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TEACHER'S EDITION

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NOvEmbER 2, 2009

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mAR. 22 APR. 12 APR. 26 mAY 10

Issue Dates

SEPT. 7

SEPT. 21

OCT. 5

OCT. 19

NOv. 2

NOv. 16 & 30

DEC. 14

JAN. 11

JAN. 25

FEb. 8

FEb. 22

mAR. 8

Vol. 58 · No. 5 · ISSN 0036-6412 · A SupplemeNt to ScholAStIc Scope

DEAR TEACHERS,

In an exciting Scope exclusive, we chat with award-winning young-adult author Walter Dean Myers. As part of our Road Map to Great Writing, Myers gives your students insight into how he sets about getting ideas for his characters, stories, and settings. In addition to the interview with Myers, we've included a sidebar with tips to help your students generate their own ideas. Our Readers Theater Play, Sherlock Holmes, will appeal to all the sleuths and mystery buffs in your classroom. Based on the upcoming movie, our adaptation brings the British inspector and his sidekick, Doctor Watson, to life. Enjoy! Sincerely,

in This TEAChER's EDiTiOn:

T-2 . . . INSIDE THE ISSUE:.Standards.&.Supplements T-2 . . . TEACHER'S CORNER:.Cool.Web.Sites.for.You! T-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LESSON 1:.Sherlock Holmes T-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LESSON 2:.Writing.With.Walter T-4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ANSWER.KEY T-5 . . . . . . GRAPHIC ORGANIZER: Cause.and.Effect T-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SKILLS PAGE: Double.Negatives. T-7 . . . . . . . . . WRITER'S TOOLBOX: Writing.Similes. . T-8 . . . . . . . . . . SKILLS PAGE: Deductive.Reasoning

d

Lucy Lehrer, Executive Editor

www.scholastic.com/scope

This issuE OnLinE

Our Web site is continually updated!

November 16-30, 2009

Readers Theater Plays:.The Blind Side and. Shakespeare's.Twelfth Night.·.National.American. Indian.Heritage.Month.Skill:.Making.Connections

09 WINNE R 20

in OuR nExT issuE

reproducibles for articles in this issue! (available October 19)

· 12 FREE standards-based

· Deductive reasoning worksheet · Tips for using Scope in your classroom · Get your students PuBLishED in Scope

This teacher's edition is available online!

UI SH E

IEV D ACH

Questions about your Scope order? Call Subscriber Services at 1-800-631-1586.

EM

EN T

aep

Scholastic Scope EdPress Winner 2009

G IN DIST

INSIDE THE ISSUE: November 2, 2009

Article

Your World, p. 3

Skills & Standards

· word origin · making connections · reading and writing for pleasure · author appreciation NCTE standards 1, 2, 3, 5 · plot, character, setting, and tone · reading comprehension · fluency and expression · Write Now (summarizing) NCTE standards 1, 2, 3

Online Reproducible(s)

· reading-comprehension quiz · headline writing · fact vs. opinion

Readers Theater Play: Sherlock Holmes, p. 6

(Lesson, p. T-3; Cause & Effect, p. T-5; Deduction, p. T-8)

· understanding sarcasm · foreshadowing · true and false syllogisms

SCOPE 100: Selena Gomez, p. 13

· vocabulary acquisition · context clues NCTE standards 1, 2, 3, 6

· vocabulary quiz (antonyms) · Latin roots and context clues

NONFICTION: Writing With Walter, p. 14

(Lesson, p. T-3)

· author appreciation · understanding character · developing ideas · reading comprehension · Write Now (expository essay) NCTE standards 1, 2, 3 · reading comprehension · interpreting text · critical thinking · visual literacy NCTE standards 1, 2, 3

· reading-comprehension quiz · character sketch

Crossword Puzzle, p. 16

· Jane & Austin storyboard · abstract and concrete nouns

NCTE & IRA MIddlE-SChOOl CuRRICuluM STANdARdS

1. 2. 3. 4. Range of materials. Range of literary works. Range of reading strategies. Adjust use of language to communicate effectively. 5. Range of writing strategies. 6. Knowledge of language conventions. 7. Conduct research, gather data, and communicate findings. 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources. 9. Understand and respect diversity of language use across cultures. 10. English-language learners use their first language for English fluency. 11. Participate as reflective, creative members of literacy community. 12. Use written language to achieve own goals.

TEAChER's CORnER

Cool Web Sites for You!

A roundup of handy online resources for you and your class

· Need book recommendations for

a theme unit? Check out Scholastic's Teacher Book Wizard. You'll find ageappropriate suggestions organized by grade level under a variety of subjects, such as bullying, Abraham Lincoln, upper-grade fantasy, and a lot more. You can also make your own lists and share with other teachers. http://bookwizard.scholastic.com 15-year-old student to help him study French. http://quizlet.com ogy standards, check out Beyond Algorithms: A Librarian's Guide to Finding Web Sites You Can Trust. www.google.com/librarian center/ articles/0601_02.html

· Want students to go behind the

scenes with the contemporary young-adult writers they love? Check out Scholastic's Stacks, which features writers like J.K. Rowling, Walter Dean Myers, Meg Cabot, and many others. Students can enjoy video interviews, biographies, fun facts, bibliographies, and a lot more. www.scholastic.com/stacks

· Did the swine flu affect your

school? Let's face it. Schools can be cesspools of germs. Help your students develop and maintain good sanitation habits with The Scrub Club from the National Sanitation Foundation and the American Red Cross. The site includes games, webisodes, and a lot of information on the causes and prevention of illnesses like the flu. www.scrubclub.org

· Do your students use flashcards

to memorize vocabulary? Save a tree and send them to Quizlet, a free site that lets users make their own flashcards online. It was created by a

· How do you know when a Web site

is accurate? When you send students online to research and meet technol-

T-2 SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION · NOvEmbER 2, 2009

Lesson

1

Readers Theater Play: Sherlock Holmes, p. 6

about Sherlock Holmes. Ask what they know about him, what his job is, and why he's famous. mood. It suggests that we haven't seen the last of Blackwood.)

INTROduCTION

Take your students on a murdermystery adventure with Inspector Sherlock Holmes and his beloved sidekick Dr. Watson. Our adaptation is based on the upcoming film Sherlock Holmes, in theaters December 25.

dISCuSSION

1. In Scene 4, Holmes tells Watson, "Never theorize before you have data. You end up twisting facts to suit theories instead of theories to suit facts." What does he mean? (Let the facts decide what's true. If you start guessing, it's easy to ignore or manipulate the facts to make your guess seem more plausible.) 2. Do you think that Blackwood really came back from the dead? Why? (Answers will vary.) 3. Why does Blackwood speak to Holmes before his execution? What does he say? What is the tone of the scene? (He predicts that three people are going to die. It creates a scary, ominous, and suspicious

ExTENSION Writing Prompt: Write a Scene

The play ends with a cliffhanger-- a plot device in which a story or scene ends in the middle of a suspenseful situation. Divide students into groups. Have each group write the next scene of the play, and perform it for the class. Remind them to use narration and dialogue that is consistent in tone and style with the play.

ObjECTIvES

To practice fluency and expression; to write a scene

SuMMARY

Sherlock Holmes is a character invented by the writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1856-1930). Doyle wrote 56 stories about Holmes, who is famous for using logic to solve mysteries.

Resources: Foreshadowing,

syllogisms, sarcasm, and more: www.scholastic.com/scope; graphic organizer and deduction worksheets in this T.E; official site of the film: http://sherlock-holmes -movie.warnerbros.com

PRE-REAdING STRATEGY

Activate students' prior knowledge

Lesson

2

Nonfiction: Writing With Walter, p.14

class, discuss what the quotation means. Then tell them they are going to read an article about how a prolific young-adult author goes after inspiration.

INTROduCTION

In this article, students will get inspired by young-adult author Walter Dean Myers.

ExTENSION Create a Character

Have students create characters of their own with these steps: · Complete the Character Sketch online reproducible. · Complete the worksheet again for three of the character's relatives. · Using magazines, newspapers, and images from the Internet, create a collage of your character's life. Be sure to include at least one image of your character. · Write a mini-biography of your character. Share with the class.

ObjECTIvES

To read for information; to create a character; to understand the fiction process

dISCuSSION

1. According to Myers, what makes a good idea for a story? (Interesting conflicts and thoroughly developed characters.) In your opinion, what other elements could make a story compelling? 2. Refer to the quotation from the Pre-Reading Strategy. How does Myers go after inspiration? (He researches his characters, he looks for the deeper meaning in conflicts, he asks "why.")

PRE-REAdING STRATEGY

Ask the class: Have you ever sat in front of a computer or a blank sheet of paper and wondered what to write? How did you feel? Next, write this quotation by the writer Jack London on the board: "You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club." As a

Resources: Character sketch and reading-comprehension sheets: www.scholastic.com/scope

EDITORIAl: Executive Editor: Lucy Lehrer · Sr. Associate Editor: Kristin Lewis · Sr. Associate Editor, Online: Zach Jones · Online Reproducibles Writer: Laura Linn · Copy Editor: Veronica Majerol · Executive Editor, Media: Marie Morreale · ART: Design Director: Felix Batcup · Photo Editor: Lois Safrani · PRODUCTION: Production Editor: William McDonald · Digital Imager: Marc Stern · mAGAZINE GROUP: President, Scholastic Classroom & Library Group: Greg Worrell · VP, Editor in Chief: Rebecca Bondor · Creative Director: Judith Christ-Lafond · Executive Production Director: Barbara Schwartz · Executive Editorial Director, Copy Desk: Craig Moskowitz · Publishing System Director: David Hendrickson · Executive Director of Photography: Steven Diamond · Senior Administrative Coordinator: Mirtha Williams · Library Manager: Kerry Prendergast · Reference Librarian: Karen Van Rossem · CIRCUlATION & mARKETING: VP, Marketing: Jocelyn Forman · Marketing Manager: Leslie Tevlin · mANUFACTURING & DISTRIbUTION: Director: Mimi Esguerra · Manufacturing Coordinator: Georgiana Deen · CORPORATE: President, Chief Exec. Officer, and Chairman of the Board of Scholastic Inc.: Richard Robinson

NOvEmbER 2, 2009 · SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION T-3

sChOLAsTiC sCOPE skiLLs

GRAPhiC ORGAnizER

Name: ___________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Event #1

Happened because:

Event #2

Consequence:

Happened because:

Consequence:

NOvEmbER 2, 2009 · SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION T-5

USES:.CopY.MACHINE,.opAqUE.pRojECtoR,.oR.tRANSpARENCY.MAStER.foR.ovERHEAD.pRojECtoR ..SCHolAStIC.INC ..gRANtS.SUbSCRIbERS.of.SCHolAStIC.Scope.pERMISSIoN.to.REpRoDUCE.tHIS.pAgE.foR.USE.IN.tHEIR.ClASSRooMS ..CopYRIgHt.©.2009.bY.SCHolAStIC.INC ..All.RIgHtS.RESERvED .

Directions: A cause is an event that makes another event happen. For example, consider this sentence: "I kicked the ball, and the ball rolled." The cause is I kicked the ball. The effect is the ball rolled. Use the graphic organizer below to describe two events from the play in this issue of Scope. For each event (or effect), list two causes and one consequence.

Cause and Effect

Available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

sChOLAsTiC sCOPE skiLLs

REUSAB

LE

SKIll: Double Negatives

Name: ___________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Do not not Do?

Directions: Each of the following sentences has a double negative. Circle the double negative, and rewrite the sentence correctly in the space provided. We've done the first one for you.

1. I do not have no time.

I have no time. ____________________________________________________________________________________________

2. She doesn't want to hear no more complaining. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. I hadn't hardly enough eggs to make the omelette. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Why did you never do nothing about the problem? ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. There wasn't no reason to wash the car because the rain cleaned off all the dirt. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. My brother never does nothing wrong. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. Your explanation doesn't make no sense! ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 8. Sometimes I feel like I don't have no friends. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 9. She hasn't started none of her essays yet. ____________________________________________________________________________________________ 10. There aren't no tickets left to the game. ____________________________________________________________________________________________

T-6 SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION · NOvEmbER 2, 2009

USES:.CopY.MACHINE,.opAqUE.pRojECtoR,.oR.tRANSpARENCY.MAStER.foR.ovERHEAD.pRojECtoR ..SCHolAStIC.INC ..gRANtS.SUbSCRIbERS.of.SCHolAStIC.Scope.pERMISSIoN.to.REpRoDUCE.tHIS.pAgE.foR.USE.IN.tHEIR.ClASSRooMS ..CopYRIgHt.©.2009.bY.SCHolAStIC.INC ..All.RIgHtS.RESERvED .

A double negative is the use of two negatives to express a negation, which accidentally changes the meaning of a sentence. For instance, "She did not tell nobody" actually means "She told somebody." A better sentence would be "She told nobody" or "She didn't tell anybody."

Available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

WRiTER's TOOLBOx

REUSAB

LE

SKIll: Similes

Name: ___________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Writing similes

A simile is a comparison using like or as; for example, "This day is as much fun as getting a cavity drilled," or "barry stared at the midterm test like a deer in headlights." Directions: Use a simile to compare each of the items below to something else. be imaginative!

Available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

USES:.CopY.MACHINE,.opAqUE.pRojECtoR,.oR.tRANSpARENCY.MAStER.foR.ovERHEAD.pRojECtoR ..SCHolAStIC.INC ..gRANtS.SUbSCRIbERS.of.SCHolAStIC.Scope.pERMISSIoN.to.REpRoDUCE.tHIS.pAgE.foR.USE.IN.tHEIR.ClASSRooMS ..CopYRIgHt.©.2009.bY.SCHolAStIC.INC ..All.RIgHtS.RESERvED .

1. Sunset ________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Poetry ________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. A mouse _______________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Music _________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. Friendship _____________________________________________________________________________________ 6. Pizza __________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. A snake ________________________________________________________________________________________ 8. Dancing _______________________________________________________________________________________ 9. A good book ___________________________________________________________________________________ 10. My bedroom __________________________________________________________________________________

Now pick the simile you like best, and use it in a short poem. Write your poem below.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________

NOvEmbER 2, 2009 · SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION T-7

sChOLAsTiC sCOPE skiLLs

REUSAB

LE

SKIll: Deductive Reasoning

Name: ___________________________________ Class: ___________________ Date: _____________

Deduce Like sherlock

Sherlock Holmes uses deductive reasoning to solve many of his cases. A syllogism (SIH-luh-jih-zum) is a form of deductive reasoning. Syllogisms present certain facts or pieces of evidence from which you can draw a conclusion. Example:

All mammals are warm-blooded. All dogs are mammals. Therefore, all dogs are warm-blooded. Directions: To practice your deductive reasoning skills, solve the syllogisms below. Circle the correct answer in each question. 1. Celia never misses a Lakers game. The Lakers are playing a game tonight. Which of the following statements is true? 4. All dogs bark. All terriers are dogs.

Available as a PDF at scholastic.com /scope

USES:.CopY.MACHINE,.opAqUE.pRojECtoR,.oR.tRANSpARENCY.MAStER.foR.ovERHEAD.pRojECtoR ..SCHolAStIC.INC ..gRANtS.SUbSCRIbERS.of.SCHolAStIC.SCopE.pERMISSIoN.to.REpRoDUCE.tHIS.pAgE.foR.USE.IN.tHEIR.ClASSRooMS ..CopYRIgHt.©.2009.bY.SCHolAStIC.INC ..All.RIgHtS.RESERvED .

Which of the following statements is true?

A B C D

Celia will play with the Lakers. Celia's favorite team is the Lakers. Celia will watch the Lakers game tonight. More information is needed.

A B C D

All terriers bark. All dogs are terriers. Barking is unique to dogs. More information is needed.

5. T-shirts are comfortable. T-shirts are 2. All ferrets are mammals. All mammals are vertebrates. Gregory is a mammal. What can you deduce about Gregory? inexpensive. Jake's shirt is comfortable. What can you deduce about Jake's shirt?

A Gregory is a ferret but not necessarily

a vertebrate.

B Gregory is a vertebrate but not necessarily

a ferret.

A B C D

Jake is wearing a T-shirt. Jake's shirt is inexpensive. Jake's shirt is an inexpensive T-shirt. More information is needed.

C Gregory is a ferret and a vertebrate. D More information is needed.

6. Charlie eats only sausage pizza. Kendra loves pizza, but she's a vegetarian. The school cafeteria is serving cheese pizza for lunch. Charlie and Kendra are eating lunch in the cafeteria. Which of the following statements is true?

3. Everyone at the park has orange hair. Everyone with orange hair has a turtle. Joshua has orange hair. What can you deduce about Joshua?

A Neither Kendra nor Charlie will eat the

school pizza.

A B C D

He is at the park. He has a turtle. He is at the park, and he has a turtle. More information is needed.

B Both Kendra and Charlie will eat the

school pizza.

C Only Kendra will eat the school pizza. D Only Charlie will eat the school pizza.

T-8 SCHOlASTIC SCOPE TEACHER'S EDITION · NOvEmbER 2, 2009

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