment (§2327), and Carnegie credit earned in middle school (§2321). c. LEAs shall not have any policies or requirements that would prevent students from graduating in less than four years.

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Describe the components and requirements of the local early graduation program. After the request from the parent, in writing, for early graduation, the principal will verify the completion of all requirements for high school graduation.

C. Accelerated Student Achievement Pathway Program 1. The Accelerated Student Achievement Pathway (ASAP) Program is an intervention process of the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Office. This process is designed to allow students the opportunity to accelerate the attainment of Carnegie units required for high school graduation. If participating, describe the components and requirements of the local ASAP Program. St. Tammany Parish is not participating in the ASAP Program.

VIII. Remediation

A. Legal Authorization 1. R.S. 17:24.4 G provides that those students who fail to meet required proficiency levels on the state administered criterion-referenced tests of the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program shall receive remedial education programs that comply with regulations adopted by BESE. 2. R.S. 17:394­400 is the established legislation for the remedial education programs. 3. A program of remedial education shall be put into place by local parish and city school systems following regulations adopted by BESE pursuant to R.S. 17:24.4. All eligible students shall be provided with appropriate remedial instruction. (R.S. 17:395A). B. Purpose 1. The intent of remedial educational programs is to improve student achievement in the grade-appropriate skills identified as deficient on the state's criterion-referenced testing program for grades 4 and 8, the Graduation Exit Examination, and the End-of-Course Tests. (R.S.17:395 B and BESE Policy). C. State Mandatory Requirements 1. Any public elementary or secondary student, including a student with a disability participating in LEAP, who does not meet the performance standards established by the Department and approved by BESE, as measured by the State criterion-referenced test, shall be provided remedial education. (R.S. 17:397) a. For the Graduation Exit Examination (GEE) and LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 (LAA2) 50 hours of remediation per year shall be provided to students in each content area (English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies) 40

they do not pass. For End-of-Course (EOC) tests, 30 hours of remediation per year shall be provided for students who do not pass. b. Remediation in the form of summer school (50 hours of instruction per subject) shall be provided to both 4th and 8th grade students who score at the Approaching Basic or Unsatisfactory achievement level on the spring LEAP (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) tests. i. Summer remediation and end-of-summer retests must be offered by school systems at no cost to students who did not take the spring LEAP tests or who failed to achieve the required level on LEAP.

ii. All students with disabilities who participate in LEAP testing should receive services along with regular education students in summer programs, with special support provided as needed, including accommodations. iii. Students with disabilities who participate in LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 (LAA 1), are not eligible to attend the LEAP summer remediation programs. iv. Students with disabilities who participate in LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 (LAA 2), are eligible to attend LEAP summer remediation programs. c. Remediation shall be provided to students who score at the Unsatisfactory level on the LEAP Science and Social Studies tests. d. Remediation is recommended for 4th and 8th grade students who score at the Approaching Basic level on the LEAP Science and Social Studies tests. e. Each LEA shall provide transportation to and from the assigned LEAP Remediation summer site(s) from, at a minimum, a common pick up point.

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D. Local Program Development and Evaluation

1. In addition to any state guidelines, the remediation plan should describe clearly how the

remedial education program will be implemented for each grade level and for each test area of the LEAP/CRT. The plan must describe how all students, including students with disabilities, will be provided remediation to overcome their educational deficits, as identified through the results of the LEAP/CRT.

School

Year Intervention/Remediation Program

o List the objectives for your school year intervention/remediation program. During the school year, students who scored Approaching Basic or lower on LEAP/iLEAP in grades 3,4, 7 and 8, including students with disabilities, may attend a program specially designed, based on needs. o Describe the criteria used to determine which 4th and 8th grade students,including students participating in LAA 2,are eligible for school year intervention/remediation. Students who did not achieve the passing score, as determined by LEAP criteria, will be encouraged to participate in a remediation program. o Does the district suggest or require a minimum pupil/teacher ratio for remediation programs at each individual school? If so, what is the pupil/teacher ratio at each grade level? The suggested pupil/teacher ratio in remediation class is no more than 15:1. o Does the district suggest or require a minimum number of remediation services hours each school should provide to its eligible students? If so, what is the minimum? At a minimum, remediation is 50 hours in ELA and math with 20 hours remediation in science and social studies. o Approximately when will the school year intervention/remediation programs begin in your district? Intervention and remediation programs begin in October. o Describe the criteria used to select teachers and/or paraprofessionals who provide instruction in the school year intervention/remediation. All teachers and para-educators must apply for employment in the summer program. A thorough screening, along with interviews and recommendations, provide a rigorous selection process. o Describe the materials and methodology to be used throughout the district in school year intervention/remediation. The district uses commercially published, SDE developed, and teacher developed materials for the instructional program. The methodology employed is specific to the needs of the student. o Describe the form of documentation collected from students/parents who refuse school year remediation services.

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The school must secure written parental refusal to participate in the LEAP Remediation program once the parent has been fully informed of the ramifications of the refusal. o Describe how science and social studies remediation is implemented. In grades 4, 5 and 8: Instruction in science shall include inquiry, physical science, life science, earth and space science and environmental science. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual understanding of all the science strands. Special curriculum materials will be used by the classroom teachers for remediation within the classroom. These materials include but are not limited to: PASS on Paper, PASS, GLE Focus lessons, comprehensive curriculum, and ancillary materials including computer software, paperback books, novels, periodicals, newspapers, and practice books. These materials shall supplement and reinforce those methods and materials used in the regular programs. Instruction in social studies shall include geography, civics, economics and history. Special curriculum materials will be used by the classroom teachers for remediation within the classroom. These materials include but are not limited to: PASS on Paper, PASS, GLE Focus lessons, comprehensive curriculum, and ancillary materials including computer software, paperback books, novels, periodicals, newspapers, and practice books. These materials shall supplement and reinforce those methods and materials used in the regular programs. o Describe the district's plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for school year remediation. Plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for remediation are part of the district strategic plan and each school improvement plan. At the district level, state, federal, and local funds are used for the remediation program. o Describe the district's plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students who are participating in school year remediation. Data on each child is compiled following unsatisfactory results on LEAP. Locally developed assessments determine progress toward tested goals. Summer Remediation Program o List the objectives for your summer remediation program. The summer remediation program shall be based on performance objectives related to educational achievement in grade appropriate skills addressed through the statewide curriculum standards for required English language arts and mathematics and shall provide services designed to meet the educational needs of each participating student which includes students with disabilities. o Describe the criteria used to determine which 4th and 8th grade students are eligible for summer remediation. Students, who did not achieve the passing score, as determined by LEAP criteria, will be encouraged to participate in a remediation program.

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o Does the district suggest or require a minimum pupil/teacher ratio for summer remediation programs at each individual school? If so, what is the pupil/teacher ratio at each grade level? The suggested pupil/teacher ratio in remediation class is no more than 15:1. o Describe the schedule for your summer remediation program. Please be reminded that the district must schedule a minimum of 50 hours per subject at both 4th and 8th grade levels. The summer remediation program is scheduled for 20 days at 4 hours a day in June prior to testing. o Describe the criteria used to select teachers and/or paraprofessionals who provide instruction in the summer remediation. Please be reminded that all teachers selected must be certified. All teachers and paraeducators must apply for employment in the summer program. A thorough screening, along with interviews and recommendations, provide a rigorous selection process. o Describe the materials and methodology to be used throughout the district insummer remediation. The district uses commercially published, SDE developed, and teacher developed materials for the instructional program. The methodology employed is specific to the needs of the student.

o Describe the form of documentation collected for students and parents who refuse summer remediation services. The school must secure written parental refusal to participate in the LEAP Summer Remediation program once the parent has been fully informed of the ramifications of the refusal. o Describe the district's plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for summer remediation. Plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for remediation are part of the district strategic plan and each school improvement plan. At the district level, state, federal, and local funds are used for the remediation program. o Describe the district's plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students who are participating in summer remediation. Data on each child is compiled following unsatisfactory results on LEAP. Locally developed assessments determine progress toward tested goals.

GEE,

LAA 2, and EOC Remediation

o Describe the GEE, LAA 2, and EOC remediation provided for students. Include the following: 44

o

Program Description o Student selection criteria Students who do not make a passing score on the GEE/EOC/LAA2 as determined by the state cutoff score are provided remediation opportunities. o Pupil/Teacher ratio The suggested pupil/teacher ratio is 15 to 1. o Instructional time Students will be offered a minimum of 50 hours during the year and summer for GEE/LAA2 remediation. Student will be offered a minimum of 30 hours during the year and summer for EOC remediation. o Selection criteria for teachers and/or paraprofessionals Secondary certified English, mathematics, science and social studies teachers, employed by the system, shall be contracted to provide the remedial instruction. The summer and extended day program will provide remediation prior to testing for those students who avail themselves of the opportunity. o Materials and methodology to be used An individualized program, taught by a secondary certified teacher, shall be used for the extended day program and for the remediation courses which are locallyapproved electives. Course content conforms to grade level expectations and state requirements. o Program type ­ Examples: remediation courses, after-school tutoring, Saturday tutoring, summer school, other: List all that apply Students may take a remediation course using an elective period during the regular school day for ½ unit credit for eighteen weeks (i.e., English or math remediation). Students may take the remediation after school and will be expected to provide their own transportation. Eligible Special Education students will be included in the remediation program. Coordination will be provided through a status report completed by the remediation teacher. Students may participate in the summer remediation program prior to the June retesting opportunity. o Documentation of students' and parents' refusal to accept remediation If a student and his parent refuse GEE/EOC/LAA2 remediation, an appropriate form must be completed at the school, documenting the refusal of remediation.

o Plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for remediation Plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for remediation are part of the district strategic plan and each school improvement plan. At the district level, state, federal, and local funds are used for the remediation program.

45

o Evaluation plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students Fifty percent of the students completing the remedial program will have passed the corresponding graduate exit test.

IX. Alternative Schools/Programs/Settings

A. Definition 1. Alternative schools/programs serve students who are not succeeding in the traditional educational setting and offer a venue which aids in preventing these students from dropping out of school. Alternative schools/programs provide educational and other services to students who have a variety of behavioral and other needs which cannot be met adequately in a traditional school setting. (Refer toBulletin 741 §2903 and Bulletin 131:Louisiana Alternative Education Standards) List the written policies for all alternatives to regular placements. Alternatives to Regular Placement Regular Education Accommodations/Modifications Students who have a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities, such as walking, seeing, speaking, breathing, or learning may qualify for reasonable accommodations and/or modifications within the classroom setting. Referral may be made by parents and teachers. Review by the SBLC/SAT with at least one person knowledgeable about the suspected disability and one person knowledgeable of the student. Parents and students are encouraged to be involved in the identification process. Parents are provided a copy of Parent/Student Rights. A determination of eligibility will be made by the committee. Students determined eligible under § 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, LA Act 854 and Act 306 will have an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP) developed. The IAP will be reviewed at least annually. Parents will receive a copy of each IAP. Parish developed procedures and process are followed for identification, assessment, and provision of services.

Special Education For students who are not successful in regular education, consideration should be given to determine if the student is eligible for special education programs. A referral can be made by parents or teachers for students ages 3 to 21. The Student Assistance Team, or a child search team when appropriate, will review and make recommendations for evaluation and assessment by the Pupil Appraisal Team, if necessary. Special programs will be provided for students who are identified are evaluated by Pupil Appraisal Services as having an exceptionality. Evaluative criteria for eligibility screening and evaluation for each exceptionality will be commensurate with the SDE Pupil Appraisal Handbook, as well as Act 754, Act 750 and Bulletin741 IEP's are developed annually, or at other times deemed necessary, by teachers, parents, and other appropriate people. It will be determined in the IEP conferences whether or not a student will receive special education services. 46

Policies adopted by the St. Tammany Parish Public Schools assure that the individually designed regular instructional programs developed for the exceptional students will be reflected in the student's IEP. Initial placement shall be made only after informed written parental consent is obtained. This placement will be reviewed at each IEP conference. Individually designed instruction may take place in regular classrooms, resource rooms, self-contained or special school settings. The placement decision in this program must be reflected in the student's IEP. The IEP/IAP will clearly state the following: Students will address the grade level general education curriculum. Students taking the LEAP assessment will pursue a regular diploma based on the attainment of the required Carnegie Units with the integrity of the Carnegie Unit preserved. Exceptional students participating in LEAP must be provided with accommodations as noted on the student's IEP, or if 504, on the IAP (Individualized Accommodation Plan). A student who participates in LEAP, Alternate Assessment Level 2 (LAA 2) and meet(s) the required graduation requirements which includes earning the required Carnegie units, passing the 3 required components (ELA and math and either science or social studies), and attendance or does (do) not meet eligibility for the LAA 2 waiver in order to receive a high school diploma, will still be eligible to exit high school with a Certificate of Achievement. Students participating in LEAP, Alternate Assessment Level 1 will pursue a state approved exit certificate. Required instructional adaptations/modifications will be provided on an individual basis. Quantitative and qualitative evaluative criteria will be used to measure progress. See grading sections for clarification on grading procedures.

The student will be re-evaluated by Pupil Appraisal Services at least once every three years. Non-Parish Review (NPR) procedures for private evaluations:

If a student has a private evaluation, an NPR will be conducted at the student's school site or the Special Education Office to determine if the evaluation meets criteria as per bulletin 1508. If the student has an evaluation completed by a private provider, the evaluation must meet the same criteria as an evaluation completed by public school districts in the state. If the evaluation meets the criteria, the evaluation is approved for initial placement. Gifted Non-Parish Review (NPR) procedures:

Gifted students who have a current evaluation from an out of state school district must have the evaluation reviewed to determine eligibility in the State of Louisiana. The evaluation must meet the same criteria as an evaluation 47

completed by public school districts in Louisiana as per Bulletin 1508. If the student meets criteria, the evaluation is approved and an initial IEP is conducted. If the evaluation does not meet criteria and the student has a current IEP, then interim services may be approved. Special Education Placement/Regular Education Placement with Accommodations In considering the educational placement of each exceptional child (disabled, talented or gifted), the IEP (Individual Educational Program) /IAP (Individual Academic Plan) Committee participants shall ensure that the placement is based upon the IEP/IAP and is made in conformity with Louisiana State Department of Education Bulletin 1706, and other state guidelines. The continuum of services for a student with an IEP shall include: Regular classroom with itinerant, resource room or supplemental services A self-contained special class in a regular school Special schools Residential special schools Homebound instruction Give a brief description of each approved alternative school/program/setting operating in the LEA, including the entrance and promotion criteria. YOUTH EDUCATIONAL SUCCESS (YES) is an alternative program within regular education. This program is designed to meet the needs of at risk students at the upper elementary level. Eligibility for YES: Students who scored below the achievement level required by the State on 8th grade LEAP Math and/or English language arts and who were retained on an 8 th grade campus will be considered first for placement in YES classes, where available. Students earn grades in the same subjects of their grade group and at the quarterly grading periods. Students must meet attendance requirements and follow promotion requirements to be considered for promotion. OPERATION JUMPSTART (OJS) is an alternative program for students who have been expelled from school in grades K-12 and who have been recommended by the Superintendent. A student who attends this school must stay until the expulsion period is satisfied. Eligibility: Students in grades K-12 who are expelled from a public school in St. Tammany are considered by the Superintendent for assignment at OJS. Promotion: Students will be considered for promotion based upon the Pupil Progression Plan. Students in grades 9-12 are eligible to earn Carnegie units. Students will be classified based on credit hours earned as provided for in the Pupil Progression Plan. GED Prep With parental permission, students who are 17 years of age and have 10 or fewer credits will be able to enter the GED prep class located on their high school campus. When the student has passed the official GED practice test and has had their 18 th birthday, they will be recommended to take the GED test through the Louisiana Technical College System. A student who passes the GED will be eligible to participate in the GED Graduation at the end of the school year hosted by the Louisiana Technical College System. Describe the LEA's procedures for placement in adult education programs. Adult Education opportunities are available to any person 18 years or older who has less than a high school education and is not currently enrolled in the K-12 system. 48

Students who were enrolled in the regular high school program within the last three years must obtain a drop slip from their high school before entering the Adult Education Program. Parents of 17 year olds and, on a very rare occasion, 16-year-old students may petition the Superintendent through Child Welfare and Attendance to allow the student to exit school in order to enroll in Adult Education for the following hardships: Pregnant or actively parenting Incarcerated or adjudicated Institutionalized or living in a residential facility Chronic physical or mental illness Family and/or economic hardships The parents must provide the appropriate documentation of the hardship.

B. Connections Process 1. Connectionsis a one-year process for over-age students to receive targeted instruction and accelerated remediation. Students who are 15 years of age by September 30th and 2 or more grade levels behind are eligible to enter the process. Describe the local process for placing students in the Connections Process. Eighth grade students who will be 16 years old by December 31st and have been retained twice will be eligible for Connections on the high school campus. Describe the components and requirements of the local Connections Process. The connections process is a one year process. During the connection year, the students will receive intervention and remediation in the areas of weakness. These students will be classified as an 8th grader and take the LEAP test, but will receive academic services on the high school campus. Following the connections year, the students will be given the TABE test. For placement decisions, the TABE score, academic progress, and attendance will be considered. Possible placement shall include Career Diploma, GED, or State Skills Certificate.

X. Other Policies and Procedures

A. Policies on Records and Reports 1. Local school systems shall maintain permanent records of each student's placement, K12. Each record shall be maintained as a part of the student's cumulative file. 2. Student records for the purposes of these Guidelines shall include the following: Course grades; Scores on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program; Scores on local testing programs and screening instruments necessary to document the local criteria for promotion; Information (or reason) for student placement (See definition of placement.); 49

Documentation of results of student participation in remedial and alternative programs; Special education documents, as specified in the approved IDEA-Part B, LEA application; A copy of the letter informing the parent of either the placement of the student in or the removal of the student from a remedial program; and A statement regarding written notification to the parent concerning retention and due process procedures. (Bulletin 741§703) Describe any additional local policies that relate to the maintenance of records and reports that affect student promotion and/or retention. Interim Reports Interim reports shall be issued to all students in danger of failing at the midpoint in the quarter. Report Cards Report cards shall be issued to every student at the end of each quarterly grading period. Cumulative File Each student (K-12) enrolled in St. Tammany Parish will have a permanent record called a "Cumulative File." Information files and reports shall be stored in a safe place with limited accessibility. The student's cumulative file shall include but not be limited to the following: A permanent record of each student's placement Course grades, including report cards and interims Scores on Louisiana Educational Assessment Program Local testing scores ­ Achievement ­ Assessment ­ Developmental Screening Information for student placement Information on the outcome of student participation in compensatory and alternative programs Attendance records Health records A copy of the parent's written consent for either the student to be placed in or removed from an alternative to regular placement Parent notification of pupil's placement in or removal from a compensatory or remedial program will be kept on file in student's folder. College entrance examination results Advanced Placement scores Written notification to parents on retention Individual Limited English Proficient Plan Other pertinent electronic records Other Records The following items shall be kept in a separate locked place with limited access: IEP's and multidisciplinary evaluations Title I and other records from supplementary programs 50

Special Education documents as specified in the approved Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) - Part B, LEA Application Documentation of SBLC/SAT procedures and actions regarding qualified handicapped students under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. B. Policies on Due Process 1. Due process procedures for teachers, students, and parents shall be specified in each local Pupil Progression Plan as related to student placement. The local school system must ensure that these procedures do not contradict the due process rights of students with disabilities, as defined in the IDEA-Part B. Describe the LEA's policies on due process procedures for teachers, students and parents as related to student placementfor the following: o Regular education students A request for a change or reconsideration of decisions relative to a student's educational program, as provided for in the Pupil Progression Plan, can be made by a parent or guardian. The principal will consider the request or refer the matter to SBLC/SAT, when appropriate. The decision shall be communicated to the parents within three school weeks of the request. Parents may appeal that decision to the Assistant Superintendent or her designee. The Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction will make a recommendation to the Superintendent who will make a final decision. Such requests must be submitted in writing and contain evidence to be considered. In the St. Tammany Parish collective bargaining agreement, Section 8, describes the processes and procedures for teachers to appeal student placement. o Students with disabilities In the case of the student with a disability, the due process procedures must be consistent with those described in the approved Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) Part B, LEA Application. o Section 504 students: Due process procedures for qualified students with disabilities must be consistent with those defined in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. C. Legislative Guidelines 1. Local school systems are encouraged to develop criterion-referenced testing programs for local assessment use (R.S. 17:391.7(G) and R.S. 17:24(H)). 2. Local criteria for K-12 must supplement the content standards approved by the BESE (R.S. 17:24(G)). 3. Local criteria must be coordinated with statewide curricular standards for required subjects, to be developed as part of the competency-based education plan (R.S. 17:24.4(E) and (G)). 51

D.

Other Policies and Procedures Each LEA shall have policies and procedures that address, but are not limited to, the following (Bulletin 741 §337): 1. the establishment of the number of school days, length of the school day, and other necessary guidelines for the operation of the schools; 2. provision of special educational and related services to exceptional students, in accordance with the IEP, for no fewer than 177 days or the equivalent during the normal 182-day school cycle; 3. the operation of special departments and special programs in each school; 4. the admittance of students to and the dismissal of students from special educational programs; 5. the exclusion of students with communicable diseases and their readmittance following their recovery (refer to §1131); 6. the control of communicable problems, such as lice and scabies (refer to §1131); 7. the care of sick or injured students, including notification of parents, in cases of emergencies that occur while students are under the jurisdiction of the school; 8. the administration of medication in schools (refer to §1129); 9. the operation of summer schools and extended school year programs for eligible exceptional students (refer to Chapter 25); 10. the disciplining of students with disabilities (refer to §131.); 11. the use of standard universal precautions by personnel when individuals have direct contact with blood or other body fluids and the provision of sanctions, including discipline, if warranted, for failure to use standard universal precautions; 12. the use of school buildings outside of regular school hours; 13. student access to the Internet (refer to §1709); 14. the prohibition against use of tobacco in schools, on school grounds, and on school busses (refer to §1143); 15. the prohibition of teachers from recommending that a student be administered a psychotropic drug and from specifying or identifying any specific mental health diagnosis for a student; 16. the prohibition of teachers from using a parent's refusal to consent to administration of a psychotropic drug or psychiatric evaluation, screening or evaluation as grounds for prohibiting a student from attending class or participating in school-related activities or 52

as the sole basis of accusations of child abuse or neglect against the parent or guardian; 17. the notification of the parent or legal guardian of every student, in writing, of the proper process and procedures to follow in order to make a complaint or request information from the school or the school's governing authority: a. such information shall include, at a minimum, the name, address, phone number, and email address of the appropriate person to contact at each step of the prescribed process or procedure, and shall be updated, at least, on an annual basis; b. such information shall be incorporated into any existing policy or policies, code of conduct, or student handbook of the LEA or of each school under its jurisdiction; 18. the implementation of §2304 Science Education; 19. the school assignment of students in foster care (refer to §1109); 20. the electronic communications by an employee at a school to a student enrolled at that school (refer to §1141); 21. the inspection by qualified persons of all fire safety and prevention equipment, including fire alarm and smoke detection devices (refer to §1501); 22. the physical abuse of public school teachers and other school employees by students (refer to §521); 23. the collection of student biometric information (refer to §1149); 24. pre-service and ongoing grade-appropriate classroom management training for teachers, principals, and other appropriate personnel regarding behavioral supports and reinforcement, conflict resolution, mediation, cultural competence, restorative practices, guidance and discipline, and adolescent development; 25. a schedule for the retention and disposition of records; the schedule shall be approved by State Archives, as required by R.S. 44:411; and 26. appropriate responses to the behavior of students with exceptionalities that may require immediate intervention. (See for reference: Guidelines for the Use of Seclusion Rooms and Restraint of Students with Exceptionalities) Include policies related to these requirements in this document,if the PPP is the appropriate location for the policies and procedures. GRADING SCALE (2-12) A B C D F = = = = = 93-100 85-92 75-84 67-74 66 and below

53

Grading Policy - GRADES 2-3 A grade A, B, C, D or F shall be assigned in reading, language, spelling, mathematics, science and social studies for each of the four quarter grading periods for all students. Only letter grades shall be recorded in the grade book. A- Excellent. The student has consistently demonstrated excellent performance. B- High Quality Work. The student's performance is in upper range of the satisfactory category. C - Satisfactory. The student is performing in a satisfactory manner for grade level. D - Needs Improvement. The student's performance is below satisfactory standards. Parent(s) and teacher(s) need to have a conference. F - Unsatisfactory Work. The student is not progressing according to standards. Parents and teachers need to have a conference. The grades for conduct will be as follows: S N Satisfactory Progress Needs Improvement

Assessment notations shall be recorded in the class record book as letter grades. When the letter grades (A, B, C, D and F) are recorded on the report card at the end of the year, add the four quarterly grade quality points (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0) and divide by four. A ".5" shall be rounded up in all cases with the exception of any average less than 1.0. Any average less than 1.0 shall receive an "F" for the end-of-the-year letter grade. There shall be a minimum of nine assessments for each second and third grade student during each quarter. Due to unusual circumstances, such as testing, some grading periods may be shortened. In this case, the number of assessments shall be a minimum of the number of weeks during that grading period. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e. portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotal records. Test items shall reflect the instructional objectives in the teacher's lesson plans based on the content standards and benchmarks. Student conduct shall not be considered when computing the quarter grade. Conduct and work habits shall be considered separately and denoted accordingly on the report card. Portfolios of student work shall be accumulated and shared with parents. Contents of the portfolio for second and third grades will include: DIBELS results, vision screening, hearing screening, writing sample, basal reading assessments, math sample, spelling test and CRT/NRT score, (3rd grade only). Students shall be assigned grades in reading based on the student's instructional level. The instructional level will be indicated by the student's ability to read designated material with at least 90% accuracy in word recognition and comprehension. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. Activities, projects, presentations, reports, etc., will require that specific grading scales or rubrics be developed and communicated to students and parents. Modifications shall be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels, and this will be indicated on the report card. Grades are given based on these accommodations. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP), an Individual Education Plan (IEP), and an Individual Limited English Proficient Plan (ILEPP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. At the close of the fourth quarter grading period, report cards will be mailed to the home at the close of the teachers' last day, or parents 54

may make arrangements for picking up the report card from the school as per school policy. The teacher is responsible for completing and issuing report cards. Each teacher is responsible for any other markings such as behavior, work habits and attendance in class. There may be supplementary remarks added to the elementary report card as determined by the school. There shall be no Honor Roll.

Grading Policy - GRADES 4-6 Grading Scale: A B C D F = = = = = 93-100 85-92 75-84 67-74 66 and below

This scale shall be used for all courses and subjects. Letter grades shall be used in the teacher's record book. Modifications will be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels, and this shall be indicated on the report card. Grades shall be given based on these accommodations. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP), an Individual Education Plan (IEP), or an Individual Limited English Proficiency Plan (ILEPP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. There shall be a minimum of nine assessments for each student during the quarterly grading period. Due to unusual circumstances, such as testing, some grading periods may be shortened or lengthened. In this case, the number of assessments shall be a minimum of the number of weeks during that grading period. No assessment shall count for more that 1/9 of the quarterly grade or a fractional equivalent of the shortened or lengthened grading period. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e. portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotals. Test items shall reflect the instructional objectives in the teacher's lesson plans based on the content standards, benchmarks, and GLE's. Student conduct shall not be considered when computing the quarterly grade.

Conduct shall be considered separately and graded "E", "S", "N" or "U". E - Excellent S - Satisfactory N - Needs Improvement U ­ Unsatisfactory When a grade of "U" occurs on a report card, a parent conference shall be requested. The degree to which homework will play a part in the overall grade shall not exceed 1/9 of the total grade or fractional equivalent of the shortened or lengthened grading period. Homework guidelines shall be communicated in writing to the student and parent. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter the class. Activities, projects, presentations, reports, etc., will require that specific grading scales or rubrics be developed and communicated to students and parents. Letter grades A, B, C, D or F shall be assigned in the following subjects: Reading Mathematics 55

Language Arts (including spelling) Science Social Studies 6th grade electives that are taught 50 minutes per day during the entire school year. For the above listed subjects, letter grades only shall be recorded on the report card and in the grade book. The letter grades (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0) for each grading period shall be averaged for the end-of-the-year final grade and recorded on the report card. IMPORTANT NOTE: Averages of .5-.9 shall be rounded up to the next highest numeral; however, in order for a student to pass a subject, he/she must have at least a 1.00.

Anything below 1.00 (.75 or .5) cannot be rounded up. Example #1: 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Final Grade GradeGradeGradeGrade B=3 C=2 B=3 C=2 B=3 Total quarterly quality points equal 10 divided by four quarterly grading periods = 2.5. 2.5 is rounded up to 3.0. 3= B. Example #2: 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Final Grade GradeGradeGradeGrade C=2 D=1 B=3 B=3 C=2 Total quarterly quality points equal 9 divided by four quarterly grading periods = 2.25. 2.25 is rounded down to 2. 2= C. Example #3: 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Final Grade GradeGradeGradeGrade D=1 D=1 F=0 D=1 F=0 Total quarterly quality points equal 3 divided by four quarterly grading periods = .75. .75 is rounded down to 0. 0=F The following subjects shall be graded E, S, N or U: Health and Physical Education Art Music Handwriting Foreign Language E - Excellent S - Satisfactory N - Needs Improvement U ­ Unsatisfactory

These subjects shall not affect the quarterly or final grade point average. Honor Roll - There shall be an Honor Roll for each grading period. A minimum of 3.0 GPA is required for the 3.0 Honor Roll. A minimum of 3.5 GPA is required for the 3.5 Honor Roll. A minimum of 4.0 GPA is required for the 4.0 Honor Roll. 56

To be included on the Honor Roll, a student must not earn a "D" or "F" in any subject. A school may report a straight "A" Honor Roll at the end of the year. To be listed on the straight "A" Honor Roll, a student must have made all A's on his/her report card in every subject, every grading period of the school year. Grading Policy - GRADES 7-8

Grading Scale:

A B C D F

= = = = =

93-100 85-92 75-84 67-74 66 and below

This scale shall be used for all courses and subjects. Modifications will be made to accommodate students' individual differences in the area of learning styles/levels and this shall be indicated on the report card. Grades shall be given based on these accommodations. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP), an Individual Education Plan (IEP), or an Individual Limited English Proficiency Plan (ILEPP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. There shall be a minimum of nine assessments for each student during the quarterly grading period. Due tounusual circumstances, such as testing, some grading periods may be shortened or lengthened. In this case, the number of assessments shall be a minimum of the number of weeks during that grading period. No assessment shall count for more than 1/9 of the quarterly grade or the fractional equivalent of the shortened grading periods. The quarterly test shall be comprehensive for the entire grading period and count for 20% of the quarterly grade. There shall be no exemptions. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e. portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotal records. Test items shall reflect the instructional objectives in the teacher's lesson plans based on the content standards, benchmarks, and GLE's as appropriate. Student conduct shall not be considered when computing the quarterly grade. Conduct shall be considered separately and graded "E", "N", "S" or "U". E - Excellence in Conduct S - Satisfactory N - Needs Improvement U ­ Unsatisfactory Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. Activities, projects, presentations, reports, etc., will require that specific grading scales or rubrics be developed and communicated to students and parents. The degree to which homework will play a part in the overall grade shall not exceed 1/9 of the total grade or the fractional equivalent of the shortened or lengthened grading period. Homework guidelines shall be communicated in writing to the student and parent. For all subjects, numerical grades shall be recorded in the class record book and averaged for the quarterly grades. The quarterly numerical grade and corresponding letter grade shall be recorded on the report card. The numerical grades for each quarter shall be averaged for the yearly grade and recorded on the report card along with the corresponding letter grade. Example:1st Quarter 2nd Quarter 3rd Quarter 4th Quarter Final Grade GradeGradeGradeGrade 57

93/A 92/B

90/B

93/A

91/B

Note: The yearly average of 91.75 was rounded to 92. All numerical grades of .5-.9 shall be rounded up to the next highest number including the grade of 64.5. English/Spelling - Since English and spelling are combined for one grade, spelling shall count for no more than 10% of that combined grade. Honor Roll - There shall be an Honor Roll for each grading period. A minimum of 3.0 GPA is required for the 3.0 Honor Roll. A minimum of 3.5 GPA is required for the 3.5 Honor Roll. A minimum of 4.0 GPA is required for the 4.0 Honor Roll. To be included on the Honor Roll, a student must not earn a "D" or "F" in any subject. Conduct is not a subject. Only letter grade equivalents "A=4," "B=3," "C=3," shall be used to compute the Honor Roll. There shall be no rounding of grades to compute Honor Roll. Example 1: A student with a 2.9 GPA would not be placed on the 3.0 Honor Roll. Example 2: A student with a 3.4 GPA would be placed on the 3.0 Honor Roll. Example 3: A student with a 3.9 GPA would be placed on the 3.5 Honor Roll. A school may report a straight "A" Honor Roll at the end of the year. Straight "A" Honor Roll: A student must have made all A's on his/her report card in every subject, every grading period of the school year. All students shall be eligible for inclusion on the Honor Roll. Extracurricular Academic Eligibility - For 7-8 athletics, dance team, student council, class/club officers, and cheerleaders, the academic requirements of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association will be the standard. Students in grade 7 and 8 will have academic eligibility determined on a quarterly basis. Students in grades 7 and 8 must pass five (5) subjects and earn a GPA of 1.5 or greater for the previous quarter. All other eligibility requirements other activities are at the discretion of the school. The school shall disseminate these requirements to students and parents. A student's GPA cannot be rounded.

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Grading Policy - GRADES 9-12 Grading Scale: A = B = C = D = F = 93-100 85-92 75-84 67-74 66 and below

This scale shall be used for all courses and subjects, except the designated weighted courses. In non-weighted classes, the following quality points will be assigned to the letter grade: "A" = 4, "B" = 3, "C" = 2, "D"=1, "F" = 0. In the designated weighted courses, the following quality points will be assigned to the letter grade: "A" = 5, "B" = 4, "C" = 3, "D" = 1, "F" = 0. The numerical grade and letter equivalent will be recorded on the report card. There shall be a minimum of nine assessments for each student during the grading period, excluding the quarterly test. Due to unusual circumstances, such as testing, some grading periods may be shortened or lengthened. In this case, the number of assessments shall be a minimum of the number of weeks during that grading period. A variety of assessments shall be included, i.e., portfolios, journals, written tests, projects, checklists, writing samples, interviews, observations and anecdotals. Test items shall reflect the instructional objectives in the teacher's lesson plans based on the content standards, benchmarks, and GLE's as appropriate. Student conduct shall not be considered when computing the quarterly grade. Conduct shall be considered separately and graded "S" or "U". "S" denotes "Satisfactory", and "U" denotes "Unsatisfactory. Each assessment shall count for no more than 1/9 of the total quarterly grade or the fractional equivalent of the shortened or lengthened grading periods. During the fourth quarterly grading period, for students who participate in the State administered End of Course tests, the assessment results must be used as the final exam and count 20% of the quarterly grade. The quarterly test shall count 20% of the quarterly grade. The 2 nd and 4th quarterly exams may be comprehensive for the entire semester; however, the exam shall include no more than 20% of material tested in the previous quarterly grading period. There will be no exemptions from quarterly exams for students in grades 9, 10 or 11. Seniors who are enrolled in a course where there is an End of Course Test cannot be exempted. This policy also pertains to seniors with the following exception: Senior Semester Exam Exemption Policy Seniors: The semester grade for the report card will be the average of both quarters prior to the semester exam for those students meeting the criteria:

· ·

A average and 3 or fewer absences B average and 2 or fewer absences

For the purpose of exemptions the following absences are not counted: · School sponsored field trips, athletics, and activities · Two official college visit days per year with documentation of participation · Spring Testing days with documentation of participation All absences, both exempted and non-exempted absences, are counted for the purposes of senior exemptions. The course syllabus shall reflect the performance standards and homework requirements. The degree to which homework will play a part in the overall grade shall not exceed 1/9 of the total grade or the fractional equivalent of the shortened or lengthened grading period. Homework 59

guidelines shall be communicated in writing to the student and parent. Teachers shall communicate, in writing, their grading practices to parents and students at the beginning of the school year and to new students when they enter class. Activities, projects, presentations, reports, etc., will require that specific grading scales or rubrics be developed and communicated to students and parents. Each teacher shall note on the report card, following parish procedures, student grades earned with documented modifications. These modifications must be documented on an Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP), an Individual Education Plan (IEP), or an Individual Limited English Proficiency Plan (ILEPP). All assessments shall be fair and reasonable as determined by the principal or designee. For all subjects, numerical grades shall be recorded in the class record book and averaged for the quarterly grades. The quarterly numerical grade and corresponding letter grade shall be recorded on the report card. The numerical grades for each quarter shall be averaged for the semester grade and recorded on the report card along with the corresponding letter grade. Example: 1st Quarter 2nd Quarter Semester Grade Grade Grade 93/A 92/B 93/A NOTE: The semester average of 92.5 was rounded up to 93. All numerical grades of .5-.9 shall be rounded up to the next highest numeral including the grade of 64.5. Honor Roll - There shall be an Honor Roll for each grading period. A minimum of 3.0 GPA is required for the 3.0 Honor Roll. A minimum of 3.5 GPA is required for the 3.5 Honor Roll. A minimum of 4.0 GPA is required for the 4.0 Honor Roll. To be included on the Honor Roll, a student must not earn a "D" or "F" in any subject. Conduct is not a subject. In non-weighted courses letter grade equivalents "A = 4," "B = 3," "C = 2," shall be used to compute the Honor Roll. In weighted courses letter grade equivalents "A = 5," "B = 4," "C = 3" shall be used to compute the Honor Roll. There shall be no rounding of grades to compute the Honor Roll. Example 1: A student with a 2.9 GPA would not be placed on the Honor Roll. Example 2: A student with a 3.4 GPA would be placed on the 3.0 Honor Roll. Example 3: A student with a 3.9 GPA would be placed on the 3.5 Honor Roll.

All students shall be eligible for inclusion on the Honor Roll if they are attempting at least five credits. Honors Courses - Grades 9-12 Honors Courses Definition of Terms As compared to a regular class, an Honors Class is a faster paced, more in-depth coverage of course content as outlined by the appropriate high school textbooks and appropriate curriculum guides. Designated Weighted Honors courses will receive the following quality point equivalent for the following letter grades, "A = 5," "B = 4," "C = 3," "D = 1," "F = 0". Honors Courses Criteria for Student Selection

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Academic performance, teacher recommendation, student preference and parental approval are recommended strongly. Specific selection criteria must appear in the course selection guides of the individual high school. Honors Courses Reporting Procedures Honors Courses will be identified and described in each individual high school's course description guide so that students and parents are aware of the opportunity for honors classes. On the course selection sheet completed by the student, the Honors Courses will be listed. Honors Courses will be reported on the cumulative record card and the transcript. Honors Courses Monitoring The Central Office staff will determine the extent to which Honors Classes are being implemented in the schools. Supervisors of Secondary Education and appropriate Curriculum Specialists will give technical assistance in the operation and expansion of Honors Courses. The Supervisors of Secondary Education must be satisfied that the Honors Courses listed on the master schedule are in compliance with the guidelines established for St. Tammany Parish high schools. Advanced Placement Advanced Placement Definition of Terms Advanced Placement is defined as a program whereby students are granted the opportunity to receive instruction in specific academic courses that are above the level of the typical high school courses. In fact, the level of the course work is on the college level. Tests are administered and the passing of such tests allows the student to receive college credit for the college level courses taken during the high school year. Students may receive high school credit for Advanced Placement courses. Advanced Placement Course Credit College Entrance Examination Board Content Outlines form the basis for the recommended college level course content leading to the successful passage of the Advanced Placement Exam. Advanced Placement Textbooks Textbooks currently being used in college level courses covering the topics included in the Advanced Placement Exam will be used.

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Advanced Placement Class Organization In St. Tammany Parish, Advanced Placement is offered ideally as a separate class. In the event that the student population will not support a separate Advanced Placement class, the Advanced Placement Program may be offered in combination with honors or regular class. Advanced Placement Reporting Procedures Advanced Placement will be identified and described in each high school's course description guide so that students and parents are aware of the Advanced Placement opportunity. On the course selection sheet completed by students, the Advanced Placement courses will be listed. Advanced Placement courses will be reported on the cumulative record card and the transcript. Advanced Placement Monitoring The Central Office staff will determine the extent to which Advanced Placement is being implemented in the schools. Supervisors of secondary education and appropriate curriculum specialists will give technical assistance in the operation and expansion of Advanced Placement. Supervisors of Secondary Education will determine that the Advanced Placement courses listed on the master schedules are in compliance with the College Entrance Examination Board guidelines and the guidelines established for St. Tammany Parish high schools. Advanced Placement School-Based Administration Refer to the School Administrator's Guide to the Advanced Placement Program published by the Advanced Placement Program in the College Board.

Grade Point Average A student's overall GPA is based on semester grades. All courses attempted, including credit earned prior to the 9th grade, courses failed and duplicate credit, shall be used to calculate GPA. A grade point average shall not be rounded off. A grade point average is defined as an average of all subjects, where "A=4," "B=3," "C=2," "D=1," "F=0". Example: A 2.7 GPA cannot be rounded off to a 3.0. Extracurricular Academic Eligibility - For 9-12 athletics, dance team, student council, class/club officers, and cheerleaders, the academic requirements of the Louisiana High School Athletic Association will be the standard. According to LHSAA, a student in high school must earn at least six (6) units with a "C" average from the previous year to be eligible for the first semester of the school year. To be eligible for the second semester of the school year, a student shall pass at least six (6) subjects from the first semester. A senior taking a shortened schedule must pass all of the classes. A student's GPA cannot be rounded. For grades 9 ­ 12, all other eligibility requirements for other activities are at the discretion of the school principal. The school shall disseminate these requirements to students and parents. "A" Average = 3.5 and Above "B" Average = 2.5 ­ 3.4999 "C" Average = 1.5 ­ 2.4999 "D" Average = 1.0 ­ 1.4999 "F" Average = Below 0.9999

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Rank-In-Class

Rank in class will be based on the quality points a student earns in grades 9-12 based on a maximum of 28 credits and the maximum number of weighted courses. The student who earns the most quality points will be ranked number one in the graduating class. All St. Tammany Parish students shall attempt 3.5 credits each semester in the 9 th, 10th, and 11th grades. To attempt fewer than 3.5 credits per semester, a student must receive prior approval from the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. Students electing to take a short day schedule in the senior year will negatively impact their rank-in-class. A student electing short day in the senior year may earn fewer quality points than seniors taking 7 credit classes. Transfer grades will be weighted only in the subjects weighted in the district.

Commencement Recognition Honor Graduates (GPA) The following will be recognized at commencement: top students based on GPA in a graduating class will be coordinated between the high schools and the secondary supervisors of instruction. Best in Class (Rank in Class) The method of recognizing the top students based on quality points in a graduating class will be coordinated between the high schools and the secondary supervisors of instruction. Accountability Outcomes The method of recognizing the students based on accountability outcomes in a graduating class will be coordinated between the high schools and secondary supervisors of instruction. Summer School Credit ­ Grades 1-12

Students in elementary grades may enroll in summer school only to remove a deficiency in order to be considered for promotion. However, an elementary student may request to enroll in a class to strengthen knowledge and skills. The summer school grade shall not replace the grade earned during the regular school year. High school students may enroll in summer school to earn Carnegie credit in order to graduate in four years, to remove a deficiency, or to improve grade point average by repeating a previously taken course. Students must have written authorization of the school principal to register and receive new credit/Carnegie credit for courses taken in summer school. New credit will be offered in an online format only. However, Carnegie credit earned through summer school shall not carry a weighted designation. Although the high school student may earn Carnegie credit during summer school for a course s/he previously failed, 63

both failing and passing grades are included on the high school transcript and in the computation for grade point average.

Foreign Exchange Visitor Program The St. Tammany Parish School Board recognizes the importance and far-reaching effect of intercultural and international experiences that supplement classroom instruction. The Foreign Exchange Visitor Programs promote and improve America's awareness and understanding of global cultures and issues allowing parish students the opportunity to be exposed on a personal basis to foreign cultures. Likewise, the foreign student is able to broaden his/her knowledge of American culture and language skills through active participation in family, school and community life. Any student from a foreign country, sponsored by a foreign exchange visitor program, who fulfills all eligibility requirements (Federal, State and local school regulations) including written approval of the principal, may attend a St. Tammany Parish public school at the discretion of the St. Tammany Parish School Board. Organizations and institutions sponsoring students for a school term must be approved by the United States Department of State in order to be eligible to participate in the Foreign Exchange Visitor Program. Students sponsored by other agencies on a short-term basis (2-4) weeks must receive approval for visiting the schools from the supervisor in charge of foreign exchange studentprograms. Foreign Exchange Sponsors All sponsoring organizations shall supply the school principal the name, address and telephone number of a local representative who lives within a 100 mile radius of the C J Schoen Administrative Complex and can be contacted in case of an emergency. This information must be included on the application form submitted by June 1 st prior to the beginning of the fall session. Foreign Exchange Student Requirements Any foreign exchange student listing a language other than English as a home, first or frequently used social language is to be screened for LEP status and, if eligible for services, to be served accordingly; ­ have appropriate medical insurance; ­ be at least 16 but not more than 19 at the time of registration; ­ classify only as a senior as determined by evaluation of the student's application packet; ­ present to the school principal all necessary translated transcripts to be evaluated; ­ follow all rules and regulations as outlined by the St. Tammany Parish School Board; ­ reside with a host family; ­ enroll in a St. Tammany Parish high school by September 1; and ­ be enrolled for one full academic year beginning in August and ending in May/June. Foreign Exchange Procedures for Admission

­

The sponsoring organization must apply by June 1st prior to the fall session and obtain written approval from the principal for admission of the student by August 1 st prior to the fall enrollment period. The application shall include the student's health record, assurance of 64

appropriate medical insurance coverage, English translation of academic records, a student biographical essay, a photo, and a written recommendation of home principal including discipline records. At the time of application, the school official shall determine whether the student will attempt to earn a high school diploma. At the time of registration, prior to the first week of school, the exchange student, accompanied by a representative of the sponsoring organization and/or a member of the host family, will receive school assignment from the Supervisor of Child Welfare and Attendance. The student will meet with the counselor to design a schedule. Prior to the opening of school, the St. Tammany Parish School Board may schedule an orientation for host parents and foreign exchange students designed to acquaint them with the American school system in general and St. Tammany Parish school system rules and regulations specifically. It is the responsibility of the sponsoring agency to make all travel and accommodation agreements. It is also the agency's responsibility to resolve all conflicts that arise between the student and the host family and/or the school. All expenses, including school related ones, are the responsibility of the sponsoring agency and the students. Foreign Exchange Student Employment If exchange students are not permitted to take regular part-time jobs during their stay in the United States, they will not be issued work permits or be enrolled in cooperative programs. Foreign Exchange Student Athletic Eligibility Students will be governed by the Louisiana High School Athletic Association rules and regulations concerning participation in interscholastic athletic competition. Foreign exchange students will be eligible to participate only in the school district in which the host family resides. Foreign Exchange Student Scheduling After the principal evaluates the student's transcript and certifies senior level placement, the school guidance counselor or other designated school official will interview the student and host family to learn as much as possible about the student's academic background, including necessary course clarification, competency, and fluency in English. Math, science and social studies classes are assigned by matching these courses as nearly as possible with the ones the student was taking previously. Carnegie Units Grades 9-12 To receive full benefit of the opportunities afforded students at the high school level, the school district expects students to carry a full schedule every year that they are attendance. In order to proceed from one grade to the next in grades 9-12, a student must have the required number of Carnegie Units. Carnegie Units may be earned through the regular program of studies at the high school level, advanced placement courses, and trade/industry credit. Other avenues for earning credit that must be approved by the high school principal include the following: State approved correspondence study Secondary coursework offered through university programs which require the submission of lessons and exams. Fees are associated with correspondence study. The student is responsible for all fees and the completion of the coursework. Approval of the principal is required. 65

Proficiency examinations State approved exams that are correlated to grade level expectations and/or minimum proficiency standards. a3 Virtual Academy Locally developed online courses delivered via distance learning and taught by a STPSB certified, highly qualified teacher. Summer school Courses offered in specific content areas in a traditional classroom setting. Early college admissions programs College level coursework taught by university professors. Student must meet the college entrance requirements for admissions. Credit Exams Locally developed course exams correlated to grade level expectations. Louisiana Virtual High School Online courses offered by the State via distance learning, taught by certified teachers throughout the State, and facilitated at the school site. Other alternate web-based recognized Carnegie unit providers as approved by the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction

Hospital/Homebound Services

Hospital/Homebound is an alternative educational setting for the provision of educational services by a certified teacher according to an Individual Education Program (IEP), and Individual Accommodation Plan (IAP), a Hospital/Homebound Education Plan (H/HEP), or an Individual Limited English Proficiency Plan (ILEPP) in which both of the following conditions exist: The student is enrolled in St. Tammany Parish Schools. The student is not able to be moved from the hospital or home environment to a full time educational program as a result of physical illness, accident, or emotional crisis or the treatment thereof. Students who are enrolled in public school may qualify for Hospital/Homebound services by obtaining medical documentation of need and upon a review IEP, IAP, or initial H/HEP. Instruction for elementary students is provided in the core subjects of language arts, math, science, and/or social studies. Instruction for secondary students is provided in English, math, science and/or social studies. The Supervisor of Special Education or the Assistant Superintendent of Instruction must approve other courses.

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APPENDIX A

This section should include the following:

Definition of Terms

Acceleration: Advancement of a pupil at a rate faster than usual in or from a given grade or course. This may include "gifted students" identified according to the Pupil Appraisal Handbook. Alternative to Regular Placement: Placement of students in programs which have applied for deviations from standards in Bulletin 741. Alternate Assessment: The substitute way of gathering information on the performance and progress of students with disabilities who do not participate in typical state assessments. Louisiana Educational Assessment Programs (LEAP): The State's testing program that includes: Iowa Test: Louisiana's Norm Referenced testing program for grades 3, 5, 6, 7 and 9 as a part of iLEAP. (Combination of NRT and CRT items) Louisiana's Criterion Referenced Test: Testing program for grades 4 and 8. Areas tested include English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Graduation Exit Examination (GEE): Louisiana's graduation tests in the subject areas of English language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) Summer School: The summer school program offered by the LEA for the specific purpose of preparing students to pass the LEAP test in English/language arts or Mathematics. Promotion: A pupil's placement from a lower to a higher grade based on local and state criteria contained in these Guidelines. Progression Plan: The comprehensive plan, developed and adopted by each parish and city school board, which shall be based on student performance on LEAP with goals and objectives which are compatible with the Louisiana grade level expectations and which supplement standards approved by BESE. Emphasis shall be placed upon the student's mastery of the grade level expectations in reading, writing and mathematics before he or she would be recommended for promotion or placement provided that other factors shall be considered.

67

Regular Placement: The assignment of students to classes, grades, or programs based on a set of criteria established in the Pupil Progression Plan. Placement includes promotion, retention, and acceleration. Remedial Programs: Programs designed to assist students, including identified students with disabilities and Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, to overcome educational deficits identified through the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program and other local criteria. Retention: Non-promotion of a pupil from a lower to a higher grade based on local and state criteria contained in these Guidelines. State Content Standards: Statements of what we expect students to know and be able to do in various content areas.

A list of terms used in the local plan. (Terms must be clearly defined; they will be used as the basis for interpretation of the components of the local plan.) Academically Able: A student who scores at or above the 76th national percentile in the discipline area in question as measured by the adopted standardized achievement test. Student interest, grades and teacher recommendation are taken into account at the school level as essential components for successful participation in courses designed for the "academically able." Students must be performing at least on grade level in the discipline area in question in order to be considered for a program designed for the academically able. Academically Able for Foreign Language: A student is academically able for foreign language if recommended by the principal and the reading teacher and if he/she satisfies all of the following criteria: Scores a minimum of 75 percentile in reading on the norm-referenced test. Has a B average in Language Arts or higher. Has demonstrated interest in learning foreign language. Parents of the academically able will be notified of the subject area omission in grades 4-8. Students in grades 4-8 who do not meet the definitions of academically able may be scheduled whenever appropriate, as long as they receive a minimum of 150 minutes of instruction each week. Co-curricular Activities: Those activities that are relevant, supportive and are an integral part of the course of study in which the student is enrolled and which are under the supervision and/or coordination of the school instructional staff (Bulletin 741:1.039.02). Cross-grading: Through the use of appropriate assessment techniques, the placement of a child in different grade levels of particular content areas to provide instruction at a more appropriate level for that specific child. Developmental: Appropriate behavior by age level in areas such as motor skills, oral language development, cognitive development, social-emotional development, auditory discrimination, visual discrimination and self-help skills (BESE policy). 68

Exceptional Promotion: That promotion of the student which is made in accordance with state law and those extenuating circumstances as so defined by the local educational agency. Extracurricular Activities: Activities which are not directly related to the program of studies and which are under the supervision and/or coordination of the school instructional staff and are considered valuable for the overall development of the student (Bulletin 741:1.039.02). Reading Proficiency: First Grade: The student has learned basic sound/symbol system correspondence, more advanced phonemic and syntactic awareness, blending and word-attack skills, automatic recognition of basic high-frequency words and word families, comprehension skills, and how to use these tools to read for meaning. The Developmental Reading Assessment or DIBELS results are to be used to determine reading proficiency. Readiness Screening: The process of identifying the performance levels, skills, and abilities of young children through the gathering of information concerning their physical, intellectual and social development. School Building Level Committee (SBLC)/Student Assistance Team (SAT): A committee of at least three school level staff members, including the principal/designee, a classroom teacher, and the referring teacher. It is suggested that other persons be included, such as the guidance counselor, reading specialist, master teacher, nurse, parents, pupil appraisal personnel, etc. This committee is a problem solving, decision making group who meet on a scheduled basis to receive referrals from teachers, parents, or other professionals on individual students who are experiencing difficulty in school due to academic and/or behavior problems. In most instances, for enrolled students, it is only through the SBLC/SAT that a referral can be made to pupil appraisal for an individual evaluation. Additional information that you wish to add would begin with Appendix B.

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