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Gateway Program Cycling Plan Overview

September 2005

Including Alternative Modes FINAL DRAFT

G at eway Bike Plan Ov erview September 2005.. doc

Table of Contents

Executive Summary............................................................................................................................ 1 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................ 3 1.1 1.2 2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3. 4. Gateway Program Description ................................................................................ 3 Gateway Cycling Plan Overview ............................................................................ 4 The Importance of Cycling....................................................................................... 6 Legislative Support ................................................................................................... 6 Scope ........................................................................................................................... 7 Improvement Rationale ............................................................................................ 7

Cycling and Walking as a Transportation Mode............................................................. 6

Consultation ........................................................................................................................... 9 Component 1: Gateway Cycling Infrastructure............................................................. 10 4.1 4.2 4.3 Port Mann/Highway 1 (PMH1)............................................................................ 10 South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) .................................................................... 14 North Fraser Perimeter Road (NFPR) .................................................................. 17

5. 6. 7.

Component 2: Options to Enhance Adjacent Municipal Networks .......................... 20 Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ 21 Next Steps ............................................................................................................................. 22

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Abbreviations and Acronyms

AADT ­ Average Annual Daily Traffic BC MoT ­ British Columbia Ministry of Transportation BEST ­ Better Environmentally Sound Transportation CPR ­ Canadian Pacific Railway CVG ­ Central Valley Greenway GEB ­ Golden Ears Bridge GVRD ­ Greater Vancouver Regional District GVTA/TransLink ­ Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority HOV ­ High Occupancy Vehicle I/C ­ Interchange NFPR ­ North Fraser Perimeter Road O/P ­ Overpass PMH1 ­ Port Mann/Highway 1 RFP ­ Request for Proposal SFPR ­ South Fraser Perimeter Road TAC ­ Transportation Association of Canada U/P ­ Underpass VACC ­ Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition vph ­ vehicles per hour veh ­ vehicles

List of Exhibits

Exhibit 1.1 Exhibit 2.1 Exhibit 4.1 Exhibit 4.2 Exhibit 4.3 Gateway Program Corridors..................................................................................... 4 Typical Cycling Facility Cross-Sections................................................................... 8 Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on PMH1.......................... 12 Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on SFPR............................ 16 Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on NFPR**........................ 19

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Executive Summary

The Gateway Program was established by the Province of British Columbia, in response to the impact of growing regional congestion, to improve the movement of people, goods and transit throughout Greater Vancouver. The Program includes development or improvement of three highway corridors within the region including Port Mann/Highway 1 (PMH1), South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR) and North Fraser Perimeter Road (NFPR). One of the primary goals of the Gateway Program is to facilitate better connections to transit, cycling and pedestrian networks. Accordingly, the current Gateway Pre-Design Concept has been developed to accommodate cycling and pedestrian modes, in addition to vehicle modes. The Gateway Program Cycling Plan Overview provides a summary snapshot of work completed to date pertaining to the integration of cycling and pedestrians into the overall pre-design concept. As the Program scope is refined, and following further public and stakeholder consultation, planning for cycling and pedestrian facilities will be developed to a more detailed level. The proposed plan accommodates commuter cyclists and pedestrians plus other alternative modes in two ways. It provides: 1. pedestrian/cycling facilities and improvements within the pre-design scope of the Gateway Program concept, in accordance with MoT policy and; 2. funding for additional improvements to adjacent municipal cycling facilities and networks in support of the above improvements, on a cost-shared basis. The first component was developed with input from the TransLink Bicycle Advisory Group, GVRD Parks, municipal staff and cycling organizations. Based on preliminary estimates, these facilities represent approximately $50 million1 in cycling infrastructure. The majority of this cost is associated with multi-use paths on and approaching the new Port Mann Bridge plus additional width on structures (interchanges and/or overpasses) along the three Gateway Program corridors. Of the total estimated investment of $50 million, approximately $7 million has been allocated for potential enhanced facilities within the Highway 1 corridor allowing for better integration with adjacent municipal cycling networks. An overview of the first component of the plan is described within this report. It assumes that facilities for cyclists and pedestrians will be provided across Highway 1 and on the proposed new Port Mann Bridge. The current prohibition of cyclists on Highway 1 within the scope of the Gateway Program will be maintained due to safety concerns. For the North and South Fraser Perimeter Roads, it is assumed that cyclists will be accommodated on shoulders for the majority of the corridors. All corridors assume accommodation for pedestrians and cyclists at interchanges/overpasses.

1 All costs contained in this document are preliminary estimates and are subject to change.

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The second component of this plan identifies an additional $10 million to fund cost-sharing improvements with municipalities for off-corridor projects that will enhance the overall effectiveness of the regional cycling network. These improvements would strengthen municipal cycling networks as well as maximize the effectiveness of cycling facilities within the Gateway corridors. Since these projects will not be directly impacted by Gateway construction, they could proceed in advance of the overall program. Municipal projects would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. No consultation has yet occurred with respect to this component of the plan. The combined value of Gateway Program commitments and municipal cost-sharing represents approximately $70 million of infrastructure for cycling associated with development of the Gateway Program. The large level of proposed investment would generate a significant improvement in the ability of cyclists to move safely and efficiently within the GVRD. Cycling improvements on the Gateway Corridors are part of a larger cycling network being developed by local, regional and the provincial governments. Successful integration with these networks will maximise the positive impacts of proposed pedestrian/cyclist improvements. It is intended that further dialogue with the Provincial Advisory Cycling Committee, TransLink, municipalities, the GVRD and Greater Vancouver cycling groups will take place, to refine the proposed concept, during subsequent community consultation.

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1.

Introduction

The Gateway Program Cycling Plan Overview has been prepared to outline how cyclists, pedestrians and other alternative modes could be accommodated within the larger Gateway Program concept. Facilitating cyclist and pedestrian trips are important goals of the Gateway Program and has been accommodated along with other modes within the current pre-design concept. Provision of facilities for commuter cyclists and pedestrians is a primary objective of the Program, while recreational cyclist and equestrian needs have been considered at specific locations.

1.1

Gateway Program Description

The Gateway Program is a proposed series of road and bridge improvements to the Greater Vancouver highway network designed to address congestion and improve the movement of people, goods and transit within the region. These improvements involve upgrading or developing three highway corridors within the Lower Mainland including:

·

The Port Mann/Highway 1 Project includes twinning the Port Mann Bridge, upgrading interchanges and improving access and safety on Highway 1 from Vancouver to Langley. The project provides for extending HOV lanes to Langley, and allows for transit and cycling over the Port Mann Bridge. It will relieve severe congestion that impacts commuters and the large numbers of commercial vehicles that rely on this route. The South Fraser Perimeter Road Project (SFPR) is a primarily new four-lane, 80 km/h route along the south side of the Fraser River extending from Deltaport Way in Southwest Delta to 176th Street and the Golden Ears Bridge connector road in Surrey/Langley. It will provide a continuous and efficient route to serve the port facilities, rail yards and industrial areas along this key economic corridor, and will also benefit commuters. The North Fraser Perimeter Road Project (NFPR) encompasses improvements on existing roads to provide an efficient, continuous route from New Westminster to Maple Ridge. The Gateway Program is responsible for the segments from King Edward Street (Coquitlam) to Maple Ridge, including a new Pitt River Bridge. Proposed upgrades will improve safety and reliability along this important corridor, serving goods movement, commuters and growing communities. The replacement of the Pitt River Bridges and construction of a new interchange at the junction of Mary Hill Bypass and Lougheed Highway is being delivered in advance of the remainder of the NFPR corridor. Cycling and pedestrian facilities are included in this project and will incorporate features for commuter and recreational users. Details of pedestrian and cyclist facilities pertaining to this portion of the NFPR corridor are currently being refined following consultation with stakeholders and the public.

·

·

The three corridors are shown below in Exhibit 1.1.

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INTRODUCTION

EXHIBIT 1.1

Gateway Program Corridors

1.2

Gateway Cycling Plan Overview

This document outlines the (Fall 2005) Gateway Program pre-design concept for accommodating cycling and pedestrians. It recognizes that cycling and walking are important components of the Program and outlines how cyclists and pedestrians will be accommodated within the larger network strategy. The Program plans to facilitate the development of the regional cycling network through two primary components: · · Component 1: The construction of pedestrian and cycling facilities in conjunction with infrastructure improvements along the three Gateway corridors. ($50 million) Component 2: Funding for further enhancements to adjacent municipal cycling facilities and networks, on a cost-shared basis to complement the identified corridor improvements. ($10 million available for contribution)

This document focuses on describing the proposed pedestrian and cycling facilities associated with infrastructure improvements in the current Gateway pre-design concept. Projects initiated under the second component will be determined in consultation with municipalities. This pre-design concept recognises that the overall concept, including components for accommodating cyclists and pedestrians will continue to evolve. Consultation with the

4

INTRODUCTION

public, municipalities and stakeholders may result in changes, in addition to those related to technical and financial analysis. To describe the Gateway Program's current proposed cyclist and pedestrian improvements, the following components are presented: · · · An outline of the benefits of cycling and cycling policies, including the Ministry of Transportation's (MoT) Cycling Policy. A description of cycling and walking conditions in each corridor including a listing of cycling barriers as identified by municipalities and stakeholders. Possible network improvements, within the Gateway corridors, to remove or mitigate barriers for cyclists and pedestrians.

In accordance with the Ministry of Transportation's Cycling Policy the program has focused on developing a comprehensive solution for accommodating pedestrians and commuter cyclists. These modes are related to both regional and local travel. Other modes such as recreational cyclists and equestrians are generally addressed in specific areas.

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2.

Cycling and Walking as a Transportation Mode

The Gateway Program will improve the movement of people, goods and transit in the Lower Mainland. To achieve these goals, the Program contemplates major improvements to Highway 1 and the NFPR plus the development of the SFPR corridor. The Program has the opportunity, when major investments in infrastructure are being made, to accommodate cyclists and encourage cycling as an alternative mode of transportation by providing high quality cycling facilities.

2.1

The Importance of Cycling

During the past 20 years, cycling has come to be seen as an important component of the transportation network. Within the Lower Mainland, all levels of government (municipal, regional and provincial) encourage cycling as a transportation mode and have promoted the development of the cycling network. There are many reasons for this support with benefits generally falling into one or more of the following categories: · Transportation Network Efficiency ­ Cycling as a commuting option has the potential to make better use of existing infrastructure by using less space per person than other modes thus reducing the demand for future road infrastructure improvements. Environmental ­ Cycling is a sustainable form of transportation, consuming low levels of energy and producing no pollution. Health ­ Cycling has numerous health benefits and promotes an active lifestyle. Tourism ­ Development of recreational cycling can generate economic activity from cycling activities and events.

· · ·

By improving the quality of connections and facilities, cycling can become a more attractive transportation mode for commuting and recreation.

2.2

Legislative Support

The Province of British Columbia, through the Ministry of Transportation, has developed guidelines for accommodating cyclists on provincial facilities. These guidelines have been compiled into the Ministry of Transportation's Cycling Policy. It is stipulated that new or upgraded highways under the jurisdiction of the Ministry, including those in the Gateway Program, should, in general, provide for cyclist access. Exceptions may be made for projects that cannot accommodate cyclists due to excessive cost, safety concerns or legislative reasons. The policy recognises that facilities appropriate for commuter and recreational cyclists may differ and in some cases the Program may consider separate/enhanced solutions to accommodate both groups.

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CYCLING AND WALKING AS A TRANSPORTATION MODE

The GVRD and GVTA also support increased use of cycling as a transportation mode. Throughout the region, the percentage of commuters that cycle has increased steadily, especially within the Burrard Peninsula. With more cyclists on the road network, the need for cycling facilities continues to grow and provisions for cyclists and pedestrians are being made in new infrastructure projects such as TransLink's Golden Ears Bridge. Better integration with transit (SkyTrain and buses) and higher densities in the regional town centres will also help to encourage cycling trips. Both SFPR and NFPR have the opportunity to become important cycling corridors; upgrades to Highway 1 provide an opportunity to improve pedestrian/cycling crossings of the corridor, particularly across the Fraser River via the proposed second Port Mann Bridge structure. The nine municipalities along the Gateway Program corridors all have bicycle networks and support cycling as a recreational and commuting alternative. Accommodation for cyclists on or across these corridors would improve local cycling networks and enhance community connections. For long distance trips, the NFPR and SFPR corridors are expected to act as important inter-municipal routes. Facilities at the Port Mann and Pitt River Bridges will permit cycling access across major marine corridors.

2.3

Scope

The primary goal of the proposed pedestrian/cyclist improvements is to provide appropriate cycling and pedestrian access along and across the three Gateway corridors. Proposed improvements focus on accommodating commuter cyclists and pedestrians but also accommodate recreational cyclists with particular provisions in specific areas such as the Pitt River Bridge. Other then on the new Port Mann Bridge, cyclists will continue to be prohibited due to high traffic volumes on Highway 1 and connecting ramps. Along SFPR and NFPR, it is proposed that cyclists will be accommodated on the highways or on parallel local routes. Cyclist and pedestrian facilities will be constructed at most crossing points in all corridors to provide access to/from the local road network, or to complete connections across the corridor. Cycling facilities built as part of the core Gateway Program infrastructure improvements will be limited to the scope of roadway and bridge improvements. Additional work outside of this scope, or limits of construction, may be developed in partnership with municipalities, via Component 2 of this plan.

2.4

Improvement Rationale

Cycling facilities proposed as part of the Gateway Program have been developed in accordance with the Ministry of Transportation's Cycling Policy and the Transportation Association of Canada's (TAC) Geometric Design Guide for Canadian Roads (1999). These documents, depending on several criteria, offer guidance on the appropriate cycling facilities for different roadway classifications and cyclist user groups. For illustrative purposes, Exhibit 2.1 provides a series of typical treatments from the TAC design guide and the conditions in which they are typically used. It is proposed that these facility types will be used on the Gateway Program, though local conditions may require specific treatments.

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CYCLING AND WALKING AS A TRANSPORTATION MODE

EXHIBIT 2.1

Typical Cycling Facility Cross-Sections

Description On-Road - Shared Wide Lane ­ Cyclists are accommodated within the travel lane, lane width can vary but typically is a minimum 4.3m wide. Often used where vehicle traffic volumes and/or speeds are low.

On-Road - Shoulder ­ On roads that have marked shoulders, cyclists are directed to use the shoulder. Ideal for rural locations where curbs are not present. Shoulder widths should be 1.5-2.5m wide.

On-Road - Bike Lane ­ A marked bike lane between the shoulder/curb and outside lane, delineated by paint line. Appropriate for areas of higher vehicle volumes or at intersections with moderate vehicle speeds. Bike lanes are typically 1.5-2.5m in width. In cases where opening day conditions do not warrant bike lanes, they may initially be marked as shoulders.

On-Road - Bike Path (Low/Moderate Speed) ­ To match the City of Burnaby Urban Trail standard these routes will generally be 3-4m in width and accommodate 2-way cyclist and pedestrian activity. The path is separated from traffic by a curb or concrete barrier.

On-Road - Bike Path (High Speed) ­ Same as above but physically separated from traffic with a concrete barrier and cyclist railing (1.4m total height)

Off-Road - Bike Path ­ A 3-4m cyclist/pedestrian path that is physically separated from the roadway.

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3.

Consultation

The Ministry recognizes the important role consultation provides when developing multimodal plans in complex environments such as the Gateway Program corridors. The extent to which Gateway's cycling infrastructure is successful will depend on its ability to integrate with municipal networks and to improve/add links to the regional cycling community. The first component of the Plan has been developed with the input of important cycling stakeholders such as municipalities, members of the VACC, the TransLink Bicycle Working Group and BEST, each of whom provided input. This document has been developed to support further consultation efforts on both components of this plan. Based on initial consultation several input themes were observed, including: · There is a strong desire to improve cyclist access across the PMH1 corridor. Future interchanges and overpasses/underpasses should accommodate cyclists and pedestrians. Existing crossings pose some challenges for both user groups. The accommodation of cycling across a future crossing at Port Mann Bridge and the proposed Pitt River Bridge will help reduce the barrier effects of the Pitt and Fraser Rivers. Accommodate cycling on the North and South Fraser Perimeter Roads. Maintain existing crossing points of recreational trails, including the Central Valley Greenway.

·

· ·

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4.

Component 1: Gateway Cycling Infrastructure

The following section presents a description of each corridor and the proposed improvements being considered in the Gateway Programs Pre-Design Concept.

4.1

Port Mann/Highway 1 (PMH1)

Existing Conditions

The Port Mann/Highway 1 corridor runs east-west from Vancouver through Burnaby and Coquitlam, crossing the Fraser River heading east through Surrey, Langley, and beyond. Along the corridor, several cycling/pedestrian facilities exist, including: · · · Central Valley Greenway ­ A mixed use recreational/commuter facility from Braid Station in New Westminster to False Creek in Vancouver. Lougheed Highway ­ Bike lanes were added to this major arterial route in conjunction with the development of the Millennium SkyTrain Project. 104th Ave. east of 160th St. Interchange is identified as part of the City of Surrey's cycling network.

These routes, along with other components of municipal cycling networks provide cyclists and pedestrians parallel east-west alternatives to the Highway 1 corridor. There is currently no cyclist/pedestrian access to, or across the Port Mann Bridge, with the nearest alternatives being the Pattullo Bridge (to the west) and the Albion Ferry (to the east) via the Pitt River Bridge. The MoT does not permit cyclist or pedestrian access on Highway 1 within the boundaries of the Gateway Program (see Motor Vehicle Act2) due to safety concerns related to high mainline and ramp volumes. In reviewing a study conducted for the Vancouver Island Highway Project that identified conditions where cyclists could be safely accommodated, it was noted that in other jurisdictions cycling had not been allowed on limited access facilities where daily traffic volumes exceeded 90,000 vehicles or where ramp volumes exceeded 900 vehicles per hour, a condition Highway 1 consistently exceeds throughout the study area. Where cycling has been allowed on Highway 1, there were no suitable parallel routes, which is not the case within the Gateway portion of the Highway 1 corridor. Interchanges along Highway 1 were built in the 1960's and reflect facilities of that era. Pedestrian facilities are limited to sidewalks, in some cases without proper approaches. Cycling facilities, although not originally provided for, have, in some cases, been added in the form of shared lanes. The 200th Street interchange, completed in 2004, includes shoulders for cyclists, and sidewalk facilities on the crossing structure and approaches.

2 For further information see MoT web site http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/popular-topics/cycling/Legislation/restrictions.htm

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

The major theme of issues concerning the Port Mann/Highway 1 Corridor pertains to the quality of cyclist/pedestrian connections crossing the highway. In addition to limited pedestrian/cyclists facilities, many of these structures have become inadequate for current traffic volumes, leading to congestion. This is a significant issue in Burnaby and Surrey, where Highway 1 bisects urban neighbourhoods. In Burnaby, the highway bisects the City and is a major barrier to north-south cyclist traffic. In Surrey, increasing congestion on the highway has reduced accessibility to the Fraser Heights Neighbourhood and limited facilities are a significant barrier to cycling.

Proposed Improvements

Proposed improvements along the Highway 1 corridor are focused on providing cyclist and pedestrian access across the highway. It is proposed that facilities for walking and cycling be provided at local road crossing points; ramps that connect directly to the highway will not generally include pedestrian/cyclist access. The type of cycling facility provided will depend on several factors, but in general will consider existing municipal facilities adjacent to the interchange. In some cases, planned facilities identified by municipalities and stakeholders that reflect future network objectives were accommodated to avoid future modifications. Starting with the BC MoT's Cycling Policy, a concept was developed along Highway 1 that provided safe and efficient accommodation of cyclists and pedestrians across the corridor. This concept, Option A, was based on TAC guidelines and provided bike lanes, shoulders or wide lanes for cyclists crossing the Highway 1 corridor with a strong focus on commuter cyclists. It also provides for sidewalks at local road crossing points such as interchanges and overpasses/underpasses. A second concept of enhanced improvements has been developed to create more seamless connections with municipal cycling networks along the corridor. Option B proposes enhancements at several locations within the corridor including conversion of shared lanes and shoulder facilities to bike lanes and multi-use paths. These additions over Option A would require support from municipalities through development of their networks to meet the enhanced investments, ensuring they are utilized to their full potential. The extent to which Option B is implemented will be influenced by consultation with the public, municipalities and stakeholders. In addition to the facilities outlined above, both concepts include a 2-way multi-use path on the west side, separated from traffic, on a new Port Mann Bridge structure. Connections on the Surrey side would connect directly to the local road network; on the Coquitlam side connections are proposed to United Blvd, Mary Hill Bypass and via a multiuse path through Cape Horn Interchange to the Lougheed Hwy. The provisions for recreational cycling facilities along the Highway 1 corridor are limited. However, the facility at Port Mann Bridge will be separated from vehicle traffic allowing a wide range of cyclists, including recreational users to cross the bridge. In Exhibit 4.1, details of proposed facilities are provided on a segment by segment basis along the corridor.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

EXHIBIT 4.1

Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on PMH1

Location 216th St 200 St 192

nd th

Proposed Cycling Facilities ­ Option A Shoulders Shoulders (Existing) On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders 2-Way On Road (Separated) Path on east side

Proposed Cycling Facilities ­ Option B On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders (Existing) On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes On Road Bike Lanes 2-Way On Road (Separated) Path on east side New pedestrian/ Cycling Connection to Fraser Heights (as an nd alternative to152 , only one crossing would be developed)

St

176th St 160 St 156th St (if developed) 152

nd th

St

112th St Port Mann Bridge Cape Horn King Edward St Brunette Ave North Road Cariboo Rd Gaglardi Way Kensington On Road Bike Lanes 2-Way On Road(Barrier Separated) Path (west side of new structure) Off Road Bike Paths/On Road (Barrier Separated) Paths connecting Mary Hill, Lougheed and United Blvd Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on road bike lanes on municipal network (if overpass reconstructed) On Road Bike Lanes

2-Way On Road (Barrier Separated) Path (west side of new structure) Off Road Bike Paths/On Road (Barrier Separated) Paths connecting Mary Hill, Lougheed and United Blvd On Road Bike Lanes On Road Bike Lanes Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on road bike lanes on municipal network (if overpass reconstructed) On Road Bike Lane (NB) ­ Urban Trail (SB) Provision for future bike lane or shoulder if/when south approach of interchange added. On Road Bike Lane (NB) ­ Urban Trail (SB) or Ped/Cycle

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

EXHIBIT 4.1

Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on PMH1

Location Sperling Sprott Douglas Wayburne Willingdon Gilmore Boundary BNSF Overpass

st 1 Avenue

Proposed Cycling Facilities ­ Option A Possible alternative to Kensington pending further discussions with City of Burnaby On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on road bikes lanes on municipal network (if interchange reconstructed) Accommodation of Central Valley Greenway to pass under BNSF O/P Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on-road bike lanes on municipal network (if interchange reconstructed) Cyclists will continue to be prohibited from Highway 1.

Proposed Cycling Facilities ­ Option B Possible alternative to Kensington pending further discussions with City of Burnaby On Road Bike Lane (WB) ­ Urban Trail (EB) On Road Bike Lanes On Road Bike Lanes On Road Bike Lane (SB) ­ Urban Trail (NB) On Road Bike Lane (NB) ­ Urban Trail (SB) Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on road bikes lanes on municipal network (if interchange reconstructed) Accommodation of Central Valley Greenway to pass under BNSF O/P Accommodate for shared wide lanes or on-road bike lanes on municipal network (if interchange reconstructed) Cyclists will continue to be prohibited from Highway 1.

Highway 1 Mainline (excluding Port Mann)

* All crossings will facilitate pedestrians on sidewalks.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

4.2

South Fraser Perimeter Road (SFPR)

Existing Conditions

The SFPR will be a new highway corridor traveling east-west between Delta and Surrey, generally along the south shore of the Fraser River. Current cycling connections east-west across North Surrey are made using the municipal arterial network, and, in some cases, involve steep grades and circuitous routing. Through North Delta and to the west, River Road provides a reasonably good connection but high truck volumes and narrow shoulders with numerous driveways make this route uncomfortable for some cyclists. In the area around Ladner and the southwest portions of Delta, 64th Street currently functions as a good north/south route. The western portion of Delta is an active equestrian area, particularly along 64th Street, 60th Ave, 62B Street, and Vassey Road. For recreational users in Surrey, access to waterfront areas such as Brownsville Park and Big Bend Regional Park Reserve were identified as important destinations for pedestrian and cyclist traffic. In Delta, Boundary Bay Regional Park forms an important recreational destination for pedestrian, cycling and equestrian users. As a new highway, accommodation of cyclists along the SFPR will focus on maintaining good connections across and along the corridor. The South Fraser Perimeter Road is proposed as a primarily new, four-lane, 80 km/h route running from Deltaport Way and Hwy 17 in Delta along the south shore of the Fraser River to the north end of Hwy 15 and east end of the Golden Ears Bridge Project in Surrey. The route traverses a series of industrial areas along the river, each forming employment centres, and potential destinations for commuter cyclists. At the west end of the corridor, Hwy 17 connects to the Tsawwassen Ferry Terminal with important cycling links to Victoria and Vancouver Island. At the east end of the corridor, SFPR provides access to important employment centres in Port Kells and connection via the proposed Golden Ears Bridge to Pitt Meadows and Maple Ridge. The SFPR route would improve cyclist access to several employment centres through Surrey and Delta as well as providing a new regional route, with good grades, connecting several Fraser River bridges and other major routes, ending at Highway 17 which connects to Vancouver Island ferries.

Proposed Improvements

Traffic volumes on the proposed SFPR facility are predicted to be considerably lower than Highway 1. However, reflecting adjacent industrial land use, the corridor is projected to carry larger proportions of commercial traffic, including heavy trucks. It is proposed that cyclists will be accommodated on the shoulder for the majority of the corridor. In several segments, the availability of parallel routes will allow for alternative routing of cyclists around several proposed interchanges, thereby allowing cyclists to avoid higher speed/volume ramp merges. At most proposed interchanges and overpasses, similarly to the Port Mann/Highway 1, cyclists will be accommodated using bike lanes or on shoulders. In some areas, particularly in Delta, proposed cyclist/pedestrian crossings are on wide shared lanes/shoulders, due to the rural farm nature of roads in this area, similar to 34 B Ave over Hwy 17. The cycling concept presented is based on a free-flow SFPR with grade separation and interchanges. If interchanges are staged, intersections provided in the interim will be designed to accommodate cyclists and pedestrians.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

Moving east from 80th St in Delta the corridor's alignment is generally established, however west of 80th St, three alternative alignment options are accommodated within the pre-design cycling concept. The cycling concepts proposed all depart SFPR (although entrance and exit points vary) and use 64th St to accommodate cyclists from south of Ladner to north of Highway 99. The accommodation of cyclists on parallel local streets was proposed to avoid complex interchanges at Ladner Trunk Road and/or Hwy 99. From 80th St east, it is proposed that cyclists be accommodated on the shoulder, although they may be directed off the highway briefly at the proposed Sunbury (Nordel Way) and Fraser Heights (104th Ave/176th St) Interchanges due to safety considerations. Pedestrians will be largely accommodated on sidewalks proposed for interchanges and overpasses that connect to the municipal road network on both sides of the highway. Recreational cycling/pedestrian facilities along SFPR have been accommodated at selected locations. In Delta, at 64th Ave, where a cycling/walking and equestrian route has been identified by the Corporation of Delta, an overpass has been proposed over the SFPR providing access to recreational areas along the shoreline of Boundary Bay. At the Fraser Heights Interchange access to Surrey Bend Regional Park and Barnston Island will be maintained. On the following page, Exhibit 4.2, details of proposed facilities are provided on a segment by segment basis along the corridor.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

EXHIBIT 4.2

Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on SFPR

Location 34B Ave 34B Ave/64th St

th th SFPR (60 Ave to 80 St)

Proposed Cycling Facilities (Upgraded Hwy 17 Alignment Only) Off Road Bike Path (Connection to Local Road Network) Shared Lanes (existing) Shoulder On Road Bike Lanes Proposed Cycling Facilities (Relocated Highway 17 ­ North and South Options)) Off Road Bike Path (Connection to Local Road Network ­ Relocated Highway 17 (South Option) only) Shared Lanes (as per existing conditions) Shoulders (as per existing conditions) Shared Lanes (as per existing conditions) On Road Bike Lanes (marked) Shoulder Off Road Bike Path (Connection to Local Road Network) Proposed Cycling Facilities (East of Nordel ­ Common to Both Alignments) Local Road Network ­ On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders ­ Access to local road network at I/C, O/P and U/P's. Possible optional route on existing River Rd ­ Shoulder or On Road Bike Lanes (as per existing conditions ) Shoulders Exit to local road network ­ On Road Bike Lanes Shoulders Local Roads to Shoulders

Ladner Trunk Rd Location 64th Ave O/P 64th St Ladner Trunk Rd 72

nd

St

Burns Dr SFPR Burns Dr to Nordel 72

nd

St O/P

Location SFPR @ Nordel Way SFPR (Nordel Way to 176th St/Highway 15) River Rd (Centre St to Elevator Rd)

th SFPR @ 176 St (to GEB) th SFPR @ 176 St (to Hwy 15)

Frontage Rd to GEB 176 St/Highway 15 to Highway 1

th

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

4.3

North Fraser Perimeter Road (NFPR)

Existing Conditions

The proposed North Fraser Perimeter Road corridor extends from the Queensborough Bridge in New Westminster to the connection between Lougheed Hwy and TransLink's new Golden Ears Bridge in Pitt Meadows. Although many components of the corridor exist, the NFPR would create a continuous route to connect between gaps in existing components as well as upgrade some existing facilities. The Gateway Program is responsible for the section from King Edward St east, with the western segment being delivered by TransLink. Many segments of NFPR are already popular with bike tours, bike racers, and commuters, especially east of the Pitt River Bridge with bike tour guides often referring to Lougheed Highway as the Cycling Gateway to Vancouver. The corridor passes through several major employment centres, particularly in the Cape Horn area and Port Coquitlam, forming potential destinations for commuter cyclists. The Pitt River Bridge currently provides twoway cyclist access on the sidewalk of the north span, although some commuters travel along the roadway on the south span. Farther west, United Boulevard is not wide enough for bike lanes and, with heavy truck volumes, is not considered an ideal cycling route. The future development of a municipal greenway path, by the City of Coquitlam, adjacent to the Fraser River from Braid St. to the Port Mann Bridge will provide an appropriate parallel route for cyclists is this area. At the Pitt River Bridge, the Pitt River Regional Greenway and the PoCo Trail travel along the east and west banks of the Pitt River. In addition, the Pitt River Bridge forms part of the Trans-Canada Trail.

Proposed Improvements

Proposed improvements for the NFPR corridor would focus on maintaining or improving existing pedestrian and cyclist access. For the majority of the corridor, it is proposed that cyclists would be accommodated on the highway shoulder. Where interchanges are developed, it is proposed that cyclists and pedestrians will be accommodated across the interchange and cyclists will be provided access to/from the corridor. At intersections, standard MoT treatments accommodating cyclists and pedestrians will be used. Replacement of the Pitt River Bridges and construction of a new interchange to replace the intersection of Mary Hill Bypass and Lougheed Highway is currently being advanced. The provision of cyclist and pedestrian access through the interchange and across a new highlevel Pitt River Bridge is part of the current project scope. Details of the project have been presented as part of the public consultation process with the public, municipalities and stakeholders. Pre-design consultation with municipalities, the GVRD, stakeholders and the public has affirmed the importance of the Pitt River Bridges as a commuter and recreational cycling route. Forming the only connection across the Pitt River, and with several popular recreational routes along the Pitt River foreshore nearby, the future bridge would likely be used by significant numbers of recreational and commuter cyclists. Therefore, the proposed cycling facilities have been designed to accommodate both cyclist groups and pedestrians.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

Public consultation further identified the need for an eastbound commuter cyclist facility; the current concept has been updated to provide a shoulder facility in the eastbound direction. East of the Pitt River it is proposed that cyclists be accommodated on the shoulder along Highway 7 with connections at Kennedy Rd and Harris Rd, similar to existing conditions. Along the Mary Hill Bypass segment, it is proposed that cyclists continue to operate on the shoulder as per existing conditions with access at existing connection points maintained. Where reconfiguration of existing intersections occurs, accommodation of cyclists and pedestrians will be included. At Highway 1 and United Blvd, cyclists can connect to an off-road trail network through Cape Horn Interchange and onto Lougheed Highway (west) or to Port Mann Bridge. Cyclists can then use the Lougheed Highway to connect to points farther west. On the following page, Exhibit 4.3, details of proposed facilities are provided on a segment by segment basis along the corridor.

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COMPONENT 1: GATEWAY CYCLING INFRASTRUCTURE

EXHIBIT 4.3

Summary of Pre-Design Concept Cycling Facilities on NFPR**

Location NFPR (United Blvd to Pitt River Bridge) Pitt River Rd Shaughnessy Broadway St Kingsway Ave Pitt River Bridge Crossing* Mary Hill Bypass/Lougheed Interchange* NFPR (Lougheed Hwy ­ Dewdney Trunk Rd to GEB) Harris Rd Proposed/Requested Cycling Facilities Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes Possible grade separation for eastbound off ramp crossing. On Road Bike Lanes, mainline cyclists may pass through ramps due to high ramp volumes. On Road Bike Lanes, mainline cyclists may pass through ramps due to high ramp volumes. Accommodation for commuter/recreational cyclists across new bridge. Maintain Dike Trail Access Under Bridge Connect Recreational Trail to Bridge Shoulders On Road Bike Lanes

*Concept continues to be developed as part of Pitt River Bridge and Mary Hill Interchange Project ** Reflects long-term grade separated concept; interim connections will be intersections at grade.

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5.

Component 2: Options to Enhance Adjacent Municipal Networks

The Ministry of Transportation is committed to enhancing cycling as a transportation alternative throughout British Columbia. As such, the Gateway Program envisions a number of improvements for cyclists within the project boundaries, as outlined previously in this report. The Program recognizes that to maximize the benefits these improvements provide to cyclists, they must integrate into the larger regional and municipal cycling network. To this end, the Program has dedicated an additional $10 million in funding to facilitate construction of improvements on municipal cycling networks that complement Gateway investments. The fund is proposed to function largely in the same way as MoT's existing Cycling Infrastructure Partnership Program (CIPP) operates. Municipalities will prepare applications for funding of projects, which will then be selected based on evaluation guidelines. Candidate projects should conform to basic standards laid out in the eligibility criteria. Through discussions with municipalities, a number of potential projects have already been identified. However, additional projects will likely be brought forward through further discussions. These improvements would strengthen municipal cycling networks as well as maximize the effectiveness of cycling facilities within the Gateway corridors. Since these projects will not be affected by Gateway construction, they could proceed in advance of the overall program.

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6.

Conclusion

Incorporating provision for cyclists and pedestrians into the transportation/road network is an important goal of the Provincial Government and other levels of government in the Lower Mainland. This overview plan proposes a high-level concept for integrating these measures into the Gateway Program. As the scope of the Program is refined, so will the concept. To identify current barriers to cycling within the Gateway corridors, consultation with municipalities and other cycling stakeholders was undertaken. This consultation identified a number of issues that impact cyclists. It appears that many of the issues raised can be addressed by the Program, in particular those that affect commuter cyclists. There are also opportunities to partner with municipalities and stakeholder groups on related facilities that are adjacent to the Gateway corridors. This report includes a high-level concept to accommodate cyclists in each corridor based on the current Program concept. Additional funds have been set aside for off-corridor cycling network improvements that, combined with Gateway Program cycling infrastructure, will improve the movement of cyclists throughout the region. Costs attributed to implementation of the cycling plan per the Pre-Design Concept have been estimated at approximately $50 million. The majority of these costs are associated with additional width on the Port Mann Bridge and approaches plus the widening of structures crossing each corridor to provide additional road space for cyclists and sidewalks for pedestrians. An additional $10 million has been allocated for funding improvements that support the program but are not within the Gateway corridors; this funding would be distributed on a cost-sharing basis. Collectively the proposed improvements represent a quantum investment in cycling and pedestrian facilities in the Lower Mainland. The benefits of this investment through will pay dividends to the community at large years to come.

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7.

Next Steps

Using these tools, Gateway can develop effective road improvements for pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. The Gateway Program will consult with stakeholders and the public about the proposed Gateway cycling improvements presented in this document through a comprehensive public consultation process. Feedback will be combined with further financial and technical analysis to refine proposed cycling and pedestrian facilities to develop a more refined scope. Additional work will be undertaken to further develop the criteria and structure to evaluate proposals for off-corridor improvements under the cost-sharing component of the program.

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Information

Microsoft Word - Gateway Bike Plan Overview September 2005_4.9.doc

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