Read PowerMate Enterprise 5000 Series User's Guide text version

PROPRIETARY NOTICE AND LIABILITY DISCLAIMER The information disclosed in this document, including all designs and related materials, is the valuable property of NEC Computer Systems Division, Packard Bell NEC, Inc. (hereinafter "NECCSD") and/or its licensors. NECCSD and/or its licensors, as appropriate, reserve all patent, copyright and other proprietary rights to this document, including all design, manufacturing, reproduction, use, and sales rights thereto, except to the extent said rights are expressly granted to others. The NECCSD product(s) discussed in this document are warranted in accordance with the terms of the Warranty Statement accompanying each product. However, actual performance of each such product is dependent upon factors such as system configuration, customer data, and operator control. Since implementation by customers of each product may vary, the suitability of specific product configurations and applications must be determined by the customer and is not warranted by NECCSD. To allow for design and specification improvements, the information in this document is subject to change at any time, without notice. Reproduction of this document or portions thereof without prior written approval of NECCSD is prohibited.

FaxFlash is a service mark of NEC Computer Systems Division (NECCSD), Packard Bell NEC, Inc. NEC, MultiSync, and PowerMate are registered trademarks of NEC Corporation, used under license. All other product, brand, or trade names used in this publication are the trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective trademark owners.

First Printing -- September 1997 Copyright 1997 NEC Computer Systems Division Packard Bell NEC, Inc. 1414 Massachusetts Avenue Boxborough, MA 01719-2298 All Rights Reserved

Using This Guide

The PowerMate Enterprise Series User's Guide provides a quick reference to information about your computer. The guide contains the following information:

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Chapter 1, Introducing Your Computer, provides a look at the system components. See this chapter to familiarize yourself with your system. Chapter 2, Using Your Computer, explains how to start up and shut down your system, provides a look at system components, contains information about using online documentation, and describes what you should do after your system is up and running. The chapter includes a quick-reference chart for finding information about a variety of topics.

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Chapter 3, Reviewing System Features, provides a quick overview of the various features of your system. Chapter 4, Using Tools and Utilities, describes the various software utilities shipped with your system, including the BIOS Setup Utility, LANDesk® Client Manager, and the NEC Select Install CD. Chapter 5, Installing Options, provides installation procedures for internal and external options. Chapter 6, Setting Jumpers, provides information on changing jumper settings when reconfiguring your system. Chapter 7, Using 24-Hour Information Services, lists the services available to you for information and help, and describes how to access the services.

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Using This Guide xiii

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Chapter 8, Solving System Problems, contains troubleshooting tips for solving simple problems and provides information on where you can find help when you cannot solve a problem yourself. Appendix A, Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment, contains guidelines to help you use your computer productively and safely. This appendix also instructs you on how to set up and use your computer to reduce your risk of developing nerve, muscle, or tendon disorders.

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WARNING

Prolonged or improper use of a computer workstation may pose a risk of serious injury. To reduce your risk of injury, set up and use your computer in the manner described in Appendix A, Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment.

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Appendix B, System Specifications, provides a technical description of your computer and its components. Appendix C, Limited Warranty, provides warranty information, policies, and restrictions.

xiv Using This Guide

TEXT CONVENTIONS

This guide uses the following text conventions.

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Warnings, cautions, and notes have the following meanings:

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WARNING

Warnings alert you to situations that could result in serious personal injury or loss of life.

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CAUTION

Cautions indicate situations that can damage the hardware or software.

Notes give important information about the material being described.

NOTE

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Names of keyboard keys are printed as they appear on the keyboard, for example, Ctrl, Alt, or Enter. Text or keystrokes that you enter appear in boldface type. For example, type abc123 and press Enter. File names are printed in uppercase letters. For example, AUTOEXEC.BAT.

Using This Guide xv

RELATED DOCUMENTS

In addition to this guide, the following printed documentation ships with your computer.

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NEC PowerMate Enterprise Quick Setup/Quick Reference Roadmap Quick Setup contains information for quickly getting your system up and running. Read this information to set up the system for the first time. The Quick Reference Roadmap gives you a look at the documentation, NECCSD tools, software applications, and services available to you.

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How Does Your Workplace Measure Up? This brochure provides information for setting up and using your computer productively and safely. Information includes guidelines to reduce the risk of injury associated with using a computer. NEC PowerMate Enterprise Release Notes Release Notes provide you with additional information about your computer that was not available at the time your user's guide was printed.

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Your system comes with the following online documentation on the hard disk:

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NEC Help Center This online documentation is a comprehensive source of information about your system. Categories include a System Tour, The Basics, Advanced Topics, Questions and Answers, System Upgrades, and Service and Support. Healthy Environment This is an online help file that complements the "How Does Your Workplace Measure Up?" brochure.

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xvi Using This Guide

Most of your application programs provide extensive online help. Some programs provide separate online user's guides for specific applications. Windows provides extensive online help and "wizards" to guide you through procedures. In addition to the documentation that ships with the system, the following documentation is available from NECCSD:

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NEC PowerMate Enterprise Series Service and Reference Manual desktop part number 819-181828-000 minitower part number 819-181884-000 This manual provides information for maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing your computer. This manual also includes hardware and interface information for programmers, engineers, and others who need to know how the system is designed. To purchase the service and reference manual, call NECCSD at 1-800-632-4565 (in the U.S.) or your local NECCSD sales provider (outside the U.S.).

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NECCSD FaxFlashSM NECCSD FaxFlash is an automated service that sends the latest information about NECCSD and its products directly to a fax machine. The service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. With FaxFlash, you can obtain product literature and technical information bulletins. By using FaxFlash, you can be kept up-to-date on the latest technical information for your system. See "NECCSD FaxFlash Service" in Chapter 7 for information about using FaxFlash.

Using This Guide xvii

Contents

Using This Guide Text Conventions...................................................... Related Documents ................................................... 1 Introducing Your Computer Front Features .......................................................... System Controls and Lamps................................. IR Window.......................................................... Diskette Drive A .................................................. CD-ROM Reader................................................. PCMCIA Device ................................................. Tape Backup Unit................................................ Zip Drive............................................................. Stand................................................................... Back Features........................................................... External Connectors............................................. Power Supply ...................................................... Speakers................................................................... Using Your Computer System Operation ..................................................... Starting Up.......................................................... Shutting Down..................................................... Setting the Date and Time .................................... Using the Keyboard ............................................. Using a Mouse..................................................... Using Diskettes.................................................... Using CDs........................................................... Handling Compact Discs................................. Loading a CD ................................................. Removing a CD .............................................. xv xvi

1-2 1-5 1-6 1-7 1-8 1-11 1-12 1-14 1-15 1-16 1-18 1-21 1-23

2

2-1 2-1 2-3 2-4 2-4 2-7 2-10 2-12 2-12 2-14 2-14

Contents iii

Using PC Cards ................................................... Using a Tape Backup Unit ................................... Using a Zip Drive ................................................ Using the IR Port ................................................. Saving Power....................................................... Protecting Your Work.......................................... Productivity.............................................................. Saving Your Work............................................... Backing Up Your Work ....................................... Printing a Document ............................................ System Care ............................................................. Protecting Your System from Damage.................. Keeping Your System in Good Condition ............. Cleaning Your Mouse .......................................... Moving or Shipping Your System ........................ Online Documentation............................................... Where to Go from Here............................................. 3

2-15 2-15 2-15 2-16 2-17 2-18 2-19 2-19 2-19 2-20 2-21 2-21 2-23 2-24 2-25 2-26 2-28

Reviewing System Features System Chassis......................................................... 3-3 Desktop Chassis .................................................. 3-3 Minitower Chassis ............................................... 3-4 System Board Components ....................................... 3-5 Processor............................................................. 3-5 Cache .................................................................. 3-5 Math Coprocessor................................................ 3-5 System Memory................................................... 3-5 Interrupt Controller.............................................. 3-6 PCI Local Bus ..................................................... 3-8 Flash ROM.......................................................... 3-8 Graphics Features................................................ 3-9 Motion Video Controller ................................. 3-9 Graphics Accelerator ...................................... 3-9 Video Support ................................................ 3-10 High-Speed Communication Ports........................ 3-11 Dual IDE Ports.................................................... 3-11

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Contents

USB Ports ........................................................... Sound System...................................................... Plug and Play Support ......................................... Power Saving Feature .......................................... 4 Using Tools and Utilities The BIOS Setup Utility............................................. When to Use BIOS Setup..................................... How to Start BIOS Setup..................................... How to Use BIOS Setup ...................................... Main Menu.......................................................... Displayed Information..................................... Language........................................................ System Time/Date .......................................... Floppy Options ............................................... Primary and Secondary IDE............................ Advanced Menu................................................... PnP O/S ......................................................... Reset Configuration Data................................ Memory Cache ............................................... Memory Banks 0 and 1 ................................... Resource Configuration .................................. Peripheral Configuration ................................. Keyboard Configuration.................................. Video Configuration........................................ DMI Event Logging........................................ Security Menu ..................................................... User Password Is ............................................ Supervisor Password Is................................... Set User or Supervisor Password .................... Using a Password ........................................... Dual Password Security.................................. Unattended Start ............................................. Power Menu ........................................................ Boot Menu........................................................... Exit Menu ........................................................... Maintenance Menu ..............................................

3-12 3-12 3-12 3-13

4-1 4-2 4-3 4-5 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-7 4-7 4-7 4-10 4-10 4-11 4-11 4-11 4-11 4-13 4-15 4-16 4-17 4-17 4-17 4-18 4-18 4-20 4-20 4-21 4-21 4-22 4-25 4-25

Contents v

Flash Utility.............................................................. LANDesk Client Manager......................................... PC Health Indicator ............................................. Managing Workstations .................................. Selecting the PC Health Meter......................... Monitoring PC Health..................................... Inventory ............................................................. DMI .................................................................... Monitoring Capabilities ....................................... Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature ...................................................... Cheyenne Backup ................................................ NEC Security ...................................................... NEC Select Install CD .............................................. Operating System Restore Program...................... Selective Application Restore Program................. 5 Installing Options General Rules ........................................................... Safety Precautions .................................................... Cover Removal and Replacement .............................. Removing the Desktop Cover ............................... Replacing the Desktop Cover ............................... Removing the Minitower Cover............................ Replacing the Minitower Cover ............................ Minitower Chassis Floor Removal and Replacement.. Removing the Minitower Chassis Floor ................ Replacing the Minitower Chassis Floor ................ Expansion Boards..................................................... Locating Expansion Slots..................................... Installing an Expansion Board.............................. Cabling Wake on LAN ........................................ Removing an Expansion Board ............................ System Board Options .............................................. Removing the System Board ................................ Replacing the System Board.................................

4-26 4-27 4-28 4-29 4-29 4-29 4-30 4-31 4-31 4-32 4-33 4-33 4-34 4-35 4-45

5-1 5-2 5-4 5-4 5-6 5-8 5-12 5-15 5-15 5-17 5-17 5-18 5-20 5-24 5-24 5-26 5-27 5-29

vi

Contents

DIMM Upgrade........................................................ Checking System Memory.................................... Removing a DIMM.............................................. Installing a DIMM............................................... Processor Upgrade.................................................... Removing the Processor ....................................... Installing an Upgrade Processor ........................... Data Storage Devices................................................ Locating Device Slots in the Desktop ................... Locating Device Slots in the Minitower ................ Preparing the Device............................................ Connecting Device Cables.................................... Desktop Cables............................................... Minitower Cables ........................................... Diskette Drive Signal Cable ............................ IDE Signal Cables .......................................... Internal SCSI Device Cables ........................... PCMCIA Device Cable................................... System Power Cables...................................... Cabling Storage Devices ...................................... IDE Device Cabling........................................ Internal SCSI Device Cabling ......................... PCMCIA Device Cabling................................ Diskette Drive Cabling.................................... Installing Storage Devices .................................... Removing the Front Panel ............................... Replacing the Front Panel ............................... Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device.......................... Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Drive in a 5 1/4-Inch Slot........................................... Replacing the 3 1/2-Inch Internal Hard Disk Drive ................................................. Replacing the Internal Hard Disk Drive in a Desktop System ......................................... Replacing the Internal Hard Disk Drive in a Minitower System......................................

5-31 5-31 5-32 5-33 5-35 5-35 5-37 5-38 5-39 5-40 5-42 5-44 5-45 5-46 5-47 5-48 5-49 5-50 5-50 5-51 5-51 5-52 5-53 5-54 5-55 5-55 5-59 5-61 5-63 5-65 5-65 5-66

Contents vii

External Options....................................................... Connecting a Parallel Printer................................ Connecting a Serial Device .................................. Enabling a Serial Port .......................................... Connecting an External SCSI Device ................... Connecting USB Devices ..................................... 6 Setting Jumpers System Board Jumper Settings .................................. Changing Processor Jumper Settings .................... Clearing Your Password ...................................... Hard Disk Drive Jumper Settings .............................. Seagate Medalist.................................................. Quantum Fireball Stratus..................................... Seagate Barracuda ............................................... Quantum Viking .................................................. CD-ROM Reader Jumper Settings ............................ 16X CD-ROM Reader ......................................... 24X CD-ROM Reader (Lite-on Technology)........ 24X CD-ROM Reader (Goldstar) ........................ Fax/Modem Board Jumpers ...................................... Zip Drive Jumpers .................................................... Tape Backup Unit Jumpers .......................................

5-70 5-70 5-72 5-73 5-75 5-76

6-1 6-2 6-5 6-8 6-8 6-8 6-9 6-10 6-11 6-11 6-12 6-12 6-13 6-13 6-14

7

Using 24-Hour Information Services NECCSD FaxFlash Service ...................................... 7-2 NECCSD Bulletin Board System .............................. 7-4 NECCSD on America Online Service........................ 7-6 NECCSD on CompuServe Online Service ................. 7-7 E-Mail/Fax Technical Support Service...................... 7-8 Internet..................................................................... 7-9 NECCSD Technical Support Services....................... 7-10 NECCSD Diskette Fulfillment Center ....................... 7-10

viii Contents

8

Solving System Problems Finding Solutions to Common Problems .................... System Problems ................................................. Diskette Drive Problems ...................................... Monitor Problems ................................................ Keyboard/Mouse Problems .................................. Serial Port Problems ............................................ IR Port Problems ................................................. CD-ROM Problems ............................................. Speaker Problems ................................................ Using the Diagnostic Diskette.................................... Replacing the Battery................................................ Getting Help ............................................................. Getting Help from Your Company........................ Getting Help from Your NECCSD Dealer ............ Getting Help from NECCSD Technical Support Center............................................................. NECCSD Warranty/Non-Warranty Repair Service ........................................................... Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment Making Your Computer Work for You...................... Arrange Your Equipment .......................................... Adjust Your Chair .................................................... Adjust Your Input Devices........................................ Adjust Your Monitor ................................................ Vary Your Workday ................................................. Pre-Existing Conditions and Psychosocial Factors ..... Checking Your Comfort: How Do You Measure Up? Checking Your Chair ........................................... Checking Your Keyboard..................................... Checking Your Mouse ......................................... Checking Your Monitor ....................................... Checking You......................................................

8-1 8-2 8-3 8-4 8-5 8-6 8-6 8-6 8-8 8-8 8-9 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-12 8-14

A

A-1 A-3 A-4 A-6 A-8 A-10 A-11 A-12 A-12 A-12 A-12 A-12 A-13

Contents ix

B

System Specifications System Processor................................................. PGA Processor Socket ......................................... Standard Random Access Memory (RAM)........... Cache Memory .................................................... Read Only Memory (ROM) ................................. Video Window RAM (WRAM) ........................... Calendar Clock .................................................... Input/Output (I/O) Facilities ................................ Device Slots......................................................... Graphics.............................................................. Sound System...................................................... Speakers.............................................................. Dimensions.......................................................... Power.................................................................. Operating Environment ........................................ Limited Warranty How Long is the Warranty? ...................................... Who is Protected? ..................................................... What is Covered and What is Not Covered? .............. What We Will Pay For and What We Will Not Pay For ............................................................... How You Can Get Warranty Service......................... Year One ........................................................ Years Two and Three...................................... Limitation of Damages and Implied Warranties ......... How State Law Relates to the Warranty.................... For Information, Telephone 1-800-632-4565.............

B-1 B-2 B-2 B-2 B-2 B-3 B-3 B-3 B-4 B-5 B-6 B-7 B-8 B-8 B-8

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C-1 C-1 C-1 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-5

Index

x Contents

List of Tables Quick Reference to Information About Your Computer ............................................................ 2-28 Supported DIMMs.................................................... 3-6 Interrupt Level Assignments...................................... 3-7 Supported Refresh Rates........................................... 3-10 Navigation Keys ....................................................... 4-5 IDE Device Primary/Secondary Master/Slave Configurations ..................................................... 5-43 Processor Bus Speed Jumper Settings........................ 6-4

Contents xi

1

Introducing Your Computer

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WARNING

Prolonged or improper use of a computer workstation may pose a risk of serious injury. To reduce your risk of injury, set up and use your computer in the manner described in Appendix A, Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment.

Once you have set up your computer, the next thing is to become familiar with the system. This chapter provides a brief overview of the

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front and back features of your system speakers.

For more information about system features, see Chapter 3, "Reviewing System Features." See the online NEC Help Center for a comprehensive source of information about your PowerMate® Enterprise system.

Double click the Online Docs shortcut icon on ® your Windows desktop to launch the NEC Help Center.

NOTE

Introducing Your Computer 1-1

FRONT FEATURES

The following figures show the features on the front of the system. A brief description follows the figures.

Front features desktop model

1-2 Introducing Your Computer

Front features minitower model

The following figures show the system controls and lamps called out in the previous figures.

Introducing Your Computer 1-3

System controls and lamps desktop

System controls and lamps minitower

1-4 Introducing Your Computer

System Controls and Lamps

System controls let you select specific system operations. Lamps let you know the status of a system operation. Your computer has the following controls and lamps:

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Power button Press this button to turn on the system power. Press it again to turn off the power. Suspend button Press this button to suspend system operation when you plan to be away from your computer for a short time. Press any key or move your mouse to resume system operation at the point where you stopped it. An amber system unit power lamp indicates that the system is in a power-saving mode. If you have a VESA-compliant monitor, your monitor also goes into power-saving mode.

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Reset button Use the reset button to restart your computer after it is powered on. You might need to restart your system if your system power is on and the computer is not running properly.

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CAUTION

Resetting your system can result in the loss of data. Press the reset button only when all other methods of restarting your computer fail.

Introducing Your Computer 1-5

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Power lamp The power lamp indicates whether system power is on or off. It also lets you know if the system is operating in a power-saving mode. A steady green lamp indicates that the power is on to all system components. An amber lamp indicates that the system is in Suspend mode with full-power reduction.

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Disk lamp A lit disk lamp indicates that the hard disk is active. The green lamp tells you that the hard disk is reading or writing data.

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CAUTION

Do not turn off the system unless absolutely necessary while the disk lamp is lit. To do so can damage your hard disk or data.

IR Window

The IR (infrared) window is the system's IR port. The IR port supports two-way wireless communications. The interface uses infrared as the transmission medium instead of a traditional cable. The IR port lets you transfer files to or from portable devices such as laptops and personal digital assistant (PDA) products using application software supporting IrDA data transfer. Systems running the Windows 95 operating system come with LapLink® software for wireless data transfer. With IrDA software, you can transfer data at speeds of up to 115 kilobytes per second (Kbps) and at distances up to 3 feet from the IR window.

1-6 Introducing Your Computer

Diskette Drive A

Diskette drive A loads and starts programs from a diskette. Files can also be copied to and from a diskette. Diskette drive A may be a bootable drive.

Diskette drive A features desktop

Diskette drive A features minitower

Introducing Your Computer 1-7

Your diskette drive has the following features:

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Diskette drive busy lamp This lamp lights when the diskette drive is reading to or writing from a diskette.

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CAUTION

To prevent damage to your diskette drive and data, do not turn off the system or remove a diskette while the diskette drive busy lamp is lit.

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Diskette release button Press this button to release a diskette from the diskette drive.

CD-ROM Reader

Your system may come with a 16X or 24X CD-ROM reader. Use the CD-ROM reader to load and start programs from a compact disc (CD). If your system has audio, you can also use the CD-ROM reader to play your audio CDs.

You can boot your system from the CD-ROM reader with a bootable CD. To enable the system to boot from the CD-ROM reader, see "Boot Menu" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

The CD-ROM reader operates at different speeds depending on whether the CD you are using contains data or music. This allows you to get your data faster and to see smoother animation and video.

1-8 Introducing Your Computer

The CD-ROM reader in your system might look different from the one shown in the following figure.

NOTE

CD-ROM reader features

The CD-ROM reader has the following features:

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Headphone jack Allows the connection of an optional set of headphones with a stereo mini-jack plug. Volume control knob Lets you adjust the volume of an optional set of headphones. Open/close button Opens or closes the reader's loading tray. Open the loading tray to insert a CD into or remove a CD from the reader.

Introducing Your Computer 1-9

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Track skip button (not shown) Advances play to the next track (available in some models). Emergency eject hole Allows the manual ejection of a CD if the eject function is disabled by software or if a power failure occurs. To manually eject the CD, insert the end point of a wire paper clip into the hole and press inward to open the CD tray. CD busy lamp Lights when the reader is retrieving data, music, graphics, or audio from a CD. Do not eject the CD or turn off the system unit when the lamp is on. CD tray Provides a surface for loading a CD into the reader. Press the open/close button to open or close the CD tray.

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1-10 Introducing Your Computer

PCMCIA Device

If your system has a PCMCIA unit or PC Card Host you can add PC cards to the system. A PC card is inserted into a PC card slot much as a diskette is inserted in a diskette drive, but each type of PC card has a different function. With one PC card host, you can add a number of capabilities to your system by getting a variety of PC cards. PC card host features are shown in the figure. Feature descriptions follow the figure.

PCMCIA device features

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PC host card slot The PC host can accommodate two PC cards at the same time. The system ships with slots that accommodate Type I and Type II cards. PC card eject buttons Each PC host card slot has a card eject button to release a PC card from the slot.

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Introducing Your Computer 1-11

Some of the PC cards currently available are listed below:

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memory card storage device sound card SCSI adapter parallel port interface serial port interface token ring LAN adapter card CD-ROM interface joystick interface card cellular phone interface.

Tape Backup Unit

Some models come with a tape backup unit. If your system has a tape backup unit, you can use it to quickly back up all or part of your system's files to a high-capacity tape cartridge. Backup software helps you tailor the backup process to protect your files and applications, which are compressed to conserve space and to speed up the process.

1-12 Introducing Your Computer

Tape backup unit features are shown in the following figure. Feature descriptions follow the figure.

Tape backup unit features

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Tape drive busy lamp The tape drive busy lamp indicates tape drive activity. Do not eject the cartridge or turn off the system when the tape drive busy lamp is on.

Introducing Your Computer 1-13

Zip Drive

Some models come with a ZipTM drive. Use the Zip drive to back up work, archive old files, and transport your work. Up to 100 MB can be stored onto a 3 1/2-inch Zip disk. Zip drive features are shown in the following figure. Feature descriptions follow the figure.

Zip drive features

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Zip disk release button Press the Zip disk release button to release a Zip disk from the Zip drive. Zip drive busy lamp The Zip drive busy lamp indicates Zip drive activity. Do not eject the disk or turn off the system when the Zip drive busy lamp is on.

1-14 Introducing Your Computer

Stand

The minitower system unit sits on a stand to prevent it from being tipped over. This is a safety feature to prevent personal injury hazard and equipment damage. Keep the system unit in the stand except when opening or upgrading the system. Place the system unit on the stand so the stand's tabs go into the slots in the bottom of the chassis. Slide the system unit forward to lock the tabs in the slots.

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WARNING

Keep the system unit in the stand. The stand is designed to keep the unit from being tipped over.

The minitower stand

Introducing Your Computer 1-15

BACK FEATURES

On the back of your computer, you'll find external connectors, power supply features, and expansion board slots. The following figure shows back features of the desktop model.

Back features desktop

1-16 Introducing Your Computer

The following figure shows back features of the minitower model.

Back features minitower

Introducing Your Computer 1-17

External Connectors

External connectors let you attach peripheral devices, such as a monitor, keyboard, mouse, and printer to your system. Your system has the following external connectors:

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VGA monitor connector Attach the signal cable from your monitor to this ® connector. Supports an NEC MultiSync monitor or other video graphics array (VGA)-compatible and super video graphics array (SVGA)-compatible monitors with a 15-pin connector. Audio connectors The following connectors come integrated on multimedia models: Microphone in jack The microphone in jack lets you connect a microphone for recording audio information in your data system files. Line out jack The line out jack allows you to connect an amplified output device, such as powered speakers, a stereo tape recorder, or an external amplifier for audio output. If you ordered speakers, use this jack to connect them.

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1-18 Introducing Your Computer

Audio connectors desktop

Audio connectors minitower

Introducing Your Computer 1-19

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Printer port Use this port to connect a parallel printer with a 25-pin connector to the system. Serial ports Attach a serial device with a 9-pin connector to each serial port. Serial devices include a pointing device, serial printer, or a modem. (Serial port 2 is disabled by default; enable COM2 in BIOS to use the port.) Keyboard port Attach the keyboard that comes with your computer to the keyboard port. The keyboard port supports a PS/2®-compatible, 101-key or 104-key keyboard (in the U.S. and Canada) or a 102-key keyboard (in the United Kingdom and Germany) with a 6-pin mini DIN connector.

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Mouse port Attach the mouse that comes with your computer to this port. The mouse port supports a PS/2-compatible mouse. Universal Serial Bus ports The Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports allow you to add new plug and play serial devices without opening up the system. You simply plug the devices into the ports. The USB determines system resources for each peripheral and assigns them without user intervention. Up to 127 devices can be daisy chained to a single USB port. Fax/modem ports Some systems come with a 56 kilobytes per second (Kbps) fax/modem board. The fax/modem board allows the connection of a phone line to the computer for fax and data communications functions. Dual fax/modem ports let you use a telephone line for the fax/modem and your telephone.

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1-20 Introducing Your Computer

The fax/modem board uses x2 technology. x2 products are capable of 56 Kbps (52 Kbps in the U.S.). However, the download speeds you experience may go lower due to varying line conditions. Uploads from end user to service provider travel at speeds up to 28.8 Kbps. An x2-compatible analog phone line and an x2-capable service provider are required for high-speed downloads. Go to http://www.usr.com/x2 on the Internet for details.

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Network board connectors If your computer comes with a network board, you can connect it to an Ethernet network and communicate with other computers.

Power Supply

Your system has the following power supply features:

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Power supply fan The power supply fan cools system components and prevents them from overheating. Keep the area near the fan clear for proper ventilation. Voltage selector switch Sets the voltage for your system to 115 volts or 230 volts.

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CAUTION

Set the switch correctly for the voltage in your area. Most wall outlets in the United States and Canada are 115 volts. Outlets in Europe, Australia, and Asia (except Taiwan) are 230 volts. Taiwan uses 115-volt outlets.

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Power socket Connect your power cable to this socket.

Introducing Your Computer 1-21

Power supply features desktop

Power supply features minitower

1-22 Introducing Your Computer

SPEAKERS

Some systems come with a pair of high-quality stereo speakers that you can arrange to suit your work environment. Desktop speakers have 8-watt total output; minitower systems have 9-watt total output. An AC adapter comes with the system. Set up the speakers with the AC adapter. The speakers connect to the line out jack on the back of the system unit. The 8-watt speaker set features an on/off button, a power lamp, and volume, treble, and bass control knobs. The 9-watt speaker set features an on/off button, a power lamp, and volume and treble control knobs. Adjust the speaker volume by using the volume control on the front of the right speaker or by using the Windows sound software. To bring up a volume control, double click the speaker icon on the taskbar (next to the system clock). Also use the software to balance the sound between the left and right speakers.

Introducing Your Computer 1-23

2

Using Your Computer

Now that you are familiar with your system, this chapter provides the information you need to start using your computer. Some of the information provided includes:

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System Operation Productivity System Care Online Documentation Where to Go From Here.

SYSTEM OPERATION

In this section you will find information on the following:

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Starting Up

starting up and shutting down your system setting the date and time using system features such as the mouse or CD-ROM reader using system protection features.

Press the power button to start up your system. The power lamp lights green to indicate that the system is on. The NEC startup screen appears.

Using Your Computer 2-1

At the bottom of this screen, messages like the following appear:

Press <F2> key to run Setup OR Press ESC to display POST

These messages are part of your system's Power-On Self-Test (POST). Your computer is checking your hardware for any changes since the last startup. If you want to see the messages displayed during POST, press ESC. If you want to go into the Setup Utility, press F2.

NOTE

One beep indicates that the system has successfully completed the power-on test. After about 5 seconds, Windows starts up. If a problem occurs, a series of beeps may sound. If this happens repeatedly after powering on, power off the system and turn to Chapter 8, Solving System Problems. This chapter provides some helpful hints on obvious system problems.

If the system displays a message indicating that system settings have changed, run Setup (see Chapter 4, Using Tools and Utilities).

NOTE

On PowerMate Enterprise systems loaded with the Windows NT® 4.0 operating system, press Ctrl-Alt-Del when prompted on-screen to do so. The log-on box appears for entering a password.

2-2 Using Your Computer

Shutting Down

Follow these steps to shut down (power off) your computer.

1. Save your work. See the documentation that comes with

your application.

2. Exit the application program. 3. Make sure that the hard disk and diskette drives are not

in use. A lit hard disk lamp or diskette drive busy lamp indicates that a drive is in use.

!

CAUTION

Wait until a program is finished running before powering off the system. Unless absolutely necessary, never power off the system when the system power lamp is amber or when either the hard disk lamp or the diskette drive busy lamp is lit. Information on the hard disk or diskette might be lost or damaged.

4. Press Start on the Windows taskbar, then point to and click Shut Down. Selecting Shut Down gives you several choices in the pop-up submenu. Select Shut down the computer, and then click Yes or press Enter

to shut down the computer.

5. Turn off power to your monitor. 6. Power off the system by pressing the system unit power

button. The system powers off after a 5- to 10-second delay.

Using Your Computer 2-3

Setting the Date and Time

To set the system date and time within Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0, double click the time display in the lower right corner of the taskbar. A dialog box appears for setting the date and time. Set the date by selecting the current month and year using the up or down arrows in the dialog box. Set the time by entering the current hour, minutes, and seconds in hh:mm:ss, 12-hour format. Select AM or PM using the up or down arrows.

Using the Keyboard

Your system comes with a PS/2®-compatible, 104-key keyboard with a 6-pin mini DIN connector. Some systems come with an ergonomic keyboard to make working at the computer easier and more comfortable. Use the keyboard to communicate with your computer. The keyboard has standard typewriter keys for typing, a keypad for entering numbers, and special keys you use to move around the screen, enter commands into your computer, and perform tasks specific to your application. Keyboard key functions depend on the operating system or software application program you use. See your operating system documentation or software documentation for specific functions. In general, your keyboard has four main areas of keys and a row of status lamps. See the name of the keyboard area following the figures for a description of it.

2-4 Using Your Computer

Keyboard features

Windows 95 keys

Using Your Computer 2-5

The keyboard has the following features:

T T T T

Typewriter keys Use the typewriter keys just as you do on a standard typewriter. Windows keys Press the left or right Windows keys to call up the Windows Start menu. Application key Press the Application key in Windows to bring up a menu of options specific to the current application. Function keys Function keys control functions specific to your particular software application or operating system. For example, some programs provide access to help with the F1 key. Standard cursor control keys The standard cursor control keys control the direction of the cursor. The Num Lock state (Num Lock lamp is on) does not affect the operation of these keys. Numeric keypad/cursor control keys The numeric keypad/cursor control keys work like a numeric keypad. In Numeric Keypad mode, the Num Lock lamp is on. To use the keys to control the direction of the cursor, press the Num Lock key (Num Lock lamp goes off). To return to the Numeric Keypad mode, press the Num Lock key. To use a keypad cursor key while in Numeric Keypad mode, press the Shift key and the keypad cursor key.

T

T

2-6 Using Your Computer

T

Num Lock lamp When the Num Lock lamp is on, the keys on the numeric keypad work like a numeric keypad. When the Num Lock lamp is off, the keys on the numeric keypad work as cursor control keys. Caps Lock lamp When the Caps Lock lamp is on, all typed letters are uppercase letters (LIKE THIS). When the lamp is off, all typed letters are lowercase letters (like this). Scroll Lock lamp When the Scroll Lock lamp is on, Scroll Lock key functions are enabled. When the lamp is off, Scroll Lock key functions are disabled. Scroll Lock functions depend upon your application.

T

T

Using a Mouse

Your mouse has a left button, right button, and a cursor movement wheel. Use the mouse (shown in the following figure) to quickly move around on the screen, to select menu items, and to choose functions specific to your software. In Windows, clicking the right mouse button on the desktop provides shortcuts to such features as the Properties menu. Other right mouse button functions depend on the application program in use. Refer to the application's documentation to see what the right mouse button does. The cursor movement wheel lets you scroll vertically and horizontally and zoom in to view data on the screen.

Using Your Computer 2-7

You can also drag an object by positioning the cursor over it and rolling the cursor movement wheel to the new location.

Mouse

Here are basic ways to use the left mouse button:

T

Click Clicking selects an object on your screen. To "click," point to the object and press and release the left mouse button. Double click Some actions require a double click to execute them. To "double click" an object, point to the object and press and release the left mouse button twice.

T

2-8 Using Your Computer

T

Press/Hold Pressing a mouse button holds an action until you release a mouse button. For example, pointing to a menu and pressing the left mouse button holds the menu open for reading until you release the button. Drag Dragging your mouse attaches your pointer to an object on the screen and allows you to highlight text or move an object. To drag an object, point to the object, press the left mouse button, and move the mouse to the new location. You can also drag an object by positioning the cursor over it and rolling the cursor movement wheel to the new location.

T

Typical screen objects that you click or double click are icons, buttons, and menu options.

If your mouse pointer disappears, move your mouse in wide circles to bring it back into the screen.

NOTE

Use a mouse pad for best results with your mouse. The mouse pad provides traction for moving the mouse and results in more sensitivity and control of movement. A textured pad provides more traction than a smooth pad. Keep the mouse pad clean. For more information about your mouse, see The Basics in the online NEC Help Center and your application documentation. Also included in the online documentation is information on cleaning your mouse.

Using Your Computer 2-9

Using Diskettes

Follow these steps to insert a 3 1/2-inch diskette in the standard diskette drive.

1. Hold the diskette at its top edge and insert it into the

diskette drive:

T

in a desktop model, insert the diskette label side facing left

Inserting a diskette desktop

2-10 Using Your Computer

T

in a minitower model, insert the diskette label side facing up.

Inserting a diskette minitower

2. Insert the diskette all the way into the drive until you

hear a click.

If your diskette did not come formatted, you must format it before storing information on it. See your operating system documentation for information about formatting a diskette.

NOTE

CAUTION: Do not format your hard disk. Formatting the hard disk will erase all preinstalled applications.

!

Using Your Computer 2-11

To remove a diskette from the diskette drive, press the release button on the 3 1/2-inch diskette drive.

!

CAUTION

Do not remove a diskette from the diskette drive when the diskette drive lamp is lit. To do so can damage both the data on the diskette and the drive. Do not turn off the system power while the diskette is being accessed. Do not reset the system (except as a last resort) when the diskette drive is in use.

Using CDs

See the following sections for information about handling, loading, and removing CDs.

Handling Compact Discs To protect your CDs from damage, use the following guidelines when you handle them.

T T

Always pick up the disc by its edges. Avoid touching the side of the disc that has no printing or writing on it. This is the data side of the disc.

2-12 Using Your Computer

Handling a CD

T T T

Do not write on or apply labels to either side of the disc. Keep the disc away from direct sunlight or high temperatures. Clean fingerprints or dust from the disc by wiping it with a soft cloth. Gently, brush the cloth from the center of the disc toward the edge.

Cleaning a CD

Using Your Computer 2-13

!

CAUTION

Avoid using benzene, paint thinner, record cleaner, static repellent, or any other chemical on the disc. Chemicals and cleaners can damage the disc.

Loading a CD

To insert a CD into the CD-ROM reader, follow these steps:

1. Press the open/close button. A CD tray slides out from

the reader door.

2. Remove the CD from its protective case. Hold the CD

by its center hole and outer edges to avoid touching its surface.

3. Place the CD, printed side up, into the circular area of

the tray.

4. Press the open/close button again. The tray

automatically slides into the reader.

Removing a CD To remove a CD, simply press the open/close button and remove the CD when the tray slides out. Press the open/close button again to close the reader door.

You can also eject a CD from Windows. Double click My Computer on the Windows desktop, right click the CD-ROM reader icon in the My Computer window, and click Eject. Your audio software also has a CD eject function.

2-14 Using Your Computer

Using PC Cards

Follow these steps to insert a PC card into the PC host.

1. Holding the PC card at its top edge, insert it, label side

up, into the PC card slot.

2. Insert the PC card all the way into the drive. 3. Wait for a beep after inserting the card.

To remove a PC card from the PC card host, press the release button next to the PC card slot.

Using a Tape Backup Unit

To insert a tape cartridge into the tape backup unit, follow these steps.

1. Hold the cartridge with the metal base plate down and

the tape access door facing the drive slot.

2. Wait until the green drive activity lamp goes off. 3. Push the cartridge into the drive slot through the flip-up

door. Once the cartridge is fully inserted, the drive's locking mechanism holds it in place. To remove a tape cartridge from the tape backup unit, wait until the green drive activity lamp goes off, and then pull the cartridge out of the drive slot.

Using a Zip Drive

Follow these steps to insert a Zip disk in the Zip drive.

1. Holding the disk at its top edge, insert it, label side up,

into the Zip drive.

2. Insert the disk all the way into the drive until you hear a

click.

Using Your Computer 2-15

To remove a Zip disk from the Zip drive, press the release button next to the Zip drive.

!

CAUTION

Do not remove a Zip disk from the Zip drive when the Zip drive lamp is lit. To do so can damage both the data on the disk and the drive. Do not turn off the system power while the disk is being accessed. Do not reset the system (except as a last resort) while the drive is in use.

Using the IR Port

In systems running the Windows 95 operating system, the infrared (IR) port on the front panel and the IrDA interface allow you to use infrared devices with your computer. Use the installed Laplink software to communicate with other computers or use a remote control device. (See the Laplink documentation for information on using the software.) Before you can use infrared on your system, you must enable Serial Port B (COM2), and also set Serial Port B Mode to IrDA through the BIOS Setup Utility. Enable COM2 for IrDA by following these steps:

1. Turn on or reboot your system. 2. Press F2 as soon as you see the message containing this

line: Press <F2> for SETUP. You have about five seconds to press F2 before system boot continues. The BIOS Setup Utility window appears.

2-16 Using Your Computer

3. 4. 5. 6.

Press the left or right arrow key to highlight the Advanced menu. Press the up or down arrow key until Peripheral Configuration is highlighted. Press Enter. Press the down or up arrow key until Serial Port B is highlighted. Press Enter to bring up the Serial Port B submenu. Press the up or down arrow key to highlight Enabled. Press Enter. Press the down or up arrow key until Serial Port B

Mode is highlighted.

7. 8.

Press Enter to bring up the Serial Port B Mode submenu. Press the up or down arrow key to highlight IrDA. Press Enter. Press Esc. Press the left or right arrow key to highlight the Exit main menu item.

9.

10. Press the down or up arrow key until the Exit Saving Changes submenu item is highlighted. 11. Press Enter. The system restarts.

Saving Power

You can enter a power-saving state Suspend mode by pressing the suspend button on the front of your unit. Pressing the suspend button is a convenient way of conserving energy when you are going to be away from your system for a short period of time.

Using Your Computer 2-17

!

CAUTION

Take care to avoid pressing the power or reset button instead of the suspend button. Accidentally pressing the power or reset buttons can result in the loss of data.

T In the desktop model, the suspend button is

below the power button and above the reset button.

T In the minitower model, the suspend button is to

the left of the power button and the reset button.

Suspend mode provides the greatest power savings by putting the system in a maximum power shutdown. When the system goes into Suspend mode, it saves data and system status and then shuts off power to all possible components. Suspend mode lets you save power without first saving your work. An amber power lamp indicates your system is in a powersaving mode. Press a key or move your mouse to resume system operation where you left off.

Protecting Your Work

Your system's security features provide protection against unauthorized access to your system and data:

T T

The system BIOS Setup utility program (see "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4) includes a feature that enables you to set up a user and administrator password. Windows contains network security features. To learn more about them, refer to your Windows documentation or consult your system administrator.

2-18 Using Your Computer

PRODUCTIVITY

The following sections explain how to use your system to maximize your productivity.

Saving Your Work

Save your work often! The time you take to periodically save your data file as you work can save you time in the end! Prevent losing a whole day's work or more when the unexpected happens, such as losing power due to a power outage. Some applications have an automatic save feature. When the feature is enabled, the application saves your work for you every time an interval of your choosing passes while the file is open. For example, you might want to save your work every 10 minutes. Using this feature reduces the amount of information you could lose if there's a power outage or a system problem. In some Windows programs, you can select automatic save as an option from the File and Save As menus. If you are creating a new file, you'll first need to specify a name for your file and the drive and directory to store it in. Always save your work before you exit an application. See the application's documentation for available save options.

Backing Up Your Work

Back up your work on a regular basis! Backup procedures are important for the efficient and effective use of your computer. Protect your program and data files with regular backup procedures. Make backup copies of your program and data files that are on diskette and on the hard disk.

Using Your Computer 2-19

The standard practice for diskette backup is to copy each diskette, store the original in a safe place, and use the copy as your working diskette. See your operating system documentation for information about copying diskettes.

For additional protection of your files, the system has a built-in backup feature included in the ® LANDesk Client Manager software that comes preloaded on your computer. This feature alerts you to possible system problems and lets you back up your files to a tape drive or a network drive. For further information, see "LANDesk Client Manger" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

Printing a Document

Before you can print out a document, you must

T T

connect your computer to a printer or to a network connected to a printer set up the printer.

If you have not connected a printer, see "Connecting a Parallel Printer" in Chapter 5. If you did not choose a printer when you initially set up your computer, you'll need to do that before you can print (see your Windows documentation). If you are using a nonWindows program, you need to set up a printer driver for that program. See your printer documentation for printer setup information.

2-20 Using Your Computer

Once your program is set up to work with your printer, printing a file within a Windows application is easy:

1. Turn on your printer power if necessary. 2. Be sure you have paper in your printer. See your printer

documentation to load paper.

3. Check that the printer is "online" or "selected." See your

printer documentation for information about choosing the online mode.

4. Select Print from the File menu of your Windows

application. A Print dialog box appears.

5. Select how many print copies you want and the range of

pages. To print one copy of all the pages, simply click OK.

SYSTEM CARE

Your system is a durable, dependable computer built for heavy use. With protective measures and proper care, you can prevent problems and promote the successful operation and long life span of your computer.

Protecting Your System from Damage

There are several ways that you can protect your system from possible damage. NECCSD strongly recommends the following protective measures:

T

The minitower system unit sits on a stand to prevent it from being tipped over. This is a safety feature to prevent personal injury hazard and equipment damage. Keep the system unit in the stand. Connect a surge suppressor between your computer and a grounded wall outlet. A surge suppressor protects your system from sudden transient increases and decreases in electrical power.

T

Using Your Computer 2-21

Be sure to connect all peripherals, such as your monitor and printer, to the surge protector. The surge protector should be the only device that you plug into the wall outlet.

T T

Avoid repeated power-on cycles. These subject the system components to temperature variations and stress. Disconnect your system from telephone and power lines when an electrical storm threatens. If you have a fax/modem, lightning can travel in on the phone line and damage both the fax/modem and the system unit. Lightening can also travel in on power lines and damage your monitor and system unit. Be sure that system power is off before you connect or disconnect a cable. Never make cable changes when the system power is on. To do so could damage your system and its peripherals. Use appropriate virus detection software regularly to protect your system from computer viruses. If you plan to use software programs other than NECCSD-supplied software, NECCSD strongly recommends that you take the necessary steps, such as virus checks, to protect your system. Use Setup options to set up an automatic reminder to run a virus check (see "Power Menu" in Chapter 4).

T

T

T

Place your computer away from direct sunlight and extreme hot and cold temperatures. The recommended operating environment is from 50°F to 95°F (10°C to 35°C). The recommended non-operating environment (shipping or storage) is from 14°F to 158°F (-10°C to 70°C).

T

After turning off power, wait about five seconds for the hard disk to spin down before you power on again.

2-22 Using Your Computer

T T

Be sure that nothing is placed on top of your system power cables. Prevent dust from entering your system by covering it when it is not in use.

Keeping Your System in Good Condition

Maintain the condition of your system by periodically using the following general procedures.

!

WARNING

For safety, power off and unplug your system, monitor, and any external devices before cleaning them.

T

Clean the outside of the computer with a soft clean cloth. You can remove stubborn stains with a cloth slightly dampened with a mild detergent. Never use a strong cleaner or solvent on any part of the system.

T T

Keep food and liquids away from your computer. Periodically clean the keyboard with a vacuum cleaner brush attachment. Do not use any liquid cleaners on the keyboard as they can damage the keyboard. If an object, such as a paper clip, falls into the keyboard, turn the keyboard over and gently shake it.

T

Clean the monitor screen with a monitor glass cleaner and wipe it with a clean, lint-free cloth. You may use wet/dry cleaning pads manufactured for monitor screens.

Using Your Computer 2-23

Cleaning Your Mouse

Under normal conditions, your mouse has a self-cleaning mechanism that prevents a buildup of dust or lint around the mouse ball and tracking mechanism. Periodically, however, you might need to clean the mouse ball. Use these steps to clean your mouse:

1. Power off your computer and any peripherals attached

to it.

2. Invert the mouse. Locate the mouse ball cover.

Mouse ball cover

3. Rotate the ball cover counterclockwise and remove the

cover.

4. Turn the mouse over so that the cover and ball fall into

your palm.

5. Clean the mouse as follows.

T T T

Use tap water, or tap water and a mild detergent, to clean the mouse ball. Use a clean, lint-free cloth to dry the ball. Blow into the mouse socket to remove remaining dust or lint.

2-24 Using Your Computer

6. Gently put the ball back into the mouse. 7. Fit the ball cover back into the mouse and turn the cover

clockwise until it locks in place.

Moving or Shipping Your System

Use these steps to prepare your system for moving or shipping:

1. Back up your hard disk files onto diskettes, Zip disks,

or tape cartridges. Be sure to take precautions for storing and transporting diskettes or cartridges so that they are not exposed to magnetic fields or electrical impulses.

2. Remove any diskette from the diskette drive. If you have

a CD in the CD-ROM reader, remove the CD.

3. Turn off the system unit and any external options

connected to it.

4. Unplug the system unit power cable from the wall outlet

or surge suppressor, then from the unit itself.

5. Unplug any external options from the wall outlets or

surge suppressor, then disconnect them from the system unit.

6. For minitower models, remove the stand. 7. Pack the system components in the original shipping

materials and cartons. If these are not available, be sure to use adequate packing materials to protect the components. To set up your system, follow the steps on the PowerMate Enterprise Quick Setup poster that comes with your computer.

Using Your Computer 2-25

ONLINE DOCUMENTATION

Your system comes with documentation conveniently available at your fingertips. Information about your system is available right from the Windows desktop.

To optimize the graphics in the online NEC Help Center, configure the monitor for high color.

NOTE

The graphics in the NEC Help Center are enhanced when viewed with high color. To configure the system for high color, use the following steps:

1. Close any applications that are open. 2. Right click on the Windows desktop. Click Properties.

The Display Properties window opens.

3. Click the Settings tab. 4. In the Color Palette field, highlight High Color (16 bit). 5. Click OK. Restart your system.

To access the system documentation, double click the Online Docs shortcut icon on your Windows desktop to open the NEC Help Center. A welcome screen appears with the information you need to use the online documentation.

2-26 Using Your Computer

The NEC Help Center is a comprehensive source of information about your system. To help you find the information you need, the documentation is organized by topic and the following modules:

T T T T T T

System Tour The Basics Advanced Topics Question & Answers System Upgrades Service & Support.

Other online documents include the Healthy Environment help file that complements the "How Does Your Workplace Measure Up?" brochure. Most of your application programs provide extensive online help at the touch of a button (usually the Help button). Some programs provide separate online user's guides for specific applications. Windows provides extensive online help and "wizards" to guide you through procedures.

Using Your Computer 2-27

WHERE TO GO FROM HERE

Once you have your system up and running, we suggest that you do the following:

T T T T

See "Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment" either in Appendix A of this User's Guide or in the online Healthy Environment help file. Take the System Tour in your online NEC Help Center. See The Basics in your online NEC Help Center. Install any applications. See the documentation that comes with the application.

See the following quick reference chart to find information about some of the things you might want to do.

Quick Reference to Information About Your Computer

WHAT YOU WANT TO FIND WHERE TO FIND IT Basic information about my computer Setting a password The Basics in your online NEC Help Center "Setting a Password" in Advanced Topics in your online NEC Help Center and "Security Menu" in Chapter 4 of this guide "Loading a CD" in The Basics (NEC Help Center) Questions & Answers in your online NEC Help Center "Saving Power" and "Managing Power" in The Basics (NEC Help Center) System Upgrades in your online NEC Help Center and "Installing Options" in Chapter 5 of this guide

Loading a CD Playing a music CD (multimedia systems) Using the suspend button Adding options

2-28 Using Your Computer

Quick Reference to Information About Your Computer

WHAT YOU WANT TO FIND WHERE TO FIND IT Understanding power management Access to the World Wide Web Transferring files from my laptop to my computer via the IR window Protecting my system from viruses Video drivers Using Desktop Management Interface Using support services "Saving Power" and "Managing Power" in The Basics (NEC Help Center) "Getting Help" in Service & Support (NEC Help Center) LapLink online help and "A Look at the Front" in The Basics (NEC Help Center) "Your Software" in System Tour (NEC Help Center) "Video Drivers" in Advanced Topics (NEC Help Center) "LANDesk Client Manager" in Chapter 4 of this guide "24-Hour Information Services" in Service & Support (NEC Help Center), and Chapter 7 of this guide "Taking Care of Your System" in The Basics (NEC Help Center) Chapter 8 of this guide

Taking care of my system Troubleshooting tips

Using Your Computer 2-29

3

Reviewing System Features

Depending on your model, your computer has a 166-MHz ® or 200-MHz Pentium microprocessor, or a Pentium 166-MHz, 200-MHz, or 233-MHz MMX microprocessor and enhanced cache memory. The MMX processor technology boosts audio, video, and 3D graphics performance. All PowerMate Enterprise systems come with the following factory-installed features:

T T T

3 1/2-inch, 1.44-megabyte (MB) diskette drive 16 MB (minimum) of Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM) S3 Trio 64 ViRGE/GX 3D video adapter.

The rest is up to you! Your system supports many optional hardware features available from NECCSD, including memory expansion modules, audio and video components, and a CD-ROM reader. A fax/modem board, video board, and several network boards are also offered. Systems are also available with a SCSI adapter board, SCSI hard disk drive, Zip drive, PCMCIA device, or a tape backup unit. In addition, the system supports a user-selectable IDE hard disk that is compatible with the Ultra DMA/33 standard for high-speed data transfers. (IDE devices that are not Ultra DMA/33-compatible are also supported.)

Reviewing System Features 3-1

Depending on your model, your system might ship with the following software installed on your hard disk:

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95 Healthy Environment Help file S3 3D ViRGE/GX or Diamond Stealth Pro 2000 video drivers Active Movie video drivers for Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0 Yamaha® or Creative Labs CT4335 audio drivers US Robotics® 56-KB Akita II modem drivers Microsoft Internet Explorer for Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95 McAfee VirusScanTM LANDesk Client Manager with NEC Security and Cheyenne Backup Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95 Bus Master IDE drivers CD-ROM drivers LapLinkTM (Windows 95 systems only) FirstAid DeluxeTM 97 (Windows 95 systems only) IntelliMouse mouse drivers for Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 95.

®

®

®

®

®

®

A diskette containing QA PlusTM Pro software and CDs containing copies of your operating system and drivers are included in the shipping carton.

3-2 Reviewing System Features

SYSTEM CHASSIS

The chassis provides an enclosure for the system board, power supply, expansion slots, and storage device slots.

Desktop Chassis

The desktop chassis has three expansion slots and four storage device slots. The expansion slots include one 8-/16-bit ISA slot (1/2-length), one shared PCI/ISA slot, and one 32-bit PCI slot. The four storage device slots accommodate up to three accessible devices and one internal hard disk drive. The accessible device slots support the standard one-inch high, 3 1/2-inch 1.44-MB diskette drive and two 1.6-inch high, 5 1/4-inch storage devices. The internal device slot supports a single one-inch high, 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive. The following figure shows the locations of the storage devices in the desktop chassis for a typical configuration.

Desktop chassis features

Reviewing System Features 3-3

Minitower Chassis

The minitower chassis has five expansion slots and six storage device slots. The expansion slots include one 8-/16-bit ISA slot, one shared PCI/ISA slot, and three 16-bit PCI slots. The shared PCI/ISA slot does not support PCI Bus Master cards. The six storage device slots accommodate up to four accessible devices and two internal hard disk drives. The accessible device slots support the standard one-inch high, 3 1/2-inch diskette drive and three 1.6-inch high, 5 1/4-inch storage devices. The internal device slots support two oneinch high, 3 1/2-inch hard disk drives. The following figure shows the locations of the storage devices in the minitower chassis for a typical configuration.

Minitower chassis features

3-4 Reviewing System Features

SYSTEM BOARD COMPONENTS

Your PowerMate Enterprise Series system board has the following components.

Processor

Depending on your model, processing for your system is provided by the 166-MHz, 200-MHz, or 233-MHz Intel Pentium microprocessor. Some processors include MMX technology for enhanced multimedia operation.

Cache

The board integrates a 16-KB internal cache (32 KB in MMX systems) and a 512-KB secondary cache and cache controller to improve system performance.

Math Coprocessor

An integrated math coprocessor increases the speed of floating point operations.

System Memory

The system comes in configurations starting with a minimum of 16 MB of system memory. Two sockets on the system board support up to 256 MB of high-speed memory using industry-standard, gold-plated, 168-pin dual in-line memory modules (DIMM).

You can install approved vendor list (AVL), 10-ns or 12-ns, Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM) DIMMs into the memory sockets.

NOTE

Reviewing System Features 3-5

Memory can be installed in one socket or both. The memory type, size, and speed can vary between sockets. The system automatically detects the memory; no jumper settings are required. The DIMMs can be either single- or double-sided. The minimum allowable memory size for the system is 8 MB, and the maximum is 256 MB. See Chapter 5 for DIMM option installation procedures. The following table describes supported DIMM modules.

Supported DIMMs

DIMM 8 MB 16 MB 32 MB 64 MB* 128 MB* TYPE CAS Latency 2 SDRAM CAS Latency 2 SDRAM CAS Latency 2 SDRAM CAS Latency 2 SDRAM CAS Latency 2 SDRAM CONFIGURATION 1 M x 64 2 M x 64 4 M x 64 8 M x 64 16 M x 64 TECHNOLOGY 16 Mbit 16 Mbit 16 Mbit 16 Mbit 64 Mbit

*64-MB and 128-MB modules are supported when available.

Interrupt Controller

The interrupt controller operates as an interrupt manager for the entire system environment. The controller accepts requests from peripherals, issues interrupt requests to the processor, resolves interrupt priorities, and provides vectors for the processor to determine which interrupt routine to execute. The interrupt controller has priority assignment modes that can be reconfigured at any time during system operations.

3-6 Reviewing System Features

The interrupt levels are described in the following table. Interrupt-level assignments 0 through 15 are in order of decreasing priority. See "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4 for information on changing the interrupts using the Setup Utility.

Interrupt Level Assignments

INTERRUPT PRIORITY IRQ00 IRQ01 IRQ02 IRQ03 IRQ04 IRQ05 IRQ06 IRQ07 IRQ08 IRQ09 IRQ10 IRQ11 IRQ12 IRQ13 IRQ14 IRQ15 * Disabled by default. INTERRUPT DEVICE Counter/Timer Keyboard Cascade (INT output from slave) COM2* and COM4 COM1 and COM3 Audio (if present) Diskette Drive Controller Parallel Port 1 Real-time clock S3 Video and USB Available Network Card if present PS/2 mouse Coprocessor Primary IDE Secondary IDE

Reviewing System Features 3-7

PCI Local Bus

The 32-bit industry-standard PCI bus is a highly integrated input/output (I/O) interface that offers the highest performance local bus available for the Pentium-based processor. The PCI bus supports burst modes that send large chunks of data across the bus, allowing fast displays of high-resolution images. The high-bandwidth PCI local bus eliminates data bottlenecks found in traditional systems, maintains maximum performance at high clock speeds, and provides a clear upgrade path to future technologies. The PCI bus contains the embedded PCI local bus IDE interface and supports the video controller.

Flash ROM

The NEC Flash ROM allows fast, economical BIOS upgrades. NEC Flash ROMs are reprogrammable system and video EPROMs. With NEC Flash ROM, a ROM BIOS change:

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is fast and easily done using a Flash utility eliminates the expensive replacement of ROM BIOS chips, and reduces system maintenance costs reduces inadvertent system board damage that can take place when replacing ROMs facilitates adopting new technology while maintaining corporate standards gives network administrators company-wide control of BIOS revisions.

Information on how to use the Flash utility is provided in Chapter 4, "Using Tools and Utilities."

3-8 Reviewing System Features

Graphics Features

Your system features a PCI local bus motion video playback controller and graphics accelerator (S3 Trio 64 ViRGE/GX) on a single chip on the system board.

The following sections describe the features of the S3 Trio 64 ViRGE/GX graphics chip on the system board. If you install your own graphics board, its features may be different.

NOTE

Motion Video Controller The motion video controller is supported on multimedia configurations. The video controller integrates a Windows graphical user interface (GUI) engine and motion video playback hardware. This means you can view 3D graphics and movies on your computer. Support includes:

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MPEG-1 or MPEG-2 Video for Windows Active Movie (Windows 95 only).

MPEG is a compression/decompression standard developed by a professional video group called the Motion Picture Experts Group. MPEG produces full-screen, 30-framesper-second (fps), broadcast-quality digital video.

Graphics Accelerator The graphics accelerator is designed for graphics-intensive operations, 3D effects, texture mapping, text and color pixel amplification, and scrolling. The graphics accelerator provides 64-bit, ultra-high performance for demanding True Color, High Color, and pseudocolor GUI and computeraided design (CAD) applications.

Reviewing System Features 3-9

The accelerator minimizes bus traffic by off-loading the tasks normally performed by the processor. The dedicated bit-block transfer (BitBLT) engine maximizes performance by speeding the movement of large blocks of image data in video memory.

Video Support Your system has 2 MB of Synchronous Graphics RAM (SGRAM) on the system board.

The system supports the following resolutions, colors, and refresh rates for systems with 2 MB of video memory.

Supported Refresh Rates

REFRESH RATE (HZ) 4-BIT COLOR (16 COLORS) 8-BIT COLOR (256 COLORS) 15-/16-BIT COLOR (32K/64K COLORS) 60, 72, 75, 85 56, 60, 72, 75, 85 43 (IL), 60, 70, 75, 85 Not supported Not supported Not supported 24-BIT COLOR (16M COLORS) 60, 72, 75, 85 56, 60, 72, 75, 85 Not supported Not supported Not supported Not supported

RESOLUTION

640 x 480 800 x 600 1024 x 768 1152 x 864 1280 x 1024 1600 x 1200

60 56, 60, 72, 75, 85 43 (IL), 60, 70, 75, 85 Not supported 43 (IL), 60, 75, 80 Not supported

60, 70, 72, 75, 85 56, 60, 72, 75, 85 43 (IL), 60, 70, 75, 85 60 43 (IL), 60, 75, 85 48.5 (IL), 60

IL = Interlaced K = thousand M = million

3-10 Reviewing System Features

High-Speed Communication Ports

Your system features an enhanced parallel port and two buffered high-speed serial ports. (One serial port, COM1, is enabled by default.) The enhanced parallel port supports Enhanced Capabilities Port (ECP) and Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) modes for devices that require ECP or EPP protocols. These protocols allow high-speed bidirectional transfer over a parallel port and increase parallel port functionality by supporting more devices. The buffered high-speed serial ports support transfer rates up to 115.2 kilobytes (KB) per second. These ports allow the installation of high-speed serial devices for faster data transfer rates. The combination of the enhanced parallel port and buffered serial ports ensure optimum performance for future peripheral devices and operating systems.

Dual IDE Ports

The riser board in your system provides two internal IDE ports:

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a primary IDE port a secondary IDE port.

Each port supports two devices for a total of four IDE devices. For system configuration flexibility, your computer allows the connection of an IDE device without the addition of a controller. Either IDE port supports the Ultra DMA/33 standard for 33.3 MB per second, 32-bit wide data transfers on the highperformance PCI local bus, as well as an enhanced IDE interface that supports up to 16 MB per second, 32-bit wide data transfers on the PCI bus.

Reviewing System Features 3-11

In the desktop model, one Ultra DMA/33 device is supported on each IDE channel. If an additional IDE device is added to an IDE channel, neither device can use Ultra DMA/33 mode due to the length of cable required.

NOTE

USB Ports

The Universal Serial Bus (USB) ports allow you to add new serial devices without opening up the system -- simply plug them into the ports. The USB determines system resources for each peripheral and assigns them without user intervention. Up to 127 devices can be daisy chained to a single USB port.

Sound System

The Yamaha sound system installed on the system board in multimedia models provides compatibility with Sound Blaster ProTM, Sound BlasterTM 2.0, Ad LibTM, MPU-401, and Microsoft® Windows Sound SystemTM for PC sound applications. For detailed sound specifications, see the "System Specifications" in Appendix B.

Plug and Play Support

Your computer comes with a Plug and Play BIOS which supports Plug and Play technology. Plug and Play eliminates complicated setup procedures for installing Plug and Play expansion boards.

3-12 Reviewing System Features

With Plug and Play technology, you add a Plug and Play expansion board simply by powering off the system, installing the board, and powering on the system. There are no jumpers to set and no system resource conflicts to resolve. Plug and Play automatically configures the board for your system. Your system also supports non-Plug and Play boards.

Power Saving Feature

A suspend button lets you quickly put the system into a full power reduction mode of operation. This is a convenient way to save power when you need to be away from your computer for a short period of time. Press a key or move the mouse and your system quickly returns to full power and to where you left off.

Reviewing System Features 3-13

4

Using Tools and Utilities

This chapter provides information about your computer's software tools and utility programs. These include:

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BIOS Setup utility Flash utility LANDesk® Client Manager NEC Select Install CD.

THE BIOS SETUP UTILITY

The BIOS Setup utility program is used to configure the main components of your computer.

Your system ships from the factory with the correct system parameters for your configuration. Unless you add optional hardware, you do not need to run the BIOS Setup utility to operate your system. However, you might wish to run the Setup utility to set features that customize your system, such as security features.

NOTE

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System configuration information is stored in nonvolatile memory. A nonvolatile memory device retains its data when system power is turned off. Nonvolatile memory in your system is stored in a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip backed up by a battery on the system board. The battery supplies continuous power to CMOS memory and maintains configuration information when system power is off (see "Replacing the Battery " in Chapter 8).

NECCSD recommends that you print out or write down your current Setup parameters and store the information in a safe place. This will enable you to restore your system to the current parameters if you ever need to replace the battery.

NOTE

When to Use BIOS Setup

The Setup utility lets you view and set system parameters. Use the Setup utility program to:

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set the time and date. update or check system parameters when you add or remove expansion options. change or set power management features. correct a hardware discrepancy when the Power-On Self-Test (POST) displays an error message and prompts you to run Setup.

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check the installation of optional memory by comparing the amount of memory installed with the amount of memory displayed by Setup. change certain system operating parameters, such as boot device sequence and keyboard parameters. configure system connections for peripherals such as your diskette drive, hard disks, and devices connected to the printer port and serial ports. customize your system with security features such as passwords, diskette drive restriction, virus check reminder, and system backup reminder. set system parameters in the event that you need to replace the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) battery.

How to Start BIOS Setup

To start the Setup utility, follow these steps:

1. Turn on or reboot the system. 2. To start the memory test before the system boots up, press F2 after POST.

There is about five seconds in which to press F2 before the system boot continues. After F2 is pressed, the screen displays the message, "Entering Setup."

Using Tools and Utilities 4-3

3. Setup's Main Menu appears and looks similar to the

following screen.

Setup Main Menu

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How to Use BIOS Setup

Use the keys shown on the bottom of the Setup menu to make your selections or exit the current menu. The following table describes the navigation keys.

Navigation Keys

Key F1 Esc Enter or arrow keys or arrow keys F9 F10 Function Provides help for the parameter field being displayed. Exits the menu Executes Command or brings up a submenu Moves cursor up and down Selects next menu

Loads the Default Configuration values for this menu Save and Exit

Menu items preceded by > contain a submenu of selectable fields for setting system parameters. To display a submenu, use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the submenu you want. Then press Enter.

Using Tools and Utilities 4-5

Main Menu

Choose the Main Menu by selecting Main Menu in the legend bar. Other Main Menu options are available by selecting submenus.

See "How to Start BIOS Setup" for a look at a typical Main Menu screen.

NOTE

Use the arrow keys to select one of the following Main Menu options and press Enter to select a submenu. Items with grayed-out text are not available. Explanations of each menu item follow.

Displayed Information The following information is displayed in the Main menu. These fields are read-only and cannot be changed:

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Language

Processor type Processor speed Cache RAM Total Memory BIOS version.

Selects the current language used by the BIOS. Use this field to select English (the default) or French.

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System Time/Date Use this menu to set the current time and date. The clock keeps time even after the system power is turned off.

To set the time, enter the current hour, minute, and seconds in hh:mm:ss, 24-hour format. Press Tab or Enter to move between fields. For example, type 13<tab>30<tab>00 for 1:30 P.M. To set the date, enter the current month, day, and year in mm/dd/yyyy format. Press Tab or Enter to move between fields. For example, type 07<tab>30<tab>1997 for July 30, 1997.

Floppy Options This field is used to select the type of diskette drive in your system. Diskette A is set to "1.44/1.25 MB 3 1/2" by default, and Diskette B is set to "Disabled." Unless you are changing your hardware, you do not need to change the diskette drive (floppy) A or B settings.

If you add an optional diskette drive to your system, select "Floppy B" and the select parameter value corresponding to the drive being added. The Floppy Write Protect field allows you to configure the floppy diskette drive(s) so that no information can be written to a diskette. Set the field to "Enabled" to write protect diskettes.

Primary and Secondary IDE The Primary and Secondary IDE Master and Slave settings control the following types of devices:

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hard disk drives CD-ROM readers Zip drives tape backup units.

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Your computer comes with the hard disk drive (drive C:) configured as the "Primary IDE Master." The system can support up to four physical IDE drives (two on each PCI/IDE connector). Choices include:

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Primary Master Primary Slave Secondary Master Secondary Slave.

The default setting for existing installed Primary Master device is "Auto," meaning that the system automatically detects the hard disk type and sets the remaining parameters. The default setting for existing installed devices is "None."

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CAUTION

When set to Auto Detected, the BIOS detects what the drive is capable of, not the translation mechanism that was used to format the drive. If a drive is run in a mode other than the mode in which it was partitioned and formatted, unpredictable results may occur, including data loss.

4-8 Using Tools and Utilities

If you install a hard disk drive that does not feature auto IDE type detection or your IDE hard disk was formatted on another system with parameters different than those reported by the drive, enter a parameter for each of the following fields:

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Type Use this field to enter the hard disk drive type. The following options are available: "Auto" (the default) automatically configures the device. "User" prompts the user to fill in the remaining fields. "CD-ROM" configures a CD-ROM device. "IDE Removable" configures a removable IDE device, such as a tape drive. "ATAPI Removable" configures a removable storage device that uses the AT attachment packet interface (ATAPI) standard, such as the Zip drive in some systems. "None" indicates that no device is selected.

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Cylinders Enter the number of cylinders. Heads Enter the number of read/write heads. Sectors Enter the number of sectors per track. Maximum Capacity This read-only field displays the capacity of the hard disk drive installed in your system.

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Multiple Sector Transfers Enter the number of sectors transferred per block. Choices include "Disabled" (no sectors chosen), "Standard" (one sector), 2, 4, 8, and 16 sectors. LBA Mode Control When "Enabled" is selected, it causes logical block addressing to be used in place of cylinders, heads, and sectors. Transfer Mode Enter the method for transferring the data between the hard disk drive and the system memory. The Setup menu only lists those options supported by the drive. Choices can include Standard Fast PIO 1, Fast PIO 2, Fast PIO 3, or Fast PIO 4.

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Ultra DMA Mode This field sets the Ultra DMA mode, which allows a faster read/write file transfer rate (33 MB per second). Choices include Mode 0, Mode 1, and Mode 2. This setting should be disabled if an older hard disk drive is installed that is not supported by Ultra DMA mode.

Advanced Menu

Selecting "Advanced" from the Main menu displays a menu with the following options.

PnP O/S

The PnP field indicates if the computer's operating system is configured to use Plug and Play devices. Choose "Yes" if you are using a system that has Plug and Play. The default is "Yes" for Windows 95 systems. For systems without Plug and Play (such as Windows NT 4.0), set this field to "No."

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Reset Configuration Data Use this setting to clear CMOS (by selecting "Yes" and rebooting) if the system parameters get corrupted. The default is "No." Memory Cache Memory cache saves time for the CPU by holding data most recently accessed in regular memory (dynamic RAM or DRAM) in a special storage area of static RAM (SRAM), which is faster. Before accessing regular memory, the CPU first accesses the cache. If it does not find the data it is looking for, it accesses the regular memory.

The default for the Memory Cache is "Enabled." This field controls both the primary and secondary caches. Setting the Memory Cache to "Disabled" will hurt performance, but might be required when running programs that utilize software-timing loops and need to be slowed down to execute properly.

Memory Banks 0 and 1 The two Memory Bank fields are read only. They display the total amount of memory in each DIMM bank. Resource Configuration T Memory Reservation Use this field to reserve specified blocks of upper memory for use by other ISA devices. Select "Reserved" to choose a memory block. The default for each block is "Available."

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The following list includes the reservable memory blocks: C800-CBFF CC00-CFFF D000-D3FF D400-D7FF D800-DBFF DC00-DFFF

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Memory Hole The default setting for this parameter is "Disabled." When enabled, memory choices are "Conventional" or "Extended." Either a 128-KB conventional memory hole (starting at 512 KB) or a 1-MB extended memory hole (starting at 15 MB) is created in system RAM. IRQ Reservation Use this field to reserve specified IRQs for legacy ISA boards. Select "Reserved" to choose an IRQ. The default for each IRQ is "Available." The following list includes the reservable IRQs: IRQ 3 IRQ 4 IRQ 5 IRQ 7 IRQ 10 IRQ 11 IRQ 15 Present only if secondary IDE channel is disabled. Serial Port A COM1 Audio Parallel Port LPT1

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Peripheral Configuration Adjustments must sometimes be made in the Setup Utility when peripheral devices are added, removed or changed.

Use the fields in the following list to configure your system when making any peripheral configuration changes.

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Serial Ports A and B Selectable parameters for these fields are "Disabled," "Enabled," and "Auto." The default setting for Serial Port A is "Enabled." The default setting for Serial Port B is "Disabled." The serial ports can be auto detected by choosing "Auto." The "Auto" parameter enables the serial device, but the BIOS will not place its resources unless the "PnP OS" field is set to "No." Use the Enabled setting if you want to choose a specific address for the serial port. The following options become available: Base I/O address Available addresses include "3F8h" (Serial Port A default), "2F8h" (Serial Port B default), "3E8h," and "2E8h." Interrupt Available IRQs include "IRQ4" (Serial Port A default) and "IRQ3" (Serial Port B default), "IRQ10," and "IRQ11." Serial Port B Mode If you are using an IrDA device, the Serial Port B Mode field should be "IrDA." The default is "Serial."

When an option is selected for one serial port, that selection is not available for the second port.

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Parallel Port Selectable parameters for this field are "Disabled," "Enabled" (default), and "Auto." The parallel port device can be auto detected by choosing "Auto." When "Auto" is selected, the first free LPT port is assigned. Setting this field to "Auto" enables the device, but the BIOS will not place its resources unless the "PnP OS" field described previously is set to "No." Select "Enabled" if you want to choose a specific address. The following options become available: Mode Choices include: "ECP" for setting the parallel port to the Enhanced Capabilities Port (ECP) mode, "Output Only," and "Bidirectional" (sets the parallel port to input/output mode only). The default setting is "Bi-directional." Base I/O address Available addresses include "378h" (the default), "228h," and "278h." Interrupt Available IRQs include "IRQ7" (the default) and "IRQ5."

NOTE

An interrupt set to IRQ5 in a multimedia system might conflict with the audio subsystem settings.

DMA Channel Available DMA settings include "DMA 3" (the default), and "DMA 5." The DMA field is not displayed when the Mode field is set to "Bi-directional."

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Floppy Disk Controller This field enables the diskette drive interface connector on the riser board. Choices include "Enabled" (the default) or "Disabled." IDE Controller The IDE Controller field enables the IDE interface connectors on the riser board. Choices include "Both" (default), "Primary," "Secondary," and "Disabled." Audio This field ("Enabled" by default) enables the audio system on the system board. Choose "Disabled" if an external audio board is installed. Legacy USB Support This field ("Disabled" by default) enables support for legacy Universal Serial Bus (USB) devices. Hardware Monitor This field ("Enabled by default) enables the hardware monitor device.

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Keyboard Configuration Use this field to adjust the following keyboard features:

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Num Lock This field controls whether the Num Lock key on the keyboard is "On" or "Off" at bootup. The default setting for this field is "Auto." Key Click This field turns audible key click on or off. The default is "Disabled."

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Using Tools and Utilities 4-15

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Keyboard Auto-Repeat Rate This field sets the number of times per second to repeat a keystroke when the key is held down. Options include 2, 6, 10, 13.3, 18.5, 21.8, 26.7, or 30 clicks per second. The default is "30." Keyboard Auto-Repeat Delay This field controls the delay before characters begin repeating when a keyboard key is held down. The higher the number the longer the delay. Options include 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, or 1 second. The default is "1/2" second.

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Video Configuration The Video Configuration submenu includes the Palette Snooping field. This option enables board "snoop" (also called RAMDAC shadowing) write cycles to the ISA video board's palette registers. This field can be either "Enabled" or "Disabled." The default is "Disabled."

This field should only be enabled if all of the following conditions occur:

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An ISA board connects to the PCI graphics board via the VESA compatible feature connector. The ISA board connects to a color monitor. The board used the RAMDAC on the PCI board. The palette snooping feature is broken on the PCI board.

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DMI Event Logging This field keeps track of system events.

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Event logging Capacity For example, space available. Event Logging Validity For example, valid. View DMI Log Press Enter to view the DMI log. Clear all DMI Event Logs "No" is the default; select "Yes" to clear logs. Event Logging The default setting for this field is "Enabled." Mark DMI Events As Read Press Enter to mark DMI events.

If no events have been logged, the Mark DMI Events As Read field is grayed out, and cannot be selected.

NOTE

Security Menu

The Security Menu contains features that enable you to restrict access to your computer. The Security menu contains the following fields.

User Password Is This read-only field indicates whether a User Password has been set. This field can be either "Clear" or "Set." The default is "Clear" (no password has been set).

Using Tools and Utilities 4-17

When both the User Password and Supervisor Password are enabled, only the Supervisor Password gives you full access to all Setup fields.

Supervisor Password Is This read-only field indicates whether a Supervisor Password has been set. This field can be either "Clear" or "Set." The default is "Clear" (no password has been set).

When both the User Password and Supervisor Password are Enabled, only the Supervisor Password gives you full access to all Setup fields.

Set User or Supervisor Password The password fields allow you to establish a user-level password or supervisor-level password. Once the password is established, it must be entered to access Setup during POST.

Use the following procedure to set a password.

1. Using your left or right arrow keys, select Security from

the menu bar. The Security menu appears.

2. Select Set Supervisor Password or Set User Password with the up or down arrow keys.

Once the Supervisor Password feature is enabled, the Setup Utility can only be accessed by entering the password.

NOTE

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3. With the password field selected, press Enter.

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If you are setting a password for the first time, Setup displays a dialog box with the following prompts:

Enter new password: [ ] ] Confirm new password: [

Type your password (passwords are not case sensitive) and press Enter. Reenter your password and press Enter again.

The cursor changes to magenta during password entry. The characters you enter do not appear on your screen.

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If you are changing a password, Setup displays a dialog box with the following prompts:

Enter current password: [ Enter new password: Confirm new password: [ [ ] ] ]

Type your current password and press Enter. Type your new password and press Enter. Reenter your new password and press Enter again.

4. Use the left or right arrow key to select Exit. 5. Use the up or down arrow key to select Exit Saving Changes. Press Enter. 6. At the prompt asking you to confirm that you wish to exit Setup, press Enter.

Your password takes effect the next time you power on the system. The next time you power on you will be prompted for a password. You must enter a password to access the system.

Using Tools and Utilities 4-19

Using a Password After you set your password in Setup and reboot the system, a password prompt appears each time you power on the system.

To use your password, type the password at the password prompt and press Enter.

For security, the characters you enter do not appear on your screen. Enter your password carefully.

NOTE

If you enter the password incorrectly, your system does not boot. You have three chances to enter the correct password. After the third unsuccessful attempt, you must reboot your system and try again.

If you forget your password, you must clear the password by setting a jumper on the system board (see "Clearing Your Password" in Chapter 6). Once you clear the password, you can boot your system and set a new password in Setup.

NOTE

Dual Password Security Dual password security provides two levels of password security. A supervisor password allows access to the system's Setup utility for system configuration. A user password allows system boot-up only after the entry of a password.

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Do not create a user password that is a subset of the supervisor password. If you do, the system may only respond to the user password.

NOTE

Unattended Start The Unattended Start field controls the point at which the user password is required. When this field is set to "Disabled" (the default setting), the user is prompted for the password before the system can boot. The "Enter Password" prompt is displayed.

When this field is set to "Enabled" and a user password is set, the system boots and runs, but the keyboard is locked. The user password must be entered to unlock it. The BIOS does not display any prompt string, but the keyboard lamps light up.

Power Menu

Power management reduces the amount of energy used after specified periods of inactivity. The Power menu provides the choice of operating the system in a full-on state or a full-power reduction state when idle.

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Power Management This field allows you to enable or disable the power management options. Selecting "Enabled" (the default) also allows you to further configure the Power Management options. Inactivity Timer This field sets the length of time before the computer powers down various system devices. Choices for inactivity time periods include 1, 5, 10, 20 (the default), and 30 minutes, or 1 or 2 hours.

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Hard Drive When this field is enabled, the hard disk drive is powered down during periods of inactivity. Choices include "Enabled" (default) and "Disabled." VESA Video Power Down This field enables you to set the video power down level of inactivity. Choices include "Disabled," "Sleep" (the most energy efficient setting), "Suspend," and "Standby." The default is "Standby."

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Boot Menu

The Boot menu allows you to configure your system's boot process.

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Scan User Flash Area The field allows the BIOS to scan the Flash ROM. Selectable parameters for this field are "Disabled" and "Enabled." The default is "Disabled." Restore On AC/Power Loss This field allows you to configure the system to automatically boot up or stay off after power is restored to the system (after an unexpected power loss). The default, "Last State," restores the system to the state it was in before the power loss. "Power On" causes the system to automatically boot up after power restoration. Choose "Stay Off" for the system to stay off after power restoration. If the field is set to "Stay Off," On LAN does not work, even if the On LAN field is set to "Enabled."

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On Modem Ring This field enables an external modem to work even when your system is in a power reduction state. Choosing "Power On" (the default) restores the system to full power so it can receive a modem ring. Other choices include "Stay Off" if you do not want full power restored on a modem ring, and "Last State." On LAN This field enables your system to be contacted via a LAN even when your system is in a power reduction state. Choosing "Power On" (default) restores the system to full power so the LAN connection can be made. Other choices include "Stay Off" if you do not want full power restored, and "Last State." (Wake on LAN does not work if the Restore On AC/Power Loss field is set to "Stay Off.") On PME This field controls how the system responds to a PCI Power Management Enable (PME) wake up event. The choices are "Power On" (the default), "Last State," and "Stay Off." Boot Order These fields allow you to set the order in which your system's drives boot up. The default order is: First Boot Device: ATAPI CD-ROM Drive Second Boot Device: Removable Devices Third Boot Device: Hard Disk Fourth Boot Device: Network Boot.

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To use the CD-ROM reader as a bootable device it must be first in boot order. Otherwise, set it last.

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Hard Drive This field lists the bootable hard disk drives in your system as well as bootable ISA boards. Removable Devices This field lists the bootable removable device drives (diskette, Zip, etc.) in your system. The first device in the list is the bootable removable device (if any). Boot Time Diagnostic Screen When set to "Enabled," this field allows you to display the Diagnostic Screen during boot up. The default setting is "Disabled." Floppy Check When set to "Enabled" (the default) this field verifies the floppy type during boot up; a setting of "Disabled" speeds up the boot. Virus Check Reminder When this field is set to "Enabled" the system displays a reminder message during boot up. The default setting is "Disabled." System Backup Reminder When this field is set to "Enabled" the system displays a reminder message during bootup. The default setting is "Disabled." Fixed Disk Boot Sector When this field is set to "Write Protect" the fixed disk boot sector is write-protected against viruses. The default is "Normal."

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Exit Menu

Selecting "Exit" from the menu bar displays the following exit options.

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Exit Saving Changes Choose this option if you wish to save any changes made and exit the Setup program. Exit Discarding Changes Choose this option if you wish to exit the program without saving any changes made. Load Setup Defaults Choose this option if you wish to load the original system BIOS default settings. Load Custom Defaults Choose this option to load previously saved user settings. Save Custom Defaults Choose this option to save any changes as custom defaults. Normally, the BIOS reads the setup parameters from CMOS, but if your CMOS fails, the BIOS will read the custom defaults (if you set them). If not, the BIOS uses the factory default settings. Discard Changes Choose this option if you wish to discard any changes made in the current session, but want to continue to enter new changes.

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Maintenance Menu

The Maintenance Menu only appears when the system board has been jumpered for Configure mode. When the system is restarted in Configure mode, the Setup Utility comes up in the Maintenance Menu. Other selections are the Main, Power Management, Security, Boot, and Exit menus.

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The Maintenance Menu only appears when the computer has been jumpered for Configure mode.

NOTE

The Maintenance Menu provides access to the Password Clear selection. Use the Password Clear selection in the Maintenance Menu if the password must be reset.

FLASH UTILITY

The system BIOS resides on a flash read only memory (ROM) chip in your system. The flash ROM can be updated with a very simple procedure. Performing an update is done with a BIOS flash diskette. The diskette contains the latest version of the BIOS code. You can obtain the flash diskette from NECCSD or, if a modem is available, the latest BIOS can be downloaded from the NECCSD Bulletin Board Service (BBS). See "NECCSD Bulletin Board Service" in Chapter 7 for the procedure for logging onto the BBS to download information. Update the BIOS from the BIOS flash diskette as follows:

1. Write down the Setup parameters currently set on the

system.

2. Turn off the system. 3. Insert the flash diskette in drive A, and turn on the

system.

4. When the flash upgrade menu appears, choose "Update

Flash Memory Area from a file."

5. When the menu asks you to enter a path/filename, use the arrow keys to select the ".bio" file and press Enter.

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6. The utility asks for a confirmation that you want to load

the new flash into memory. Select "Continue with Programming."

7. After the upgrade completes, remove the upgrade

diskette.

8. Reboot the system and start the Setup program. Press F9 to reset the BIOS defaults. Then, use the copy of the

Setup selections you made at the beginning of this procedure to set the parameters. See "NECCSD Bulletin Board Service" in Chapter 7 for information about using the bulletin board (available in the U.S. and Canada).

LANDESK CLIENT MANAGER

LANDesk® Client Manager (LDCM) is a software program provided with your computer. LDCM uses the Desktop Management Interface (DMI) standard to manage components (network interface cards, memory, software applications) within a client (local) or remote (workstation) PC system. It provides features for managing the resources of a local PC and can be used by system administrators to manage groups of computer systems. With Client Manager you can perform the following tasks:

T T T

review system inventory of workstation hardware and software components view DMI-compliant component information set security features to change password (local machine) or enable/disable the serial ports, printer, or diskette drive (system administrator)

Using Tools and Utilities 4-27

Parallel and serial ports can only be controlled from LANDesk Client Manager if they are also enabled in NEC Security. LANDesk Client Manager settings cannot override the settings established in NEC Security.

NOTE

T T T T T T T

back up and restore system configuration files back up system and application software using Cheyenne Backup troubleshoot receive notice of system events (for example, if the system is running low on memory, you are notified of the potential problem) detect changes to CPU, memory, and hard disk characteristics and alert you to these changes (Configuration Change Notification) transfer files to and from client workstations remotely reboot client workstations.

There are two main components of Client Manager: PC Health Indicator and Inventory.

PC Health Indicator

PC health indicator consists of three parts:

T T T

managing workstations selecting the PC Health meter monitoring PC Health.

4-28 Using Tools and Utilities

Managing Workstations Client Manager sets up a connection to all the workstations running on the network to allow the administrator to monitor the functions of each workstation.

The monitoring is in real time so that if an unhealthy workstation is fixed, you can refresh the screen to view the new correct PC health. You can also set the monitor to report only unhealthy workstations.

Selecting the PC Health Meter The PC Health meter is a traffic signal that provides a visual indicator of workstation health.

T T T

A red light indicates that a critical system event has occurred. You are required to fix the problem immediately. A yellow light or noncritical system event requires that you monitor the situation. It may be a problem that could get worse and become a critical event. A green light indicates everything is working fine with the system.

Monitoring PC Health PC health can be determined by monitoring various system components for threshold levels. Some of the components that are monitored include:

T T T T T T

drive space prediction of hard drive failure (Smart Hard Drive failure prediction) free virtual memory temperatures power supplies chassis opened

Using Tools and Utilities 4-29

T T T

GDI used non-critical boot failure boot virus detection.

Once a threshold level has been passed on a workstation, you can request notification of the problem and have it written into a log file.

Inventory

Client Manager Inventory views the hardware and software components of your workstation. The inventory consists of the following categories:

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

workstation summary basic hardware drives memory audio keyboard/mouse video system resources I/O ports operating system network applications system files user information.

You can also view the current system configuration, edit user information, and create or restore file snapshots.

4-30 Using Tools and Utilities

DMI

As a part of the LANDesk Client Manager, the Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is the standard interface used to manage system components on the computer. Examples of system components are network interface cards and software applications. System components provide a Management Information Format (MIF) file to be DMIcompliant. The information file describes component attributes that can be managed. Client Manager can be used to "get" attribute information on system components. It can also be used to "set" attribute values in real time.

Monitoring Capabilities

Your PowerMate Enterprise computer has a chip mounted on the system board that supports many new and advanced real-time monitoring capabilities used by DMI. This chip provides the following features:

T T T

an integrated temperature sensor with configurable interrupt generation based on upper and lower temperature limits a power supply monitor with configurable interrupt generation based on upper and lower voltage limits chassis intrusion detection with interrupt generation capabilities.

Using Tools and Utilities 4-31

To take advantage of these features, DMI has expanded its interface in the following areas:

T T T T

Interrupts may be enabled or disabled. High and low limits can be set and are displayed for temperature and power supply voltages. Current readings are displayed for temperature, power supply voltages, and chassis state. Interrupts can be detected when "out of range" conditions occur. User prompts are displayed to alert the user to a potentially harmful condition.

Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature LANDesk Client Manager allows you to monitor your system against chassis intrusion. Whenever the chassis is opened, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports the incident in a screen message the next time the system is booted. The message appears in a LANDesk Client Manager Notification window. This window appears every time the system is rebooted until the report is cleared.

Close the notification window to remove the message from the screen. Clear the message to prevent it from appearing again the next time the system is rebooted. To clear the message, follow these steps.

1. Access LANDesk Client Manager.

T T

If the LANDesk Client Manager Notification window is still open, click Yes, and then click the Client Manager button. From the desktop click Start on the taskbar, point to Programs, point to LANDesk Client Manager, and click LANDesk Client Manager 3.0.

LANDesk Client Manager launches.

4-32 Using Tools and Utilities

2. Open the Tools menu and click PC Health. The PC

Health window appears. The Chassis Opened field displays the Yes setting.

3. Click Clear next to the Chassis Opened field. 4. Exit from LANDesk Client Manager.

Cheyenne Backup

On systems that use the Windows 95 operating system, Cheyenne Backup is a data management and backup program that operates in conjunction with LANDesk Client Manager's Smart Hard Drive Auto-Backup Utility and NEC Backup Utility. If hard drive performance degrades due to bad sectors or other internal problems, the Smart Hard Drive utility automatically invokes the Cheyenne Backup program and backs up the entire file system to tape or to a network drive. Cheyenne Backup can also do regularly-scheduled backups and scan files for viruses during a backup operation.

NEC Security

On systems that run the Windows 95 operating system, NEC Security features allow a local user to change NEC Security passwords and enable a system administrator to control local machine devices, including printer ports, serial ports, and diskette drives.

The NEC Security password is different than the password(s) that can be set through the BIOS Setup Utility.

NOTE

Using Tools and Utilities 4-33

NEC SELECT INSTALL CD

Your system comes with an NEC Select Install compact disc (CD). This disk contains all your system software files. Should a problem occur that causes data loss or corruption, you can restore these system files to their original factoryinstalled state on your computer. If you want to build your own system or just change part of it, the Select Install CD provides the flexibility you need to meet a variety of hardware and software demands. The Select Install CD reinstalls all or part of your computer's software in two phases:

T T

operating system (OS) restore selective application restore.

Phase one, the OS Restore, allows you to reinstall Windows 95 or Windows NT from the CD. If you need to do a full restore after a catastrophic system failure, start with phase one. Then continue with phase two. Phase two, the Selective Application Restore, takes place while the OS is running and lets you choose the application software you want to reinstall. Use phase two for restoring selected applications from the CD at any time. Both the OS and application phases use easy-to-understand dialog boxes and screen messages so you can smoothly proceed through the restore process. The following sections explain how to use the NEC Select Install CD.

4-34 Using Tools and Utilities

Operating System Restore Program

OS Restore is the first phase of a full system restore. When the system boots from the NEC Select Install CD, it automatically loads the DOS-based Restore program.

To perform an OS Restore, you must boot the system from the Select Install CD.

NOTE

Follow these steps to restore your original, factory-installed operating system using OS Restore:

1. With system power on, insert the Select Install disc into

the CD-ROM reader.

2. With the CD installed in the CD-ROM reader, press Ctrl-Alt-Del to reboot the computer.

The system boots from the CD, and the Operating System Restore Welcome screen appears (see the following figure).

Welcome screen

Using Tools and Utilities 4-35

3. Click Continue to continue (or Exit to exit the

program). A License Agreement screen appears with three options: Back, Reject, and Accept.

T T T

The Back button returns you to the Welcome screen. The Reject button terminates the restoration process. The Accept button signals that you accept the terms of the license and allows you to continue.

4. Read the license agreement and click Accept to

continue. The Restore Mode screen appears (see the following figure) with three options: Back, Auto, and Custom.

T T T

The Back button returns you to the License Agreement screen. The Auto button selects a restore process designed for basic users who require limited manual control of restore functions. The Custom button selects a more advanced restore process for users who want more control of restore functions.

If you are a basic user and want minimal control of the restore process, proceed to the next step. If you want more control of the restore process, go to step 7.

4-36 Using Tools and Utilities

Restore Mode screen

5. Click Auto to do a basic operating system restore. (Go

to step 7 if you want to do the more advanced, customized restore process.) After you click Auto in Windows 95, the Partition Information screen appears as shown in the following figure. (In Windows NT 4.0, the FAT16 Partition warning screen appears as described later in this procedure.) The Partition Information screen that appears in Windows 95 has three options (Back, FAT 16, and FAT 32) and lets you select the File Allocation Table (FAT) type you want to use for the operating system restore:

T T T

Click Back to return to the Operating Mode screen. Click FAT 16 to select the FAT16 allocation table (recommended for Windows 95 at this time). Click FAT 32 to select the FAT32 allocation table (Windows 95 systems only).

Using Tools and Utilities 4-37

Partition Information screen

In Windows NT 4.0 systems, the Partition Information screen does not appear. Instead, the FAT16 Partition warning appears. This screen is described in the following paragraph.

NOTE

After you select the FAT type, a warning screen appears indicating that the system is about to partition and format your hard disk using the FDISK program. This warning screen (see the following figure) contains three options: Back, Exit, and Continue.

T T T

Click Back to return to the Partition Information screen. Click Exit to terminate the restore process. Click Continue to perform FDISK.

4-38 Using Tools and Utilities

FAT16 Partition screen

If you press Continue, the system performs FDISK using the FAT type you selected and reboots the system. After the reboot, all partitions are formatted. When all the partitions have been formatted, the OS loads from the CD.

The drivers and other software components required for the operating system are also loaded from the CD.

NOTE

6. Go to step 11 after the Auto restore completes. 7. Click Custom (instead of Auto) on the Restore Mode

screen if you do not want to partition and format the hard disk before restoring the OS (see the following figure).

Using Tools and Utilities 4-39

Restore Mode screen

After you click Custom, the integrity of your system's existing FAT table is verified. If the table is functional, a Partitioning the Hard Drive screen appears with options allowing you to retain the present partition structure (by selecting Skip) or partition the hard disk using FAT16 or FAT32 (by selecting Continue).

Partitioning the Hard Drive screen

If the existing partition table is not functional, the system automatically follows the Auto restore scheme described in step 5.

NOTE

4-40 Using Tools and Utilities

If you want to retain the present partition structure, go to the next step. If you want to partition the hard disk, go to step 10.

8. Click Skip on the Partitioning the Hard Drive screen to

retain the present partition structure on the hard disk (go to step 10 if you want to partition the hard disk). The Format Mode screen appears with four options: Back, Exit, Quick, and Full.

T T T T

Click Back to return to the Partition Information screen. Click Exit to terminate the restore process. Click Quick to do a quick hard disk format. Click Full to do a full hard disk format.

Format Mode screen

Using Tools and Utilities 4-41

After you select the type of hard disk format you want to do (Quick or Full), a warning screen appears with three options: Back, Exit, and Continue.

T T T

Click Back to return to the Formatting Mode screen. Click Exit to terminate the restore process. Click Continue to format the hard disk.

After you click Continue, the Installing Applications screen appears, indicating the status of the restore process as the operating system loads from the CD.

Installing Application screen

The drivers and other software components required for the operating system are also loaded from the CD.

NOTE

9. Go to step 11.

4-42 Using Tools and Utilities

10. Click Continue on the Partitioning the Hard Drive

screen. The Partition Information screen appears (in Windows 95 systems only; in Windows NT 4.0 systems, the FAT16 Partition warning appears as described later in this procedure). The Partition Information screen has three options and lets you select the File Allocation Table (FAT) type you want to use for the operating system restore:

T T T

Click Back to return to the Operating Mode screen. Click FAT 16 to select the FAT16 allocation table (recommended). Click FAT 32 to select the FAT32 allocation table (Windows 95 systems only).

Partition Information screen

In Windows NT 4.0 systems, the Partition Information screen does not appear. Instead, the FAT16 Partition warning appears. This screen is described in the following paragraph.

NOTE

Using Tools and Utilities 4-43

After you select the FAT type, a warning screen appears indicating that the system is about to partition and format your hard disk using the FDISK program. This warning screen contains three options: Back, Exit, and Continue.

T T T

Click Back to return to the Partition Information screen. Click Exit to terminate the restore process. Click Continue to perform FDISK.

FAT16 Partition screen

If you click Continue, the system performs FDISK using the FAT type you selected and reboots the system. After the reboot, all partitions are formatted. When all the partitions have been formatted, the OS loads from the CD.

The drivers and other software components required for the operating system are also loaded from the CD.

NOTE

4-44 Using Tools and Utilities

11. Remove the CD from the CD tray when the OS finishes

loading.

12. Click OK to reboot.

Selective Application Restore Program

After the operating system is up and running, you can begin phase two, allowing installation of the applications associated with the OS. Use this process to reinstall selected applications at any time. Follow these steps to install the applications for your system.

1.

With the operating system running, place the Select Install CD in the CD tray. The CD's autorun feature generates the NEC Selective Application Restore Program screen.

Only the applications that work with your system's OS appear in the Select Install Program screen. For example, if your OS is Windows 95, but there are applications for both Windows 95 and Windows NT 4.0 on the CD, only the drivers required for Windows 95 appear.

NOTE

Using Tools and Utilities 4-45

Selective Application Restore screen

2. Select the applications you want to install by double

clicking on the item box or line. A check mark appears in the box. To unselect an item, double click it again so that the check mark disappears.

Items that appear grayed-out are already installed on your system.

NOTE

3. Click OK.

The application files reload sequentially, and a progress bar appears for each application selected.

4-46 Using Tools and Utilities

4. When all the applications have finished installing,

remove the CD.

5. Click Restart Computer to reboot and ensure that the

installation process completes successfully.

Using Tools and Utilities 4-47

5

Installing Options

Your computer supports a variety of industry-standard and NECCSD expansion options. This chapter provides installation instructions for the following options:

T T T T T

expansion boards DIMM memory module upgrade processor upgrade data storage devices external devices.

All options require that the system cover be removed. The procedure for removing the cover is included in this chapter.

GENERAL RULES

Follow these general rules when you install the system options.

T T T T T

To prevent tipping, always place the system unit back in its stand after completing a system upgrade. Turn off system power and unplug the power cable. Turn off and disconnect all peripherals. When handling boards or chips, touch the system frame to discharge static. Do not disassemble parts other than those specified in the procedure.

Installing Options 5-1

T T

All screws are Phillips-head unless otherwise specified. Label any cable connectors before disconnecting. Note where the connector goes and in what position it was installed.

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

Observe safety rules when working inside the system and when handling computer components. Avoid electric shock or personal injury by observing the following warning.

!

WARNING

Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged.

Static electricity and improper installation procedures can damage computer components. Protect computer components by following these safety instructions.

!

CAUTION

Electrostatic discharge can damage computer components. Discharge static electricity by touching a metal object before removing the system unit cover.

5-2 Installing Options

T T

Avoid carpets in cool, dry areas. Leave boards and chips in their anti-static packaging until they're ready to be installed. Dissipate static electricity before handling any system components (boards, chips, and so on) by touching a grounded metal object, such as the system's unpainted metal chassis. If possible, use anti-static devices, such as wrist straps and floor mats.

T T T T

Always hold a chip or board by its edges. Avoid touching the components on the chip or board. Take care when connecting or disconnecting cables. A damaged cable can cause a short in the electrical circuit. When installing a cable, route the cable so it is not pinched by other components and is out of the path of the system unit cover. Prevent damage to the connectors by aligning connector pins before you connect the cable. Misaligned connector pins can cause damage to system components at power-on.

T

When disconnecting a cable, always pull on the cable connector or strain-relief loop, not on the cable itself.

Installing Options 5-3

COVER REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT

The following sections describe how to remove and replace the system unit cover in the desktop and minitower models.

Removing the Desktop Cover

Before installing optional hardware inside your computer, first remove the system unit cover.

!

WARNING

Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged.

If the cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports it in a screen message the next time the system is booted. This message appears every time the system is rebooted until the report is cleared. For more information on closing the notification window and clearing the message, see "Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

1. Turn off and unplug the system unit. 2. Disconnect the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and any other

external options (such as speakers or a printer) from the rear of the system unit.

5-4 Installing Options

!

CAUTION

Electrostatic discharge can damage computer components. Discharge static electricity by touching a metal object before removing the system unit cover.

3. If you have a cover lock, unlock it and remove it from

the system unit.

4. Loosen the two cover screws on the rear of the system.

Loosening desktop cover screws

5. From the rear of the system, grasp the sides and slide the

cover about an inch away from the front.

The cover fits tightly. Press the front edge of the cover to release it from the front panel. Also, press against the rear panel to slide the cover about one inch away from the front panel.

NOTE

Installing Options 5-5

6. Lift the cover up and away from the system unit.

Releasing the desktop cover

Replacing the Desktop Cover

Replace the cover as follows:

!

CAUTION

To prevent damage to system cables, carefully tuck the cables out of the path of the cover.

1. Position the cover over the chassis with its front edge

about one inch behind the front of the chassis.

2. Lower the cover onto the chassis taking care to align the

tabs on the sides of the cover with the inside unit frame.

3. Slide the cover forward to meet the front panel.

5-6 Installing Options

Replacing the desktop cover

The cover fits tightly. If the cover does not slide all the way to the front panel, place one hand on the front of the unit while you slide the cover forward from the rear.

NOTE

4. Secure the cover with the two thumb screws. (See

"Removing the Desktop Cover," earlier in this chapter.)

5. Reconnect all external peripherals. 6. Plug in the power cables.

If the cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports it in a screen message the next time the system is booted. This message appears every time the system is rebooted until the report is cleared. For more information on closing the notification window and clearing the message, see "Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

Installing Options 5-7

Removing the Minitower Cover

Before installing optional hardware inside your computer, you must first remove the system unit cover. Directions for removing the stand are considered part of removing the minitower cover.

!

WARNING

Before removing the system unit cover, turn off the power and unplug the system power cable. Power is removed only when the power cable is unplugged.

If the cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports it in a screen message the next time the system is booted. This message appears every time the system is rebooted until the report is cleared. For more information on closing the notification window and clearing the message, see "Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

1. Turn off and unplug the system unit. 2. Disconnect the keyboard, mouse, monitor, and any other

attached device (such as speakers or a printer) from the rear of the system unit.

5-8 Installing Options

!

CAUTION

Electrostatic discharge can damage computer components. Discharge static electricity by touching a metal object before removing the system unit cover.

3. Hold the stand in place and slide the system unit back

about one-half inch. This unlocks the tabs connecting the stand to the chassis. Lift the system unit off the stand.

!

WARNING

To prevent tipping, always place the system unit back in its stand after completing a system upgrade.

Removing the minitower stand

Installing Options 5-9

4. If you have a cover lock, unlock it and remove it from

the system unit.

5. Loosen the three cover screws on the rear of the system

unit.

Loosening minitower cover screws

6. Slide the cover back about one inch; you may need to

grasp the sides where they meet the rear of the system and press your thumbs against the rear panel to slide the cover away from the front.

The cover fits tightly. Press the front edge of the cover to release it from the front panel. Also, press against the rear panel to slide the cover about one inch away from the front panel.

NOTE

5-10 Installing Options

7. Lift the cover up and away from the system unit.

Removing the minitower cover

To replace the cover, see "Replacing the Minitower Cover."

Installing Options 5-11

Replacing the Minitower Cover

Replace the cover as follows:

!

CAUTION

To prevent damage to system cables, carefully tuck the cables out of the path of the cover.

1. Position the cover over the chassis with its front edge

about one inch behind the front of the chassis.

2. Lower the cover onto the chassis taking care to align the

tabs on the sides of the cover with the inside unit frame.

Replacing the minitower cover

5-12 Installing Options

3. Slide the cover forward to meet the front panel.

The cover fits tightly. If the cover does not slide all the way to the front panel, place one hand on the front of the unit while you slide the cover forward from the rear.

NOTE

4. Secure the cover with the three thumb screws. (See

"Removing the Minitower Cover," earlier in this chapter.)

5. Place the system unit over the stand with its front edge

about 1/2 inch from the front of the stand. Align the tabs on the stand with the slots on the floor of the chassis.

!

WARNING

To prevent tipping, always place the system unit back in its stand after completing a system upgrade.

Installing Options 5-13

6. Slide the system unit forward to lock the tabs in the

slots.

Replacing the minitower stand

7. Reconnect all external peripherals. 8. Plug in the power cables.

If the cover is removed, LANDesk Client Manager logs the intrusion and reports it in a screen message the next time the system is booted. This message appears every time the system is rebooted until the report is cleared. For more information on closing the notification window and clearing the message, see "Using the Chassis Intrusion Notification Feature" in Chapter 4.

NOTE

5-14 Installing Options

MINITOWER CHASSIS FLOOR REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT

The following sections describe how to remove and replace the minitower chassis floor.

Removing the Minitower Chassis Floor

Before removing the system board, or upgrading an expansion board, you must remove the chassis floor in minitower models. Remove the chassis floor as follows.

Remove the stand and the system unit cover before removing the minitower chassis floor. See "Removing the Minitower Cover."

NOTE

1. Remove the minitower cover (see "Removing the

Minitower Cover").

2. Place the system unit on its right side. 3. Loosen the thumbscrew holding the floor to the edge of

the chassis.

Installing Options 5-15

Locating the chassis floor thumbscrew

4. Slide the floor back about 1/2 inch along the chassis. 5. Once the floor tabs are free of the slots in the chassis,

angle the top edge of the floor away from the chassis. When the floor angles away from the chassis, its lower edge disengages from the chassis.

Removing the chassis floor

5-16 Installing Options

Replacing the Minitower Chassis Floor

Replace the chassis floor as follows.

1. Place the system unit on its right side. 2. Line up the chassis floor with the chassis so its untabbed

edge is along the lower (right) edge of the chassis. The tabs along the upper edge of the floor must line up with the slots in the upper edge of the chassis.

3. Angle the upper edge of the floor away from the chassis

and position the lower edge in the groove along the chassis edge.

4. Press the floor up against the bottom of the chassis. 5. Slide the floor toward the front of the chassis to lock the

tabs in the slots.

6. Secure the floor to the chassis with the thumbscrew.

EXPANSION BOARDS

Your system supports industry standard architecture (ISA) 8- and 16-bit expansion boards (Plug and Play and non-Plug and Play). It also supports 32-bit Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) expansion boards, which are Plug and Play. With Plug and Play expansion boards, you can install a board in an expansion slot without changing the hardware settings. There are no system resource conflicts to resolve. Plug and Play automatically configures the board for the system.

Installing Options 5-17

Locating Expansion Slots

The desktop model has three expansion slots:

T T T T T T

one PCI slot one shared PCI/ISA slot one ISA slot (supports 1/2-length ISA cards only).

The minitower model has five expansion slots: three PCI slots one shared PCI/ISA slot (does not support PCI Bus Master cards) one ISA slot.

ISA expansion slots support industry-standard 8-bit or 16-bit expansion boards. The PCI/ISA slot also supports PCI expansion boards. PCI expansion boards run at half the system board's bus speed. The PCI bus handles 32 bits of data at a time, being wider as well as faster than the standard ISA bus. PCI boards can send and receive data much faster, boosting system performance.

5-18 Installing Options

5

Installing Options

5-18 Installing Options

Locating desktop expansion slots

Locating minitower expansion slots

Installing Options 5-19

Installing an Expansion Board

To install an expansion board in the system, perform the following steps:

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. In a minitower system, remove the chassis floor (see

"Removing the Minitower Chassis Floor").

3. Follow any preinstallation instructions that come with

the expansion board (such as setting switches or jumpers on the board).

4. Remove the screw securing an expansion slot cover (see

the following figure). Set the screw aside (it is used to secure the expansion board).

5. Remove the slot cover. Save it to cover the slot again in

case the expansion board is removed.

!

CAUTION

A slot cover can damage the system board or any option board if it falls into the system. Take care to keep the slot cover from falling when removing the screw. If the slot cover does fall into the unit, remove it before replacing the cover.

5-20 Installing Options

Removing a slot cover desktop

Removing a slot cover minitower

Installing Options 5-21

6. Holding the board by its edges or its bracket, insert the

board into the expansion slot. Press the board firmly into the expansion slot connector on the riser board.

7. Use the slot cover screw removed earlier to secure the

expansion board.

Installing an expansion board desktop

5-22 Installing Options

Installing an expansion board minitower

8.

Attach any signal cables required by the expansion board. To cable an Intel EtherExpress PRO 100 LAN board for Wake on LAN, see "Wake on LAN Cabling." To connect a SCSI device, see "Cabling an Internal SCSI Device." To connect a PC card host device, see "Cabling a PCMCIA Device."

9.

In a minitower system, replace the chassis floor (see "Replacing the Minitower Chassis Floor"). Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover").

10. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Installing Options 5-23

Cabling Wake on LAN

If your system is equipped with an Intel EtherExpress PRO 100 LAN board and it is connected to a network that is set up for it, your system may be configured for "Wake on LAN" by connecting the Wake on LAN Cable. Wake on LAN allows your system to be powered up remotely by the server computer. To cable the system for Wake on LAN do the following:

1. Connect the brown 5-pin connector on the cable to J15

on the Riser board.

2. Connect the white 3-pin connector on the cable to P3A

on the LAN board.

Removing an Expansion Board

To remove an expansion board, perform the following steps:

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. In a minitower system, remove the chassis floor (see

"Removing the Minitower Chassis Floor").

3. Label and remove any cables connected to the board.

5-24 Installing Options

4. Remove the screw that secures the board to the support

bracket. Set the screw aside (it is used to secure the slot cover once the board is removed).

Removing an expansion board

5. Pull the board out of the connector. Pull the board out of the expansion slot.

6. Replace the slot cover removed when the expansion

board was installed. Secure the cover with the screw.

7. In a minitower system, replace the chassis floor (see

"Replacing the Minitower Chassis Floor").

8. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover").

Installing Options 5-25

SYSTEM BOARD OPTIONS

The system board in your computer is easy to remove, which makes upgrading or changing options on the system board a quick and simple task. System board options that can be changed include:

T T T

adding memory modules upgrading the processor changing jumper settings.

The following figure shows the locations of the sockets and connectors on the system board.

System board sockets and connectors

5-26 Installing Options

Removing the System Board

No cables connect to the system board. All power and signal connections from the system board are made through the riser board connector. Use this procedure to remove the system board:

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. In a minitower system, remove the chassis floor (see

"Removing the Minitower Chassis Floor").

3. Lift the insertion/extraction latches and pull them away

from the system unit (see the following figures). This releases the system board and slides it part way out of the system.

Insertion/extraction latches desktop

Installing Options 5-27

5

Installing Options

Installing Options 5-27

Insertion/extraction latches minitower

4. Carefully slide the board the rest of the way out, taking

care not to lift the board before it is free of its housing.

Removing the system board desktop

5-28 Installing Options

Removing the system board minitower

Replacing the System Board

Use this procedure to replace the system board:

1. Make sure the insertion/extraction latches are in the

open position.

2. Position the narrow ends of the system board rails in the

chassis guides.

3. Slide the system board into the system unit along the

chassis guides. Guide the edge of the I/O spring (the edging around the board's I/O panel) under the cutaway in the chassis wall as you slide the board. Stop sliding the board when it clears the latches and meets resistance.

Installing Options 5-29

Replacing the system board

4. Simultaneously push the insertion/extraction latches

closed. This slides the board the rest of the way into the system unit and inserts the inner edge of the board into the riser board connector. If the board does not slide as the latches are pushed, slide the board a bit further into the system unit before pushing the latches.

5. Push the I/O panel into its bracket in the chassis to make

sure it is fully seated.

6. In a minitower system, replace the chassis floor (see

"Replacing the Minitower Chassis Floor").

7. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover").

5-30 Installing Options

DIMM UPGRADE

Memory upgrades are installed into memory module sockets on the system board. The system board provides two sockets for memory modules and supports up to 256 MB of high-speed memory. The system supports SDRAM modules in 8-, 16-, 32-, 64-, and 128-MB 64-bit, non-parity memory configurations. To determine the memory you need to purchase for a memory upgrade, see "Checking System Memory."

Checking System Memory

If you do not know how much memory is installed in your system, check the amount by using the following procedure:

1. On the Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0 desktop, point

to My Computer and click the right mouse button.

2. With the left mouse button, click Properties. The

General tab shows the random access memory (RAM). This is the amount of system memory in your computer. In Windows 95, you can also find the amount of memory by selecting the Performance tab.

Installing Options 5-31

Removing a DIMM

If your memory configuration requires the removal of a module, perform the following steps:

!

CAUTION

Before opening the computer and before handling boards or memory modules, reduce static discharge by touching the system's metal chassis.

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. In a minitower system, place the system unit on its right

side.

3. Press the plastic clips at the outer edges of the socket

away from the memory module. This ejects the DIMM from the socket.

Removing a DIMM

5-32 Installing Options

Installing a DIMM

Install a memory module by performing the following steps:

1. If you need to remove a currently installed memory

module, see "Removing a DIMM."

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

3. In a minitower system, place the system unit on its right.

!

CAUTION

Before you install a module, reduce static discharge by touching the system's metal chassis.

4. Align the new module with an empty memory socket.

Make sure the notches on the module align with the keys in the socket.

5. Press the module firmly into the socket. 6. Make sure the locking clips at either end of the module

click closed.

Installing Options 5-33

Inserting a DIMM

7. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover").

If you find a discrepancy in the amount of memory displayed at the Power-On Self-Test or in Windows with the amount of memory that you installed, check that you installed the memory modules correctly.

NOTE

5-34 Installing Options

PROCESSOR UPGRADE

The zero-insertion force (ZIF) socket makes a processor upgrade easy. The ZIF socket accepts pin-grid-array (PGA) processors, such as the primary processor or a next generation processor.

!

CAUTION

Incorrect installation of the processor can damage the processor, system board, or both. Follow the installation instructions carefully. The system requires a heatsink on the processor. Verify that you have the correct heatsink for the processor being installed. Changing the heatsink may result in some expansion slots becoming useable only for halflength expansion boards.

When upgrading the processor, first remove the processor currently installed in the system, then install the upgrade processor.

Removing the Processor

Remove the processor installed on the system board as follows.

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. Locate the processor socket (see "System Board

Options").

3. Release the heatsink clip from the tabs on the socket (see

the following figure).

Installing Options 5-35

4. Release the processor by pulling the lever on the socket

away from the socket and as far back as it goes without forcing.

Releasing the processor

!

CAUTION

Before picking up the processor, reduce static discharge by touching the metal frame of the system unit.

5. Lift the processor out of the socket. 6. Continue with the following procedure to install the new

processor.

5-36 Installing Options

Installing an Upgrade Processor

To install a processor, perform the following steps:

1. Remove the processor currently in the system (see

"Removing the Processor").

!

CAUTION

Before picking up the processor, reduce static discharge by touching the metal frame of the system unit.

2. Align the notched corner of the processor with the pin 1

alignment corner in the socket. Insert the processor in the socket.

Aligning the processor

3. Swing the lever down to lock the processor in the socket.

Installing Options 5-37

!

CAUTION

Be sure to either reattach the heatsink used with the old processor or install the heatsink supplied with the new processor.

4. Replace the heatsink by positioning the clamp opening

over the front and back socket tabs.

5. Check to see if the newly installed processor requires a

system board jumper change (see Chapter 6, Setting System Board Jumpers).

6. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Desktop Cover" or Replacing the Minitower Cover").

DATA STORAGE DEVICES

The system board in the computer supports the following storage devices:

T T

up to two diskette drives, including the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive up to four IDE devices such as IDE hard disks, an IDE CD-ROM reader, and an IDE Zip drive.

Other storage devices might require the installation of a compatible controller board. See your hardware dealer about the storage devices available for your system.

5-38 Installing Options

5

Installing Options

5-38 Installing Options

The desktop system supports only one Ultra DMA/33 device on the primary IDE channel. If an additional IDE device is added to the primary IDE channel, neither device can use Ultra DMA/33 mode. If a CD-ROM reader is not installed on the secondary IDE channel, you can add an Ultra DMA/33 device to the secondary IDE channel.

NOTE

Locating Device Slots in the Desktop

The desktop has four storage device slots (see the following figure):

T T T

one 3 1/2-inch vertical accessible device slot that contains the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive. one 3 1/2-inch internal hard disk drive slot (thin-height); the 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive is installed in this slot. two 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots (1.6-inch high, half-height). The accessible device slots may contain a CD-ROM reader, PCMCIA device, Zip drive, or a tape backup unit. You can install accessible devices such as a diskette drive or tape drive with a 5 1/4-inch form factor (frame) in the 5 1/4-inch slots. You can also install a 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive in the 5 1/4-inch slot if the hard disk drive is inserted in a 5 1/4-inch form factor.

Installing Options 5-39

The following figure shows the device slot locations in the desktop model.

Locating device slots desktop

Locating Device Slots in the Minitower

The minitower has six storage device slots (see the following figure):

T T T

one 3 1/2-inch accessible device slot that contains the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive. two 3 1/2-inch internal hard disk drive slots (thinheight); the 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive is installed in one of these slots. three 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots (1.6-inch high, half-height). The accessible device slots may contain a CD-ROM reader, PCMCIA device, Zip drive, or a tape backup unit.

5-40 Installing Options

You can install accessible devices such as a diskette drive or tape drive with a 5 1/4-inch form factor (frame) in the 5 1/4-inch slots. You can also install a 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive in the 5 1/4-inch slot if the hard disk drive is inserted in a 5 1/4-inch form factor. The following figure shows the device slot locations in the minitower model.

Locating device slots minitower

Installing Options 5-41

Preparing the Device

Before installing a storage device in the system, follow any preinstallation instructions that come with the device. For example, check the following information:

T

Diskette drive remove any termination on the optional diskette drive. See the documentation that comes with the drive.

NOTE

Some systems come with a two-connector diskette drive cable that supports one diskette drive. In such systems the addition of another diskette drive requires the replacement of this cable with a three-connector cable (see "Connecting Device Cables" for more information).

T

IDE device check the jumper settings on the device before installing it. See the documentation that comes with the device for jumper setting information. Each IDE device in the system must be set correctly as the first (master) or second (slave) device on the IDE channel. In systems with an IDE hard disk drive, the drive is set as the master device on the primary IDE connector. If the system also has a second IDE device such as a CD-ROM reader, a Zip drive, or Tape backup unit, set that device as the master device on the secondary IDE connector. The following table details recommended IDE device configurations.

5-42 Installing Options

IDE Device Primary/Secondary Master/Slave Configurations

CONFIGURATION PRIMARY CONNECTOR Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - none Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk Master - hard disk Slave - Zip drive Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk Master - hard disk Slave - hard disk SECONDARY CONNECTOR Master - none Slave - none Master - CD-ROM Slave - none Master - tape backup Slave - none Master - Zip drive Slave - none Master - CD-ROM Slave - Zip drive Master - CD-ROM Slave - tape backup Master - CD-ROM Slave - none Master - tape backup Slave - none Master - Zip drive Slave - none Master - CD-ROM Slave - tape backup Master - CD-ROM Slave - tape backup Master - CD-ROM Slave - Zip drive Master - Zip drive Slave - tape backup

1 device (hard disk) 2 devices (hard disk, CD-ROM) 2 devices ( hard disk, tape backup unit) 2 devices ( hard disk, Zip drive) 3 devices (hard disk, CD-ROM, Zip drive) 3 devices (hard disk, CD-ROM, tape backup unit) 3 devices (hard disk, hard disk, CD-ROM) 3 devices (hard disk, hard disk, tape backup unit) 3 devices (hard disk, hard disk, Zip drive) 4 devices (hard disk, CD-ROM, Zip drive, tape back up unit* 4 devices (hard disk, hard disk, CD-ROM, tape backup unit)* 4 devices (hard disk, hard disk, CD-ROM, Zip drive)* 4 devices (hard disk, hard disk, Zip drive, tape backup unit)*

* 4-device configurations apply only to minitower systems

Installing Options 5-43

Desktop systems support only one Ultra DMA/33 device on each IDE channel. This is due to the fact that the length of the three-connector cable required for the configuration might cause signal degradation. Two Ultra DMA/33 IDE devices can be used on the same PCI/IDE channel in a desktop system if neither device is run in Ultra DMA/33 mode. You can run two Ultra DMA/33 devices in Ultra DMA/33 mode in a desktop system if one device is connected to the primary PCI/IDE channel, and the other is connected to the secondary IDE channel.

NOTE

Connecting Device Cables

The cables used for installing optional storage devices include the following:

T T T T

diskette drive signal cable IDE signal cables internal SCSI cables system power cables.

5-44 Installing Options

Desktop Cables The two-connector diskette drive cable shipped with the desktop system supports one device. The two-connector IDE cable connected to the primary PCI/IDE connector supports one device. The three-connector IDE cable connected to the secondary PCI/IDE connector supports two devices. Cable connector locations on the riser board in the desktop model are shown in the following figure.

Riser board cable connectors desktop

Installing Options 5-45

Minitower Cables The two-connector diskette drive cable in the minitower system supports one device. The three-connector IDE cable shipped with an IDE hard disk drive in the minitower system supports two devices. The three-connector IDE cable connected to the secondary PCI/IDE connector supports two devices. Cable connector locations on the riser board in the minitower model are shown in the following figure.

Riser board cable connectors minitower

5-46 Installing Options

Diskette Drive Signal Cable A two-connector diskette drive signal cable comes attached to the riser board and to the standard 1.44-MB diskette drive.

The installation of a second diskette drive in a minitower system requires the replacement of the existing diskette drive signal cable with a three-connector cable. Connect an optional diskette drive to the middle connector on the replacement cable. The colored edge of the cable goes to pin 1 on the cable connector. Align the red edge of the cable with pin 1 (the notched end) on the drive connector. The following figure shows an optional three-connector diskette drive signal cable.

Optional diskette drive signal cable

Installing Options 5-47

IDE Signal Cables Desktop systems with an IDE hard disk drive come with a two-connector IDE interface cable attached to the primary PCI/IDE connector. Systems also come with a threeconnector IDE cable connected to the secondary PCI/IDE connector.

Minitower systems with an IDE hard disk drive come with a three-connector IDE interface cable attached to the primary IDE connector. Systems also come with a three-connector IDE cable connected to the secondary PCI/IDE connector. Each PCI/IDE connector on the riser board supports two IDE devices. If you are installing an optional IDE CD-ROM reader, connect it to the secondary IDE connector. The primary IDE connector should be reserved for hard disks. The following figure shows a typical three-connector IDE cable. If the IDE cable is not keyed with a connector tab, align the colored edge of the cable with the pin 1 side of the drive connector.

Optional IDE cable connectors

5-48 Installing Options

Internal SCSI Device Cables Systems come with a four-connector 68-pin SCSI device cable. The cable can connect an internal SCSI device to the 68-pin internal connector on a SCSI adapter board. The unused connectors are terminated.

This four-connector cable can be used to connect up to three internal SCSI devices to a SCSI adapter board.

SCSI device cable

Installing Options 5-49

PCMCIA Device Cable A set of two PCMCIA-compliant cables comes with the PCMCIA device available in some systems. The cables are bound together, and connect to the dual PCMCIA ports on the PC card and the PC card host. System Power Cables Power cables come from the power supply and are attached to the standard storage devices. System power cables vary in length and provide connector sizes to accommodate a variety of supported storage configurations. Power cable connectors are keyed to fit only in the correct position. The following figure shows the power cable connectors.

Power cable connectors

5-50 Installing Options

Cabling Storage Devices

All storage devices require power and signal cable connections. Devices shipped with the system are already connected. There are four types of cabled storage devices:

T T T T

IDE devices - hard disk drive, CD-ROM reader, Zip drive, or tape backup unit internal SCSI devices PCMCIA devices diskette drive - 1.44-MB drive.

IDE Device Cabling The following procedure explains how to cable an IDE device.

The appearance of your device may vary from the one shown.

NOTE

1. Connect the signal cable connector to the connector on

the IDE device. Take care to prevent bending drive connector pins. Align the cable connector as shown in the following figure.

2. Locate an available power connector coming from the

power supply.

3. Connect the appropriate power cable to the power

connector on the IDE device.

Installing Options 5-51

Connecting IDE device cables

4. If you are installing a CD-ROM reader and your system

contains audio components on the system board or audio card, also connect the audio cable (see the instructions that come with the reader).

Internal SCSI Device Cabling The following procedure explains how to cable an internal SCSI device.

The appearance of your device may vary from the one shown.

NOTE

1. Remove the termination from the appropriate connector

on the SCSI device.

2. Connect the appropriate connector on the SCSI device

cable to the SCSI cable connector on the SCSI device.

5-52 Installing Options

3. Locate an available power connector coming from the

power supply

4. Connect the power cable to the power connector on the

SCSI device (see "System Power Cables").

Connecting internal SCSI device cables

PCMCIA Device Cabling The following procedure explains how to cable a PCMCIA device also known as a PC card host.

1. Connect the connectors at one end of the PC card cable

set to the PC card. (The PC card is installed in one of the expansion slots. See "Installing an Expansion Board" if the card must be installed first.) The connectors are keyed to fit only one way.

2. Connect the connectors at the other end of the PC card

cable set to the connectors at the rear of the PC card host.

Installing Options 5-53

Diskette Drive Cabling The following procedure explains how to cable a diskette drive.

1. Connect the diskette drive signal cable connector to the

signal connector on the diskette drive as shown in the following figure.

2. Locate an available power connector coming from the

power supply.

3. Connect the power cable to the power connector on the

device.

Connecting 1.2-MB diskette drive cables

5-54 Installing Options

5

Installing Options

5-54 Installing Options

Installing Storage Devices

The following subsections describe how to install 3 1/2-inch and 5 1/4-inch drives. The installation procedures include:

T T T T T T

removing the front panel replacing the front panel installing a 5 1/4-inch device installing a 3 1/2-inch drive in a 5 1/4-inch device slot installing a 3 1/2-inch diskette drive installing an internal 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive in either internal hard disk drive slot.

Removing the Front Panel Remove the front panel before installing a device in one of the 5 1/4-inch accessible device slots.

If you are installing an accessible 5 1/4-inch device, you also need to remove the blank panel that covers the slot on the front panel. You might also need to remove the slot panel on the front of the chassis. Remove the front panel and blank panel as follows:

1. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

2. Remove the front panel by pulling the panel away from

the front of the unit with even pressure at both ends of the panel. Four tabs on the back of the front panel secure it to the system (see the following figures).

Installing Options 5-55

Removing the front panel desktop

Removing the front panel minitower

5-56 Installing Options

3. If you are installing an accessible device, such as a Zip

drive or tape drive, remove the blank panel. Remove the blank panel from the slot by pressing the panel tabs from inside the front panel and pushing the blank panel out (see the following figures).

Locating the blank panel tabs desktop

Installing Options 5-57

Locating the blank panel tabs minitower

4.

In a desktop system, remove the perforated metal plate from the selected slot on the chassis by pulling the plate back and forth until it releases. In a minitower system, if there is a panel over the slot in the chassis, loosen the screws on either side of the slot and remove the panel.

5-58 Installing Options

Locating the breakaway panel

5. Install the device (see "Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device").

Replacing the Front Panel If a 5 1/4-inch device has been removed from your system, you need to replace the blank panel before replacing the front panel. The blank panel covers the opening previously used by the device.

Replace the front panel as follows:

1. Replace the blank panel if necessary. Press the blank

panel into the inside of the front panel, aligning the panel with the empty slot. Press the panel into the slot until the four tabs lock the panel in place.

2. Align the four front panel tabs with the holes in the front

of the system unit.

3. Evenly press the front panel into position until the tabs

lock the panel in place.

Installing Options 5-59

Aligning the front panel desktop

Aligning the front panel minitower

4. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover").

5-60 Installing Options

Installing a 5 1/4-Inch Device Use the following procedure to install a 5 1/4-inch device into a 5 1/4-inch accessible device slot.

A 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive can also be installed in a 5 1/4-inch device slot if the device is fitted into a 5 1/4-inch frame (form factor) first. See "Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Device in a 5 1/4-Inch Slot."

NOTE

1. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the

device, such as setting jumpers and switches.

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover").

3. Remove the front panel (see "Removing the Front

Panel").

4. Locate the device rails that ship with your system.

Attach the device rails to the sides of the device with the four screws that come with the device.

Attaching device rails

Installing Options 5-61

5. From the front of the system, insert the device, connector

end first, into the device slot.

NOTE

To easily access device connectors for cabling, do not insert a 5 1/4-inch device all the way into the slot.

6. Connect the device cables (see "Connecting Device

Cables" and "Cabling Storage Devices").

7. Insert the device the rest of the way into the device slot,

making sure that the locking tabs at the ends of the device rails snap into the brackets on the chassis.

Inserting a device desktop

5-62 Installing Options

Inserting a device minitower

8. 9.

Replace the system unit front panel (see "Replacing the Front Panel"). Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover"). (see "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4).

10. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration

Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Drive in a 5 1/4-Inch Slot A 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive can be installed in a 5 1/4-inch device slot.

The 3 1/2-inch device is fitted into a 5 1/4-inch frame (form factor), so it can be secured in the larger device slot. This frame might come with the hard disk drive or it might need to be purchased separately. For more information, see the dealer from whom the drive was purchased.

Installing Options 5-63

To install the device, proceed as follows:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the device, such as setting jumpers and switches. Secure the hard disk drive in the form factor. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the Desktop Cover" or "Removing the Minitower Cover"). Remove the front panel (see "Removing the Front Panel"). From the front of the system, insert the device, connector end first, into the device slot.

NOTE

To easily access device connectors for cabling, do not insert the device all the way into the slot.

6. 7.

Connect the device cables (see "Connecting Device Cables" and "Cabling Storage Devices"). Insert the device the rest of the way into the device slot, making sure that the locking tabs at the ends of the device rails on the form factor snap into the brackets on the chassis. Replace the system unit front panel (see "Replacing the Front Panel"). Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the Desktop Cover" or "Replacing the Minitower Cover"). (see "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4).

8. 9.

10. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration

5-64 Installing Options

Replacing the 3 1/2-Inch Internal Hard Disk Drive The following sections describe how to replace the 3 1/2-inch internal hard disk drive in desktop and minitower systems.

A 3 1/2-inch hard disk drive can also be installed in a 5 1/4-inch device slot if the device is fitted into a 5 1/4-inch frame (form factor) first. See "Installing a 3 1/2-Inch Device in a 5 1/4-Inch Slot."

NOTE

Replacing the Internal Hard Disk Drive in a Desktop System Replace a hard disk drive in a desktop system as follows.

1. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the

new device, such as setting jumpers and switches.

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Desktop Cover").

3. Label the device signal and power cables connected to

the currently installed hard disk drive and then disconnect them.

4. Remove the four screws securing the currently installed

hard disk drive to the outer wall of the chassis.

5. Remove the drive from the chassis. 6. Insert the new hard disk drive into the drive slot with the

cable connectors toward the front of the system and the four holes toward the outer wall of the chassis.

7. Align the four holes on the hard disk drive with the holes

in the chassis.

8. Secure the device to the chassis with the four screws that

came with the device or the screws from the old device.

Installing Options 5-65

Securing the hard disk drive

9.

Connect the cabling devices (see "Connecting Device Cables" and "Cabling Storage Devices"). Desktop Cover").

10. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the 11. Run the Setup program to set the new configuration

(see "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4).

Replacing the Internal Hard Disk Drive in a Minitower System The minitower system has two internal hard disk drive slots located near the top rear of the chassis. You can upgrade the system by replacing an existing hard disk drive, or by adding another one.

If the system has one hard disk drive, it should be located in the inner of the two internal hard disk drive slots. If you are adding an additional hard disk drive, install it in the outer of the two internal hard disk drive slots.

5-66 Installing Options

If your system has two hard disk drives and you are upgrading the drive in the inner of the two slots, remove both hard disk drives, add the new hard disk drive to the inner slot, and then install the remaining drive in the outer slot.

NOTE

Install a 3 1/2-inch internal hard disk drive by following these steps:

1. Follow the preinstallation instructions that come with the

new hard disk drive, such as setting jumpers and switches. See "Device Preparation" for information on preparing the device.

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

Minitower Cover").

3. If a currently installed hard disk drive is being replaced:

T T T

Label the IDE device signal and power cables connected to the drive and then disconnect them. Remove the four screws securing the drive to the internal bracket or the chassis wall. Remove the drive from the chassis.

4. Insert the new hard disk drive into the drive slot. Orient

the cable connectors toward the front of the system.

Installing Options 5-67

5. Line up the four holes in the drive with:

T T

the holes in the internal bracket (for the inner slot) the holes in the chassis wall (for the outer of the two slots).

6. Secure the device with the four screws that came with

the device or the screws from the old device. The screws for the inner drive are accessed through the cutouts in the chassis wall.

Securing the device to the internal bracket

5-68 Installing Options

Securing the device to the chassis wall

7. Connect the device cables (see "IDE Device Cabling" or

"Internal SCSI Device Cabling").

8. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

Minitower Cover").

9. Run the Setup program to set your new configuration

(see "The BIOS Setup Utility" in Section 4).

Installing Options 5-69

EXTERNAL OPTIONS

Additional devices can be connected to your computer through the use of external connectors.

Connecting a Parallel Printer

Before connecting a printer to the system, be sure the printer is set up correctly. Follow the setup instructions that come with the printer.

NOTE

Connect a parallel printer to the system as follows:

1. Turn off power to the system and printer. 2. Connect the printer cable to the printer port on the rear

of the system unit.

Connecting a printer cable to a desktop computer

5-70 Installing Options

Connecting a printer cable to a minitower computer

3. Secure the cable with the screws provided. 4. Connect the other end to the printer.

Installing Options 5-71

Connecting a Serial Device

Connect a serial device to the system as follows:

Before connecting a serial device to the system, be sure the serial device is set up correctly. Follow the setup instructions that come with the option. Serial port 2 (serial port B) is disabled by default. To use serial port 2, set the Serial Port B field to "Enabled" in the BIOS Setup Utility, See "Enabling a Serial Port" following this section.

NOTE

1. Turn off power to the system and to the serial device. 2. Connect one end of the serial cable to one of the two

serial ports on the rear of the computer.

Connecting a serial device cable to a desktop computer

5-72 Installing Options

Connecting a serial device cable to a minitower computer

3. Secure the cable with the screws provided. 4. Connect the other end to the serial device.

Enabling a Serial Port

In the BIOS Setup Utility, serial port 1 is referred to as Serial Port A; serial port 2 is referred to as Serial Port B. This section describes how to enable serial port 2; it also applies to serial port 1, with the exception of steps 7 and 8, which apply only to serial port 2.

1. Turn on or reboot your system. 2. Press F2 as soon as you see the message containing this

line: Press <F2> for SETUP.

Installing Options 5-73

You have about five seconds to press F2 before system boot continues. The BIOS Setup Utility window appears.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Press the left or right arrow key to highlight the Advanced menu. Press the up or down arrow key until Peripheral Configuration is highlighted. Press Enter. Press the down or up arrow key until Serial Port B is highlighted. Press Enter to bring up the Serial Port B submenu. Press the up or down arrow key to highlight Enabled. Press Enter. If you wish to enable serial port 2 for infrared, press the down or up arrow key until Serial Port B Mode is highlighted. Otherwise, press Esc and skip to step 9. Press Enter to bring up the Serial Port B Mode submenu. Press the up or down arrow key to highlight IrDA. Press Enter. Press Esc. Press the left or right arrow key to highlight the Exit main menu item.

7.

8.

9.

10. Press the down or up arrow key until the Exit Saving Changes submenu item is highlighted. Press Enter. 11. The system restarts.

5-74 Installing Options

Connecting an External SCSI Device

Connect an external SCSI device to a minitower system as follows:

Before connecting an external SCSI device to the system, be sure the device is set up correctly. Follow the instructions that come with the option.

NOTE

1. Turn off power to the system and to the SCSI device. 2. Connect one end of the SCSI cable to the SCSI

connector at the rear of the system unit.

Connecting an external SCSI device cable to a minitower computer

3. Connect the other end of the cable to either of the SCSI

connectors on the SCSI device.

4. See the documentation that comes with the device for

instructions on whether, or how, to terminate the device.

Installing Options 5-75

Connecting USB Devices

Connect a USB device to your system as follows:

1. Connect one end of the USB cable to one of the two

USB ports on the rear of the computer.

2. Connect the other end to the USB device. 3. Up to 127 USB devices can be daisy-chained to the USB

ports with the proper cabling. See the documentation that comes with your device to connect additional USB devices.

5-76 Installing Options

6

Setting Jumpers

Some devices in the system have pins that must be jumpered according to way the device is used in your computer, or the way your system is configured. For example, jumpers on the system board must be set to correspond to the processor speed and processor bus speed. A hard disk drive or CD-ROM reader must be jumpered as a master or slave device. Jumpers on the fax/modem board are set differently according to whether the system is running the Windows 95 or Windows NT operating system.

SYSTEM BOARD JUMPER SETTINGS

System board jumpers enable you to configure your system for a particular system requirement. Conditions that require changing jumper settings include the following situations:

T T T

You are upgrading your processor. You need to check that jumpers are set correctly for processor upgrade. You forgot your password and cannot boot your system. You need to set a jumper to "clear" your current password. Your BIOS has become corrupted and you must perform a BIOS Recovery. This entire procedure is performed in conjunction with a BIOS Recovery diskette. This procedure is seldom required; if it is, see the instructions that are provided with the diskette.

Setting Jumpers 6-1

You can obtain the BIOS Recovery program by downloading it to a diskette from the NECCSD Bulletin Board System (BBS) or the NECCSD File Transfer Protocol (FTP) site. See "NECCSD Bulletin Board System" in Chapter 7 for information on how to download files onto a diskette. See "Internet" in Chapter 7 to access the NECCSD FTP site.

!

CAUTION

Jumpers are set correctly at the factory for your configuration. If your system requires a jumper change, change only the setting for that condition. Otherwise, keep the jumpers at their factory settings.

Changing Processor Jumper Settings

The following procedure explains how to locate and change the jumper setting when you upgrade your processor:

!

WARNING

The system power must be off before changing a jumper setting.

1. Power off and unplug the system and any peripherals. 2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5).

3. Remove the system board (see "Removing the System

Board" in Chapter 5).

6-2 Setting Jumpers

4. Locate the following jumpers on the system board (see

the following figure).

T T T

J4A1 (pins 1, 2, and 3) J4A1 (pins 4, 5, and 6) J6J1 (pins 4, 5, and 6)

Locating system configuration jumpers

5. Set the Processor/Bus Speed jumpers for your processor

(see the following table). Change the jumper setting by lifting the plastic block and placing it on the appropriate pins as shown in the following table. NECCSD recommends using needlenose pliers to move a jumper.

Setting Jumpers 6-3

Processor Bus Speed Jumper Settings

PROCESSOR SPEED 90 MHz 100 MHz 120 MHz 133 MHz 150 MHz 166 MHz 166 MHz MMX 200 MHz 200 MHz MMX 233 MHz MMX BUS SPEED 60 MHz 66 MHz 60 MHz 66 MHz 60 MHz 66 MHz 66 MHz 66 MHz 66 MHz 66 MHz J4A1 (PROCESSOR) 1-2, 4-5 1-2, 4-5 2-3, 4-5 2-3, 4-5 2-3, 5-6 2-3, 5-6 2-3, 5-6 1-2, 5-6 1-2, 5-6 1-2, 4-5 J6J1 (BUS) 4-5 5-6 4-5 5-6 4-5 5-6 5-6 5-6 5-6 5-6

6. Replace the system board (see "Replacing the System

Board" in Chapter 5).

7. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5).

8. Power on the system.

6-4 Setting Jumpers

Clearing Your Password

If you forget your password, use the following procedure to clear your current password and to set a new one.

1. Power off the system and monitor and unplug any

peripherals.

!

WARNING

The system power must be off before removing the cover and changing a jumper setting.

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5).

3. Remove the system board (see "Removing the System

Board" in Chapter 5).

4. Locate the BIOS Recovery jumper J6J1 on the system

board (see the figure "Locating system configuration jumpers").

Setting Jumpers 6-5

5. Move the jumper block to the Configure Mode pins (pins

2-3). NECCSD recommends using needle-nose pliers to move a jumper.

BIOS Recovery Jumper

Jumper J6J1 also has a Recovery Mode setting (pins 1-3 not jumpered) for upgrading the BIOS or recovering BIOS data in the unlikely event that the BIOS becomes corrupted. This procedure is performed in conjunction with a BIOS Recovery diskette. See the instructions that are provided with the diskette.

NOTE

6. Replace the system board (see "Replacing the System

Board" in Chapter 5).

7. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the

System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5).

8. Connect the system power cables and monitor.

6-6 Setting Jumpers

9.

Power on the system unit and monitor. The Setup Utility screen appears automatically after POST, and no password is required. In Configure Mode, the Setup Utility Main Menu has a Maintenance menu item in addition to the others. Select the Maintenance menu.

10. Clear All Passwords is highlighted by default when the Maintenance menu is active. Press Enter. 11. A Setup Confirmation window appears with the

prompt, "Clear All Passwords Now?" The default is Yes. Press the left or right arrow key to toggle between Yes and No. Select Yes and press Enter to activate the choice.

12. Turn off the computer and unplug the system unit and

monitor.

13. Remove the system unit cover. 14. Remove the system board. 15. Return the jumper block to the Normal Operation

position (pins 1-2). NECCSD recommends using needle-nose pliers to move a jumper.

16. Replace the system board. 17. Replace the system unit cover. 18. Reconnect the system and monitor power cables and

peripheral devices.

19. Power on the system unit and monitor. 20. Run Setup to set a new password (see "The Setup

Utility" in Chapter 4).

Setting Jumpers 6-7

HARD DISK DRIVE JUMPER SETTINGS

Hard disk drive jumpering varies according to the particular model in the system and how that model is configured. The following subsections provide jumper settings for Seagate Medalist, Quantum Stratus, Seagate Barracuda, and Quantum Viking hard disk drives.

Seagate Medalist

Set jumpers on the Seagate Medalist ST31012A hard disk drive as follows:

T T T T

Slave None Master (in single or dual-drive system) 5-6 Master (with non-ATA-compatible slave) 5-6, 3-4 Cable Select enabled 3-4

Quantum Fireball Stratus

The Quantum Fireball ST (Stratus) Ultra DMA drives use a three-position jumper block to configure the master/slave and cable select options of the hard drive. The user selectable jumper is shown in the following figure and its settings follow.

Quantum Fireball Stratus hard disk drive jumper locations

6-8 Setting Jumpers

T T

CS: Cable Select jumper Not used Master device Enabled, DS jumpered (factory default) Disabled, DS open

T

Master device with Slave present (if the Slave drive does not use the Drive Active/Slave Present (DASP-) signal to indicate its presence: Enabled, DS and CS jumpered Disabled, CS open

T

Slave device Disabled, PK open (factory default) Enabled, PK jumpered

Seagate Barracuda

The Seagate Barracuda SCSI drive uses jumper blocks A3, A2, A1, and A0 to configure the SCSI ID for the drive. See the documentation that comes with the drive for more information on when to configure the drive. The SCSI ID jumpering is listed below.

T T T T T T T T T

SCSI ID=0, no jumpers SCSI ID=1, A0 jumpered SCSI ID=2, A1 jumpered SCSI ID=3, A1 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=4, A2 jumpered SCSI ID=5, A2 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=6, A2 and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=7, A2, A1, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=8, A3 jumpered

Setting Jumpers 6-9

T T T T T T T

SCSI ID=9, A3 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=10, A3 and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=11, A3, A1, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=12, A3 and A2 jumpered SCSI ID=13, A3, A2, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=14, A3, A2, and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=15, A3, A2, A1, and A0 jumpered

Quantum Viking

The Quantum Viking SCSI drive uses jumper blocks A3, A2, A1, and A0 to configure the SCSI ID for the drive. See the documentation that comes with the drive for more information on when to configure the drive. The SCSI ID jumpering is listed below.

T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T

6-10 Setting Jumpers

SCSI ID=0, no jumpers SCSI ID=1, A0 jumpered SCSI ID=2, A1 jumpered SCSI ID=3, A1 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=4, A2 jumpered SCSI ID=5, A2 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=6, A2 and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=7, A2, A1, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=8, A3 jumpered SCSI ID=9, A3 and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=10, A3 and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=11, A3, A1, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=12, A3 and A2 jumpered SCSI ID=13, A3, A2, and A0 jumpered SCSI ID=14, A3, A2, and A1 jumpered SCSI ID=15, A3, A2, A1, and A0 jumpered

CD-ROM READER JUMPER SETTINGS

CD-ROM reader jumper settings vary according to the particular model in the system and how that model is configured.

16X CD-ROM Reader

The NEC 16X CD-ROM reader CDR-1600A/BR uses a three-position jumper block to configure the master/slave and cable select options. The user selectable jumper is shown in the following figure and its settings are as follows.

16X CD-ROM reader jumpers

T T

CS: Cable Select jumper Not used SL: Slave Present jumper Disabled, pin 2 open (factory default) Enabled, pin 2 jumpered.

T

MA: Master Select jumper Enabled, pin 3 jumpered (factory default) Disabled, pin 3 open

Setting Jumpers 6-11

24X CD-ROM Reader (Lite-On Technology)

The Lite-ON Technology 24-speed CD-ROM reader has one jumper block on the back of the reader. Jumpers on the block configure the reader as a master (factory set) or slave. Descriptions of the jumpers are as follows:

T T T

CS (cable select) -- enables/disables the cable select feature. Factory set at disabled (pins not jumpered). SL (slave) -- enables/disables the slave feature. Factory set at disabled (pins not jumpered). MA (master) -- enables/disables the master feature. Factory set at enabled (pins jumpered).

24X CD-ROM Reader (Goldstar)

The Goldstar 24-speed CD-ROM reader has one jumper block on the back of the reader. Jumpers on the block configure the reader as a master (factory set) or slave. Descriptions of the jumpers are as follows:

T T T

CS (cable select) -- enables/disables the cable select feature. Factory set at disabled (pins not jumpered). SL (slave) -- enables/disables the slave feature. Factory set at disabled (pins not jumpered). MA (master) -- enables/disables the master feature. Factory set at enabled (pins jumpered).

6-12 Setting Jumpers

FAX/MODEM BOARD JUMPERS

The 56-Kbps fax/modem board has jumper blocks for COM port and the IRQ settings. These blocks should remain unjumpered (or parked on only one pin of jumper pin pairs) for systems running the Windows 95 operating system. In systems running the Windows NT operating system, the fax/modem board should be jumpered as follows:

T

COM jumper block COM 1 -- 0 pins, 1 pins, and SEL pins COM 2 (default) -- 1 pins and SEL pins COM 3 -- 0 pins and SEL pins COM 4 -- SEL pins

T

IRQ jumper block -- jumpered on pin 3 only.

ZIP DRIVE JUMPERS

The three-position jumper block for the Zip drive is located on the rear of the drive. The following description applies when the rear of the drive is viewed with the IDE connector to the left of the jumper block, and the power connector to the right.

T T T

Drive 0 Select (Master Drive Select) -- right two pin sets jumpered Drive 1 Select (Slave Drive Select) -- right-most pin set jumpered Cable Sect Mode -- all three pin sets jumpered.

Setting Jumpers 6-13

TAPE BACKUP UNIT JUMPERS

T T

Cable Select jumper (1,2) Not used Master device (5,6) Enabled, DS jumpered Disabled, DS open (factory default)

T

Slave device (3,4) Disabled, open (factory default) Enabled, jumpered.

6-14 Setting Jumpers

7

Using 24-Hour Information Services

NECCSD has made it easy for you to get information and help when you need it. We offer 24-hour information services via the following services described in this chapter:

T T T T T T T T T

NECCSD FaxFlashSM Service NECCSD Bulletin Board System NECCSD on America Online Service NECCSD on CompuServe Online Service E-mail to NECCSD Technical Support Services through a commercial online service or the Internet Fax Service to NECCSD Technical Support Services NECCSD Web and FTP Sites NECCSD Technical Support Services (U.S. customers only) NECCSD Diskette Fulfillment Center.

® ®

If you have access to a modem and/or fax machine (telephone for Technical Support), you can use the above services to obtain information about your system at any time, day or night, seven days a week. Not only do these services provide general information about your system, they can also be used to answer your questions and help solve any problems you may have with your system, should that ever be necessary.

Using 24-Hour Information Services 7-1

NECCSD FAXFLASH SERVICE

The NECCSD FaxFlash service is a self-help, automated electronic information service for obtaining up-to-date product application notes, installation procedures, troubleshooting tips, data sheets, technical information bulletins, illustrated parts lists, part numbers, and other information about your system. Using a fax machine, you can obtain information from FaxFlash 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Simply call the FaxFlash number on your touch-tone telephone and order the information you want by following the voice prompts. FaxFlash automatically faxes the information to you. If you are new to FaxFlash, first order one of the following catalogs. Each catalog lists the available documents and their document numbers. Current catalogs include:

T T T T T T

Catalog 1, NECCSD Telephone Directory and Online Service Information Catalog 3, NECCSD Computer Product Specifications, Warranty Policy, Ultracare Guidelines, and Sales Information Catalog 5, NEC ProServaTM and Express Serva Product Information Catalog 6, NEC Ready Consumer Desktop Systems Catalog 7, NEC PowerMate Commercial Desktop Systems Catalog 8, NEC Portable Systems (including Versa® Notebook and MobileProTM Handheld computers).

Catalogs 5, 6, 7, and 8 contain technical support information, including Technical Information Bulletins, Illustrated Parts lists, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) lists, and other product support documents.

7-2 Using 24-Hour Information Services

Order information from FaxFlash as follows.

1. Be sure that your fax machine or fax/modem is on. Have

the document number ready for the document you want.

2. At your touch-tone telephone, enter 888-329-0088 (USA

and Canada) or 978-635-6090 (international).

3. Listen to the instructions provided by the voice prompts.

Press 1 if you do not want an introduction to FaxFlash. Follow the automated instructions for ordering your document or catalog. Press 2 if you want an introduction to FaxFlash. Follow the automated instructions for ordering your catalog or document.

4. When prompted, enter your fax number and name.

For international use, first enter the international long distance access number (011), your country code, your area code or city code, then your fax number. The information you request will be automatically sent to your fax machine. Please wait for the ordered document to arrive at your fax machine before calling to order more documents. If FaxFlash attempts to send the second order before the first order is completed, the order may be canceled. After three tries, FaxFlash assumes that your line is busy and terminates any further processing of the order.

Using 24-Hour Information Services 7-3

NECCSD BULLETIN BOARD SYSTEM

If you have access to a modem, you can use the NECCSD Bulletin Board System (BBS) to get the latest information on hardware and software. The BBS allows you to download files (video drivers, printer drivers, BIOS updates, etc.) for system enhancements and upgrades. The BBS can also be accessed through the CompuServe online service. Log onto the BBS as follows.

1. From the Windows desktop, click the Start button. 2. Point to Programs. Point to Accessories and then click HyperTerminal. 3. Double click the Hypertrm.exe icon. The

HyperTerminal program appears.

4. Follow the instructions on the screen to set up your modem. Click the HyperTerminal help button for

information about dialing the phone number. If you need to check communications settings, check that the settings match the following BBS parameters.

T T T T T

Baud rate: select any baud rate that matches your modem Parity: none Data bits: 8 Stop bits: 1 Flow control: Xon/Xoff (select Hardware if using 14.4 bps or higher).

7-4 Using 24-Hour Information Services

5.

Following the HyperTerminal instructions, enter the BBS phone number (978-635-4706). Your business phone system and/or location might require a 9 1 or 1 prefix.

The first time that you use the BBS, you are requested to provide information for a new user questionnaire.

NOTE

6. 7. 8. 9.

Press Enter twice. Enter your first name, last name, and password. Press Enter after each. Follow the screen prompts until the Main Menu is displayed. At the Main Menu, select J to join a conference. Select Conference 1 for the desktop conference. menu.

10. From the Main Menu, press F and Enter for the File 11. At the File menu, select F for a list of downloadable

files. Follow the prompts to select a file for downloading.

!

CAUTION

Executable files automatically format your diskette when you download files from the BBS. Formatting destroys any data on the diskette. Before you download files from the BBS, check that you do not have information on the diskette that you need.

Using 24-Hour Information Services 7-5

After you complete downloading your file, log off the BBS as follows:

1. Press Enter (to continue). 2. Press G (command for Goodbye/Hangup). 3. Press Enter.

NECCSD ON AMERICA ONLINE SERVICE

If you subscribe to America Online, you can use the service to obtain information about NECCSD and its products. You can use America Online to E-mail technical questions to NECCSD Technical Support staff, post technical questions and messages on the Message Board, and access the NEC Software Library to download files. Use the following steps to access America Online and NECCSD online information services.

1. Log onto America Online. 2. At the opening screen, click Go To in the Main Menu. 3. At the Go To menu, click Keyword. 4. At the prompt, type NEC and press Enter. 5. At the NEC menu, double click one of the following

topics, then follow the prompts:

T T T T T

About NEC Terms and Conditions News Product Information Questions and Answers

7-6 Using 24-Hour Information Services

T T T

NEC Promotions Message Board Software Library.

6. Exit anytime by double clicking the rectangle in the

upper left corner of the screen.

NECCSD ON COMPUSERVE ONLINE SERVICE

If you subscribe to CompuServe, you can use the service to obtain information about NECCSD and its products. You can use CompuServe to E-mail technical questions to NECCSD Technical Support staff, post technical questions and messages on the Bulletin Board, and access NECCSD BBS.

You cannot download information from the NECCSD Bulletin Board from CompuServe. You must call the NECCSD Bulletin Board directly using the procedure described earlier in this chapter.

NOTE

Use the following steps to access CompuServe and NECCSD online information services.

1. Log onto CompuServe. 2. At the opening screen, click the Go button, then type NECTECH at the prompt, and click OK. 3. At the NEC menu, double click one of the following

topics, then follow the prompts:

T T

NEC Bulletin Board Information About This Service

Using 24-Hour Information Services 7-7

T T T

Access NEC BBS Access CompuServe Information Services Exit.

4. Exit anytime by double clicking on the rectangle in the

upper left corner of the screen.

E-MAIL/FAX TECHNICAL SUPPORT SERVICE

The NECCSD Technical Support Center offers technical support by E-mail over the Internet network if you have a modem. The Internet address is:

[email protected]

You can also fax technical questions to the NECCSD Technical Support Center if you have access to a fax machine or fax/modem. The fax number is:

(978) 635-4100

When using the E-mail or fax support service, you should include the following words in the subject field for prompt response from the appropriate technical person:

T T T T T

Desktop Monitor CD-ROM Printer Notebook.

You should provide as much specific information about your questions as possible. Also, if you are sending a fax, please include your voice telephone number and your fax number with the question. You will receive a response to your questions within one business day.

7-8 Using 24-Hour Information Services

INTERNET

If you have a modem, you can access the NECCSD Home Page on the Internet World Wide Web. You can do this through a commercial online service or through your Internet account. The NECCSD Home Page contains general information about NECCSD products. You can also use the Internet to access the NECCSD FTP (file transfer protocol) site to download various files (video drivers, printer drivers, BIOS updates). The files are essentially the same files as on the NECCSD Bulletin Board System. To access the World-Wide-Web NECCSD Home Page, enter the following Internet Uniform Resource Locator (URL) through your service:

http://www.nec-computers.com/

To access the NECCSD FTP site, enter the following Internet ftp address through your service:

ftp.nectech.com

Once in the file menu, follow the prompts to choose and download the file(s) you want.

Using 24-Hour Information Services 7-9

NECCSD TECHNICAL SUPPORT SERVICES

NECCSD also offers direct technical support through its Technical Support Center. (NECCSD technical support is for U.S. and Canadian customers only; international customers should check with their sales provider.) Direct assistance is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call the NECCSD Technical Support Center, toll free, at 1-800-632-4565 (U.S. and Canada only) for the following support.

T

System hardware -- toll-free phone support is limited to the length of the standard warranty. For hardware support after the standard warranty, get system hardware support for a fee.

T

Preinstalled software -- toll-free phone support for 90 days from the time of your first call to the NECCSD Technical Support Center. After the initial 90 days, get preinstalled software support for a fee.

Please have available your system's name, model number, serial number, and as much information as possible about your system's problem before calling. For outside the U.S., please contact your local NECCSD sales provider.

NECCSD DISKETTE FULFILLMENT CENTER

NECCSD provides driver files and BIOS updates free of charge through our Bulletin Board System (BBS). Also, diskettes containing these updates can be mailed at a rate of $15/per disk for duplication, shipping, and handling. Call the fulfillment center from 8:30 AM to 6:00 PM (EST), Monday through Friday at 1 (800) 842-6446.

7-10 Using 24-Hour Information Services

8

Solving System Problems

Occasionally, you may encounter a problem with your computer. In most cases, the problem is one that you can solve yourself. Your system has a built-in checking program that automatically tests its components when you turn the system unit power on. If there is a problem, the system displays an error message. If this happens, follow any instructions on the screen. If screen messages do not help or an error message does not appear, refer to the following information in this chapter to determine and solve the problem:

T T T

"Finding Solutions to Common Problems" Refer to this section to solve common minor problems. "Using the Diagnostic Diskette" If your system boots, use the diagnostic diskette to determine and resolve the problem. "Getting Help" Refer to this section if the above listed procedures have failed to correct the problem.

FINDING SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMS

See the following sections to match your problem area and view the possible causes and solutions. When trying to solve problems, you should note what the system was doing when the problem occurred and what you attempted to do to correct the problem. This information is useful if you request assistance.

Solving System Problems 8-1

System Problems

Check the following list to match your problem and see the possible cause and solution.

T

No power and power lamp not lit.

Check that all power switches are on. Check that the power cable is plugged into the system power socket. Check that the other end of the cable is plugged into a live, properly grounded AC power outlet or surge protector. Check the outlet or surge protector by plugging in a lamp.

T

Non-System Disk error message displays when the system is started.

You have a diskette in the diskette drive, and the diskette drive is set before the hard disk drive in boot order. Remove the diskette from drive A and restart the system.

T

System does not boot and error message displayed on screen.

Run the Setup Utility (see Chapter 4). Check that the parameters are set correctly, particularly if you just installed an option.

T

System emits continuous beeps.

Turn the system off, wait at least five seconds, and turn the system on. If the beeps continue, call your NECCSD dealer or the NECCSD Technical Support Center.

T

System does not maintain date, time, system configuration information.

Change the battery (see "Replacing the Battery" in this chapter). For assistance, call your NECCSD dealer or the NECCSD Technical Support Center.

8-2 Solving System Problems

T

System does not boot from hard disk.

The system usually tries to start from the diskette drive before it starts from the hard drive. Remove the diskette from the diskette drive. Run the Setup Utility (see Chapter 4) and set the initial Boot parameter to hard drive C instead of diskette drive.

T

System performance appears sluggish.

Check that your system is set for optimal operation. See your operating system documentation. Check the memory requirements of your software applications. If required, install additional DIMM memory (see Chapter 4). If you added optional memory, check that you correctly installed the DIMM memory.

T

System password forgotten.

Clear the password and reset it. See "Clearing Your Password" in Chapter 6.

Diskette Drive Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T

Diskette won't load.

Check that the diskette is being loaded correctly. Check that the system and monitor power lamps are on and the power-on screen appears. Check that the diskette is formatted. If not, format it. See your operating system documentation. Check that the diskette size is 1.44 MB.

Solving System Problems 8-3

If the diskette drive busy lamp does not light when you load the diskette, try a different diskette. If this loads, the problem is in the software.

T

Non-System Disk or Disk Error message displayed.

If you are trying to boot from the diskette drive, insert a diskette with system files into drive A. If a bootable diskette does not boot, use the Setup Utility to verify that the initial boot parameter is set to diskette drive A and not a hard disk.

Monitor Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T

Monitor screen is dark or the display is hard to read.

Check that the monitor is on. Check that the monitor power cable is connected to the monitor and a power outlet, the monitor signal cable is connected to the system, and the brightness and contrast controls are adjusted. Press the space bar or move the mouse to take the system out of the power management mode.

T T

Distorted image appears on your monitor screen.

Adjust the monitor's video controls. If this does not help, turn the monitor off for several seconds, then back on.

There is constant movement on the screen.

A magnetic field is affecting your monitor. Move any devices (fan, motor, another monitor) that generate magnetic fields away from your monitor.

8-4 Solving System Problems

T

The screen display is fuzzy or flickering; graphics characters or garbage appears on the screen.

Check that your monitor is set up correctly and that all connections have been made. Check that the video refresh rate and video driver are correct. Click the right mouse button anywhere on the Windows desktop and a menu appears. Click on Properties and the Display Properties window appears.

Keyboard/Mouse Problems

Check the following problem to see the possible cause and solution.

T

Mouse or keyboard does not respond.

You may have connected the mouse and keyboard after turning on your system. Turn the system off, make sure the mouse and keyboard are connected, and turn the system back on.

T

Image appears on screen but nothing happens when you use the mouse or keyboard.

Tighten the keyboard or mouse cable connection. If this does not help, turn off the system, wait five or more seconds, and turn on the system.

Solving System Problems 8-5

Serial Port Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T

Serial port 2 does not work

Serial port 2 is disabled by default. To use serial port 2 (also known as COM2, or serial port B), you must enable it through the BIOS Setup Utility. See "Enabling a Serial Port" in Chapter 5 for more information.

IR Port Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T

The IR port does not work

To use an infrared device with a system running Windows 95, you must enable Serial Port B (COM2), and also set Serial Port B Mode to IrDA through the BIOS Setup Utility. See "Using the IR Port" in Chapter 2 for more information.

CD-ROM Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T

The system does not see the CD-ROM reader.

The drive designation is wrong and should be changed. The drive designation for the CD-ROM reader depends upon the storage device configuration in your system. To find out what drive designation letter is assigned to your CD-ROM reader, double click My Computer on the Windows 95 or Windows NT 4.0 desktop. The drive designation is below the CD-ROM reader icon.

8-6 Solving System Problems

Alternatively, open Windows Explorer and scroll down the list of folders until you locate the CD-ROM reader icon. The drive designation is beside the icon.

T

The CD-ROM reader is not reading a disc.

Check that the disc is inserted in the CD tray with the printed label side up. Check that the disc is a data disc, not a music disc. Try a different disc to see if the problem is limited to one disc.

T

The CD-ROM disc does not eject due to a power failure or software error.

Turn off the system and use the CD-ROM emergency eject feature. Insert the pointed end of a paper clip into the eject hole. Press inward on the clip to open the door.

T

The CD-ROM plays music CDs but the sound is not heard. However, .WAV and .MIDI sounds can be heard when played.

Check that the cable connecting from the rear of the CD-ROM drive to the system board CD audio connector is in place and secure. Check the CD Audio volume setting.

Solving System Problems 8-7

Speaker Problems

Check the following problems to see the possible cause and solution.

T T

No sound from the speakers.

Check that the speaker power is on. Verify that all speaker cable connections are correct and secure.

Speaker volume is too low.

Adjust the volume control on the speaker. If the volume is still too low, adjust the volume through the system software. See your Windows Multimedia online help.

T

Sound is only coming from one speaker.

Balance the speaker output by adjusting the balance in the sound software. See your Windows Multimedia online help.

USING THE DIAGNOSTIC DISKETTE

If you are unable to resolve your system's problem using the Problem/Solutions topics in this chapter, NECCSD suggests that you run the QA Plus® diagnostic diskette. The diagnostic diskette permits quick testing of all major system components, individual testing of different system components, and access to various testing options. To run diagnostics, insert the diagnostic diskette into drive A: with the system unit off. Power on the system. The system boots from the diskette and provides you with the test options.

8-8 Solving System Problems

REPLACING THE BATTERY

All system boards use a battery to maintain system configuration information. Your system uses a coin-cell battery mounted on the system board (see the following figure). If it fails to maintain system configuration information, replace it with an identically rated battery from the same manufacturer.

!

CAUTION

Removing the battery from the system board causes the computer to lose system configuration information. Prior to removing the battery, run the Setup Utility (see Chapter 4) and print out or write down your system configuration settings. Then you can restore your system to its previous settings.

!

WARNING

The battery can explode if it is incorrectly replaced or improperly discarded. Use only the same battery or an equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer when replacing the battery. Lithium acts as a catalyst when exposed to water and causes spontaneous combustion on contact. Discard used batteries according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Solving System Problems 8-9

If you need to replace the battery, follow these steps:

1. Turn off and unplug the computer and any external

components connected to it.

2. Remove the system unit cover (see "Removing the

System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5). Observe all safety precautions when removing the cover.

3. Slide the system board out of the chassis (see

"Removing the System Board" in Chapter 5).

4. Locate the battery socket on the system board.

This procedure is for system boards using the 3-volt lithium battery shown in the following figure.

NOTE

Locating the battery socket on the system board

5. Carefully lift the battery clip until there is enough space

to slide the battery out of the socket.

8-10 Solving System Problems

!

CAUTION

To maintain a tight battery contact with the socket, do not over-bend the battery clip.

6.

Remove the battery and discard in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

Removing the battery

7. 8. 9.

Carefully lift the clip on the battery socket. With the positive (+) side facing up, slide the new battery into the socket. Slide the system board back into the chassis (see "Replacing the System Board" in Chapter 5). System Unit Cover" in Chapter 5).

10. Replace the system unit cover (see "Replacing the 11. Connect external peripherals and power cables. 12. Run the Setup Utility to reconfigure your system

parameters (see "The Setup Utility" in Chapter 4).

Solving System Problems 8-11

GETTING HELP

If you tried correcting problems yourself and were not successful, you may want to try one or more of the following 24-hour services for answers to your questions. (Some services require a modem or fax machine.)

T T T T T T T T

NECCSD FaxFlashSM Service NECCSD Bulletin Board System NECCSD on America Online Service NECCSD on CompuServe Online Service E-mail to NECCSD Technical Support Services through a commercial online service or the Internet Fax Service to NECCSD Technical Support Services Internet NECCSD Technical Support Services

If you still need help, continue with the suggestions that follow.

Getting Help From Your Company

If you are in a company, the best source of help may be internal. Your company may have designated central support personnel to whom you can go when you have problems.

Getting Help From Your NECCSD Dealer

The NECCSD dealer from whom you purchased your system is a good source of help and should be contacted. The dealer is backed by complete support resources and programs within NECCSD.

8-12 Solving System Problems

Getting Help From NECCSD Technical Support Center

Help is available to you through the NECCSD Technical Support Center. (International customers should check with their sales provider.) Direct assistance is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call the NECCSD Technical Support Center, toll free, at 1-800-632-4565 (for the U.S. only) for the following support.

T

System hardware -- toll-free phone support is limited to the length of the standard warranty. For hardware support after the standard warranty, get system hardware support for a fee.

T

Preinstalled software -- toll-free phone support for 90 days from the time of your first call to the NECCSD Technical Support Center. After the initial 90 days, get preinstalled software support for a fee.

Please have available your system's name, model number, serial number, and as much information as possible about your system's problem before calling. For outside the U.S., please contact your local NECCSD sales provider.

Solving System Problems 8-13

NECCSD Warranty/Non-Warranty Repair Service

NECCSD repair service is designed to support your warranty and non-warranty service activity. Before you call for repair service, see the previous sections in this chapter to determine if you can solve the problem yourself, within your company, through your dealer, or with the help of a technician from the NECCSD Technical Support Center. If your system requires repair service from NECCSD, call 1-800-632-4565 (United States and Canada only). If you are outside the U.S. and Canada, please contact your local NECCSD sales provider.

8-14 Solving System Problems

A

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

! WARNING

Prolonged or improper use of a computer workstation may pose a risk of serious injury. To reduce your risk of injury, set up and use your computer in the manner described in this appendix.

Contact a doctor if you experience pain, tenderness, swelling, burning, cramping, stiffness, throbbing, weakness, soreness, tingling and/or numbness in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, and/or legs.

MAKING YOUR COMPUTER WORK FOR YOU

Computers are everywhere. More and more people sit at computers for longer periods of time. This appendix explains how to set up your computer to fit your physical needs. This information is based on ergonomics -- the science of making the workplace fit the needs of the worker. Some nerve, tendon, and muscle disorders (musculoskeletal disorders) may be associated with repetitive activities, improper work environments, and incorrect work habits. Examples of musculoskeletal disorders that may be associated with certain forms of repetitive activities include: carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, tenosynovitis, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, and trigger finger, as well as other nerve, tendon, and muscle disorders.

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-1

Although some studies have shown an association between increasing hours of keyboard use and the development of some musculoskeletal disorders, it is still unclear whether working at a computer causes such disorders. Some doctors believe that using the keyboard and mouse may aggravate existing musculoskeletal disorders. Some people are more susceptible to developing these disorders due to preexisting conditions or psychosocial factors (see "Preexisting Conditions and Psychosocial Factors" later in the appendix). To reduce your risk of developing these disorders, follow the instructions in this appendix. If you experience discomfort while working at your computer or afterwards, even at night, contact a doctor as soon as possible. Signs of discomfort might include pain, tenderness, swelling, burning, cramping, stiffness, throbbing, weakness, soreness, tingling and/or numbness in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, and/or legs.

A-2 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

ARRANGE YOUR EQUIPMENT

Arrange your equipment so that you can work in a natural and relaxed position. Place items that you use frequently within easy reach. Adjust your workstation setup to the proper height (as described in this appendix) by lowering the table or stand that holds your computer equipment or raising the seat height of your chair. To create more desk space, you can put your computer base on the floor.

Adjust your keyboard and mouse

Adjust your monitor

Adjust your chair

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-3

ADJUST YOUR CHAIR

Your chair should be adjustable and stable. Vary your posture throughout the day.

Check the following:

T T

Keep your body in a relaxed yet upright position. The backrest of your chair should support the inward curve of your back. Use the entire seat and backrest to support your body. Tilt the backrest slightly backwards. The angle formed by your thighs and back should be 90° or more.

A-4 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

T

Your seat depth should allow your lower back to comfortably contact the backrest. Make sure that the backs of your lower legs do not press against the front of the chair. Extend your lower legs slightly so that the angle between your thighs and lower legs is 90° or more. Place your feet flat on the floor. Only use a footrest when attempts to adjust your chair and workstation fail to keep your feet flat. Be sure that you have adequate clearance between the top of your thighs and the underside of your workstation. Use armrests or forearm supports to support your forearms. If adjustable, the armrests or forearm supports should initially be lowered while all the other adjustments discussed in this appendix are made. Once all these adjustments are completed, raise the armrests or adjust the forearm supports until they touch the forearms and allow the shoulder muscles to relax.

T T T T

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-5

ADJUST YOUR INPUT DEVICES

Follow these points in positioning your keyboard and mouse.

T T

Position your keyboard directly in front of you. Avoid reaching when using your keyboard or mouse. If you use a mouse, position it at the same height as the keyboard and next to the keyboard. Keep your wrists straight and use your entire arm when moving a mouse. Do not grasp the mouse tightly. Grasp the mouse lightly and loosely. Adjust the keyboard height so that your elbows are near your body and your forearms are parallel to the floor, with your forearms resting on either armrests or forearm supports, in the manner described previously. If you do not have armrests or forearm supports, your upper arms should hang comfortably at your sides. Adjust your keyboard slope so that your wrists are straight while you are typing.

T

T

A-6 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

T T

Type with your hands and wrists floating above the keyboard. Use a wrist pad only to rest your wrists between typing. Avoid resting your wrists on sharp edges. Type with your wrists straight. Instead of twisting your wrists sideways to press hard-to-reach keys, move your whole arm. Keep from bending your wrists, hands, or fingers sideways. Press the keys gently; do not bang them. Keep your shoulders, arms, hands, and fingers relaxed.

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-7

T

ADJUST YOUR MONITOR

Correct placement and adjustment of the monitor can reduce eye, shoulder, and neck fatigue. Check the following when you position the monitor.

T

Adjust the monitor height so that the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye level. Your eyes should look slightly downward when viewing the middle of the screen. Position your monitor no closer than 12 inches and no further away than 28 inches from your eyes. The optimal distance is between 14 and 18 inches.

T

A-8 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

T T

Rest your eyes periodically by focusing on an object at least 20 feet away. Blink often. Position the monitor at a 90° angle to windows and other light sources to minimize glare and reflections. Adjust the monitor tilt so that ceiling lights do not reflect on your screen. If reflected light makes it hard for you to see your screen, use an anti-glare filter. Clean your monitor regularly. Use a lint-free, nonabrasive cloth and a non-alcohol, neutral, non-abrasive cleaning solution or glass cleaner to minimize dust. Adjust the monitor's brightness and contrast controls to enhance readability. Use a document holder placed close to the screen. Position whatever you are looking at most of the time (the screen or reference material) directly in front of you to minimize turning your head while you are typing. Get regular eye check-ups.

T T T T T T

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-9

VARY YOUR WORKDAY

If you use your computer for prolonged periods, follow these instructions.

T T

Vary your tasks throughout the day. Take frequent short breaks that involve walking, standing, and stretching. During these breaks, stretch muscles and joints that were in one position for an extended period of time. Relax muscles and joints that were active.

A-10 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

T T

Use a timer or reminder software to remind you to take breaks. To enhance blood circulation, alter your sitting posture periodically and keep your hands and wrists warm.

For more information on workstation setup, see the American National Standard for Human Factors Engineering of Visual Display Terminal Workstations. ANSI/HFS Standard No. 100-1988. The Human Factors Society, Inc., P.O. Box 1369, Santa Monica, California 90406

NOTE

PRE-EXISTING CONDITIONS AND PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS

Pre-existing conditions that may cause or make some people more susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders include the following: hereditary factors, vascular disorders, obesity, nutritional deficiencies (e.g., Vitamin B deficiency), endocrine disorders (e.g., diabetes), hormonal imbalances, connective tissue disorders (e.g., arthritis), prior trauma (to the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, or legs), prior musculoskeletal disorders, aging, fluid retention due to pregnancy, poor physical conditioning and dietary habits, and other conditions. Psychosocial factors associated with these disorders include: workplace stress, poor job satisfaction, lack of support by management, and/or lack of control over one's work. Contact a doctor if you experience pain, tenderness, swelling, burning, cramping, stiffness, throbbing, weakness, soreness, tingling and/or numbness in the hands, wrists, arms, shoulders, neck, back, and/or legs.

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-11

CHECKING YOUR COMFORT: HOW DO YOU MEASURE UP?

Use this checklist to see if you are setting up your work environment to fit your physical needs.

Checking Your Chair

T T T T T T T T T

Do you sit in an upright position with the backrest supporting your lower back? When sitting, are your feet flat on the floor? Do you periodically adjust your chair and your posture?

Checking Your Keyboard

Is your keyboard angled so your wrists are straight when you type? Is your keyboard directly in front of you? Do you avoid resting your wrists on sharp edges? Do you press the keys gently and not bang on them?

Checking Your Mouse

Is your mouse at the same height as the keyboard and next to the keyboard? Are your wrists straight and your touch light when moving the mouse?

Checking Your Monitor

T T T T

Did you adjust your monitor so that the top of the screen is at or slightly below eye level? Do you periodically rest your eyes by blinking often or looking away from the screen? Is your monitor no closer than 12 inches and no further away than 28 inches from your eyes? Do you use a document holder placed close to the screen?

A-12 Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment

Checking You

T T T T T T

Is your work area set up to promote a natural and relaxing working position with frequently used work items within close reach? Do you take frequent short breaks? Do you stretch and walk during your breaks? Do you vary your tasks during the day? Do you have regular eye checkups? Do you contact your doctor if you feel any sustained discomfort?

For more information on workstation setup, see the American National Standard for Human Factors Engineering of Visual Display Terminal Workstations. ANSI/HFS Standard No. 100-1988. The Human Factors Society, Inc., P.O. Box 1369, Santa Monica, California 90406 This appendix was prepared in consultation with Dr. David Rempel of the University of California/San Francisco Ergonomics Program and Mr. M.F. Schneider of HUMANTECH, Inc., Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Setting Up a Healthy Work Environment A-13

B

System Specifications

The following specifications are standard except where noted. System specifications are listed by component.

System Processor

Pentium Processor Clock Rate

T T

166-MHz processor 166-MHz internally, 66-MHz externally 200-MHz processor 200-MHz internally, 66-MHz externally

MMX Processor Clock Rate

T T T

166-MHz processor 166-MHz internally, 66-MHz externally 200-MHz processor 200-MHz internally, 66-MHz externally 233-MHz processor 233-MHz internally, 66-MHz externally

Processor Support

T T T

32-bit addressing 64-bit data MMX processor enhances audio, video, and 3D graphics performance

System Specifications B-1

PGA Processor Socket

The system comes equipped with the latest 321-pin zeroinsertion-force (ZIF) socket (Socket 7) for easy processor upgrades with next-generation processors.

Standard Random Access Memory (RAM)

Standard RAM minimum of 16 MB of Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM) installed in one of two industry-standard dual in-line memory module (DIMM) sockets on system board Total Memory support for up to 256 MB of high-speed RAM in two memory module sockets on system board Memory module type gold-plated, non-parity, 10- or 12-ns SDRAM modules Expansion supported in 16-MB, 32-MB, 64-MB, and 128-MB DIMMs

Cache Memory

T T T

pipelined 32-bit addressing 64-bit data 512 KB of pipeline burst secondary cache integrated on system board; direct mapped write-back and writethrough organization

Read Only Memory (ROM)

Flash ROM 2 Mbit

B-2 System Specifications

Video Window RAM (WRAM)

Standard video memory 2 MB of SGRAM Graphics support:

T T T T

1280 by 1024 pixels, up to 256 colors 1024 by 768 pixels, up to 64K colors 800 by 600 pixels, up to 16M colors 640 by 480 pixels, up to 16M colors.

Factory setting 800 by 600 with 256 colors

Calendar Clock

Year/Month/Day/Hour/Minute/Second/.01 Second; maintained by battery backup module Battery Type Real Time Clock (RTC) battery module

Input/Output (I/O) Facilities

Industry-Standard Interfaces integrated on the system board

T T T

Parallel bidirectional, ECP/EPP support; one 25-pin connector Serial two high-speed RS-232C ports using 16550 UART, support transfer rates up to 115.2 KB per second; 9-pin connectors Universal Serial Bus (USB) two USB ports, support two USB peripherals directly to the system; with appropriate connector, each port supports up to 127 daisy-chained devices; supports 12 megabits (Mbs) per second VGA Video Monitor supports standard, super, and high-resolution VGA modes; 15-pin connector (D-shell)

T

System Specifications B-3

T T T T T

Keyboard PS/2-compatible, 6-pin connector (mini DIN) Mouse PS/2-compatible, 6-pin connector (mini DIN) Microphone In supports a microphone or other audio input device for recording audio information in your data files, or broadcasting audio Line Out supports an amplified output device.

Industry-Standard Interfaces integrated on the riser board IDE dual IDE channels; both supporting one Ultra DMA IDE device CD-ROM reader and hard disk on separate channels support for up to 33.3 MB/second 32-bit transfers on PCI bus support for a total of four IDE devices; 40-pin connectors support for PIO mode 3 and mode 4

T T T

Device Slots

Diskette Drive supports two diskette drives, 1.2-MB and 1.44-MB; 34-pin connector CD Audio In Connector Modem In Connector

I/O Bus PCI/ISA

T

Desktop model three expansion slots One 8-/16-bit ISA slot (supports 1/2-length cards) One 32-bit PCI slot One shared ISA/PCI slot

B-4 System Specifications

T

Minitower model five expansion slots One 8-/16-bit ISA slot Three 32-bit PCI slots One shared ISA/PCI slot (does not support PCI Bus Master cards)

Graphics

S3 ViRGE/GX on system board

T T T T T

2D/3D video/graphics accelerator, 170-MHz RAMDAC, and clock synthesizer integrated in a single chip Video Memory 2 MB of video SGRAM S3 Streams Processor technology for video playback Supports SGRAM Graphics Support 1280 by 1024 pixels, up to 256 colors 1024 by 768 pixels, up to 64K colors 800 by 600 pixels, up to 16M colors 640 by 480 pixels, up to 16M colors

T

Text 80 columns by 25 lines 132 columns by 25 lines 132 columns by 43 lines

System Specifications B-5

Sound System

Based on Yamaha OPL3-SA3 hardware in systems with audio on system board

T T T T T T T T T T T

Compatible with Sound Blaster ProTM, Sound BlasterTM 2.0, Ad LibTM, MPU-401, and Microsoft® Windows Sound SystemTM for PC sound applications Stereo jacks microphone in and line out Built-in 16-bit sigma-delta stereo CODEC Dual DMA channel and built-in FIFOs for full duplex simultaneous playback and record in 16-bit stereo Programmable sample rate from 5.5 KHz to 48 KHz for recording and playback 6-bit (64 steps) master volume control IMA-compatible adaptive differential pulse code modulation (ADPCM), A-Law and u-Law compression/decompression Built in 6-channel stereo mixer; supports 3-channel analog input Software programmable ISA bus interface (DMA, Interrupt, I/O address) Power down mode, dual master clock input Sound Retrieval System (SRS) for 3D sound effects

B-6 System Specifications

Speakers

Goldtron 8-watt set

T T

Magnetically shielded Speaker Controls Power-on/off button Power indicator lamp Volume control Treble control Bass control Subwoofer output jack Mini-stereo headphone jack External DC jack AC adapter 120 V to 12 V Detachable cables

T T T T T T T T T

Altec Lansing 9-watt system Frequency Response 90 Hz - 20 kHz Operating voltage 15 VDC Sensitivity 300 mV Speaker Controls Power-on/off button Power indicator lamp Volume control Treble control Subwoofer output jack External DC jack AC adapter Detachable cables Weight 5 lb.

System Specifications B-7

T T T T T

Dimensions

Desktop System Unit

T T T T T T T T T T T T

Height 4.7 in. Width 18 in. Depth 16 in. Weight starting at 22 lb.

Minitower System Unit Height 17 in. Width 8.5 in. Depth 18 in. Weight starting at 28 lb.

Keyboard Height 1.6 in. (40.6 mm) Width 19.0 in. (482.6 mm) Depth 8.4 in. (213.3 mm) Weight 3.5 to 4 lb.

Weights are average and depend upon the system configuration.

Power

Universal Power Supply NLX200 Watt, 115/230 Volt Power Management Partial- and full-power reductions, suspend button

Operating Environment

Temperature -- 50° F to 95° F (10° C to 35° C) Relative Humidity -- 20% to 80%

B-8 System Specifications

C

Limited Warranty

NEC Computer Systems Division, Packard Bell NEC, Inc. (hereinafter "NECCSD") warrants this Product to be free from defects in material and workmanship under the following terms:

HOW LONG IS THE WARRANTY?

Labor and parts are warranted for three (3) years from the date of the first consumer purchase in the U.S.A., Canada, and selected countries. Year one is on-site; years two and three are on a return-to-service-center basis. Spare parts are warranted for ninety (90) days.

WHO IS PROTECTED?

This warranty is non-transferable and may be enforced only by the first consumer purchaser.

WHAT IS COVERED AND WHAT IS NOT COVERED?

Except as specified below, this warranty covers all defects in material and workmanship in the PowerMate Desktop Computer.

1. Any product which is not distributed in the U.S.A. or

Canada by NECCSD, or by an authorized NECCSD dealer or distributor. If you are uncertain as to whether a dealer is authorized, please contact NECCSD or 1-800-632-4565.

2. Any Product on which the serial number has been

defaced, modified or removed.

Limited Warranty C-1

3. Damage, deterioration or malfunction resulting from, but

not limited to: a. Accident, misuse, abuse, neglect, fire, water, lightning or other acts of nature, unauthorized Product modification, or failure to follow instructions supplied with the product. Repair or attempted repair by anyone not authorized by NECCSD. Any shipment of the Product (claims must be presented to the carrier). Removal or installation of the Product. Any other cause which does not relate to a Product defect.

b. c. d. e.

4. Cartons, carrying cases, pens, external cabinets,

magnetic media, or any accessories used in connection with the Products.

5. This warranty covers only NECCSD-supplied

components. Service required as a result of third party Products is not covered under this warranty.

WHAT WE WILL PAY FOR AND WHAT WE WILL NOT PAY FOR

We will pay labor and material expenses for covered items, but we will not pay for the following:

1. Removal or installation charges. 2. Costs of initial technical adjustments (set-up), including

adjustment of user controls. These costs are the responsibility of the NECCSD dealer from whom the Product was purchased.

3. Payment of shipping and related charges incurred in

returning the Product for warranty repair.

C-2 Limited Warranty

HOW YOU CAN GET WARRANTY SERVICE

Year One

For the first year, NECCSD provides an on-site limited warranty for all PowerMate Series Computers installed within a 50-mile radius of an NECCSD TotalService Preferred Dealer location or NECCSD authorized third party maintenance organization. On-site warranty service is available Monday through Friday during normal business hours, exclusive of NECCSD holidays. Such on-site warranty service may be obtained by contacting your local NECCSD TotalService Preferred Dealer or calling 1-800-632-4565. Beyond the 50-mile radius, travel charges will be applied. Alternatively, you may obtain warranty service in the same manner as the procedure for years two and three, below.

Years Two and Three To obtain warranty service during years two and three of the warranty terms, you must return this Product to a NECCSD authorized service center or directly to a NECCSD factory for repair. Packaging material used to transport the Product to an authorized repair facility is the responsibility of the owner. Packaging should be suitable to reduce risk of damage to the Product in transit. Damage in shipping is the responsibility of the shipping party.

Limited Warranty C-3

LIMITATION OF DAMAGES AND IMPLIED WARRANTIES

NECCSD'S SOLE LIABILITY FOR ANY DEFECTIVE PRODUCT IS LIMITED TO THE REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT OF THE PRODUCT AT OUR OPTION. NECCSD SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR:

1. DAMAGE TO OTHER PROPERTY CAUSED BY

ANY DEFECTS IN THIS PRODUCT, DAMAGES BASED UPON INCONVENIENCE, LOSS OF USE OF THE PRODUCT, LOSS OF TIME OR DATA, LOSS OF SOFTWARE, COMMERCIAL LOSS; OR

2. ANY OTHER DAMAGES, WHETHER

INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL OR OTHERWISE. THIS WARRANTY IS EXCLUSIVE AND IS IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OF IMPLIED WARRANTIES OR THE LIMITATION OR EXCLUSION OF LIABILITY FOR INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES; THEREFORE, THE ABOVE EXCLUSIONS OR LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU.

HOW STATE LAW RELATES TO THE WARRANTY

This warranty gives you specific legal rights, and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state.

C-4 Limited Warranty

FOR INFORMATION, TELEPHONE 1-800-632-4565

NOTE: All Products returned to NECCSD for service MUST have prior approval; this may be obtained by calling the above number. NECCSD Products are warranted in accordance with the terms of the applicable NECCSD limited warranty. Product performance is affected by system configuration, software, the application, customer data, and operator control of the system, among other factors. While NECCSD Products are considered to be compatible with many systems, the specific functional implementation by the customers of the Product may vary. Therefore, the suitability of a Product for a specific purpose or application must be determined by the customer and is not warranted by NECCSD.

Limited Warranty C-5

Index

A Advanced menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-10 America Online, 7-6 Audio connectors, 1-18 Auto-repeat delay (keyboard), 4-16 Auto-repeat rate (keyboard), 4-16 B Backing up, 2-19 Backup unit, 1-12 Battery, 8-9 replacing, 8-9 BIOS Setup Utility, 4-1 Advanced menu, 4-10 Boot menu, 4-22 Exit menu, 4-25 Main menu, 4-6 Maintenance menu, 4-25 navigation keys, 4-5 Power menu, 4-21 Security menu, 4-17 starting, 4-3 uses, 4-2 Boards audio, 3-1 expansion, 5-1, 5-17 fax/modem, 3-1 network, 3-1 riser, B-4 SCSI adapter, 3-1 system, 3-5, 5-26, B-3 video, 3-1 Boot menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-22 Boot order, 4-23 Bulletin Board System, 7-4 C Cables desktop, 5-45 diskette drive, 5-47 IDE device, 5-48 minitower, 5-46 PCMCIA device, 5-50 power, 5-50 SCSI device, 5-49 strain-relief loop, 5-3 Cabling diskette drive, 5-54 external SCSI device, 5-75 IDE device, 5-51 internal SCSI device, 5-52 parallel printer, 5-70 PCMCIA device, 5-53 serial device, 5-72 storage device, 5-51 USB devices, 5-76 Wake on LAN, 5-24 Cache, 3-5 Caps lock, 2-7 CD Restore selecting restore options, 4-45

Index-1

CD-ROM reader, 1-8, 2-12, 3-1 busy lamp, 1-10 eject/retract button, 1-9, 1-10 emergency eject, 1-10 headphone jack, 1-9 jumper settings, 6-11, 6-12 problems, 8-6 tray, 1-10 volume control, 1-9 CDs cleaning, 2-13 loading, 2-14 removing, 2-14 Chassis, 3-4 desktop, 3-3 minitower, 3-4 Chassis floor removing, 5-15 replacing, 5-17 Checking system memory, 5-31 Cheyenne Backup, 4-33 Cleaning CD, 2-13 monitor screen, 2-23 mouse, 2-24 your system, 2-23 CMOS battery replacement, 8-9 CompuServe, 7-7 Configuration, 3-1 CD-ROM reader jumper settings, 6-11, 6-12 enabling a serial port, 2-16, 5-73 fax/modem board jumper settings, 6-13 hard disk drive jumper settings, 6-8, 6-9, 6-10

Index-2

IDE device primary/secondary master/slave, 5-42 IR port, 2-16 keyboard, 4-15 password clear jumper settings, 6-5 software, 3-2 system board jumper settings, 6-2 tape backup unit jumper settings, 6-14 Zip drive jumper settings, 6-13 Connectors, 1-18 fax/modem ports, 1-20 keyboard port, 1-20 line out, 1-18 microphone in, 1-18 mouse port, 1-20 network board, 1-21 printer, 1-20 serial port, 1-20 USB, 1-20, 3-12 VGA monitor, 1-18 Cover removal desktop, 5-4 minitower, 5-8 Cover replacement desktop, 5-6 minitower, 5-12 D Data storage devices, 5-38 Date, setting, 2-4 Desktop cables, 5-45 chassis, 3-3 Device slots, 3-3, 3-4

Diagnostics, 8-8 QA Plus, 8-8 DIMMs installing, 5-33 memory, 3-5 removing, 5-32 supported, 3-6 upgrading, 5-31 Disk lamp, 1-6 Diskette inserting, 2-10 QA Plus Pro, 3-2 removing, 2-12 Diskette drive, 1-7 cable, 5-47 cabling, 5-54 problems, 8-3 release button, 1-8 selecting in Setup, 4-7 DMI, 4-31 event logging, 4-17 Documentation, xvi, 2-27 online, 2-26 Drivers, 3-2 E ECP. See Enhanced Capabilities Port E-mail support, 7-8 Enhanced Capabilities Port, 3-11 Enhanced Parallel Port, 3-11 EPP. See Enhanced Parallel Port Error message, 8-1 Exit menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-25

Expansion boards, 5-1 installing, 5-17, 5-20 removing, 5-24 Expansion slots, 3-3, 3-4 locating, 5-18 External options, 5-70 external SCSI device, 5-75 parallel printer, 5-70, 5-76 SCSI device, 5-75 serial device, 5-72 USB devices, 5-76 F Fan, 1-21 Fax support, 7-8 Fax/modem board, 3-1 connectors, 1-20 jumper settings, 6-13 FaxFlash service, 7-2 Features, 3-5 back, 1-16­1-22 disk lamp, 1-6 diskettes, 2-10 Flash ROM, 3-8 graphics, 3-9 PCI local bus, 3-8 power lamp, 1-6 power saving, 1-5 processor, 3-5 reset button, 1-5 system controls and lamps, 1-5 Flash ROM, 3-8 Flash utility, 4-26 Floor removing, 5-15 replacing, 5-17

Index-3

Front panel removing, 5-55 replacing, 5-59 Full Power On mode, 1-6 G Graphics, 3-9, B-5 MPEG, 3-9 Graphics accelerator, 3-9 H Hard disk drive desktop, 5-65 jumper settings, 6-8, 6-9, 6-10 minitower, 5-66 Headphones, 1-9 Help, 8-12 from your company, 8-12 from your NECCSD dealer, 8-12 repair service, 8-14 I IDE device cables, 5-48 cabling, 5-51 configuring in setup, 4-8 Information services, 7-1 America Online, 7-6 CompuServe, 7-7 E-mail support, 7-8 fax support, 7-8 Internet, 7-9 NECCSD Bulletin Board System, 7-4 NECCSD Diskette Fulfillment Center, 7-10

Index-4

NECCSD FaxFlash, 7-2 NECCSD ftp site, 7-9 NECCSD technical support, 7-10 NECCSD World Wide Web home page, 7-9 World Wide Web, 7-9 Inserting 5 1/4-inch devices, 5-62, 5-63 CDs, 2-14 diskettes, 2-10 internal hard disk drives, 5-65, 5-66 PC cards, 2-15 tape cartridges, 2-15 Zip disks, 2-15 Installing 3 1/2-inch drives, 5-63 5 1/4-inch devices, 5-61 expansion boards, 5-17, 5-20 Internet, 7-9 Interrupt controller, 3-6 IR port problems, 8-6 IR window, 1-6 IrDA data transfer, 1-6 J Jumper settings CD-ROM reader, 6-11, 6-12 fax/modem board, 6-13 hard disk drive, 6-8, 6-9, 6-10 password clear, 6-5 system board, 6-2 tape backup unit, 6-14 Zip drive, 6-13

K Key click, 4-15 Keyboard application key, 2-6 auto repeat delay, 4-16 auto-repeat rate, 4-16 configuring, 4-15 connecting, 1-20 cursor control keys, 2-6 features, 4-15 function keys, 2-6 key click, 4-15 keypad, 2-6 Num Lock, 4-15 port, 1-20 problems, 8-5 typewriter keys, 2-6 using, 2-4 Windows keys, 2-6 Keypad, 2-6 L Lamps Caps lock, 2-7 CD busy, 1-10 disk, 1-6 diskette drive busy, 1-8 Num lock, 2-7 power, 1-6 scroll lock, 2-7 tape backup unit, 1-13 Zip, 1-14 LANDesk Client Manager, 4-27 Cheyenne Backup, 4-33 DMI, 4-31 NEC MagicEye Capabilities, 4-31

NEC Security, 4-33 PC health indicator, 4-28 LDCM. See LANDesk Client Manager Line out jack, 1-18 Loading CDs, 2-14 Locating expansion slots, 5-18 M Main menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-6 Maintenance menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-25 Master device, 5-42 Math coprocessor, 3-5 Memory, 3-5 checking, 5-31 Microphone features, 1-18 jack, 1-18 Minitower cables, 5-46 chassis, 3-4 Minitower stand, 1-3, 1-15, 2-21, 2-25, 5-1 removing, 5-8, 5-9 replacing, 5-13 Monitor problems, 8-4, 8-6 Monitor screen cleaning, 2-23 Mouse cleaning, 2-24 clicking, 2-8 connecting, 1-20 double clicking, 2-8 dragging, 2-9

Index-5

port, 1-20 pressing, 2-9 problems, 8-5 using, 2-7 MPEG, 3-9 N NEC Help Center, 2-26 NEC repair service, 8-14 NEC Security, 4-33 NEC Select Install CD, 4-34 operating system restore, 4-35 restoring applications and drivers, 4-45 selective application restore, 4-45 NECCSD Bulletin Board System, 7-4 NECCSD Diskette Fulfillment Center, 7-10 NECCSD FaxFlash, 7-2 NECCSD Technical Support Center, 8-13 NECCSD Technical support services, 7-10 Network connectors, 1-21 Non-warranty repair service, 8-14 Num Lock, 2-7, 4-15 O Online diagnostics, 8-8 Online documentation, xvi, 2-26, 2-27 Option installation, 5-1, 5-18, 5-27, 5-38, 5-54 cover removal, 5-4 expansion board, 5-17 precautions, 5-2

Index-6

P Parallel port, 1-20 Parallel printer cabling, 5-70 connecting, 5-70 Password clearing, 6-5 setting, 4-18 using, 4-20 PC card host, 1-11 PC cards, 1-11 inserting, 2-15 removing, 2-15 PC Health Indicator, 4-28 inventory, 4-30 managing workstations, 4-29 monitoring PC health Workstations, 4-29 PC health meter, selecting, 4-29 PCI local bus, 3-8 PCI/IDE channel, 5-42 PCMCIA device, 1-11, 3-1 cable, 5-50 cabling, 5-53 Ports ECP, 3-11 EPP, 3-11 IDE, 3-11 IR, 1-6 POST, 2-2 Power button, 1-5 lamp, 1-6 management, 2-17 menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-21 socket, 1-21 specifications, B-8

Power supply, 1-21 desktop model, 1-22 fan, 1-21 minitower model, 1-22 power socket, 1-21 voltage selector switch, 1-21 Power-On Self-Test, 2-2 Primary PCI/IDE channel, 5-42 Printer port, 1-20 connector, 1-20 Printing, 2-20 within Windows, 2-21 Problems CD-ROM reader, 8-6 common, 8-1 diskette drive, 8-3 IR port, 8-6 keyboard/mouse, 8-5 monitor, 8-4, 8-6 serial port, 8-6 speakers, 8-8 system, 8-2 Processor, 3-5 installing, 5-37 Pentium, 3-5 removing, 5-35 upgrade, 5-35 Protecting your system, 2-21 R Removing CDs, 2-14 DIMMs, 5-32 diskettes, 2-12 expansion boards, 5-24 front panel, 5-55 minitower chassis floor, 5-15

minitower stand, 5-8, 5-9 PC cards, 2-15 processor, 5-35 system boards, 5-27 tape cartridges, 2-15 Zip disks, 2-16 Repair service, 8-14 Replacing 3 1/2-inch drives, 5-63 5 1/2-inch devices, 5-61 DIMMs, 5-33 front panel, 5-59 hard disk drives, 5-65, 5-66 minitower chassis floor, 5-17 minitower stand, 5-13 processor, 5-37 system board, 5-29 system unit cover, 5-6, 5-12 Restoring applications and drivers, 4-45 files, 4-34 the operating system, 4-35 Riser board, B-4 S Safety precautions, 5-2 Saving work, 2-19 Scroll lock, 2-7 SCSI, 5-49 SCSI device cabling, 5-52, 5-75 connecting, 5-75 Secondary PCI/IDE channel, 5-42 Security features, 2-18 Security menu (BIOS Setup utility), 4-17 Select Install CD, 4-34, 4-35, 4-45

Index-7

Serial device cabling, 5-72 connecting, 5-72 Serial ports, 1-20 connectors, 1-20 enabling, 5-73 problems, 8-6 Services, 8-12 Setting a password, 4-18 date and time, 2-4, 4-7 Setup menus Advanced menu, 4-10 Boot menu, 4-22 Exit menu, 4-25 Main menu, 4-6 Maintenance menu, 4-25 Power menu, 4-21 Security menu, 4-17 Setup Utility (BIOS), 4-1 Shipping procedures, 2-25 Shutting down system, 2-3 Slave device, 5-42 Sound, 3-12 Sound software, 1-23 Speakerphone, 1-18 Speakers, 1-23 AC adapter, 1-23 controls, 1-23 problems, 8-8 Specifications cache memory, B-2 calendar clock, B-3 device slots, B-4 dimensions, B-8 graphics, B-5 input-output facilities, B-3

Index-8

operating environment, B-8 PGA processor socket, B-2 power, B-8 processor, B-1 random-access memory, B-2 read-only memory, B-2 sound system, B-6 speakers, B-7 video memory, B-3 Stand, 1-3, 1-15, 2-21, 2-25, 5-1 removing, 5-8, 5-9 replacing, 5-13 Starting Setup utility, 4-3 system, 2-1 Storage device installation, 5-39, 5-40, 5-55 3 1/2-inch drives, 5-63 5 1/4-inch devices, 5-61 cabling, 5-51 device cables, 5-44 device preparation, 5-42 device slots, 5-39, 5-40 replacing the front panel, 5-59 Strain-relief loop, 5-3 Surge suppressor, 2-21 Suspend mode, 1-6, 2-17, 2-18, 3-13 System care, 2-21 cleaning, 2-23 problems, 8-2 shutdown, 2-3 specifications, B-1 startup, 2-1

System board, 3-5, B-3 interrupt controller, 3-6 jumper settings, 6-2 options, 5-26 removing, 5-27 replacing, 5-29 T Tape backup unit, 1-12 jumper settings, 6-14 Tape cartridge inserting, 2-15 removing, 2-15 Technical support, 7-10 Time, setting, 2-4 Troubleshooting, 8-1 common problems, 8-1 NECCSD Technical Support Center, 8-13 online diagnostics, 8-8 replacing the CMOS battery, 8-9 U Universal Serial Bus port, 1-20 Upgrading processor, 5-35 USB devices cabling, 5-76 USB ports, 3-12 V VGA monitor connector, 1-18 Voltage selector switch, 1-21 Volume, 1-9, 1-23

W Wake on LAN cabling, 5-24 Warranty repair service, 8-14 Z Zip disk inserting, 2-15 removing, 2-16 Zip drive, 1-14, 3-1 jumper settings, 6-13

Index-9

(For United States Use Only) FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION RADIO FREQUENCY INTERFERENCE STATEMENT WARNING: Changes or modifications to this unit not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user's authority to operate the equipment. NOTE: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures.

T T T

Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna. Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver. Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from the one to which the receiver is connected.

Use shielded and properly grounded I/O cables and power cable to ensure compliance of this unit to the specified limits of the rules.

(For Canadian Use Only)

This Class B digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations. Cet appareil numérique de la classe B repecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada.

BATTERY REPLACEMENT A lithium battery in some computers maintains system configuration information. In the event that the battery fails to maintain system configuration information, NEC recommends that you replace the battery. See "Replacing the Battery" in Chapter 8 of this guide for battery replacement information. WARNING: There is a danger of explosion if the battery is incorrectly replaced. Replace only with the same or equivalent type recommended by the manufacturer. Discard used batteries according to the manufacturer's instructions. ATTENTION: Il y a danger d'explosion s'il y a replacement incorrect de la batterie. Remplacer uniquement avec une batterie du même type ou d'un type recommandé par le constructeur. Mettre au rébut les batteries usagées conformément aux instructions du fabricant.

BATTERY DISPOSAL Do not place used batteries in your regular trash. The nickel-cadmium or nickel metal-hydride batteries must be collected, recycled, or disposed of in an environmentally-approved manner. The incineration, landfilling, or mixing of batteries with the municipal solid waste stream is prohibited by law in most areas. Return batteries to a federal or state approved battery recycler. This may be where your purchased the battery or a local seller of automotive batteries. In MINNESOTA, call 1-800-225-PRBA if further disposal information is required. Contact your local waste management officials for other information regarding the environmentally sound collection, recycling, and disposal of the batteries.

NEC Computer Systems Division, A Division of Packard Bell NEC, Inc.

DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY

We, the Responsible Party NEC Computer Systems Division Packard Bell NEC, Inc. 1414 Massachusetts Ave. Boxborough, MA 01719 (978) 264-8000

declare that the product

NEC

POWERMATE ENTERPRISE DT

is in conformity with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation of this product is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

NEC Computer Systems Division, A Division of Packard Bell NEC, Inc.

DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY

We, the Responsible Party NEC Computer Systems Division Packard Bell NEC, Inc. 1414 Massachusetts Ave. Boxborough, MA 01719 (978) 264-8000

declare that the product

NEC

POWERMATE ENTERPRISE MT

is in conformity with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation of this product is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.

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