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AN OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH TRAINING SERIES FOR HIGH HAZARD INDUSTRIES

© 2004 Courage Safety Systems, LLC., San Clemente, CA 92673 Tel: (800) 673-7569 Company Name:________________ Dept:________ Location:_______________ Date:_______

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#4

HEAD PROTECTION FROM IMPACT, FALLING OR FLYING OBJECTS AND ELECTRICAL BURNS

Employees working in areas where there is a possible danger of head injury from impact, or from falling or flying objects, or from electrical shock and burns shall be protected by protective helmets. Thousands of head injuries each year occur in the construction industry. This standard requires employees to wear "hard hats" to mitigate or lessen the effects of being struck by an object, accidentally striking their heads against an object or making contact with an energized electrical line. It needs to be emphasized that this standard is not just for employees that work at sites where there is a possibility of falling objects striking them in the head, i.e. workers on lower levels of a multi-story building project which are exposed to falling materials such as hand tools, bolts, nuts, etc. But it is also intended for employees who work in the vicinity of an operation or other workers that create the potential for objects to become accidentally airborne. These flying objects are sometimes the result of an unintended energy release while using power tools, pushing, pulling or prying or almost any typical operation that is found on a construction site. These types of energy releases are common to almost all construction operations and are not predictable. Almost all construction operations involve the potential of falling and flying objects, and therefore, employees must wear head protection. Additionally, many impact hazards exist. For instance, ironworkers are constantly exposed to striking their heads on structural steel during erection, carpenters strike their heads on temporary framing lumber as they move through a building, etc. Employees that work in the vicinity of electrical conductors are exposed to potential shocks and burns to the head should they contact an uninsulated conductor. The employer must determine which employees face possible head injuries and must wear appropriate head protection. OSHA has no exhaustive guidelines for determining when head protection must be worn. A case-by-case analysis must be performed be the employer.

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Filling Instructions: Copies of this "Tailgate Talk" should be filed in employer's safety training records and crossreferenced in each employee safety-training file. This is intended as a guide only- all rights reserved.

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"TAILGATE TALKS"~ SAFETY MEETING SUBJECTS

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