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TEACHER'S EDITION · MAy 10, 2010

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Issue dates

SEPT. 7 JAN. 11 SEPT. 21 JAN. 25 OCT. 5 FEB. 8 OCT. 19 FEB. 22 NOV. 2 MAR. 8 NOV. 16 & 30 MAR. 22 DEC. 14 APR. 12 JAN. 11 APR. 26 JAN. 25 MAY 10

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Vol. 58 · No. 17 · ISSN 0036-6412 · A SupplemeNt to ScholAStIc Scope

Dear Teachers,

The finish line is in view as the school year comes to a close. Pat yourself on the back for doing one of the hardest and most important jobs a person can do--teaching young people to read, write, think, and connect with the world. Our staff is already excited about the next publishing year. With a fresh look and new and improved features in the magazine and on our Web site, Scope is more interactive than ever. From our new Writer's Workshop in the magazine with a corresponding PowerPoint online, to our expanded nonfiction articles and SCOPE 100 crossword puzzle, we continue to provide you with the tools you need to engage your students. We would love to get your feedback about the new features. You can e-mail us at [email protected] Don't forget to renew your subscription for next year! Call 1-800-schOLasTIc or go to www.scholastic.com/classmags to renew. Have a great summer and we'll see you in the fall!

In tHIS teaCHeR'S edItIon:

t-2 ......................... InSIde tHe ISSue:

Standards & Supplements

t-3 .............. LeSSon 1: the last Airbender t-3 ............ LeSSon 2: Alexander the Great t-4 .................................. ANSWeR KeY t-5 ..................... GRaPHIC oRGanIZeR:

the 5 W's of Alexander the Great

t-6 ............. SKILLS PaGe: Word Wrangling T-7 ....................... wRIteR'S tooLBoX:

d tHIS ISSue onLIne

scholastic.com/scope

crafting conclusions t-8 .............. SKILLS PaGe: The Scope 100

Lucy Lehrer, Executive Editor

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· Become a fan of Scope on FaCeBooK--and get a FRee play! facebook.com/ScholasticScope · 17 FREE standards-based reproducibles for articles in this issue (available April 26) · POWerPOINT on persuasive writing! · VIdeo on Alexander the Great

this teacher's edition is available online.

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G IN DIST

InSIde tHe ISSue: May 10, 2010

article

the News, p. 2

Skills & Standards

· reading for information Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 11

online Materials

· reading-comprehension quiz

The Issue: Should Orcas Be Kept in captivity?, p. 4

· forming an opinion · critical thinking Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5

· reading-comprehension quiz

The Interview: Spider-Man Speaks, p. 6 Readers Theater Play: the last airbender, p. 8

(lesson, p. t-3)

· reading for information Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 · plot, character, setting, and tone · fluency and expression · reading comprehension Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5 · reading comprehension · interpreting a map· reading for information · crosscurricular reading · vocabulary acquisition Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 · setting · plot · character · reading comprehension · point of view Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 · organizing · editing · critical thinking · using conventions · conducting research · developing an argument Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 12 · reading comprehension Ncte standards 1, 2, 3

· BONUs! Get the full interview and a post-reading quiz! · interviewing a fictitious character

· summarizing · character analysis

Nonfiction: Alexander the Great: Master of the ancient World, p. 14

(lesson, p. t-3)

· NeW FeaTUre! Pre-Reading Video Clip! · reading-comprehension quiz · terms to Know · making predictions · reading-comprehension quiz · BONUs! Get the scoop on all the characters. · NeW FeaTUre! Persuasive Writing PowerPoint! · fill-in-the-blank outline · using clear thinking

Scope Serial: Love & Salamanders, p. 18 Writer's Workshop: Go ahead, convince Me!, p. 20

(crafting conclusions, p. t-7)

activities: test Prep, p. 22

· making connections short-answer quiz

activities: your turn, p. 23

· interpreting text · visual literacy · write in response to reading Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 5, 11

· how to write a headline

Activities: the ScoPE 100, p. 24

(Scope Skills, p. t-8)

· vocabulary acquisition · context clues Ncte standards 1, 2, 3, 6

· SAt prep · fill-in-the-blank sentences · vocabulary quiz (antonyms)

nCte & IRa MIddLe-SCHooL CuRRICuLuM StandaRdS

1. Range of materials. 2. Range of literary works. 3. Range of reading strategies. 4. Adjust use of language to communicate effectively. 5. Range of writing strategies. 6. Knowledge of language conventions. 7. conduct research, gather data, and communicate findings. 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources. 9. understand and respect diversity of language use across cultures. 10. english-language learners use their first language for english fluency. 11. participate as reflective, creative members of literacy community. 12. use written language to achieve own goals.

T-2 ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN · May 10, 2010

Lesson

1

Readers theater play: The Last Airbender, p. 8

seen the animated television series on which the movie is based. You might also watch the movie trailer online. 3. What does Sokka mean when he says the way to win a war is "by fighting on the big fronts and on the inside"? What does Sokka hope to do by visiting villages? (Answers will vary, but Sokka means something like, it is important to get the public's support and involvement-- you can't leave a war entirely to the army. He wants to embolden the members of the other three nations to stand up to the Fire Nation.)

IntRoduCtIon & SuMMaRy

It is up to a 13-year-old boy to save the world in Scope's adaptation of M. Night Shyamalan's upcoming movie, The Last Airbender. The action-adventure fantasy tells the story of Aang, the current incarnation of the "Avatar," a deity in human form. It is the Avatar's job to keep peace among the world's four nations, each of which is connected to one of the four elements--air, water, earth, and fire. Unfortunately, the Fire Nation is set on world domination, and young Aang still has a lot to learn. The film opens on July 2.

dISCuSSIon

1. Explain what the Avatar is in this play. Has there been just one Avatar, or have there been many? (The Avatar can control all four elements and is responsible for keeping peace among the world's four nations and the spirit realm. There has been just one Avatar, but the Avatar has been reincarnated many times, as different humans.) 2. Why did Aang run away from the monks at the Southern Air Temple? (He was upset at being told that he could never fall in love or have a family.) How would you feel if someone told you what the monks told Aang? (Answers will vary.)

eXtenSIon: Creative Writing

Ask students to imagine that they can "bend" one of the four elements. Have them write a story, set in the present, about how they use their special ability.

oBjeCtIVe

To practice fluency and expression

anCHoR aCtIVItIeS

Ask if any of your students have

Resources: For worksheets listed in the grid (p. T-2), go to scholastic .com/scope.

Lesson

2

Nonfiction: alexander the Great: Master of the Ancient World, p. 14

on scholastic.com/scope. As a class, fill in the first column. (Students will complete the chart during and after reading the excerpt.) He killed Batis for failing to kneel.) 3. Does Alexander remind you of anyone else you've read about? (Answers will vary.)

IntRoduCtIon

In this excerpt from Alexander the Great: Master of the Ancient World, your students will read about the Macedonian king who conquered the Persian Empire and fancied himself a demigod.

dISCuSSIon

1. What does the phrase "bristling like porcupines" in the first paragraph make you picture? Why do you think the author chose this simile? ("Bristling" means "thick with stiff hairs" as well as "angry." The simile paints a powerful picture of intimidating soldiers. If the weapons are the porcupines' quills, then the soldiers are well-armed and ready to fight.) 2. How does Alexander respond to respect? (It's very important to him.

eXtenSIon: Write a Diary

Ask students to imagine that they are soldiers in Alexander's army. Have them choose one scene described in the article, such as Alexander getting injured or digging a tunnel under Gaza's walls. Then ask them to write a very detailed first-person diary account of what happened.

oBjeCtIVeS

To read for information; to acquire vocabulary

anCHoR aCtIVItIeS

Play the video clip on scholastic .com/scope, and ask the class what they think of it. What kind of person is Alexander the Great? What is he known for? Next, pass out the Terms to Know worksheet

Resources: For worksheets listed in the grid (p. T-2) and a pre-reading video, go to scholastic.com/scope.

EDITORIAL: executive editor: lucy lehrer · Senior editors: Jennifer Dignan, Kristin lewis · online Reproducibles Writer: Robbin Friedman · copy editors: Veronica majerol, Ingrid Accardi · executive editor, media: marie morreale · ART: Design Director: Felix Batcup · photo editor: lois Safrani · PRODUCTION: production editor: William mcDonald · Digital Imager: marc Stern · MAGAZINE GROUP: president, Scholastic classroom & library Group: Greg Worrell · Vp, editor in chief: Rebecca Bondor · creative Director: Judith christ-lafond · executive production Director: Barbara Schwartz · executive editorial Director, copy Desk: craig moskowitz · publishing System Director: David hendrickson · executive Director of photography: Steven Diamond · Senior Administrative coordinator: mirtha Williams · Reference librarian : Karen Van Rossem · CIRCULATION & MARKETING: Vp, marketing: Jocelyn Forman · marketing manager: leslie tevlin · MANUFACTURING & DISTRIBUTION: Director: mimi esguerra · manufacturing coordinator: Georgiana Deen · CORPORATE: president, chief exec. officer, and chairman of the Board of Scholastic Inc.: Richard Robinson

May 10, 2010 · ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN T-3

schO La sT I c s c O P e s k I L L s

GraPhIc OrGaNIzer

Name: _____________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

wHo are the major characters?

wHat is the article mostly about?

wHeRe do the events take place?

wHen do the events take place?

"Alexander the Great: Master of the ancient World," excerpted from the book by Doug Wilhelm

wHy do the events take place?

May 10, 2010 · ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN T-5

uSeS: copY mAchINe, opAque pRoJectoR, oR tRANSpAReNcY mASteR FoR oVeRheAD pRoJectoR. ScholAStIc INc. GRANtS SuBScRIBeRS oF ScholAStIc Scope peRmISSIoN to RepRoDuce thIS pAGe FoR uSe IN theIR clASSRoomS. copYRIGht © 2010 BY ScholAStIc INc. All RIGhtS ReSeRVeD.

directions: Fill in the graphic organizer below to organize the who, what, where, when, and why of the article "Alexander the Great: Master of the Ancient World."

The 5 W's of alexander the Great

available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

IllustratIon: Mark suMMers

schO La sT I c s c O P e s k I L L s

ReuSa

BLe

SKILL: Spelling

Name: _____________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Word Wrangling

directions: Some words in the English language often get mixed up, such as "it's" and "its" and "complement" and "compliment." In the following sentences about Asian Pacific American heritage Month, circle the correct word from the pairs in bold. Need a hint? Use a dictionary.

available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

1. In/Inn the United States, Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month is celebrated each May. 2. The celebration pays tribute to the contributions made/maid by people of Asian and Pacific Islander decent/descent. 3. Many aspects of American culture half/have been influenced by/bye Asian cultures; four/fore/for example, some English words, such as "tycoon" and "guru," originated in Asian languages. 4. The first Chinese immigrants arrived in the U.S. in 1849. Like many others, these immigrants were lead/led to California by the allure of gold, which/witch had just been discovered there/they're/their. 5. In 1869, thousands more/moor arrived to help build/billed the transcontinental railroad; unfortunately, they weren't paid/payed a lot/alot, even though the work was grueling. 6. The laborers who were all ready/already in California felt threatened by the Chinese workers; the U.S. passed/past the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 to curb immigration. 7. In spite of the mini/many hardships and obstacles they faced, Asian-Americans proceeded/preceded to build bustling and successful communities in the U.S. 8. The first Asian-American to/too/two serve in Congress was Dalip Singh Saund in 1956. 9. In 1992, figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi became the first Asian-American to win a gold metal/medal at the Olympics. 10. Author Jhumpa Lahiri won/one a Pulitzer Prize for her first short-story collection Interpreter of Maladies; her work often explores Indian immigrant experiences in the U.S.

T-6 ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN · May 10, 2010

uSeS: copY mAchINe, opAque pRoJectoR, oR tRANSpAReNcY mASteR FoR oVeRheAD pRoJectoR. ScholAStIc INc. GRANtS SuBScRIBeRS oF ScholAStIc Scope peRmISSIoN to RepRoDuce thIS pAGe FoR uSe IN theIR clASSRoomS. copYRIGht © 2010 BY ScholAStIc INc. All RIGhtS ReSeRVeD.

WrIT e r 's T OO L B O x

SKILL: Conclusions

Name: _____________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Crafting Conclusions

1. use a Meaningful Quotation

available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

a conclusion may restate your opinion clearly and forcefully and show how your points fit together, but it should also give readers something to think about. Review "The Python Problem" outline on p. 21, then search online or at the library for a quotation that would make a powerful ending. (it could be a quote about responsibility, the environment, or something inspiring that relates to the topic.) your Turn: Write a conclusion to "The Python Problem" that incorporates the quotation you found.

_________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

2. Give a Call to Action

a call to action challenges readers to do something. For example, the call to action for "the Python Problem" might urge readers to start an organization that adopts pythons from owners who don't want them anymore. your Turn: Write a conclusion to "The Python Problem" that includes a call to action.

_________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________

May 10, 2010 · ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN T-7

uSeS: copY mAchINe, opAque pRoJectoR, oR tRANSpAReNcY mASteR FoR oVeRheAD pRoJectoR. ScholAStIc INc. GRANtS SuBScRIBeRS oF ScholAStIc Scope peRmISSIoN to RepRoDuce thIS pAGe FoR uSe IN theIR clASSRoomS. copYRIGht © 2010 BY ScholAStIc INc. All RIGhtS ReSeRVeD.

in celebration of endings--the end of spring, the end of the school year, the end of final exams-- let's take a look at two ways to write a strong conclusion to a persuasive essay. Review "Go ahead, Convince Me!" on page 20. Then complete the activity below.

s c hO L a s T I c sc O Pe skIL L s

SKILL: Vocabulary

Name: _____________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

You learned eight SCOPE 100 words in this issue. Use this guide to familiarize yourself with each word's primary meaning and its pronunciation.

1. anarchic adj [ahn-awR-kihk]: characterized by lack of organization Synonyms: lawless, chaotic 2. bequest n [bee-KweSt]: the act of giving property, such as by a will Synonym: inheritance 3. capricious adj [kuh-PRIH-shuss]: tending to make sudden and unpredictable changes Synonyms: fickle, flighty 4. flippant adj [FLIH-punt]: lacking proper respect or seriousness Synonyms: glib, offhand

The scOPe 100

available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

6. redundant adj [rih-duHn-duhnt]: characterized by unnecessary repetition Synonyms: repetitive, superfluous 7. reparation n [reh-puh-Ray-shun]: the amends given for a wrong or an injury Synonym: compensation 8. unsolicited adj [uhn-soh-LIH-ssih-ted]: given, sent, or received without having been asked for Synonyms: unwanted, unasked for

Use the lines below to write eight sentences, each of which uses one of the ScoPE 100 words above. 1. _______________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________ 8. ________________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________________

T-8 ScholaStic ScoPE tEachER'S EDitioN · May 10, 2010

your Turn

uSeS: copY mAchINe, opAque pRoJectoR, oR tRANSpAReNcY mASteR FoR oVeRheAD pRoJectoR. ScholAStIc INc. GRANtS SuBScRIBeRS oF ScholAStIc Scope peRmISSIoN to RepRoDuce thIS pAGe FoR uSe IN theIR clASSRoomS. copYRIGht © 2010 BY ScholAStIc INc. All RIGhtS ReSeRVeD.

5. imperceptible adj [ihm-pur-SeHPt-uh-buhl]: extremely slight or gradual; difficult to detect Synonym: unnoticeable

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