Read english 11 syllabus text version

Mr Cunningham College Prep English 11 2010-2011 760-436-6136-6270 [email protected] ) English 11 is a college prep class designed around a student-centered curriculum of inquiry, and discovery using American literature, expository texts and writing in all modes to develop critical thinking skills, further develop and define your voice and ideas and master the college entrance level standards of composition and research-based writing. These skills will serve you well on the SAT test, the ACT and college entrance exams. This class is your class and you get out of it what you put into it. All ideas and opinions are welcome as long as all points of view are tolerated. Freedom of speech and thinking is vital if an English class is to survive and develop. Take chances with your writing and thinking...don't settle for the ordinary or the commonplace. All interpretations of the literature are valid, as long as they can be supported by the text. If you do the work, come to class, and perform to the best of your ability, you will succeed. .An open, positive attitude is essential. The work in this class is not always easy or simple. It requires effort and reading.

Goals: 1. Through writing and reading, students will continue to master grammar skills, the basics of composition and develop their voices to become lifelong learners and readers, and to think and write critically 2. Students will reinforce their skills at evaluating visual, oral and written arguments, and deepen their ability to understand an author's purpose and tone. 3. Students will acquire the skills and vocabulary necessary to succeed in reading challenging texts and then write and talk about those texts in an analytical, historical and social context. 4. Students will study the writer's tools, the rhetorical strategies of expository texts, advertising, political writing, political cartoons, satire and literature as a way to clarify their values and contribute in a positive way to the culture of La Costa Canyon High School and their communities.

Grading Scale: Grading Grades will be based on mastery of skills and standards. You will know ahead of time which skills will be assessed. Rubrics will be used as much as possible. Grades are not based on effort, working hard or good character, although all of these can and will improve your ability to learn and then improve your grade. "A" students complete all the reading to the best of their ability and challenge themselves by asking questions, improving their writing through conferences, metacognitions, rewriting and notetaking, annotating and journaling on reading assignments. "A" students go beyond the ideas and work discussed in class and bring something new and original to the

reading and writing. Assignments are graded on a point basis. Process papers-100-140 points In class essays-50-70 points Reading quizzes-10-30 points Homework-10-25 points Projects 30-70 points All points are cumulative during the semester. I do not use a weighted scale for any individual assignments. If you do all of your work you will most likely earn an A or a B in class. 99 ­ 100% = A+ 88 ­ 89% = B+ 78 ­ 79% = C+ 68 ­ 69% = D+ 92 ­ 98% = A 82 ­ 87% = B 72 ­ 77% = C 62 ­ 67% = D 90 ­ 91% = A80 ­ 81% = B70 ­ 71% = C60 ­ 61% = DBelow 60% = F

You should check your progress on the AERIES interface. If you have questions about your grade, please see me before or after class. Note that a plus or minus will appear on your report cards, they will not appear on your final transcript from LCC; an A- or an A+ will convert to an A. Office hours: 1,3, 5 days before class at your request, Thursdays after school, or any day that your request after school , if it works with my schedule. It usually does. You are not your grade. Grades are only an indication of mastery of skills and standards, they can always be improved, if you receive a less than satisfactory grade you can use that as in indication to improve. Failure (not in the form of an F necessarily), is how we improve. Athletes, musicians, artists, businessmen, and scientists, all learned how to do well in their chosen field by failure and umporovement. They succeeded after numerous attempts at their chosen endeavor. Writing and reading well can be hard, but it should be enjoyable. All process paper writing assignments can be rewritten for a a higher grade as long as the student makes an appointment with the teacher and completes the rewrite within six week so the original paper's return date. The new grade will replace the original, it is not averaged. If you are willing to work and learn, your mastery and skill will inevitably improve, as well as your grade.

Homework :

will be less than an hour , if you read well and have a quite study area, and will be meaningful. Homework will be purposeful and clear and based on the grade-level standards for the class. If it is not clear or you are not clear on the assignment, please ask questions, ask me to clarify or speak up, that's how we learn. is assigned at the end (almost) of every class period in English. It is written on the board in the right hand corner and is usually on my website should be written down before you leave class every day. Listen to instructions and read the board. Keep an assignment calendar, or use your LCC agenda to keep track of assignments and due dates. completed in LCC manuscript form, blue or black ink, or typed, double-spaced. Do not write on the back of the paper. Leave margins on all sides of the paper. Written work that does not follow these guidelines will not be graded or given credit. Written work submitted in pencil will not be graded or given credit. is due at the beginning of the class period. Work must be completed and ready for submission when the bell rings. WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED LATE. If you have started the assignment but not completed it, you are better off turning in the incomplete work; you may at least receive partial credit. If the homework was a reading assignment and you did not read it, you will receive a zero on a quiz if I give one. No meails on homework please. Come in and speak to me in person or find out the work from a classmate. Exception: If you have an emergency (and we all do), or circumstances beyond your control prohibit you from completing your work, it is your responsibility to talk to me about setting up an extension for you. I'll trust you (to a point). If possible, please talk to me before the work is due. If you do not talk to me, I will not accept the work. With an excused absence, you have one class period for each day of EXCUSED absence to make up the work that you have missed. It is your responsibility to find out what assignments you have missed. This includes homework assignments, as well as assignments that were completed during class time when you were absent. Do not come up at the beginig of class and ask, what did I miss or did we do anything,

1.

You should contact students in class prior to your return to find out what you missed and what is due. I will let you know what you need to do. If you return to class without having found out what you missed, you may see me before or after class (but not once the bell has rung I get distracted too easily) and I will talk to you individually. It is also your responsibility to know what the reading assignments are. READING: If you are absent, you should still have completed the reading that is due upon the day of your return. Be prepared for the reading quizzes, unless your illness makes it impossible to read. If for some reason you are not prepared for the quiz, you will have two days to make it up. It is your responsibility to remember to do so. (Example: You have my class on a Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of one week. You are in class on Monday, but you are gone on Wednesday and return on Friday. The homework that was due on Wednesday will be turned in first thing on Friday. If you can it's a good idea to contact a classmate or check the website and complete the work you missed, however you do have one extra day per California Ed Code. The homework that was assigned on Wednesday but due on Friday will be turned in first thing on the following Tuesday, in addition to the homework that was assigned on Friday and due on Tuesday. Work not submitted within one class period will not be accepted unless you speak to me first about an extension.

2.

I WILL NOT ACCEPT LATE WORK. LATE means that you did not turn in the assignment when I collected it. If you left it on your desk at home, I will not accept it. There will be no make-up work for assignments that you do not complete. Late Work Exception: If you have an emergency, or circumstances beyond your control prohibit you from completing your work, it is your responsibility to talk to me about setting up an extension for you. If possible, please talk to me before the work is due. If you do not talk to me, I will not accept the work. We all habve emergencies, I'll trust you.

3.

Holistic scoring of homework:: A: Synthesis and evaluation of the test. The work of students at this level will have some or many of these characteristics. · a strong interest in the material as evidenced through an awareness of levels of meaning, judgments are textually and experientially based, predictions are thoughtful and keenly observed, character analysis is consistent with the material presented, show an understanding of character motivation, comparisons and connections are found between text and other literary and artistic works, recognizes the author's writing choices and reasons for those choices, recognizes the energy and deliberateness of the writing process, awareness that their own personal beliefs may differ from those expressed in the text, demonstrates an awareness of point of view.

B: Evidence and understanding and appreciation of text. · The work of students at this level will have some or many of the following characteristics, does not summarize, but rather reflects upon the narrative, personal connections between text and student's own experiences are made, predictions are plausible given the scenario (but may change after further reading), demonstrates an ability to understand characters' motivations, quotes from text for support, ability to hypothesize and predict, evidence that students are engaged in the text

C: A literal surface encounter with the text. The work of students at this level will have some or many of the

following characteristics. · lacks a critical interest in the narrative ,primarily summarizes the selection, unsupported by evidence from the text or experience, predictions are unrealistic or improbable, fails to ask questions or hypothesize, uses stereotypical responses, too short , confusion about the text and the story, off-topic responses, quickly done, no original thinking or going beyond the average response, difficult to read or understand

Class tools: 1. You will be responsible for keeping and bringing to class, every day, a journal. We will write every day at the beginning of class for ten minutes. You may write about any subject that enters your mind. I will not read your journal. You will be expected, however to share your journals twice a quarter, out loud, with the class. If you're late, you lose credit for the day's journal. You should have a separate spiral notebook that fits in your class binder for reading journals, writing to learn exercises and vocabulary. One of the keys to reading well is to clear your mind and think as you read. Because of this I will often require annotations, dialectical journals, charts or double sided reading journals. Research has shown that the thinking that happens when we read is lost unless we write it down as we think about it. You need to register with the class on turnit.com. All major papers, and many home work assignments and smaller papers will be submitted. I will often grade reading journals only in an electronic form. In order to succeed you will need to take notes as you read, engage the text, and keep vocabulary and leaning logs to help you improve as a reader.

2.

3.

_____________________________________________________________

Expectations 1. 2. 3. Please be on time-it shows a willingness to participate and succeed in -Tardy policy attached Be respectful of class members. Listen to each other, and approach the instructor with questions at the appropriate time. Please do not use cell phones or IPODS/music players in class. Please turn off cell phones if you have them. Refrain from texting, more on this later. No exceptions. Learning is hard; distractions interfere with learning. If you have a medical condition or emergency that requires communication with a doctor or your parents let me know and contact the school office. If your parents need to contact you, have them call the office or arrange that contact through the instructor. Complete work on time. Prearranged absences for trips, sports, colleges, or family business must be cleared with the instructor and the administration. Work will not be accepted late for a prearranged absence unless the absence has been cleared ahead of time. We have lives out of class and I have no problem with giving you work if you give me a week notie. Be responsible and proactive. Complete work with care and thought. Parent notes for late work are not accepted. Computer problems are not accepted excuses for late work. Plan ahead, email your work, back it up or contact the teacher before the due date. Contact the instructor ahead of time if you are struggling or need help. The teacher's job is to help you understand. Make an appointment for one on one instruction. Again, understanding and success starts with honesty (I don't understand, this is hard for me, I need help) and learning is a collaborative effort that requires communication. Do your own work; do not plagiarize.

4.

5.

6.

Definitions of Academic Dishonest Behaviors Specific types of academic dishonesty which will not be tolerated are defined below: 1. Cheating on Tests - Any intentional giving or use of external assistance relating to an examination, test, or quiz without express permission of the teacher. This includes looking on another student's paper, sharing answers, or copying another student's paper. 2. Fabrication - Any intentional falsification or invention of data citation, or other authority in an academic exercise. 3. Unauthorized Collaboration - While collaboration is often encouraged, unauthorized collaboration is not permitted. 4. Plagiarism - Any intentional representation of another's ideas, words, or work as one's own. Plagiarism includes the misuse of published material, electronic material, and/or the work of other students. The original writer who intentionally shares his/her paper for another to copy, without permission of the teacher, is also engaged in plagiarism. 5. Alteration of Materials - Any intentional and unauthorized alteration of student, teacher, or library materials. 6. Forgery - Any unauthorized signing of another person's name to school related documents. 7. Theft - Any theft of materials. 8. Transfer of Unauthorized Materials - Any giving or selling of unauthorized materials. Consequences for Academic Dishonesty Any alleged violation of this policy will be investigated thoroughly and appropriate disciplinary measures will be taken consistent with Board policy. Depending on the severity of the offense one or more of the following consequences may occur: 1. Referral to the assistant principal and the parent/guardian will be contacted. 2. Loss of all credit for the assignment or test with no makeup permitted. 3. Placement on probation with a contract (in the class of the infraction) for the remainder of that class. 4. Receipt of a "U" in citizenship for the current grading period. 5. Violation on a school administered national or state examination will result in a district code of conduct violation. 6. Dropped from the class with no credit. 7. Referral to the Student Assistance Services (SAS) Team. 8. Suspension from school. 9. Removal from all elected or appointed leadership positions for the remainder of the school year. This information is taken directly from SDUHSD policy Drink only water in class. Please police and clean up your area. No eating, ants thrive and messes grow. Thanks for this consideration.

7.

Consequences 1. The first violation of a rule will result in a dialogue/conference between teacher and student. A violation of rule three will result in the device will be taken away and returned at the end of class with a warning once, we all make mistakes. Did I mention I do not like cell phones in class? The first instance of plagiarism will result in a "0" on the assignment, a referral to administration and a call home. The second offense results in a failure in the class and removal from the Honors/Advanced Placement program. 2. On the second violation of rule three, I'll borrow the cell phone or IPOD and it will be returned by administration to the parent or student. All other second violations will result in a parent-teacher conference with the exception of plagiarism. 3. Third violation: referral to Vice Principal.

Class Tools

1. You will be responsible for keeping and bringing to class, every day, a journal. We will write every day at the beginning of class for ten minutes. You may write about any subject that enters your mind. I will not read your journal. You will be expected, however to share your journals, out loud, with the class. If

you're late, you lose credit for the day's journal. Students and teachers are expected to share ten times a semester, which works out to once every other week. Each semester you will have a short writing assignment where you choose a selected number of journals and reflect upon them. 2. You should have a separate spiral notebook that fits in your class binder for reading journals, writing to learn exercises and vocabulary. One of the keys to reading well is to clear your mind and think as you read. Because of this I will often require annotations, dialectical journals, charts or double sided reading journals. Research has shown that the thinking that happens when we read is lost unless we write it down as we think about it. You need to register with the class on turnit.com. All major papers, and many home work assignments and smaller papers will be submitted. I will often grade reading journals only in an electronic form.

3. One of the keys to writing well is the ability to hold two opposing, seemingly contradictory ideas in your mind at one time. A skill important for this is to be able to understand the irony, paradox, ambiguity and duality of most great ideas. Writing in this way becomes exploratory and form often follows function. Discover what you want to say, who your audience is and then an organizational pattern will become clear. Writing well is the hardest work there is. It requires concentration and metacognitive skills.

1.

I have read and understood the class norms for English 11. I will follow the norms of the class and understand the consequences. I will contact the instructor before or after school if I need help.

Student Signature_____________________________________________________________________ Parent's Signature _____________________________________________________________________

Classmates ________________________________________________________________

·

· · ·

· ·

All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse, and sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was. Ernest Hemingway I believe that good questions are more important than answers, and the best children's books ask questions, and make the readers ask questions. And every new question is going to disturb someone's universe. Madeleine L'Engle I try to leave out the parts people skip. Elmore Leonard I learned a surprising thing in writing this book. It is possible to move away from a vast, unbearable pain by delving into it deeper and deeper -- by "diving into the wreck," to borrow the perfect words from Adrienne Rich. You can look at all the parts of a terrible thing until you see that they're assemblies of smaller parts, all of which you can name, and some of which you can heal or alter, and finally the terror that seemed unbearable becomes manageable. I suppose what I am describing is the process of grief. Barbara Kingsolver Great literature, if we read it well, opens us up to the world, and makes us more sensitive to it, as if we acquired eyes that could se through things and ears that could hear smaller sounds. Donald Hall Do not train the youth to learning by force and harshness, but lead them to it by what amuses their minds so that you may discover the peculiar bent of the genius of each. --Plato

Syllabus Curriculum English 11

First week Syllabus signed and returned Turnitin.com (mandatory) Inside the actors reading studio Practice essay based on the EPT

Each semester:

Free Reading Project (SSR)

Students will choose two works to read and reflect on as suggested in the California Framework. You may choose any writer and any book and any topic as long as it is at your reading or grade level writing, your parents clear the book for your reading, and you have an interest in the text. There will be 20 minutes of time to read in each class period and you are expected to read for 20 minutes every class period at home. There will be a selection of assignments (about 400-you should find one you like) to turn in at the end ot he reading period.

2.2 Write responses to literature: a. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the significant ideas in works or passages. b. Analyze the use of imagery, language, universal themes, and unique aspects of the text. c. Support important ideas and viewpoints through accurate and detailed references to the text and to other works. d. Demonstrate an understanding of the author's use of stylistic devices and an appreciation of the effects created. e. Identify and assess 2.4. Make warranted and reasonable assertions about the author's arguments by using elements of the text to defend and clarify interpretations. 2.5 Analyze an author's implicit and explicit philosophical assumptions and beliefs about a subject. e impact of perceived ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text.

#1 Rhetorical Triangle Voice, speaker, audience, text Logos pathos ethos #2 Literary analysis: comparing views of America

Breadline http://www.theonion.com/articles/nation-instinctively-forms-breadline,2668/ #1 Visual and written arguments arguments. Plagiarism

Trip Gabriel "Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age" 2.2 Write responses to literature: a. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the significant ideas in works or passages. b. Analyze the use of imagery, language, universal themes, and unique aspects of the text. c. Support important ideas and viewpoints through accurate and detailed references to the text and to other works. d. Demonstrate an understanding of the author's use of stylistic devices and an appreciation of the effects created. e. Identify and assess the impact of perceived ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text.

#2 How to think, read, and write critically Expository Texts and analysis or arguments Charting and analyzing an argument Adrienne Rich "Claiming an Education" Mary Sherry "In Praise of the F Word"

First essay: Argument response "Uncle Sam and Samantha"

#3 Puritans and Communists-Using Historical analysis to develop your voice and beliefs

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God -Puritan possibilities The Crucible-The decline of the Puritans as a metaphor for the McCarthy witch hunts

2.0 Reading Comprehension (Focus on Informational Materials) 2.1 Analyze both the features and the rhetorical devices of different types of public documents (e.g., policy statements, speeches, debates, platforms) and the way in which authors use those features and devices. Comprehension and Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text 2.2 Analyze the way in which clarity of meaning is affected by the patterns of organization, hierarchical structures, repetition of the main ideas, syntax, and word choice in the text. 1.4 Use rhetorical questions, parallel structure, concrete images, figurative language, characterization, irony, and dialogue to achieve clarity, force, and aesthetic effect. 1.5 Distinguish between and use various forms of classical and contemporary logical arguments, including: a. Inductive and deductive reasoning b. Syllogisms and analogies

Debates/Controversial Issue paper Third Unit Romantics/Transcendentalists/Dark Romantics

2.0 Students combine the rhetorical strategies of narration, exposition, persuasion, and description to produce texts of at least 1,500 words each. Student writing demonstrates a command of standard American English and the research, organizational, and drafting strategies outlined in Writing Standard 1.0. 2.1 Write fictional, autobiographical, or biographical narratives: a. Narrate a sequence of events and communicate their significance to the audience. b. Locate scenes and incidents in specific places.

c. Describe with concrete sensory details the sights, sounds, and smells of a scene and the specific actions, movements, gestures, and feelings of the characters; use interior monologue to depict the characters' feelings.

Exploring the intuitive nature of man: Stephen King's "The Man in the Black Suit" Thoreau-Walden Emerson and Nature Hawthorne http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm

Modernism/Post Modernism One Flew Oer the Cuckoos Nest Student directed teaching and learning

2.6 Deliver multimedia presentations: a. Combine text, images, and sound and draw information from many sources (e.g., television broadcasts, videos, films, newspapers, magazines, CD-ROMs, the Internet, electronic media-generated images).

Student choice writing The Great Gatsby- Modernism and the Roaring Twenties as a metaphor for the duality of The American Dream

2.3 Write reflective compositions: a. Explore the significance of personal experiences, events, conditions, or concerns by using rhetorical strategies (e.g., narration, description, exposition, persuasion). b. Draw comparisons between specific incidents and broader themes that illustrate the writer's important beliefs or generalizations about life. c. Maintain a balance in describing individual incidents and relate those incidents to more general and abstract ideas.

Reflective journals Reflective Essay Things they carried Seminar sets: student choice in reading and writing.

2.6 Deliver multimedia presentations: a. Combine text, images, and sound and draw information from many sources (e.g., television broadcasts, videos, films, newspapers, magazines, CD-ROMs, the Internet, electronic media-generated images).

Possible texts include:

Their Eyes Were Watching God Zora Neale Huston Yellow Raft on Blue Water Michael Dorris Stranger In A Strange Land Robert Heinline Slaughterhouse Five Kurt VonnegutJr. St. Maybe Anne Tyler One flew Over the Cuckoos Nest Ken Kesey The House of Spirits Mama Day

RRJ/Reading Response Journal/Homework Assignments/Annotations Grading Rubric

from Reading Response Logs by Mary Kooy/JanWells, Pembroke Publishers Ltd., Markham, Ontario, Canada L3R 3K9 1996

A reading journal is an effective way to keep a record of your reading responses - positive or negative, sure or unsure. It offers a chance to respond personally, to ask questions, wonder, predict, or reflect on the characters, events, literary elements, or language of a text. As you read take time to record your observations. You may do this as ideas strike you or after you have read a small portion of the text, for example ten pages. Write often and record as many of your observations as possible. Do not summarize. Instead, record your textual observations. Some of the first nine week's essays will reflect your responses, so take time and care when writing in your journal.

If you are having trouble beginning an entry, try some of these "starters." I was impressed by...I noticed that...I wonder about...Some questions I have are...I don't understand...I now understand why/how/what...Something I notice appreciate/don't appreciate/wonder about is...I predict...An interesting word/sentence/thought is...This reminds me of...I never thought...I was surprised by... Please keep in mind that these logs are not meant to be a personal diary. They are meant to be read by others and should relate only to the assigned material. You will be sharing your journal in class, so keep this in mind as you write. When sharing you will have the opportunity to confirm, clarify, and modify your responses through discussion. There are handouts to accompany this assignment. Make sure you have them all. Generally three stages of student work are exhibited in these journals. You should strive for stage three. Stage I: A literal surface encounter with the text. The work of students at this level will have some or many of the following characteristics. · · · · · · · · · · lacks a critical interest in the narrative primarily summarizes the selection unsupported by evidence from the text or experience predictions are unrealistic or improbable fails to ask questions or hypothesize uses stereotypical responses uses images drawn from movies or television entries are too short confusion about the text and the story off-topic responses

Stage II: Evidence and understanding and appreciation of text. The work of students at this level will have some or many of the following characteristics: · · · · · · · does not summarize, but rather reflects upon the narrative personal connections between text and student's own experiences are made predictions are plausible given the scenario (but may change after further reading) demonstrates an ability to understand characters' motivations quotes from text for support ability to hypothesize and predict evidence that students are engaged in the text

Stage III: Synthesis and evaluation of the text. The work of students at this level will have some or many of these characteristics. · a strong interest in the material as evidenced through an awareness of levels of meaning

· · · · · · · · ·

judgments are textually and experientially based predictions are thoughtful and keenly observed character analysis is consistent with the material presented show an understanding of character motivation comparisons and connections are found between text and other literary and artistic works recognizes the author's writing choices and reasons for those choices recognizes the energy and deliberateness of the writing process awareness that their own personal beliefs may differ from those expressed in the text demonstrates an awareness of point of view.

Information

english 11 syllabus

11 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

1258447


Notice: fwrite(): send of 197 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531