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Animated Adventures

A Teaching Resource

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Contents

01 02 03

Visiting: Independent - Animated Adventures Curriculum connections and Learning Outcomes Resources Teachers Notes Image Bank Supporting Documents Zoetrope Make Your Own Zoetrope Thaumatrope Make Your Own Thaumatrope Storyboard Skills Glossary Useful links

04 05

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Visiting: Independent Visit - Animated Adventures 01

INTRODUCTION

Session length: 1 hour Session Description: KS2 Cost: Free It's time to get animated in our latest exhibition, Animated Adventures, presented by W5. Explore, investigate and discover the world of animation in this temporary exhibition using our self-led resources, designed by our Learning Team along with the interactive games and activities in the gallery. The resources help to encourage exploration, discussion, questioning and thinking surrounding the topic of animation. You can also take part in our storyboard activity using the ready-made template, which you can take back to school to display and use for follow-up activities. Animated Adventures will be at The Herbert from 24th October to 17th January, book now to avoid disappointment. This teacher's resource pack has been designed to support the KS2 school curriculum. Within the pack you will find a selection of cross curricular activities supporting the development of key skills and other useful resources to compliment your work in the classroom. The activities are suitable to be carried out pre or post visit to the Herbert and we strongly recommend a visit to the museum to get the most out of your pack. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Learning Outcomes

· · · · Increased ability to ask questions and collect information relevant to the focus of enquiry. Opportunities to collect visual and other information to further develop ideas. Higher knowledge of the roles and purposes of artists, craftspeople, designers and animators. Developed exploration of a range of starting points for practical work. · · · Improved speaking and listening through group discussion and interaction. Higher ability for giving shape and organisation to written work. Development of planning and drafting in preparation for final layouts of work.

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Curriculum Connections and Learning Outcomes 02

Further exploration of how to convey ideas, feelings and emotions through creative text whilst improving skills for increasing reader interest. A broader vocabulary which they can use in inventive ways. Improved writing and presentations skills. Skills for using a variety of methods to convey ideas and designs. Opportunity to apply their experience of materials and processes to develop and control their own practical work. Further knowledge of materials and processes and how these can be used to match ideas and intentions.

Opportunity to prepare a neat, correct and clear final copy of written work.

Put all of the storyboards together to make one big sequence - how will this work? Can the frames from each storyboard be mixed together to make a story that has a start, middle and an ending?

Create new illustrations for the thaumatrope and zoetrope templates. Make the storyboard into a comic book.

Using the storyboard from the visit to The Herbert, turn it into a full length, written story.

Literacy

Art and Design

Using plasticine or modelling clay, create characters for the storyboard activities.

Increased knowledge of historical objects and an increased ability to make links between these objects with present day.

Zoetropes and thaumatropes were highly popular in Victorian times as toys and entertainment - what other toys were popular in the Victorian period? Do they still exist today? Have they been adapted or replaced with something else?

Animated Adventures

History Drama

Act out scenes from the storyboard developed at The Herbert. What equipment would be needed to make a stop-motion film? - Make a film using models from the storyboard

Citizenship Design and Technology

Research the job roles required for making an animation.

Opportunity to create, adapt and sustain different roles, individually or in groups.

Explore new ways to make zoetropes and thaumatropes move - what tools and methods could be used?

Higher knowledge of the roles and purposes involved in different jobs.

Higher ability for using characters, actions and narrative for conveying stories, themes, emotions and ideas.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Improved skills for working independently and collaborating with other on projects in two and three dimensions.

An increased understanding of tools and materials, how they are used and what they are used for.

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Teacher's Notes 03

Animation

Animations are created when images of 2D artworks or 3D models are rapidly shown in a sequence, which creates an illusion of movement. Computer Animation: There are two types of computer animation, which are 2D and 3D animations. 2D animations use similar processes to traditional animations, but the frames are enhanced and edited using computer programmes. Animations such as Danny Phantom and Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends use 2D animation processes. 3D animations build a virtual world digitally and create characters and objects that are much more realistic. Films such as Shrek, Toy Story and Finding Nemo are excellent examples of 3D animations.

Types of Animation

Tradional Animation: This type of animation refers to the oldest and historically the most popular and well known form of animation, where animations are drawn by hand, frame by frame. We refer to these animations more commonly as cartoons, with famous examples of tradtional animations being Cinderella, Tom and Jerry and The Simpsons. Stop Motion: Stop motion animation is when real objects are moved slightly for each frame for the sequence and then filmed or photgraphed, paused and the process is then repeated. Well known animations that use the stop motion technique are Wallace and Gromit, Coraline, Pingu and Bob the Builder. These still frames are then rapidly shown, one after the other, to make a moving picture.

How do we Capture Movement?

A trick of the human eye called the persistence of vision allows our eyes and our brain to work together to capture a still image in a split second of time. When this still image is followed with another image that is slightly different our brain puts the two images together and we see it as a movement. These images have to follow-on from each other very quickly, otherwise our brain would have time to register the images as two seperates pictures.

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03

ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITION

This is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, `The Curse of the Were Rabbit'. Overall the film took five years to make, with only five seconds of film being completed per week but each animator. This shows how long the process of animation can be and how much detail goes into to making all of the sets, scenes and filming perfect and ready for the final film production. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03

ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITION

This is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, `The Curse of the Were Rabbit'. The model-making department for this film consited of 40 talented individuals, who used a special blend of plasticine called Aard Mix to create the characters and objects featured throughout the film and can now be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures KS2: Image Bank 03

ANIMATED ADVENTURES ExHIBITION

This is an image from one of the sets featured in the Animated Adventures exhibtion. This scene is from the Wallace and Gromit film, `The Curse of the Were Rabbit'. Altogether over 500 rabbits were made for this film, 43 versions of Gromit and 35 versions of Wallace. Each character featured in this film recieved a new set of eyes, on average, every two months. This scene can be seen in the Animated Adventures exhibtion in Gallery 1 at The Herbert.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

ZOETROPE

A zoetrope is a drum shaped optical toy that turns still images into a moving animation. It was invented by W.G Horner in 1834 and then later developed by Milton Bradley who patented it in 1867. Images are printed or drawn onto a piece of paper that runs the length of the zoetrope's circumference, with each image being slightly different from the previous one. This is then secured into place inside of the zoetrope's drum. The drum has slits in it that are evenly spaced out; this is where the viewer looks through to see the animation. To make the animation work, the zoetrope needs to sit on a stand that will allow the drum to spin around. As the drum spins around and the viewer looks through the slits, an optical illusion makes the images appear to be moving and in doing so an animation is created. On the follwing page there are instructions for how pupils can make their very own zoetropes.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN ZOETROPE

Required materials: · Paper plate · Black Paper (A3) · Templates (print onto A3 paper) · Pencil · Glue/sticky tape · Scissors Step 1: Cut a piece of black A3 paper in half, horizontally. Only one side of this will be used per pupil. Step 3: Stick the two ends of the paper together to create a cyclinder. Step 6: Use a pencil to create the final part of the zoetrope. Insert it through the centre of the paper plate and secure it in place by holding it underneath the plate, using your fist to stop it from slipping down the pencil.

Step 4: Stick the template into the bottom half of the cylinder, below the viewing gaps, print side up.

Step 5: Attach the cylinder to the paper plate using sticky tape. This can be reinforced using card tabs.

Step 2: Cut strips into the top half of the black paper, (where the dash lines appear on the image below) evenly spaced and 0.5cm wide. This is where pupils will look through their zoetrope.

Step 7: Your pupils zoetrope is now complete and it is time for them to spin them around and see their very own Victorian style animation.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN ZOETROPE BLANK TEMPLATE

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

THAUMATROPE

The thaumatrope was a popular toy during the Victorian period, invented around the 1820s. It is a circular toy with an image on each side of the card or disk. The disk is held at opposite ends by pieces of string, which when turned between the fingers spin the disc rapidly which causes the two images, from either side of the disc, to combine and appear as one. This is possible because of the persistence of memory, as explained in the Teacher's Notes. Unlike the zoetrope, which can create the illusion of a moving animation, the thaumotrope simply creates a different still image. A popular image used for thaumotropes was a bird on one side and an empty cage on the other, which when spun create the illusion that the bird is the cage. An example of which can be seen in The Herbert's History Gallery and it is also used as a template for the activity on the next page.

These two thaumatropes can be seen in The Herbert's History Gallery.

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN THAUMOTROPE

Required materials: · Templates photocopied onto card (three

templates are available on the following pages, with the option of using a balnk template for pupils to draw their own images)

Step 2: When the two sides are glued together, pupils should use a hole punch or a sharp pencil to create the holes at the side. They then thread a piece of string through each hole that is around 12cm long. Step 3: Now your pupils can turn the string between their fingers to spin the thaumatrope and see the two images combine. Extension:

· · · · ·

String Scissors Hole punch or Sharp Pencil Glue Colouring Pencils (optional)

Step 1: Get the pupils to cut around their chosen template and glue them together. If the pupils are using the blank template it is important to note that the images drawn should be opposite ways around, as in the ready-made templates. This is because when the thaumatrope is spun it is going up and down, rather that flip over from side-to-side.

Using ICT skills, looking through books and exploring The Herbert's History Gallery, discover different designs that have been used on thaumatropes. Can your pupils find any other toys that were popular in the Victorian period?

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

This thaumatrope can be seen in The Herbert's History Gallery.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN THAUMOTROPE BLANK TEMPLATE

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN THAUMOTROPE BIRD AND CAGE TEMPLATE

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Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

MAKE YOUR OWN THAUMOTROPE VASE AND FLOWERS TEMPLATE

Top Top

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Supporting Documents 03

STORYBOARD SKILLS

There are many things that can be done with the storyboard that was completed at The Herbert during your school groups visit to the Animated Adventures exhibtions. Listed are some ideas that you could use for post-visit activities in the classroom: · · · · · Turn the storyboard into a fully written story. Act out the story as a drama piece. Turn the story into an interpretive dance. Animate the story using ICT and media skills. Create a stop-motion film of the story, using objects and clay-models, simply film, pause, reaarange the set and characters slightly, continue filming and repeat. Put all of the stories together and create a gigantic story-board for a classroom wall display. Turn the storyboards into comic book strips. Discuss with the class other ways that these storyboards could be used in inventive, animated ways.

· · ·

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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Animated Adventures: KS2 Glossary 04

Animation: The art or process of creating animated cartoons, films, characters, etc. Two-dimensional: When appears to look flat. an animation

Three-dimensional: When an animation appears to come out of the page or television screen. Carefully applied shading and perspective gives the animation depth. Illusion: When they eye sees something but percieves it as something else. In animation, although we are actually looking at a series of still images, we think they are moving. Frame: Each still image from an animation sequence is called a frame. Persistence of Vision: This is what creates the illusion of movement when we watch an animation. Our mind holds onto the still image of one frame from the animation, but before we have time to register it as a still image we are shown another image. This repeats rapidly, meaning our mind does not have time to think of every image as still. Instead it appears the images are moving. Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

(c) TM Aardman Animations Ltd.

Herbert Learning

Animated Adventures: KS2 Useful Links 05

If you are interested in finding out more detailed information about animation a look at these websites.

Websites:

· Wallace and Gromit http://www.wallaceandgromit.com/ · Learning about Animation (interactive website) http://www.kidzdom.com/tutorials/ · Information about Clay Animation http://www.clayanimator.com/english/menu.html

Books:

· Cracking Animation: The Aardman Book of 3-D Animation by Peter Lord and Brian Sibley · Drawing Cartoons by Anna Milbourne

Herbert Art Gallery & Museum. Coventry www.theherbert.org/learning

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