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Foundations

Comedy triple bill `Sandy: the Musical' WWI Battlefields tour Crossing the great divide More than just marks... Rugby tour of England and Ireland News from the Preps

Issue 40

Newsletter of the Sydney Grammar School Foundation

Putting on the black and gold

Grammar

June 2009

June 2009

SPEECH DAY

Below: Still from Who Said Size Doesn't Matter Old Sydneian and former Senior Prefect (1988) Dr Rowan Gillies was the guest speaker at the 2008 Speech Day at the Sydney Opera House. After completing his surgical training in 1999, Dr Gillies went on to become a field doctor for Médecins Sans Frontières. In January 2002 he became Australia's MSF leader and its international leader later that year. In an inspiring occasional address, Dr Gillies spoke of his time in Liberia working with a group of 8000 people who had escaped their homes as rebel militias took over territory in the north of the country. After talking graphically about his experiences there, he put this challenge to the boys: If you listen to the hollow promises and claims of parts of our society, you could assume ownership of an iPhone, a Ferrari and a waterfront home is all you need to be happy. However, if you listen to your soul, and maintain your own counsel, you will hear a more insistent voice urging you to enjoy the true fruits of what it is to be human. It's about striving to perceive and avoid the lows, and understand and enjoy the highs of human existence, and first among these are the rewards of assisting those less fortunate than ourselves. For believe me, to assist someone to restore their own dignity, be it through respect, compassion or just keeping them alive is the most rewarding act I have experienced and can imagine.

TROPFEST

Five Grammar boys have achieved acclaim for their filmmaking skills at Trop Junior this year. Seamus McNamara (I) and Miles Gibson (Year 5, Edgecliff Prep) were part of the team led by director Daniel Colomb that produced the winning film, Dry Water. Seamus was a cameraman and Miles was one of the lead actors and film editor. Miles' own film, I Dare You, was also shortlisted. Another short-listed film was Who Said Size Doesn't Matter, written and directed by Joshua Milch (II) with the help of Kim Ho (II) and starring Sam Milch (Year 6, Edgecliff). Over 140 budding filmmakers entered this year's competition, which requires candidates to make a film of no more than 5½ minutes' duration.

CONCERTO CONCERT

The annual Concerto Concert on 2 April was another of those `must hear' events: Form VI Concerto Competition winners Samuel Payne (`cello ­ Haydn Concerto in D), Timothy Gonski (tenor ­ Lotti Pur Dicesti, O Bocca Bella), Matthew Yee (flute ­ Chaminade Concertino) and Narek Shamavonian (oboe ­ Le Brun Concerto No 2 in G minor) impressed not only by their technical command but also by their expressiveness and innate musical sense. The School Orchestra under Rita Fin provided apt support as did accompanists Ransford Elsley and Robert Wagner. The programme was rounded by performances from AMCO, the Segovia Guitar Ensemble and our two a cappella groups, the Croonivores and the Grammarphones. The audience's appreciation was tangible.

Cast and crew of Dry Water pictured with Jan Ellis, Projects Co-ordinator, Metro Screen: Seamus McNamara (second from left), Miles Gibson (lower right)

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BIG WEEK OUT

Pace Huxley (VI) was one of sixteen pupils from around the country to take part in the National Geographic's Big Week Out, a six-day field trip to Noosa, Queensland. Participants spent the week studying the environmental aspects of the region and analysing the relationship between the local environment and manmade development.

`MOVEMBER'

There are not many occasions where an employee can arrive at work unshaven and get away with it. In November last year, twenty-two masters (pictured before and after) did so in an effort to raise money for `Movember' to be donated to the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia and beyondblue: the national depression initiative. Gold coin donations were taken through tutorials and the level of support given by the boys was very pleasing. In all, the masters involved raised over $2,500. Prior to the event, Charlie Davidson (Director of Football), had promised to shave off his thirty-year-old moustache if over $2,000 was raised. On 28 November, Mr Davidson was shaved at lunchtime in the middle playground, revealing virgin skin between nose and mouth for the first time in three decades.

ANOTHER WORLD: HARRY WHITE IN INDIA

Harry White (V) was on assignment with Jamie Durie filming an assignment for Channel 7 during the 2008 Third Term holiday. Harry's role was producer and presenter of six short films that are, in total, a mini-documentary about the lives of people in New Delhi and Rajasthan. The principal photography, completed in two weeks, highlights the social issues of the region from a young person's perspective. The stories were on the Youth Media programs operating in the country and included coverage of mobile crèches on construction sites and the issue of child marriage. Some of the locations included deserts, slums and houses built beneath flimsy construction developments. The project is part of Plan International Australia's work. This is a nongovernment organisation and the film will appear on their website (www.plan.org.au) when finished.

VICTORIAN BUSHFIRES: ONE BOY'S RESPONSE

From The Sydney Morning Herald, 12 February 2009: Thousands of people, previously unknown to one another, have joined each other, gathering what they can in garages and backyards. Like Ben Lichtman, a twelve year-old student at Sydney Grammar who has collected 500 blankets to donate to the victims of the bushfires ... Ben Lichtman was already collecting blankets ahead of his Bar Mitzvah later this year, when he heard of the bushfire appeals. He snapped into action, more than doubling the number he had already collected. `I thought I could do something special for my Bar Mitzvah and influence the community,' Ben said. `I started six months ago and now that there's a crisis, I decided they should go to Victoria.'

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June 2009

FUNDRAISING FOR CHARITY

The total amount raised for charity by the School in 2008 was $18,500. This money was donated to the Prefects' chosen charity for the year, the Fred Hollows Foundation, which aims to restore sight to visually impaired people in the AsiaPacific region. This year's Prefects, led by Charles Arcus, Senior Prefect, and Lewis McLeod, Second Prefect (pictured right and left), launched the 2009 fundraising activities with a collection from the boys following assemblies on Friday 20 February. A total of $3,504 was collected (including an impressive $1,072 from First Form) and this money has been directed to the Red Cross Victorian Bushfire Appeal. In a personal and very quickly executed fund-raising endeavour late last year, Hamish Stening (II) (pictured above right) almost single-handedly raised $262.90 in support of the National Breast Cancer Foundation Pink Ribbon Campaign ­ all this, while on crutches nursing a torn medial ligament!

COLE CLASSIC SWIM CHALLENGE ASHLEY LEVI

Ashley Levi, a member of last year's Sixth Form, sustained severe spinal injuries after falling in an organised activity at a camp in the Snowy Mountains in January this year. Ashley remains in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Prince of Wales Hospital. While an operation was successful, he is unable to commence any form of rehabilitation at this stage. Once Ash is well enough to leave the ICU, he will be transferred to the spinal ward of the hospital and the long process of rehabilitation will begin. Although Ashley is not able to receive visitors, messages of encouragement are very important in the recovery process. His family have asked: `We are currently making a scrapbook of all your emails, with photos, to keep Ash smiling in the difficult months ahead. Please email us, on [email protected], with funny stories, hot gossip, happy memories and photos to share with Ash. You can also leave Ashley a voice message by calling (02) 8723 7079. It means a great deal for us to be surrounded by such wonderful friends. Thank you very much for your support.' On 1 February this year, Sam Molloy, Brian Lam, Tom O'Neill, Charlie Arcus and Aidan Bryant (all Form VI) formed a team called the `Bumble Bees' to swim the Cole Classic, a 1km swim from Shelly Beach to Manly Beach to raise funds for the Sir David Martin Foundation. The Sir David Martin Foundation helps young people get off the streets, away from unhealthy situations and into care and rehabilitation. The boys raised $2,346 from friends and family and a bucket collection at school. This was the highest amount raise by a team. James Scutts (VI) also raised money with the team but was unable to swim on the day. Left to right: Brian Lam, Tom O'Neill and Sam Molloy

Photo (courtesy Tim Molloy)

HSC RESULTS 2008

Four boys in last year's Sixth Form ­ Emmanuel Marinos, Ben Pope, Alex Wells and Mark Yeow ­ achieved a maximum UAI (Universities Admission Index) of 100. 41 boys gained a UAI of 99 or above, 94 boys got 95 or higher and 140 candidates scored 90 or above. Grammar boys topped the state in nine courses (the highest number from any one school). They were Harry Cameron ­ Italian (Continuers and Extension); Heydon Letcher ­ French (Extension); Max Menzies ­ Mathematics (Extension 2); Ben Pope ­ Latin (Continuers); Eli Tung ­ Japanese (Beginners); Tom Vallance ­ Classical Greek (Continuers and Extension); Alex Wells ­ German (Continuers). (See article More than just marks... page 12)

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SINGING WITH OPERA AUSTRALIA

Jasper Holmes (I) writes... `When I began singing with Opera Australia, I did not know the difference between Dame Joan Sutherland and Dame Edna Everage. After my first performance, the 50th Anniversary of Opera Australia's Gala Performance, I did. We performed A Midsummer Night's Dream in front of the amazing Dame Joan Sutherland. I've loved singing with Jasper Holmes second from right in Opera Australia from the word `Cavalleria Rusticana' `go', though given my passion for rock music, I would never have thought in a million years that I would be singing opera. Since being in Opera Australia, I have performed in many operas, including A Midsummer Night's Dream, Carmina Burana, Carmen, Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci, and this year in `Opera in the Park'. The experience Jasper Holmes third from right in has enriched my life greatly `Carmen' through the audition process, the commitment to rehearsals and, finally, the performances. The only downside is closing night. I hope that I will perform in more operas ­ it's such a fulfilling part of my life.'

Ashley (left) and Daniel Heyworth and their boat MWD

NATIONAL SAILING CHAMPION

Ashley Heyworth (III) has won the Open division of the Manly Junior National Championships together with his younger brother, Daniel. In the seven-race series held early in January at Bayview Yacht Racing Club, the brothers finished the seven-race series five points ahead of their nearest rivals. Fellow Grammar boy, Billy Ditmarsch (II) finished second with crewmate Tristan Bongolan. Ashley intends to move up to Flying 11s next season.

Photo courtesy Alan Pryke, The Australian/Newspix

ROB ALLINGHAM RETIRES

At the end of Term I this year the School said farewell to one of its longest serving and most respected masters, Rob Allingham. An Old Sydneian himself, Rob was appointed by Alastair Mackerras to teach English in 1973. He has fulfilled that most important of roles ­ the classroom teacher ­ with enormous distinction, something to which generations of Old Sydneians will attest. Boys felt themselves extremely fortunate to have been placed in his class or his House. Rob was Tutor of Group 20 under the old tutor scheme and, in 1991, was one the founding House Masters in the new system. Rob was, for a time, Head of English and was acting Director of Studies for just over a year during the critical time of the School's Registration and Accreditation inspection. He was elected Honorary Secretary of the Common Room for two years and also served on various committees such as the Education Policy committee which he chaired for two years in the early 1990s. In his early years at the School, Rob coached rugby, cricket and debating. Later, he coached both the First and Seconds tennis teams and was appointed master-in-charge of tennis. Rob fulfilled his pastoral roles in the School with humaneness, warmth and calm. He has an instinctive understanding of adolescents and communicates easily and warmly with them. He will be remembered with great affection.

JOHN HUGHES

Following critical recognition for both The Idea of Home and Somebody Else, School Librarian Dr John Hughes found himself in the international spotlight for the latter. Somebody Else was one of twenty works nominated for the inaugural Warwick Prize for Writing. The very generous prize is the initiative of Warwick University, UK, and rewards `excellence and innovation' in new writing. The twenty nominations came from across the globe and across genres, all fulfilling this year's thematic heading of `Complexity'. The prize was ultimately awarded to Naomi Klein.

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ACCLAIM FOR YOUNG COMPOSER

Philip Jameson (IV) has continued to impress Sydney's music circles. While composing his first staged musical (Sandy: the Musical ­ see full article on page 21) produced at the end of last year, Philip was also busily working on a re-orchestration of his chamber piece Pebbles and Stuff for the Sydney Symphony's Discovery Series. In a performance during February at the Angel Place Recital Hall, conductor Richard Gill led the audience through an analysis of Philip's piece alongside Mendelssohn's Hebrides Overture and Italian Symphony. All three works were then performed by Sydney Sinfonia. In a speech to the audience, Richard Gill spoke glowingly of the musical opportunities offered at Grammar. Such was the applause for Philip's work, that it was played again at the end of the concert as an encore.

Photo courtesy Sydney Symphony Orchestra

PEN VOICES: ANNA FUNDER

On 12 November 2008, Australian author Anna Funder delivered the third public lecture in the Sydney PEN 3 Voices Project in the Alastair Mackerras Theatre. Following an introduction by Thomas Keneally, Ms Funder spoke on the subject of courage, in particular its relationship with political power. She began with an account of the final actions of Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, with whom she once shared a newspaper column. Anna Funder is the author of Stasiland: stories of people who heroically resisted the communist dictatorship of East Germany and of people who worked for its secret police, the Stasi.

Photo courtesy Martine Archambault

OLD SYDNEIANS AT YOUTH OLYMPICS

Five Old Sydneians achieved considerable success in the rowing component of the 2009 Australian Youth Olympic Festival held at the Sydney International Regatta Centre earlier this year. As members of the Men's Coxed Eight and competing against crews from Australia and overseas, former Grammar rowers Charles Budd, Edward De Carvalho (both OS 2007), Matthew Dignan (OS 2008) and Cox Matthew Grimes (OS 2007) were placed fourth in the final of this event. Charles Budd and Edward De Carvalho then went on to win a gold medal as members of the Men's Quad Sculls and a silver medal in the Men's Lightweight Double Scull. Matthew Dignan also raced well in the Men's Coxless Pairs and Coxless Fours, whilst former Grammar rower and team reserve Thomas Cartmill was placed sixth in the Men's Single Scull (reserve) event.

Australian Men's Quad Scull (from left) Charles Budd (OS 2007), Aleksander Berzins, Nicholas Purnell and Edward de Carvalho (OS 2007)

Photo courtesy Brad Hunter, NewsPix

MATHEMATICS COMPETITION MEDAL

Alexander London (V) has won one of only eight medals awarded in Australia in the Intermediate division of the Australian Mathematics Competition. Only one other medal was awarded in New South Wales. Conducted in the Asia/ Pacific region, the competition attracts the most entries of any such competition in the world and is therefore considered to be the biggest and most testing of its kind.

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June 2009

MALCOLM TURNBULL RETURNS TO GRAMMAR

On Wednesday 10 February 2009 the boys in Forms II to VI were treated to a political encounter with the Leader of the Federal Opposition, the Honourable Malcolm Turnbull (OS 1972). After recounting some of his experiences of College Street in the early 1970s, Mr Turnbull spoke of his interest in education as a means of self-improvement. In his introduction Dr Vallance had referred to the scholarship provided by Mr Turnbull in memory of his father. Mr Turnbull stressed his belief in the need to provide educational opportunities for all and modestly expressed the hope that he had contributed to that ideal. Bravely, as we thought, providing the opportunity for questions, Mr Turnbull was immediately challenged on a number of issues. He responded in true parliamentary fashion, giving his critics no quarter and providing enough examples to impress even the most exacting debating adjudicator. Mr Turnbull's visit was much appreciated, and provided plenty of material for discussion.

CLANCY NEWMAN CELLO RECITAL

Distinguished American `cellist and composer, Clancy Newman, gave a thrilling lunchtime recital in Big School on Friday 20 March 2009. Mr Newman has been the recipient of many musical honours and awards including the National Symphony Orchestra Young Soloists Competition; Juilliard School `Cello Competition; Juilliard Pre-College `Cello Competition; National Society of Arts and Letters `Cello Competition in Washington, D.C.; Australian National Youth Concerto Competition; Gold Medal for Strings at the Dandenong Youth Festival (Australia); and the Ithaca College High School Competition.

1ST YEAR 10 VIII WIN AT GPS REGATTA

Cheered on by the entire School, 1st Year 10 VIII won their event at this year's GPS Head of the River in a time of 6:12.07. Coached by Michael Smith and Stefan Szcurowski, the crew finished 1.84 seconds in front of Shore (2nd) and 5.29 seconds in front of King's (3rd). Ranked second in the GPS point score after the lead-up regattas, the 1st VIII finished fourth just 1.23 seconds behind third place. The 3rd VIII were placed third in their event. 1st Year 10 VIII crossing the line

Photo courtesy Melba Studios

TRI-GRAMMAR CRICKET

The annual Tri-Grammar Cricket Competition was hosted this year by Melbourne Grammar. In the first of a four game series, Melbourne batted first and scored 350. SGS looked good in reply at 3 for 220. However the team fell away and Melbourne won on first innings. After the Brisbane batsmen got away early to a good start in the second match, SGS batted and fell into a terrible hole and was at one stage 9 for 34. James Graham and Anish Krishnan made things somewhat respectable by bringing the score to 158. Brisbane batted again the next morning and added another 150 before declaring and leaving SGS to score 324 in an afternoon. With nothing to lose, SGS went about the chase which will go down in Tri-Grammar history as one of the most exciting afternoons ever. Our final wicket fell with the score at 320 with two balls left to be bowled. It was a great team effort. Melbourne went on to win the series and Charlie Arcus, James Graham and Daniel Smith were selected in the combined side.

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June 2009

CADET CEREMONIAL PARADES

Group Captain Henrik Ehlers (Director, Co-ordination Royal Australian Air Force) was the reviewing officer at last year's Air Force Cadets ceremonial parade held at historic Victoria Barracks, Paddington. To mark the closing of the year, the Army Cadet Corps gathered at Weigall for their annual Ceremonial Parade. This year's Reviewing Officer, Lieutenant Colonel David Eyland (OS 1987) presented the trophies after which he addressed the Corps, referring at times with some emotion to his memories of his own time at Grammar and the importance of Army Cadets in forming his own career choices. The Reviewing Officer and Headmaster received the General Salute from the assembled cadets, before the Parade was dismissed; this was followed by afternoon tea.

MORE SWIMMING RECORDS BROKEN!

Ben Schafer (II) has had a great season in the pool. He was the School 14s Age Champion and has set new School records in the 50m, 100m and 200m Freestyle, 50m Butterfly and 200 Individual Medley. He also set GPS records in the 50m and 100m Butterfly. He was a member of the 14s Relay team with James Mok, John O'Neill and Reiji Sano who had an undefeated season breaking the GPS record in the Freestyle Relay. Ben set a State age record in the 50m Butterfly and has achieved qualification at the Age National Titles in the 50m, 100m, 200m, 400m Freestyle, 100m, 200m Butterfly and the 200m Individual Medley.

HEADMASTER'S EXHIBITION

Professor John Talent, Emeritus Professor of Palaeontology at Macquarie University, was examiner for this year's Headmaster's Exhibition. Set reading for the examination was Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner and candidates were required to sit two three-hour papers which included questions specifically related to the set reading. One such question asked boys to consider the following: `Afghanistan, the Solomon Islands, Moldova, Georgia, Abkhazia, Zimbabwe, Tajikistan, Haiti and Chechnya (in Russia) are close to being categorized as failed political entities, if not indeed outlaw ones. What options can you imagine for the future of the citizens of such political entities?' Professor Talent awarded the Headmaster's Exhibition to Ronald So (V) and the Johns Prize (proxime accessit) to Sam Molloy (VI).

GPS REPRESENTATIVES

Daniel Smith gained selection in the combined GPS cricket XI. In tennis, James Fermanis was selected in the combined 1st GPS team (also selected in the NSW team) and Tom Berrigan in the GPS 2nds. Tom McClintock, Captain of Boats, was named as a member of the combined GPS VIII. Boys who gained GPS selection in swimming were Ben Schafer, James Mok, Reiji Sano, John O'Neill, Peter Barratt, Jay Ditmarsch, Nic Vogel, Martin Charteris, Matthew Self, William Slattery, James Medway, Andrew Kam and Tom O'Neill, who was also appointed Captain of the combined GPS team. Left to right: Tom Berrigan, Daniel Smith, James Fermanis and Tom McClintock

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`SHEP' FAREWELLED GRAMMARPALOOZA

In the first week of Term IV 2008, the fifth annual rock concert was held in the Alastair Mackerras Theatre with another large crowd cheering on the bands. Organisation of the event was taken on jointly by Form V boys Charles Arcus, Ross McQuinn, William Naughtin-Dent and Tom O'Neill, all members of the band The Avenue. The showstopper for the evening was Harry Stitt (I) who performed an arrangement of Pachelbel's Canon for solo guitar. Grammarpalooza raised $4,000 for The Fred Hollows Foundation, the Prefects' charity of choice throughout the year.

On 30 November we farewelled Christopher Shepard, Director of Music, who returned to his native USA at the end of 2008 to pursue his conducting career and to expand on the Bach project he began here in Sydney. A special concert to mark the occasion was organised by Rita Fin to acknowledge the tremendous contribution Chris made to the School over his twelve years at Grammar. Many current boys, old boys and staff performed in the Mackerras Theatre on the day to pay tribute to the man they admired so well. Each item on the programme had special significance, representing some aspect of Chris's time in Australia, and all reflecting Chris the teacher, the conductor, the mentor and the musician. The inclusion of Rossini's Cat duet, however, remains a mystery!

ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE

Michael Fitzjames, who has been our artistin-residence for Term I, is well-known both as a painter and as a practitioner of the genre that used to be known simply as `black and white'. His complex and allusive illustrations in an idiom of silhouettes and arabesques have appeared most recently in The Australian Financial Review. Boys have regularly visited the studio, especially during tutorial groups, and have had the opportunity to watch Michael at work and ask him about his approach. The Headmaster opened an exhibition of his paintings in the Edmund Barton Room on Friday 27 March 2009.

DEL KATHRYN BARTON AT EDGECLIFF

During Week 4 of Term I, artist Del Kathryn Barton worked with Infants boys to make self-portraits...attached to the body of an animal! Boys chose the animal for their self-portraits based on characteristics of themselves. They made line drawings and painted with watercolour. These artworks will be exhibited at the Infants assemblies in the library. Del Kathryn Barton studied at the College of Fine Arts of UNSW where she is now a lecturer. She won the 2008 Archibald Prize for portraiture for You are what is most beautiful about me, a selfportrait with her two children, Kell and Arella.

Photo courtesy Oliver Burt (2nd Class, EPS)

DUNN TWINS TOP PROMOTIONS COURSE

During the summer holidays, Alexander and Douglas Dunn (both VI) attended the 3 Wing 1/09 AAFC Cadet Under Officer (CUO) Promotions Course from 6 to 23 January 2009. During the three-week course they took part in numerous assessments, activities and challenges. These included planning and managing a `Fieldcraft Exercise' for 150 cadets and assisting in the overall management of the detachment. At the conclusion of the course they were successfully promoted to the rank of CUO and both received the Peter Marshall Trophy for joint first place on the CUO course.

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June 2009

JACK GLATZER MASTERCLASS

On Thursday 23 October visiting American violinist Jack Glatzer gave a Violin Masterclass to seven string-players from Forms I to IV: Paddy Jow (I), Samuel Lister (I), Victory Wang (I), Alexander Chen (II), Edward Emmett (III), Joseph Cohen (III) and Brian Lee (IV). Mr Glatzer was in Australia on a concert tour, including a performance of the complete Paganini Caprices the following day. Playing on a Stradivarius violin, his recital showed his impeccable control of the instrument and bow. The extraordinary sounds he is able to produce (particularly in the playing of harmonics) at times were breath-taking. From the start of the Masterclass Mr Glatzer talked about true intonation and the use of the bow to help produce a free warm and strong tone. He also worked on the importance of the correct use of fingerings and bowings. Brian Lee (IV) was congratulated by Mr Glatzer on his fine playing of the Kabalevsky Rondo.

Photo courtesy Joel Santos

A FIRST-HAND ENCOUNTER WITH HISTORY

In the November 2008 edition of `Foundations', we reported on a visit to the School by Gitta Alderson Gold, a Hungarian Holocaust survivor. In part of his own account of her visit, her great-great nephew, Andrew McWilliam wrote: `...I asked Gitta about her experiences before, during and after the war. A really confronting part for my great-great aunt was when she talked about her arrival at Auschwitz and the selection process. Gitta told us how when she arrived, Joseph Mengele, the infamous torturer of children, stood up on a platform and told all the people to stand to one side if they were too tired and wait for a car. Gitta told her parents to stand aside, as they were sick and weak, and Gitta stayed with those who were not too tired. Those who stayed behind were put into a wagon and taken to the gas chambers. That was the last time Gitta saw her parents.' `...Gitta's willingness to come in and talk about such a painful time in her life meant a lot to me and my classmates. As her talk revealed, Gitta was a normal person who did nothing wrong and was brutally persecuted in concentration camps because of her cultural background. I think that this taught the class the importance of tolerance and appreciating what we have in life. Not only did Gitta overcome the brutality of the concentration camps, but she did not subsequently allow herself to be consumed by anger and hurt from this experience, and instead went on to start a family and live a happy life. Gitta is an inspiration.'

VALE IAN BROWN

Ian Stephens, Headmaster of Edgecliff Prep, writes: Ian Brown passed away suddenly last December leaving the Edgecliff community devastated. Ian worked as a chemical engineer before retraining to become a teacher. He worked at Edgecliff for the past four years as a class teacher and was much loved by both pupils and colleagues. Ian was the Maths Coordinator for the past two years and enjoyed coaching cricket and football teams. Being a musician himself, he showed a keen interest in the jazz ensembles and the percussion groups. A memorial service was held in the Big Schoolroom at College Street on 19 December, where we were able to remember Ian as a wonderful husband, father, son, friend and colleague. He was an exceptional teacher and I know that all who knew him ­ boys, parents and teachers ­ will feel this loss deeply.

VALE ALASTAIR WILSON

At the beginning of January this year a memorial service was held in Big School for Alastair Wilson who died after a two-year battle with cancer. The Headmaster spoke of Alastair's will to fight the disease as well as his concern for his parents and sisters and how they would cope through his illness. Dr Vallance also spoke of Alastair's humane determination so that even when things were going badly, he managed to find positives and to persevere with his work through to the gaining of his HSC just before he died. At the service, tributes were given by Alastair's Housemaster, Rob Allingham, and a close friend, Robert Lapsley. David Foong and Roy Chen played a musical tribute. Alastair was awarded a scholarship to study at the University of Sydney and, in recognition of his courage in adversity, he was awarded the Brother John Taylor Prize by the Board of Studies. His twin sister Alice accepted the prize at a ceremony at Parliament House in March. Alastair was passionate about all aspects of School life and excelled at Rugby, rowing and athletics. In recognition of his contribution to the life of the School he was awarded the Marc Freedman Prize in both 2007 and 2008. His good nature and concern for others will be remembered by all who knew him.

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Tour of WWI Battlefields

Over Easter, 18 boys travelled to Turkey, France and Belgium. At the gravesides of fallen Old Sydneians, each boy spoke about the lives of the men who had died. Here are extracts from two boys' tributes.

Thomas Wright (III) Ekin Leslie Montrose was born in 1893. He was killed on Saturday 1 July 1916 in the Battle of the Somme, aged 22. Leslie volunteered for the English army instead of the Australian army and at his time of death he was a Second Lieutenant in the York and Lancaster regiment. His younger brother James had also joined the English army and was killed, aged 19, on the same day in the same battle as his brother. Leslie received the Military Cross `for conspicuous gallantry as Officer in command of a Lewis gun team. He led his men out into the open under heavy machine gun and shell fire, in which they all became casualties and he himself wounded. Notwithstanding, he took the gun forward alone, and continued to serve it until it was knocked out of action again and he was seriously wounded again'. Another brother, Sidney, was too young to fight, but he joined the Royal Ulster Rifles during the Second World War and was killed in Tunisia. The Montrose family had lost three of four brothers in war. Their surviving sister, Kathleen, named her only child after Sidney in honour of his service to his country. Seamus Thomson (V) Gerardus (Jerry) Paling left Sydney Grammar School in 1897, aged 15. Because his stay at Grammar was short, there was little time for him to gain recognition amongst higher sporting teams and other extra-curricular activities. When the War broke out, Paling enlisted in the Australian Infantry Force with the 53rd Battalion in which he gained military training to fight on the Western Front in defence of France. Sadly, this is the country where he lies at rest today. He was killed near Fromelles on 19 July 1916, barely three weeks after he arrived in France. In his poem `The Soldier', Rupert Brooke says that the ground where an English soldier fell or was buried would remain forever England. Somewhere behind me or around us today, there is a little patch of ground and grass. Somewhere here a man who would have shared similar experiences in their school days to you and me lies at rest. Somewhere here...there is an area of ground that will be forever Australia.

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1 Tom Wright 2 Seamus Thomson 3 Seamus Thomson and Conor Taylor at the Menin Gate 4 Tour group at ANZAC Cove

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More than just marks...

In 2008 four Grammar boys achieved a UAI of 100; nine boys topped the State in an HSC course. But as each of them says, they got so much more out of Grammar than just good marks.

Emmanuel Marinos (UAI of 100) `What I enjoyed most about my time at Grammar was the mix of music, sport, academic extension and the various clubs and societies, all combined together within the comparatively small area of the School. We had every opportunity and the freedom to try any activity we might choose as well as the resources and environment to continue these activities to high levels.'

Alex Wells (UAI of 100) `Many of my most formative experiences took place down the road at Weigall. From my days as the young 'un of the First XI Football team, desperate to learn everything from the seemingly invincible Sixth Formers, to my very last day, it has been pure entertainment ­ and pure life. Other memories stick out, too: performing on the drums, albeit rather woefully, the Masters versus Prefects dodgeball tournament, and the general camaraderie in the playground. It is Grammar's strength that all this can go on alongside academic excellence ­ may it ever be so.'

Mark Yeow (UAI of 100) `Music at Grammar is about more than just what or how you play. The camaraderie of a big musical, the satisfaction of a seamless concert ­ there are few other fields where both the intellectual and the social come together in such a cohesive way.'

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Ben Pope (UAI of 100; top of State Latin Continuers) `There are three things I particularly enjoyed. First was the Rifle Club for its camaraderie and the sport's intense selfcontrol and attention to detail. Second was music. Third were the Viking Club and the nascent Hieroglyphs Club. One of the high points of my final year was when Professor Simon Goldhill from Cambridge came to talk to us about Greek. Our teachers stepped beyond what was required in simply delivering the coursework and gave us the opportunity to develop our interests.'

Harry Cameron (Top of State ­ Italian Continuers and Extension) `The School offered so much more than just good teachers and good results. I have particularly fond memories of my final year when the School trusted us to organise a social cricket team that was a great success and a welcome escape from the workload of the HSC year. In lower years I played Rugby, and later refereed it. I was a library senior and did debating. The standard of coaching we received was very high. I participated in Mock Trial in Forms IV and V, which was an intellectually stimulating way to get a taste of the enigma that is the legal system.'

Heydon Letcher (Top of State ­ French Extension) `Grammar is a school that looks out for the interests of the student. Keen on languages, I remember my delight when within six months of starting at the school I was already off overseas on exchange to New Caledonia. I also enjoyed a termlong exchange to École Alsacienne in the Parisian 5th arrondissement, Freiburg's Berthold Gymnasium school in Germany and the Spain and Italy football tours. Activities like debating, mock trial and mooting were stimulating extras.'

Max Menzies (Top of State ­ Mathematics Extension 2) `The best part about Grammar was the diversity of student life. I was able to balance intense participation in the Mathematical Olympiad with other pursuits. I have always insisted that Latin and Greek are the finest subjects. I had great teachers and great texts to read. Grammar's Classics department is proof that the School follows its philosophy of education: to learn for learning, not earning. There was everything else, from sport to chemistry extension, from creative writing to Classical Chinese; it was the diversity, and the sheer excellence of everything, that made my years.'

Eli Tung (Top of State ­ Japanese Beginners) `What I most enjoyed was being in a strong and vibrant community. Although musical rehearsals were tough, the outcome of performing on stage and receiving recognition for your efforts was worthwhile, especially the three full nights of Sweeney Todd! My musical endeavours at Grammar have developed skills such as leadership, cooperation and organisation. It is through organisation and hard work that I have been able to succeed in my academic studies.'

Tom Vallance (Top of State ­ Classical Greek Continuers and Extension) `Schoolwork occupied only a small part of my involvement with the School. The Music Department allows hundreds of boys to gain experience in performing all genres of music. I also had a great experience of sport, playing cricket, football and Rugby as well as refereeing Rugby. I feel vehemently that if I hadn't been there to watch the Rugby each weekend ­ and likewise if I hadn't concentrated on more than just the schoolwork ­ then my six years at College Street would have been infinitely less rewarding.'

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Science beyond the curriculum

Dr Malcolm Binns (Science Department) brings us up to date on the latest scientific quests beyond College Street.

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arly Fourth Term 2008 saw Grammar families rafting and fishing at Chowder Bay, Sydney Harbour, whilst contemplating the weightier aspects of marine sustainability put to us an hour beforehand by Dr Iain Suthers from the Sydney Institute of Marine Science. Perhaps the most graphic part of his presentation was when he displayed polystyrene cups which had been taken to the ocean floor far off the coast and squashed to a third of their original size by the intense deep ocean pressure. The fun continued at year's end when we undertook the two-day Innovation Tour to inspect technology and its application in the Illawarra Region. The inspirational highlight of the tour was possibly the video presentation of the Sea Cliff Bridge's construction and ensuing discussion with Mr Alex Dunstan of the RTA, after which many of the boys decided to become career engineers. Later in the evening boys and parents constructed winged kites which were flown the following day in a brisk wind in a large park almost free from kiteeating trees. In the afternoon we strolled over the Sea Cliff Bridge and enjoyed ice cream at Bald Hill to commemorate the achievements of the Father of Flight, Sir Lawrence Hargrave. March 2009 saw a party of sixty or so visit Long Reef, Collaroy, in search of strange-looking life forms. We were not disappointed. No sooner had one boy found a 30cm sea cucumber than others found fluorescing shellfish. For some time the best find for the day appeared to be the `painful-if-stung-but-not-lethal' fire worm. However at day's end, the killer of the reef ­ the blue ring octopus ­ was finally exposed. SGS Fellow, Dr Ian Graham, introduced us to the geology of the region as the headland to the south of us disappeared under the grey of an encroaching storm. In April we visited the Port Kembla Steelworks, a manufacturing plant

capable of making five million tonnes of steel per year. The eruption of the glowing 1700°C slag from the BOS furnace on the addition of dolomite flux was spectacular! Afterwards we visited the coalface of the Illawarra literally. Dr Ian Graham talked about the prevailing conditions millions of years ago when the coal seam was formed, and explained why the coal around and under the Sydney Basin is plentiful and of the highest grade.

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Port Kembla Steelworks On the Illawarra Fly tree-top walk Dr Iain Suthers, Chowder Bay Cameron McArthur (I) and Alexander Babidge (I) at Long Reef

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Crossing the great divide

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Tom O'Neill (VI) relates his experiences of working at the Aboriginal community of Warmun, in remote inland Western Australia.

delivering them. I also did odd jobs at the school. I also spent quite a lot of time in the health clinic with the nurses learning about how healthcare in such a remote part of Australia is provided. My ten days in Warmun gave me a chance to experience first hand the harshness of life in such outback communities, and certainly gave me a greater insight into Aboriginal culture, Kija culture in particular. The experience also allowed me to appreciate, to an extent, the sense of cultural displacement that haunts the indigenous community of our country ­ something which I feel is often overlooked and misunderstood by our non-indigenous population.

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he day after Speech Day I caught a plane to Perth, then another to Kununurra, a small city just west of the Northern Territory border in the East Kimberley. From there I was greeted with cheerful smiles by Sister Mary McDonnell of the Sisters of St Joseph, a long-time friend of my mother. We drove 200 kilometres west along the Great Northern Highway to a tiny Aboriginal community called Warmun, also known as Turkey Creek. Warmun is the largest of a group of Aboriginal communities (600 people) in that particular area of the Kimberley with a school, a health clinic (run by WA nurses) and a hall. It is from Warmun that the administration of other `out-stations' ­ smaller communities ­ is organised. It is hard to imagine that such a cultural disparity can exist in one country. Coming from the formal proceedings of our Speech Day in the Sydney Opera House to the true outback of Western Australia and into the culture of the Kija people presented an absolutely amazing contrast. I was staying in a `donga' ­ a small, tin house ­ with Sr Mary who teaches at the Ngalangungpum School. I was involved in helping with a meals-on-wheels service for the elderly of the community, packing lunches and

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Sunset at Warmun Heading west, Great Northern Highway Mirrilingki Hill Tom with `Winnie' Tom and friends from Frog Hollow Sunset at Warmun

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Comedy Triple Bill

Peter Rudge, Senior Subject Master in English and Director of this term's drama presentation, reflects on `three nights of pure joy'.

ach of the three plays chosen for the Comedy Triple Bill ­ the first dramatic production of 2009 ­ presented its own challenges. The simple scenario of two young men sitting on a bench, chatting about ducks (The Duck Variations) would appear the easiest to execute. And in terms of props and costuming, it was. But when that `chat' is Mamet's carefully orchestrated set of variations, the demands of learning the dialogue are enormous. With little in the way of physical action to carry the play's message, tone and timing become paramount, as does the creation of character. Whilst I found the play delightfully comical, the boys were less sure. Indeed, it was not until the dress rehearsal that one of them could relax, now knowing that the play was not going to be met with a bored silence. Chris Masters (V) and Sean Marshall (III) are to be congratulated on presenting a

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memorable comic duo, their whimsical mediations, arch cynicism, temper tantrums and poignant reflections engaging the audience wholeheartedly. It was also rewarding to have an eager Phil Jameson run up to me last year, wanting to compose music for the show. His `Duck Variations' added their own special something to the show, capturing the mood of each scene and the play as a whole. The mood of Dog, on the other hand, was encapsulated in the sudden blast of the Sex Pistols that next greeted the audience. Written by Steven Berkoff, Dog is an exercise in virtuosic acting, with the one actor playing both a man and his dog. The challenge facing Harry Richardson (V) was finding the character of both. `How do I play a dog?' Harry asked early on. `Just get down on stage and be dog-like', was my less than helpful reply. What evolved over the coming weeks was physically believable, but also believable as a character in its own right ­ the dog had been found. The lager-loving Millwall supporter posed less of a challenge. Some fine-tuning of the accent, some tightening of the body,

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an actual Millwall shirt and just the right amount of bling had Harry charming the audience in all his vulgarity and repulsive attractiveness. The final play of the evening took the audience in yet another direction ­ the farcical. Stoppard's After Magritte is a relatively early work and it does not pretend to the metaphysical seriousness of Stoppard's extraordinary debut, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, nor to the intellectual and emotional demands of his masterpiece, Arcadia (SGS 2007). It does, however, share those plays' delight in parody, word games, wit and the sheer joy of comedy. Whilst short, the play was technically complex, both for the crew and for the actors and what was asked of them.

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Nevertheless, all involved were able to present a polished production, ending in a memorable final tableau with Max Volfneuk (V) as a slipper-clad mother playing the tuba; Nick Della Marta (V) in dark glasses and eating a banana; Ben Brooks (V) balancing on one leg, with a cushion cover over his head and wearing a ball-gown over his dinner suit; Rosie Connolly (SCEGGS Darlinghurst) crawling around in a camisole, looking for a needle; and a bewildered Will McClellan (IV), looking on in amazement at this bizarre spectacle. My heartfelt thanks to all involved (including the tech boys ably led by Mr Marc Warry and Mischa Davenport) for providing three nights of sheer joy.

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1 Rosie Connolly and Ben Brooks (After Magritte) 2 and 3 Harry Richardson (Dog) 4 Max Volfneuk and Rosie Connolly (After Magritte) 5 Max Volfneuk, Nick Della Marta, Rosie Connolly (After Magritte) 6 Nick Della Marta and Max Volfneuk (After Magritte) 7 Will McClellan (After Magritte) 8 Chris Masters (The Duck Variations) 9 Sean Marshall and Chris Masters (The Duck Variations)

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Photography: Brett Boardman

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Promoting friendship at St Ives

Lesley Dorn, Director of Infants, reports on a programme which teaches strategies for making friends ­ and keeping them!

n the K­2 years at St Ives, Friendship Groups are formed to develop social skills such as taking turns, sharing, empathy and tolerance. Friendship Groups meet each term and for special events such as Science Day, Book Week and Mathematics Morning. Each Friendship Group is made up of boys from across all K­2 grades, thus extending the boys' opportunities to have a wider circle of friends at school. There are eleven groups in total, each containing approximately fifteen boys. During the course of the year, the groups rotate through a series of handson activities. For example: mosaic tiles, stained glass windows, making decorative biscuits and having fun with hearing. In these early years, we pay particular attention to the social and emotional development of the boys. Our Social Skills Programme introduces two highly effective programmes: PALS, which develops social play, and BOUNCE,

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which develops resilience. Young children have always needed effective coping skills, however, there is evidence that today's world is more challenging and that young children may have fewer resources to deal with those challenges than previous generations had. For this reason, we focus on the BOUNCE programme during Friendship Groups. We introduce, share and discuss the language of BOUNCE. Through these programmes we aim to give the boys strategies to handle everyday situations and to develop resilience in managing setbacks. One final important feature of Friendship Groups is to provide an opportunity for play. Play is a child's natural approach to understanding the world. Our society is becoming increasingly organized, and children need time with their friends and family to play. They need time alone to create, to imagine, to discover and to dream!

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B ad feelings always go away again. O ther people can help you to feel better if you talk to them. U nhelpful thinking makes you feel worse. N obody is perfect. Mistakes help you learn. C oncentrate on the good things and have a laugh. E verybody feels sad and worried sometimes, not just you.

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1 Benjamin Bruckner and Ethan Hume build a telephone 2 Construction fun with Leon Mylordis and Giles Fitzpatrick-Vale 3 William Chan and Sean Leech making biscuits 4 Ari Hastings and Henry Tang build a stained glass window 5 Charlie Bennett and Tom Quin play with mosaic tiles

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Edgecliff boys explore the natural world

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n first term we were joined by Scientistin-Residence, Anthony Stimson. Anthony is a well known naturalist who has worked with many groups educating people about the environment. Amongst other deeds, he rescues and cares for injured wildlife that cannot be returned to the bush. Each class at Edgecliff spent a whole day with Anthony. Each day began with Anthony introducing the boys to some of the injured animals in his care. He showed the boys a range of wildlife including a ring tailed possum whose mother had been killed by a cat. The discussion promoted by his stories and the close contact with the animals, showed great empathy and understanding of a whole range of ecological issues. Each class, except Fourth Class, was then taken on an expedition to Trumper Park where they investigated the environment in and around the pond. The older boys measured the temperature, turbidity and pH and discussed how the chemistry of the water affected the pond life. They then used long nets to collect the macroinvertebrates living in the pond, which were identified using keys. Some classes worked in collaboration with the local council to learn about bush regeneration and the plight of native wildlife striving to survive in an urban environment. The boys learnt about weeds and the damage they do, before spending some time weeding and planting indigenous plants.

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Naturalist, Anthony Stimson, spent a term at Edgecliff Prep as Scientist-inResidence and stimulated some keen interest among the boys!

Photos courtesy Matthew McCloskey

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Fourth Class spent the day building a vegetable garden. They assisted in the design of the flower beds, the construction using railway sleepers and the moving of five tonnes of dirt and gravel! The boys had germinated plants which they then planted in their new garden. The experience promoted a range of discussion from the use of companion plants to the costs of transporting food from farm to the table.

1 Oliver Burt, Jonas Lianos and William Tudehope meet a regular visitor to the pond 2 Anthony Stimson and Second Class boys discuss their findings from the pond 3 The boys find abundant life in an urban environment 4 Zak Michael searches for inhabitants of the pond 5 Christopher Alexakis enjoys the pickings from the new vegetable garden

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Photos courtesy Anne Russell

Rugby tour of England and Ireland

An Open Rugby squad of twenty-four boys played four games in England and Ireland whilst also managing brief stops in Scotland and Wales along the way.

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lying in to Manchester on Easter Saturday we travelled to nearby Cheadle, our base for the next four days. The brief patch of rain during the first afternoon's training session was to be the only poor weather we encountered. The effects of jet-lag were in evidence in our first match against the local Wilmslow Club (lost 7-17) which also proved disastrous for us in terms of injuries, three boys being sidelined for the remainder of the tour. However, we greatly enjoyed the warm hospitality of our Wilmslow hosts who made us feel extremely welcome. On our way to Ireland we stopped overnight at the Shap Wells Hotel in Cumbria where the boys were not only afforded the unique opportunity of a late afternoon run through picturesque fields, but also the chance of experiencing English country hotel life (and dining!) belonging to a bygone era. Reaching Stranraer in Scotland the next morning, we made the two-hour ferry crossing to Hollyhead in remarkably calm seas. We arrived at the Royal School, Armagh in the late afternoon where the boys met their billets. All boys commented on how much they enjoyed staying with their host families and learning more about life in Northern Ireland. Despite a more spirited and

co-ordinated showing in the game the next afternoon, we went down to a strong Armagh team 5 to 21. Our next port of call was the beautiful city of Dublin where, again, we enjoyed spectacular weather. After a day of sightseeing, we travelled to Donnybrook for our encounter with a very strong and experienced Bective Rangers Club side. Despite a decisive defeat (0-31), improvements were evident and we were pleased at having held them to only one try in the second half. Crossing the Irish Sea once again and travelling via Wales we arrived in Stratford-upon-Avon for our last fixture against King Edward VI School. The next day, after being treated to a tour of the ancient parts of the School (including `Big School' where Shakespeare is reputed to have attended lessons), we made a brief trip to the picture-postcard village of Burton-on-the-Water in the Cotswolds. Despite high hopes and a much-improved performance, we went down by 31 points to 12 to the King Edward's. As our flight did not leave until late in the evening, we had time for a day out in London where all boys took the opportunity of (yet more) great weather to explore the many glorious sights the city has to offer.

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King Edward VI School, Stratford At Royal School, Armagh Versus King Edward VI School Versus Wilmslow Rugby Club Training at KES ground Stratfordupon-Avon

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June 2009

Sandy: The Musical (the gym session we had to have)

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Writer and director Hugh Sturgess (VI) reflects on the Term IV show written, composed, directed and acted entirely by boys.

ne of the things about Grammar that makes me proud to be a pupil here is its sense of the absurd, a sense which made Sandy: The Musical seem so customary when, in any other context, it would be so strange as to be virtually incomprehensible. Then there is the breadth of interest and talent we have. I think it would be hard to find anywhere else the creativity to devise the concept, the trust in the boys by the School to pull it off, and the respect for the offbeat in those boys that allowed them to sing and dance to eleven songs about a fitness trainer with the degree of power and energy that they did. Sandy was something of which Grammar should be proud. We first met the real Sandy ­ Rob Rowland-Smith, the land-coach of the Grammar senior Boatshed ­ in late 2007. With his cheery nature and his catchcries of `this is just the warm-up', `you've still got it', `with me now' and so on, he carried the air of a man well aware that he was on the verge of self-parody, and gave the distinct impression that he was laughing at the sheer size of his personality. That was in the days of Keating! and while to call the concept of Sandy `inevitable' would be to fall prey to the play's own aesthetic, the idea came readily to mind. A huge amount of the success of Sandy (about 90% of it, at my guess) is down to the wonderful cast, band and crew. Lines were learnt, complex rhythms and harmonies mastered and a rushed technical rehearsal was carried off with professional aplomb. Ultimately, the cast brought to the stage an energy and vitality greater than I could have hoped for. Special thanks must go to Phil Jameson (III) for his stunning musical composition, and to Mr Marc Warry and Ms Bronwen Williams for constantly supporting this criminally bizarre project.

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The latter deserves special praise, as our brilliant co-director and all-round production navigatrix, for being so unrelentingly positive about the entire production. Grammar doesn't have a reputation as a `sporty' school, but while it's true that even our most sports-mad jocks look eccentric by absolute standards, we do have students who would much rather head to the gym than see a musical. One of my proudest achievements is that some of those same boys went to see Sandy, and enjoyed it. It bridged that gap between arts and sport; both Rob Roland-Smith and the Headmaster were delighted with the production, which I think sums up the breadth of its appeal. Anything that can make Dr Vallance quip `the Quest for the Chest continues' in assembly is surely impressive in at least that respect. Sandy: The Musical ­ something that began as a joke and is still outrageously ludicrous ­ has been performed. At school. With everyone watching. Sandy: ridiculous, absurd, outrageous even ­ and something of which we're all very, very proud.

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1 Matt Coe and Tim Newman 2 Tim with the real `Sandy' (Rob Rowland-Smith) 3 Cast and Director

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Photography: Rowing: Brigit Kirk; Tennis: Nick Cranney; Swimming Richard Medway; Basketball: Tony Hill; Cricket: Kirk Powell

Summer sport round-up

The Sportsmaster, Sharon Ditmarsch, looks back over a long, hot summer of sport.

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nder the guidance of the Director of Rowing, Mr Michael Smith, the Grammar Boatshed continues to thrive. The 2008/2009 season saw a record number of boys wanting to participate in the sport. The Junior Shed had a good season with all crews racing competitively in their weekly regattas. Particularly noteworthy performances included the 5th and 1st Year 8 Quads who achieved 1st and 2nd place respectively in Division 1 of the Gold Cup Regatta. At the Head of the River Regatta, the 3rd VIII placed third and, after dominating all season, the 1st Year 10 VIII won its event. The 1st VIII went into the Head of the River Regatta ranked second on point score. As expected, Shore won, but it was the competition for the minor places which was attracting all the attention. We narrowly missed the podium by finishing fourth. The Swimmers had a good season

with the junior team finishing 4th, the intermediate team finishing 3rd and the senior team 6th. We had 13 boys selected to represent the GPS at the Combined Independent Schools carnival. Tom O'Neill was selected as the Captain of the GPS team. Ben Schafer broke School and GPS records in both the Butterfly and Individual Medley and along with John O'Neill, Reiji Sano and James Mok set a new GPS record in the 14s Freestyle Relay. This relay team went through the season undefeated. Basketball continues to develop across all the age groups, with 40 teams taking to the court each week. In the Opens the 5ths had a particularly good season losing only one game out of fourteen. The 1sts and 2nds toiled manfully throughout and the 1sts were particularly unlucky to lose to King's by only one point. This was backed up with another tight result against Riverview the following week. We

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were fortunate to have at our disposal a number of high quality coaches who contributed to improved skill levels and a focused approach across the age groups. We have a good base for the open teams next year. The Cricket Club had another enjoyable summer. For our senior teams, it was a season of transition. The 1st XI and 2nd XI lost many of their senior players from last season but this presented an opportunity for the next generation of cricketers. The 1st XI had a strong end to the season winning two of their last three matches. The highlights for the 2nd XI were their thrilling onerun win against Newington and their epic outright victory over High. The 15A XI had a successful season, recording an impressive four victories. A most pleasing aspect of the season was the depth in the Form I teams. Grammar fielded five teams in the 13s and all of the teams

produced promising results. This season we successfully used specialist coaches from Sydney University Cricket Club who provided the boys with great assistance in developing their core skills. In tennis we saw mixed results, particularly for the Open teams. In the younger age groups there are some quite encouraging developments; the new 13s players have shown determination and quite a bit of talent, not unlike their predecessors who now make up the 15s. In all age groups, there has been some excellent development of skills thanks to natural talent and the work of some very dedicated coaches. The Firsts and Seconds had a difficult time with injuries, illness and a relatively inexperienced group of players; to their credit a number of the new players looked past the weekly challenges and were able to match ­ or in some cases surpass ­ much stronger opposition. Particular mention must be

made of the efforts of our number one and two players, James Fermanis and Thomas Berrigan, both of whom gained selection in GPS tennis teams.

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Scholarships ­ a great start in life

Erica Aronsten, Director of Development, presents the second in a series of articles on former recipients of scholarships at the School.

Brian Dickey (OS 1956) Brian Dickey came to Sydney Grammar School from Hurstville Primary School on a full scholarship in 1951. The offer had come after success in the scholarship exams for which he had been well prepared. Brian describes himself at the time of his arrival at the School as `a podgy eleven year old reliant on glasses, with limited social experience and knowing nothing of the private school social scene'. He soon discovered that the A classes were fiercely competitive. History excited him as a way of entering the lives of people from the past. Alec Hill, then Senior History Master, encouraged him to think for himself using a tried and true technique ­ the liberal use of the red pencil. According to Brian, when it came to the Modern History Honours syllabus, `Alec Hill was brilliant at helping us to grasp the material and express it clearly'. Later Alec Hill was to become a mentor for Brian, a friendship that endured until Alec Hill's death last year. Brian's Leaving Certificate results in 1955 included first place in the Ancient History Honours list and third in Modern History. He was 36th in the State overall. A second Sixth form in 1956 saw Brian serve as a prefect and culminated with his award as Captain of the School (Dux of the School in literary subjects). Brian went on to Sydney University, followed by Cambridge: at both he was awarded first class honours in history. Later, he graduated with a PhD in history from the Australia National University and commenced a career as an academic historian which lasted for thirty-three years. In retirement, his time is spent researching and writing on the subject that has been his lifelong passion ­ history. For Brian, his time at Sydney Grammar School `picked me up and transformed my life, setting me on a path from which I have never deviated'. Bryan Gaensler (OS 1990) Bryan Gaensler was awarded the Sir Norman Cowper Scholarship at Grammar in 1985. He is currently a professor of astronomy and a Federation Fellow at The University of Sydney. Bryan writes: `An entrance scholarship made it possible for me to attend Sydney Grammar. This opened up a huge window of opportunity, because the SGS experience taught me two key life lessons from which I continue to benefit. `First, the teachers at College Street taught me the value of hard work. In primary school, I had coasted a lot of the time. But at Grammar the standards were high and the classes were challenging; the message quickly got through that success comes not merely from being clever, but from having motivation, perseverance and a solid work ethic. Much of what I have subsequently achieved has come from repeatedly applying these foundations to fresh challenges. `What Grammar also taught me is that learning is about breadth, not just depth. Already in primary school I had decided to be an astronomer, and for high school I had planned to focus my energy solely on maths and physics. However, the subjects offered at SGS and the way they were taught made me realise that there was much more on offer. At Grammar I was given the chance to translate Cicero and Aristophanes, to sing Schubert and Haydn, and to debate the meaning of Les Murray's poems with Murray himself. Only at Grammar could I have accumulated such experiences. I emerged not just with my enthusiasm for science intact, but also with an appreciation of the richness of human experience in all its forms. Most of my interests and passions today come from seeds planted during those six years at College Street. And I am just one of hundreds of students who down the years have received such a scholarship.'

Brian Dickey OS 1956) at the 1986 launch of his book Rations, Residence, Resources: a History of Social Welfare in South Australia since 1836

Photo courtesy K Roche Turner/ L Louey Gung

Bryan Gaensler (OS 1990)

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Postcards

Erica Aronsten, Director of Development, brings us the third in a series of postcards with news of the movements and achievements of Old Boys around the world.

David Freeman

Stephen Lloyd (OS 1974) Stephen credits his then Headmaster, Alastair Mackerras, and teachers Peter Seymour and Tod Piekos for encouraging his early interest in music. Looking back, he sees his time at the School as a defining moment in terms of his future career. His big break came in 1980 when, as a recipient of the Marten Bequest Scholarship, he left Australia for Europe to pursue his music career studying the flute in Manchester and conducting in Vienna. Here, he divided his time between his two passions ­ music and tennis. Stephen had been a champion tennis player at school and now, with his postgraduate studies behind him, he was able to indulge his passion for the sport ­ playing on the international circuit. However, music won out in the end. Today Stephen is based in Italy at the geographically and culturally elevated location of Brixen/Bressanone in Südtirol. As the music director of South Tyrol's only professional German speaking theatre since 1994, Stephen divides his time between composing, arranging and

conducting. Here in Bolzano, Stephen was jointly responsible for a series of internationally recognised productions, Die Dreigroschenoper, West Side Story and Into The Woods. He is currently rehearsing this year's production, Cabaret. He also finds time to conduct school concerts with the regional Orchestra Haydn where he still draws on the influence of Peter Seymour. Together with his wife Irene, also an accomplished musician, he is both founder and artistic director of South Tyrol's first youth orchestra. He tells us that his three children are a continual source of joy and inspiration.

million cable stayed bridge which closely resembles the Anzac bridge in Sydney. For Matthew, the main challenge posed by the project was finding solutions to project problems without the backup of networks and facilities we are used to in Australia. For him, living in such an old and culturally rich country can be rewarding, but not without considerable frustration. He is however confident that with the current rapid expansion of technical knowledge and experience, major projects will be completed with progressively more and more local participation.

Matthew Duly (OS 1973) Matthew's life is about bridging the technical and commercial divide in a developing country with a very old and sophisticated culture. Matthew has worked with Baulderstone since 1990, and spent three years living and working in Vietnam starting in 1996. He returned to Ho Chi Minh City two years ago to work as Commercial Director on a $150

Stephen Lloyd

Matthew Duly

David Freeman (OS 1969) An outstanding cast, exotic beasts, dancing animals and death defying stunts are all part of the magic of Opera Australia's 2009 season's production of Mozart's The Magic Flute, directed by David Freeman. David's stellar career can be traced back to 1973 when, just four years after leaving school, he formed his own company, Opera Factory. In 1975, he travelled to Germany on a German government exchange scholarship and then to Switzerland, where he founded Opera Factory Zurich (1976-1995, 22 productions). He founded Opera Factory London (1982-1998, 24 productions) and in 1991, Opera Factory Films for which he directed The Marriage of Figaro for television. Today, the world is his stage. Notable opera productions include Aventures and Eight Songs for a Mad King at the Théâtre du Châtelet, conducted by Pierre Boulez and Auber's Manon Lescaut at the Opéra Comique in Paris. In Germany he directed Ligeti's Le Grand Macabre and in Russia he directed Prokofiev's The Fiery Angel at the Kirov (now Mariinsky) Opera St. Petersburg, conducted by Valery Gergiev. In the USA continued overleaf

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continued from previous page he directed the American premiere of Glass's Akhnaten in Houston and New York. In the United Kingdom he directed a new opera, Gaddafi, presented in the 2006/2007 season for English National Opera and La Bohème for Opera North. Theatre includes The Winter's Tale for the opening season of Shakespeare's Globe in London and both parts of Goethe's Faust, starring Simon Callow in the title role. In 2004 he returned to Australia to direct Twelfth Night for the Bell Shakespeare Company. Subsequent productions in Australia such as Nabucco for the Queensland Opera have also met with critical acclaim. Forthcoming and recent work includes revivals of his outstanding commercial productions of Madama Butterfly, Tosca and Carmen in the Royal Albert Hall, London, a new production of Wozzeck in Brussels, and the modern premiere of Vivaldi's L'Incoronazione di Dario for Garsington Opera, where he returns for another Vivaldi re-discovery in 2011.

Photo courtesy DFAT

Thomas Barlow with his son, Blue

Peter Rowe (OS 1968) Peter writes to us from the Australian Embassy in Seoul as our Ambassador to the Republic of Korea and ranks as a senior officer in the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. In that role he travels regularly to Mongolia and North Korea, for which he also has responsibility. A career diplomat, Peter has had numerous postings throughout Southeast Asia. Prior to his current position he was Deputy Head of Mission, Australian Embassy, Jakarta. In the years before that posting he was Assistant Secretary, North East Asia Branch, handling relations between Japan and Korea. His diplomatic career began in Canberra where he gained valuable experience which served to heighten his interest in Asia. This culminated in a position with the Office of National Assessments, where he held responsibility for Korea and China and acted as head of the Asia Branch. Overseas, Peter has also held many senior positions including that of High Commissioner to Sri Lanka. On leaving school, Peter gained a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Sydney. It comes as no surprise to learn that he speaks both Korean and Chinese.

Thomas Barlow (OS 1988) Two years ago, Picador published Thomas Barlow's decidedly anti-government book about innovation and the Australian character, The Australian Miracle. This wry polemic advocated a much lighter touch from government, especially in industry and science policy. So it is ironic that Thomas has become a strategic advisor to many of Australia's leading research organisations, most of which are at least partly dependent upon governments for financial support. Thomas works as a research and development strategist. This means he advises universities, high-tech companies, and even governments themselves about international trends in science and technology. He has a unique expertise in understanding the distribution of scientific activity globally and in analysing the impacts of government policy upon the Australian research community. He also publishes a major study every two years on the state of research in Australian universities. Thomas has certainly had a colourful career. He has previously been a biomedical researcher, an Oxford Fellow, a columnist with The Financial Times in London, a screenwriter, and a political advisor within the Howard Government.

Peter Rowe

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Scott Dillon

Giovanni with José Ramos Horta

Giovanni Trambaiolo (OS 1999) It was the opportunity to go to Paris while at School, and subsequently teach at the same school in France for a year in 2000, that first sparked Giovanni's interest in working abroad. His love of the French language (thanks to teachers José Pavis and Gilles Berger) was later to lead him to embark on a Master's degree in International Humanitarian Law in France and then to qualify for various jobs in the diplomatic field both in New York and Geneva. His interest in working in international assistance and development came several years earlier in his career when studying for a degree in Physiotherapy. At that time, he practised as a physiotherapist in remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory, and in Cambodia. Having completed a post-graduate diploma in French, European and International Law in Aix-en-Provence and his Master's degree in Humanitarian Law, he went on to two internships. The second of these was undertaken at the Australian Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York. This has brought Giovanni into contact with world figures such as Jose Ramos Horta. In December 2008, he began working at the Headquarters of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, Switzerland. Giovanni insists that his success to date would never have been possible without the opportunities presented to him as a recipient of a scholarship to Sydney Grammar School. Giovanni's brother, Daniel (OS 1997), also benefited from a scholarship to the School.

Guy Degen (OS 1990) Guy read History and Australian Literature at Sydney University and soon after graduating returned to College Street as an Assistant Master teaching History. Writing school reports can be a chore, but it started Guy thinking about journalism. After leaving the School in 1997, he backpacked around the USA, Europe and Africa and also taught History in London at a small preparatory school. Volunteering at the Sydney community radio station 2SER gave Guy the opportunity for hands-on experience in broadcasting and journalism. He now lives in Bonn, Germany and travels widely working as a freelance multimedia journalist in Africa, Central Asia and the Caucasus. Guy finds journalism and the craft of storytelling hugely rewarding. He is a regular contributor to English programming at Deutsche Welle, Germany's international broadcaster. His reports are often re-broadcast overnight or on weekends in Australia via ABC NewsRadio. More recently, Guy has also returned to the classroom to train journalists in developing countries. Log onto to Guy's blog www. notesfromthefield.typepad.com to read more about his travels and reports.

Guy Degen filming homeless youth in Niamey, Niger, April 2008

Scott Dillon (OS 1945) If you were into surfing as a teenager in the 1960's, chances are you owned a Scott Dillon surfboard. You would have been in good company, as most of the surfing greats such as future world champion, Robert `Nat' Young, also rode a Dillon board. Scott Dillon made his name as a designer and builder of surfboards at Bondi in 1956, before moving to the northern Sydney suburb of Brookvale where he opened his first surfboard making factory. Many leading surfers began their careers by shaping and finishing their surfboards at Scott Dillon's factory including Mick Dooley, Peter and Jimmy Pike, Warrick Smith and Gordon Merchant ­ founder of international surf clothing company Billabong. Scott based his knowledge of surfboards on first hand experience as he took on the big waves at the Queenscliff bombora in 1963 and monster surf at Bare Island in 1963-64. Around that era, he was also the subject of many photographs on big swells at Fairy Bower and North Narrabeen Scott did not restrict his exploits to surfing alone. A successful boxer in his younger years, he narrowly missed being chosen to represent Australia at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland. Later, he became known for his skills as a professional spear fisherman. He also took on the race track, becoming a high ranking speedway driver at the Sydney Showground and Liverpool Speedways. Having recently celebrated his 80th birthday, Scott shows no sign of slowing down. Now located at Coff's Harbour, he runs the unique and highly successful Legends Surf Museum. In 2004, Scott was inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame as one of the true original six legends of the Australian surfing industry.

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June 2009

OSU DINNER TO LAUNCH THE OLD SYDNEIANS' ROOM

Friday 4 September 2009 will mark a milestone in the history of the OSU with the official opening of The Old Sydneians' Room in the newly refurbished Weigall Pavilion. The project has received the strong support of the OSU, which made a most generous donation and ongoing pledge towards the project. OSU Patron, The Hon. Sir Anthony Mason AC, KBE will unveil a plaque to mark the occasion. The guest speaker this year will be award-winning financial journalist, Mr Michael West (OS 1980). Michael is now Business Editor of the Sydney Morning Herald. Be one of the first Michael West to dine in The Old Sydneians' Room! Numbers are limited. Contact Wendy Scotter for more information or to secure a table. Telephone: (02) 9332 5888 or email: [email protected]

Old Sydneians' Union

OLD SYDNEIANS UK BRANCH ANNUAL DINNER

James Aitken (OS 1988), Hon. Secretary, writes: The 2008 Old Sydneians (UK branch) annual dinner was held on Friday 31 October 2008 at The Oxford and Cambridge Club, hosted as usual by our President, Adrian Jack. This year's dinner was notable for several reasons: the absence of our great friends Ken Deane (OS 1941) and Ian Wyness (OS 1954) for the first time since 1979, the former because he was travelling and the latter due to ill health (we drank a toast to them both); the number of sleeper Old Sydneians here in the UK we located over the past year, several of whom attended; and overall, the largest number of younger members many of us could recall. Yet again it was an excellent opportunity for new and old friends to catch up and talk about the School and the world. For many of us, the discussion continued well into the following morning and was a welcome break from the financial markets in which many of us remain heavily involved. Our youngest guest, Andrew Maloy (OS 2006) had the task of updating us about recent developments at the School and did a masterful job. Our President entertained us with the history of the Princess Marie-Louise suite and Philip Parr (1979), who went to extraordinary lengths to attend, sensibly revived the idea of an Old Sydneians UK cricket team for the summer of 2009. We encourage all readers of Foundations magazine who may be aware of Old Sydneians living here in the UK, or indeed might be passing through to get in touch. Our summer BBQ will be held on Sunday 12 July 2009 at the home of James Aitken in Wimbledon. The Annual Dinner will be held earlier this year on Friday 2 October 2009 at the Oxford and Cambridge Club. For further details contact James Aitken at [email protected]

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MEMORIAL ASSEMBLY FOR ALEC HILL AM MBE

The Big School Room was filled to capacity on Tuesday 18 November 2008 for an assembly to remember former master and Old Sydneian, Alec Hill AM, MBE. Over two hundred Old Sydneians attended the event including the President of the OSU, Mr Leon Shohmelian. Among the distinguished guests were Mrs Patsy Hill, Lt General David Hurley AO DSC and Mrs Hurley, Dr Tim Healey, Mr Harry Macdonald OAM and Mrs Macdonald, and Chairman of Trustees, Mr David Gonski AC. Both Lt Gen Hurley and Dr Tim Healey spoke eloquently of their long association and friendship with Mr Hill. The Headmaster spoke of the many facets of Mr Hill's life as a teacher, academic, author and noted historian. He reflected on the way Mr Hill had been such a positive influence on so many lives. This is perhaps best summed up by Lt Gen (Ret'd) John Grey AC, who sent a moving tribute to his friend and mentor: Alec Hill was my school master and officer commanding when I was a member of the SGS Cadet Corps. He was largely responsible for me entering the Royal Military College, Duntroon, and pursuing a successful military career. My world has been a better place for the privilege of knowing him and being one of his boys. Another tribute was received from Professor John Wade of Bond University in Queensland. For him, being taught modern history by Alec Hill was: a vigorous and memorable experience. He taught me how to research and write with some clarity and challenged my tendency to say that `near enough is good enough.' During the morning tea which followed the event, guests were invited to sign a memorial book for Alec Hill which will be kept in the School Archives. A fitting end to the day was the presentation to the School by Mrs Hill of a collection of antiquarian books from Alec Hill's personal library.

QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY AND AUSTRALIA DAY AND AWARD RECIPIENTS, 2008/2009

We congratulate the following Old Sydneians who have recently been recognised with awards: Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) The Hon. Professor Peter E Baume AC (OS 1951) ­ for services to advancing higher education and services to the community through various leadership roles Member of the Order of Australia (AM) David M Freeman AM (OS 1968) ­ for service to the Jewish community ­ especially through the development of hospital and aged care facilities in Sydney Professor Phillip J Harris AM (OS 1962) ­ for service to medicine in the field of cardiology as a clinician, administrator and educator Russell A Watts AM (OS 1945-46) ­ for service to conservation and the environment Order of Australia Medal (OAM) Murray A Clarke (OS 1972) ­ for services to rowing, in particular as a coach and administrator, and to the community Robert H Lytton (OS 1945) for service to the community of Forbes

Dr Ray Hyslop signing the memorial book

Colonel Kenneth S McKenzie DSM (Ret'd) (OS 1942) ­ for service to the welfare of ex-service personnel and their families through the RSL

Robert and Patricia Grant signing the memorial book

Gordon L McMaster (OS 1953) ­ for service to the merino wool industry and the kelpie working sheep dog industry Kevin A Meyer (OS 1943) ­ through a range of roles in welfare, charitable, sporting and service organisations and to the banking industry

(L to R) Dr Tim Healey, Mrs Patsy Hill, Mrs Linda Hurley, Lt Gen David Hurley and the Headmaster

Russell A Murray (OS 1949) ­ for service to the community of Sussex Inlet (since deceased).

James Barkell and John Sheldon

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June 2009

60TH ANNIVERSARY BRINGS CLASS OF 1948 BACK TO THE SCHOOL

The class of 1948 returned to the School for lunch on Monday 2 December 2008 to celebrate their 60th anniversary. The Headmaster was on hand both to welcome the group and to thank them for their leadership and support with regard to the School's means-tested scholarship fund. The closely-knit group normally meet for lunch each year at a function hosted by Maurice Green at the Greenwood Hotel at North Sydney. This year, given the significance of the event, the lunch was held at College Street in the Wallace King Room. Among the fifty-five Old Sydneians in attendance were Maurice Green AM, Professor Tom Taylor, Ray Chegwyn, Doug Golding, Don Sams, Bryan Mason, Stan Edwards, Barry Trumper and Alan Hislop. Guests from the USA included Peter Swift and Professor Ross Davis. Queensland was well represented with John Parkinson, Charlie Spencer, George Prince and David Barnett. Another interstate guest was Tony Hall from the ACT. Allistair Hazard proved to be a congenial MC. In keeping with the informal proceedings of the day, speakers included Professor Jim McLeod, David Einfeld and Rodney Knock who is also a former master at the School. Many of those present recognised themselves in photographs on display at the lunch which showed various sporting teams, masters, prefects and other memorabilia from their years at Grammar.

ROSEVILLE PRIMARY SCHOOL: FOUR SCHOLARS IN ONE YEAR!

When we think of boys coming to the School on a scholarship we tend to focus on the boys and their achievements, but we often neglect to acknowledge those behind the scenes. The year was 1933. The Headmaster of what was then known as Roseville Primary Practice School was Mr FW Alldis. Times were tough and the Great Depression was biting hard. Unemployment was at an all time high and children were often forced to leave school early, only to face the reality of dismal employment prospects. Fortunately for the boys at Roseville Primary Practice School, Mr Alldis was no ordinary Headmaster. He was a visionary, a man with a passionate belief in the potential of his pupils and four in particular: Sidney Noble, Peter Perry, Alan Prowse and Bevan Mitchell. The boys were all in the top class and Mr Alldis believed that they had what it took to try for a scholarship at Sydney Grammar School. The parents of the boys supported their sons in this endeavour, even though the chance of winning a scholarship to a school like Grammar seemed a remote possibility. As the record shows, all four boys won a scholarship to Grammar. Whether Mr Alldis had similar success at other schools is unknown, but it is unlikely that the record of four boys from one school winning a scholarship to Grammar has been equalled to this day. Bevan Mitchell as a boy

OS OLYMPIAN A POPULAR GUEST SPEAKER

The annual 1945-46 lunch, held on Friday 28 November, had the added attraction of an Olympian for a guest speaker: Lachlan Renshaw (OS 2005), who competed in the 2008 Beijing Olympic games. In introducing him, Convenor David Hunt spoke of Lachlan's impressive record as an athlete both at School and beyond. Lachlan is currently the Australian 800m champion. Prior to taking part in the 2008 Olympics, he represented Australia at the 2006 World Junior Championships and the World University Games in 2007. Lachlan impressed his audience with details of his rigorous training programme and answered a seemingly endless series of questions. Among those attending the lunch were regulars: Bruce Storey, John Allman, Brian Cotton, Alan and Ian Doust, Hamish Grieve, Robert Holland, Tom Hughes, Jim Marr, Tom Savage, Bruce Taylor and Pat Tingwell. We were especially pleased to see interstate guest, Michael Hanlon AM, and those attending for the first time including Dennis Arnold and John Clifton.

Vic Middleton, Lachlan Renshaw, the Headmaster, David Hunt and Bruce Storey Peter Swift (New York) and Ross Davis (Florida)

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OSU VICTORIAN BRANCH

The Victorian Branch of the OSU once again held two functions during the year, an informal lunchtime gathering on 20 June 2008 at the Old Kingdom Restaurant in Fitzroy (famed for its Beijing Duck) and its traditional annual dinner at The Athenaeum Club on 16 October 2008. The members were pleased to welcome as their special guest to the annual dinner the President of the OSU, Leon Shohmelian. The occasion provided Leon with an opportunity to outline the activities of the OSU, the role he sees for the branches and his ideas for the development of new activities, aimed at engaging the wide range of interests of OSU members. This was greatly appreciated by those present as evidenced by the lively discussion which followed. The Victorian Branch aims to provide opportunities for the growing numbers of Old Sydneians living in Victoria to maintain their link with the School. Those moving south are encouraged to make contact with the Branch.

HAVE YOU CONSIDERED A GIFT TO THE SCHOLARSHIP FUND?

By giving your support, you could enable a talented boy, whose family would otherwise be unable to pay the fees, a chance to take advantage of all that Sydney Grammar School can offer. Imagine how that could change a young man's life! Gifts and pledges to this fund are tax deductible. For further information, contact Erica Aronsten on (02) 9332 5708.

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REMEMBERING JAMES BRIDGLAND (OS 1938)

James (Jim) Bridgland had a long and close association with his old school. He was OSU President from 1972-74 and served as a Trustee from 1973-1981. On his passing in 2004 he bequeathed a gift to the School, expressing a desire to be remembered at the Weigall ground, a place of special significance for him. A garden bench with a plaque in his memory is to be placed at the ground.

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All Old Boy enquiries If you have any enquiries please contact Wendy Scotter in the Development Office Tel +61 2 9332 5888 | Fax +61 2 9332 5866 | Email [email protected]

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Foundations is produced by the Sydney

Grammar School Foundation Limited College St, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010 Telephone +61 2 9332 5877 Facsimile +61 2 9332 5866 Email [email protected] Front cover photograph: Regatta day Photo courtesy Jerry Hutchins Back cover photograph: Concerto Concert Photo courtesy Mike Marshall

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