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PERMIT 54 PURCELLVILLE, VIRGINIA ECRWSS

VOLUME 3, NO. 12

SERVING WESTERN LOUDOUN COUNTY

JUNE 16, 2006

Seniors Graduate Fourth Annual Festival Celebrates in Loudoun Pride of Purcellville

By Mandy Gibbs Seniors from Loudoun Valley High School graduate this weekend on June 17, 2006, at 10:00 am in the Leonard Stadium at Loudoun Valley High School. Other students in Loudoun from Foxcroft School, Notre Dame Academy, and home-schooling programs have graduated or will graduate soon. Foxcroft graduation ceremonies were held last Friday, as were ceremonies for Homeschool students at Blue Ridge Bible Church in Purcellville. Graduating this year from Loudoun Valley High School are 413 students (listed on pages 6 and 7), as well as the following from Loudoun's other high schools: Homeschool Students: Joseph Bozzay, Emily Chamberlain, Jessica Marie Mantay, Abby Guthrie, Lindsay Walker, Sarah St. Sing, Mary Parker, Geoffrey Foster, Graysen Wilson, Richard Lataille, Justus Parrotta, Dale Clay, Thomas Seng, Molly Jenkins, Melissa Garvis, and Mary Dean. Foxcroft Graduates: Emily Rae Appenzeller, Purcellville, Va.; Ariana Veronica Ash, Frederick, Md.; Nicole Lauren Baudouin, Continued page Benjamin, Mexico City, Mexico; BethanyonLynn 6 Chestertown, Md.; Cleo Lorraine Bennett, New York, N.Y.; Clara Bertozzi-Villa, Bloomington, Ind.; Katherine Ann Chopivsky, Leesburg, Va.; Christina M. Cobaugh, Easton, Pa., Jessica Morley Coil, Round Hill, Va.; Jessica Paige Copeland, Ligonier, Pa., Olivia Howard Dumont, Middleburg, Va.; Elizabeth Rose Fischer,

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By Mandy Gibbs Purcellville and surrounding towns are preparing once again for the annual Pride of Purcellville Celebration this Fourth of July in the Purcellville Plaza Shopping Center. "The 2005 festival was very successful with thousands of people visiting our booths, rides, and events," coordinators said. This year's celebration will mark the fourth annual Pride of Purcellville festival, with hopes for many more to come. The annual Fireman's Parade, a favorite from before Pride of Purcellville festivals, will start off the day at 11:00 am, with Vendor Booths opening at 11 as well for anyone not interested in watching the parade. After the parade, at noon, carnival rides will open for the children, with games and vendor booths until 7pm so everyone can rest for a few hours before the fireworks start at Franklin

Park at 9pm. This year there will be a small fee for a day pass to ride the carnival rides, but

entrance to the events will, as always, be

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File Photo

Be Cool at the Pride of Purcellville festival once again in 2006!

Clock Ticking on 2008 School Opening

By Judy Stearns Purcellville Council said "no" again to Fields Farm for the new Western High School site. Time and time Purcellville has cited the familiar mantra; no water and sewer capacity and serious transportation and traffic problems if the school were placed there. Hamilton echoed the same concerns while Round Hill and Lovettsville were insistent that they would welcome the high school in or near their towns. After the School Board staff recommended the Harmony site outside of Hamilton, the School Board took another path. The majority voted for Fields Farm. It did not take long for Purcellville to respond. A Purcellville panel met on May 31st with residents to address their concerns. Mayor Bill Druhan, Vice Mayor and Mayorelect Bob Lazaro, Planning Director Martha Mason Semmes, Town Attorney Maureen Gilmore joined moderator Councilman Greg Wagner to respond to written questions. Two petitions were passed around that evening; one against the Fields Farm site and one for the location. Support for Fields garnered only a handful of signatures while the opposition gathered around 300 signatures. The message from that meeting was, "We can't support a high school at Fields Farm as it ignores the PUGAMP agreement and we are going to have to do something about it." Legal action was hinted although Council members said they did not want to be forced into that. School Board members and staff met with the Board of Supervisors on June1st. Supervisor Jim Burton (Blue Ridge District) said that he had intended to call for a vote on the high school site that evening. He withdrew that motion because Bruce Tulloch (Potomac) could not attend and wanted to participate in the vote. When Chairman Scott York asked Druhan, Lazaro,

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Find the Sunflower

This issue, we are hiding a sunflower. The sunflower, pictured here, is hiding somewhere in the Gazette. If you find it, e-mail the Gazette at [email protected]

Photo courtesy of Notre Dame Academy

Notre Dame Academy graduating class gather for a photo.

IN THIS ISSUE...

Letters to the Editor page . . . . . . . . . 2, 3, 4 Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 6, 7, 15 Town Council Applicants . . . . . . page 13 & 15 Theater Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 26 Town Turnups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 10 Community Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . page 31

Editorial

Burton High

While the title above raises several questions, it hits home the fact that perhaps the Blue Ridge Supervisor misjudged his support from those who live along Route 7 in the towns of Hamilton, Purcellville and Round Hill. During the 2003 election, Burton was supported by former Blue Ridge Supervisor Towe, then Democrat then Independent and now Democrat again, as the "real voice" of Blue Ridge. With his main base of support in Middleburg and St. Louis, Burton was an unknown in old Blue Ridge. While he won the election against Republican Ben Weber and won the support of many to remain on Purcellville PUGAMP as opposed to Supervisor Snow in Dulles, he has left many wondering if perhaps their choice was misguided.

Gas Gauge©

(as of June 14, 2006) Purcellville BP - $3.09 Mobil - $ TBD Citgo - $3.09 Berryville Shell - $2.72

P. O. Box 65 Purcellville, Virginia 20134 540.662.0852 Fax 540.662.1021 www.thepurcellvillegazette.com Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . Kim Pregartner Weber Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . Judy Stearns Assistant Managing Editor . . . . Mandy Gibbs Contributing Senior Writer. Joseph LaFiandra Senior Staff Writer . . . . . . . . . Royce Kincaid Senior Staff Writer . . . . . . . . Bobbi Carducci Feature Columnist . . . . . . . . David Sackrider Contributing Writer. . . . . . . . Shannan Butler Junior Staff Writer . . . . . . . . . Robbie Jones Director of Sales . . . . . . . . . Tena McDonald Graphic Designer . . . . . . . . Justin Mistretta Staff Photographer. . . . . . . . Heather Clarke Purcellville Gazette is published twice a month by R. Ben Weber, Publisher Master Media Group, Inc. 17 West Boscawen Street Winchester, VA 22601 www.mastermediagroup.com Advertising rates are available upon request. Letters to the Editor can be faxed to 540.662.1021 or e-mail to [email protected]

All banking and real estate ads are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act.

While judging a person on solely one issue is never fair, the issue of a second high school in a town of only 6,500 is serious. In fact, he was also not opposed to the choice of a second high school in the small town of Hamilton. A representative is supposed to represent the communities in which they serve. Yes, sometimes elected officials have to make tough decisions, but a second high school in Purcellville will have lasting effects, both good and bad on the town as well as western Loudoun for decades. Hundreds of voting residents of western Loudoun have asked that he revisit other areas such as Franklin Park and Lovettsville, two areas who have openly welcomed the new high school, but he thwarted those efforts. When asked about how his county is going to pay for road improvements, he says not to worry and then money is found in various budgets not used. When questions are raised about the Town's ability to even supply the water and sewer to the new school, he ignores the cries from the Town's elected officials who say it is not possible. In many cases, these are the same people who supported Mr. Burton in 2003. What happened? In documents obtained from the county between staff members of Jim Burton on the issue of the Fields Farm discussing the communal system for Mt. View elementary, the new high school and the stadium, a single handwritten note states Burton is not available as he went home for a rest and that "he (Burton) is going to play it straight on this one" as opposed to the other option recommended by Karl Phillips of the Purcellville Town Council. Play it straight on this one.....what do they mean? About the communal system, about possible developer hook ups to help offset the cost of water and sewer, about using "evil" developer money to pay for road improvements? Then again, if he is playing it "straight" on this, does that mean he has not played it "straight" in the past? The purpose is not to hang Mr. Burton out to dry, but he claims that all he is worried about are the destruction of Franklin Park and the long bus trips for students. (Burton Email to voters 5/30/06 11:16am). Both are reasonable, but extremely limited in thought. Mr. Burton has a much better thought process than this, but for some reason, Fields Farm is his sole choice, as if, perhaps, he is fulfilling a promise. He is even working with various developers whom he swore were the cause of all of Loudoun's woes. Has he realized that talking to all parties involved is actually a good thing? ­ If that is the case, why won't he listen to residents in Purcellville.

ISSN 1549-9308

Letters to the Editor

An Open Letter to the Board of Supervisors I'm writing this email to express my displeasure with the School Board's decision to place the new high school at the Fields Farm site. I believe it is misguided and will create a traffic nightmare for the Town of Purcellville. For the School Board to ask the Town of Purcellville to host two High Schools without the County paying for the necessary infrastructure to support the new High School is clearly an injustice. If the BOS approves this site, it's obvious to me the Town of Purcellville residents will not only have to deal with increased traffic but also pay higher taxes to support the infrastructure. Secondly, I attended the School Board meeting with the BOS last evening and it was apparent to me that the Fields Farm site violates PUGAMP. Although Supervisor Burton seems intent on ignoring PUGAMP ("LET THEM SUE") , I would hope the rest of the Board has the character, vision and integrity to keep their word with the Town of Purcellville and adhere to PUGAMP. BOS -Please reject the Fields Farm site. Thank you for your time and consideration. Mike Ryan Purcellville CRITICAL CONDITION Our students can wait no longer. LCPS Superintendent Hatrick outlined the consequences of not opening the Western Loudoun high school in Fall 2008 (www.loudoun.k12.va.us). The effects on students are DISTURBING: transporting 10th graders to Harmony for classes in trailers so

theyâ¤TMll ha ve one less class per day than other students, class sizes to state maximums of 35 students, double or overlapping shifts, limited enrollment in upper-level classes needed for college, early or late lunches, limited space in extra-curricular activities, more conflict because of the overcrowding. And, the heart of Purcellville will have MORE buses transporting students between Blue Ridge, Harmony and Loudoun Valley than they have today. Our students deserve better - they deserve a new high school opening in Fall 2008. We should be ashamed of what we are doing to our children. Anita Burkard Hamilton Reagan Park There is a simple solution to the dilemma facing the county. It involves the PUGAMP and how to kill it off since the town of Purcellville has been bought and paid for by the Piedmont

Environmental Council (PEC) and consequently, the town will never implement their portion of the agreement. (Incidentally, there is no truth to the rumor that the town will change its name to PECerville.) Now we have a new school that the PECers don't want and consequently are children are being held hostage by the PECers. The Roncaglione property (the area east of Carlyle & Anderson) developers proposed that a separate water and sewer system be built to serve development on their property, Patrick Henry College, and St. Francis de Sales Church. This system would be built entirely by developers and then turned over to a municipality. It was assumed that the municipality would be Purcellville. Does it really have to be Purcellville? Suppose a new town would be chartered by the state, would not the charter by the state supersede any agreement between a county and an existing town? I think it would. So if the area north of bypass route 7 were to be chartered into a new town, this town could determine its own fate and Purcellville would have to mind its own business. The idea behind this town would be to keep taxes low, much in the mold of Warrenton, with a target of a 1-2 cent tax rate. To do this, they could open up areas currently planned for commercial use and allow big box stores and other commercial development to be constructed. This would

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PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

Letters to the Editor

provide a large non-residential tax base for the town. There would be no historical overlay district and architectural review boards to frustrate commercial development. The water and sewer money for the Fields Farm school could be combined with the Roncaglione developer's money and used to have enough capacity for the entire town. Any excess capacity provided (beyond the needs of the initial stake holders) could be recouped through connect fees for future users and repaid to the developer and school board. Town regulations could be drafted such that any existing private well/septic users would not be forced to use town facilities. To keep rates low, the utilities could be turned over to LCSA. Welcome to Reagan Park! This new town would welcome a new high school and welcome new development. Taxes would be very low and the town would only regulate necessary items, not their personal color preferences as is done in neighboring PECerville. The town would begin its existence with a new utility system, a fairly new elementary school and new high school. Not a bad start. Soon stores such as Walmart and Lowe's would be added to give competition to the snooty stores across the divide. And the high school that would be welcomed would of

course be named Reagan High. For the School Board, one facet of good leadership is to make a decision and then make the decision right. You have made your decision for the good of the students in western Loudoun. Now make that decision right. Ben Belrose Purcellville Dear Supervisors, My name is Richard Rovang. I am writing to you this morning on the eve of the meeting on the zoning of western Loudoun County. I implore you to consider the effects of your decision on the citizens of this county. My father, Richard Sr., will be speaking before you this evening. I would like to take this opportunity to speak up for him. My father is the epitome of the American dream. He was born and raised poor in Oregon, met my mother here in Virginia, and bought 40 acres in Lovettsville 30 years ago. He built his house with his own two hands has since added land, and has been a productive, tax-paying citizen that entire time. He has worked hard and played by the rules. He was looking forward to retirement and having the land he owns as his nest egg. Through his generosity, I returned to the county this past year with my wife and 2 children, looking forward to a better life in Loudoun County and giving my children the

opportunity to attend Loudoun public schools. Your decision on the zoning issue will determine if my family and I will be able to stay in Loudoun County. On our own, my wife and I would not be able to afford to live in Loudoun County. I am a school teacher in Loudoun County and she is going to school to become a librarian, hopefully in the Loudoun school system. Through my father's intended generosity, he has planned a family subdivision in which we will be able to build in Lovettsville and give our children the benefit of the school system in Loudoun. This can only happen in one of two ways: 1. Maintaining the A-3 zoning or 2. By grand fathering people like my father, who has already spent tens of thousands of dollars on this effort. Maintaining the A-3 zoning would allow my father to enjoy his retirement by giving him financial security. Grand fathering would at least allow my father to create the family subdivision and keep his investment of tens of thousands he has already spent to create it. If you do not at least grandfather people like my father into the zoning, this is tantamount to stealing from taxpayers. I cannot see how you have any interest in keeping middle class families in Loudoun County with such a decision. In conclusion, I love Loudoun County. I truly enjoy living here and look forward to having my children experience life growing up

in Loudoun County. Only YOU, the supervisors, can make that happen. Do the right thing for all your constituents, not just the vocal minority of "slow-growth" proponents. Maintain the A3. If that is not possible, at the very least grandfather people like my father, who only want to make a better life for themselves and their families. Thank you for your time and attention and I look forward to your decision. I hope I am able to proudly say "My family and I live in Loudoun County" for years and decades to come. Richard Rovang, Jr. Lovettsville Dear Editors, Regarding the approved proposal to build an "inebriation center" in Loudoun County, I'd like to ask our Board of Supervisors "what do you think this is Mayberry and our town drunk Otis can walk himself into Andy's office and lock himself in while he sleeps it off?!" The very idea that our elected representatives would support anything other than punishment and fines for people who are breaking the law is absolutely ridiculous! According to the newspaper article, there were 900 people arrested in one year for being drunk in public and 153 were repeat offenders. So what that none of them drove a car or otherwise endangered themselves or others, THEY

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JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

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School

Continued from front

Gilmore and Town Manager Robert Lohr to sit at the dais and be part of the discussion, Burton vehemently objected as did some of the School Board members. At the same time, Supervisors Jim Clem (Leesburg) and Steve Snow ( Dulles) left the BOS meeting. York allowed Gilmore to detail the PUGAMP agreement pertaining to points relevant to the high school. Gilmore explained why the Town believed PUGAMP would be violated if the high school were to be placed on Field's Farm. As the County's legal Counsel was not available for the meeting, Supervisor Burton said that a vote would be called for at the next BOS meeting on June 6th. . At that time the full Board should be present. At the June 6th BOS meeting, public comment was received on the future Western High School site. Supervisor Burton started the discussion with a surprise announcement. No vote would be taken that day because 1) Purcellville had submitted under the signatures of Druhan and Lazaro a two page letter and 59 page document . Purcellville's submittal stated "We are forced to challenge this issue due to the enormous community issues and legal exposures that will be created if the County MIGHT HAVE!! Instead of sending lawbreakers a strong message that public drunkenness will not be tolerated,our BOS has approved a nice new facility that will cost the taxpayers $800,000 to build and $50,000 to operate so that drunks can have a safe place to sleep it off. Well, I'm tired of government officials from the Federal to the local level being soft on crime and coddling the criminals. To the three supervisors who voted against this proposal, THANK YOU! I hope your constituents will reward you with their support. To my supervisor who voted for this, Jim Burton: DON'T look for my vote next time around. Becky M. Jones Leesburg Dear Board of Supervisors: I wish to convey my concern to you as to the LCSB decision of selecting Fields Farm as it's primary choice for a new Western Loudoun County high school. Yes we do need a new high school but not in Purcellville. Purcellville already supports seven major County facilities within one mile of town limits. And at our current grow rate of new residents in and surrounding town limits how are we suppose to support an additional high school with town services. The town of Purcellville is reaching it's boiling point, and your constituents are facing higher assessments and nothing to show for it. Those of us that live in the town limits are facing higher water bills to try and keep up with the current demand on our town water supply and here we are 6 years after the county purchased Fields Farm and the LCSB has provide you with this failure of a plan for a new school. How can they provide you a plan of failure and get away with that? Why hasn't the South Riding area been consider for this new high school? Is it the cost of purchasing new land due to your own county assessments, out of reach in the South Riding/Middleburg area? To the few Board members that do not believe the citizen's of Purcellville have voiced their concern as to the High School. Did you follow the recent election? Did you see who and why we voted the way we did, in both Hamilton and Purcellville, these are the people that elected YOU. Nathan Hofelt Purcellville

Purcellville Gazette welcomes letters to the Editor. Letters must be signed and include the writer's name, address and phone number. Letters are routinely edited for grammar, spelling, factual errors, and may be condensed for space. Letters may be submitted by fax: 540-662-1021 or by email: [email protected]

moves forward with this transfer and the School Board attempts to build a high school at this site". 2). It had come to Burton's attention that Chairman York said there was the "possibility of another site." The vote for the next Western High School is now scheduled to be on the BOS June 20 agenda. Alternative site(s), if viable, will be included in the discussion.

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JUNE 16, 2006

Losing It: One Girl & the DMV

By Shannan Butler If you are reading this column, you are most likely a resident of the fine state of Virginia. I have two words for you. Don't. Move. If I had heeded that advice I would be $1100 richer and a little bit friendlier. Friends, it's been a rough six weeks. On May 6th, I graduated from James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va and decided to make a permanent move to Washington, D.C. in order to pursue a writing career. I loaded up my 1991 Jeep Cherokee with all my worldly possessions and headed to DC. Note: the value of the aforementioned possessions was somewhere in the neighborhood of $23.04, which did not include my three year-old long-haired Dachshund. After I had unpacked, I sat down at my laptop and pulled up the DC Department of Motor Vehicle website to find out how to register a car in the District of Columbia. Sooner or later I would have to change my VA tags to DC and I figured there was no time like the present. I perused the website and quickly realized that I would need to be a Rhodes scholar to navigate the nuances of changing plates. So I called them. I was on hold so long that I was actually able to finish writing thankyou notes to friends and family who had come to my graduation. And then I addressed the envelopes, stamped them, and mailed them. Still on hold. I glanced at an unpacked box and decided to sort some items out. Did I really need to hold on to my U2 Achtung Baby cassette? Or that mushy card from a certain ex-boyfriend from New Jersey that no one in my family liked anyway? dumped the card and kept the tape. "Hi, can I help you? WOAH! Almost fell off the chair as I raced to grab my cell phone which had been on speaker-phone. "Hi, I'd like to ask some questions about transferring Va tags to DC." "You can find that information on our website." Click. Like I said, it's been a rough six weeks. In the District of Columbia there is one inspection station where they do everything inhouse. This includes emissions and safety inspections. Unlike Va where any accredited garage can address your needs, DC has one location. You cannot get your tags until you have passed inspection. So I went. And I failed. The print-out they gave me said something about how my emissions failed so badly they wondered how I hadn't suffered brain damage from sitting in traffic with my car running. (the

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JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

5

Loudoun Valley, Foxcroft, Homeschool, and Notre Dame Grads

Continued from front

Dallas, Tex.; Adela Evans, Griswold, Middleburg, Va., Caroline Claire Haeberle, Ashland, Ky.; Sarah Elizabeth Hinton, Reston, Va.; Julie Elizabeth Hoppmann, The Plains, Va.,; Lindsay Elizabeth Jennings, Ashburn, Va.; Donielle Nicole Johnson, Alexandria, Va.; Caitlin Elizabeth Kr--zyston, Orangeburg, S.C.; Jung Eun Lee, Seoul, South Korea; Caitlin Hanna Lighthouse, Los Altos, Calif.; Candice Cross Lindeman, Greensburg, Pa.; Amy Langan Lucas, Leesburg, Va.; Mary Michelle McAdam, Dallas, Tex.; Ellen Margaret McWade, Middleburg, Va.; Amber Emeliem Ogbolu, Ashland, Ky.; Rachael Lauren Pearce, Ligonier, Pa.; Jacquelyn Nicole Piraquive, New York, N.Y.; Katherine Alexandra Pischke, Middleburg, Va.; My Phuong Tran, Hanoi, Vietnam; Elizabeth Garrett Waters, Fenton, Mich.; Whitney Emilie Weeks, Southport, Conn.; Mary Anne Wheeler, Oak Hill, Va.; Emily Watson Wheelwright, The Plains, Va.; Shannon Elaine, Wisotzkey, Wilmington, N.C Notre Dame Academy Graduates Patrick Davidson Behan*, Laura Marie Brown, Yong Jin Choi, Yeon Kap Chung, Jaime Lynn Coppage, Melissa Ann Cormack*, Kyle Blair Creegan, Ashleigh Lauren Cumba*, Justine Nichole Dugger*, Michael Chandler Dulik, Philip Aymar Embury, Jr., Frida Lopez Figueroa, Ryan Jeffrey Garrison, Christina Anne Graham*, Chloe Garnette Grayson*, Matthew Ronald Greenwood*, John Dunham Hasselberger*, Matthew Richard Heimlich*, Paris Elaun Henderson*, William Forest Hendrick*, Bryan Patrick Hinger, Daniel Patrick Hodges*, Alice Elizabeth Houk, Keenan John William Jackson*, Christopher Ricci Jamison, Lamont Robert Johnson, II, Krista Marie Juris*, John Ward Kennan, John Anthony Kerivan*, Paige Katherine Kettering, Derrick Chuk-Wung Lam, John Curry Lee, V*, Jong Sun Lee, Kwan Bin Lim, Erica Ann Lindgren, Jacqueline Michele Mains, Michael Anthony Manfro, Lauren Katherine McCormick*, Elizabeth Anne McFadden* Katherine Paige Mehan*, Megan Lee Moore*, Lindsay Ann Nash, Katherine Lee Nolan, Hunter Andrew Nordhauser, Morgan Ann O'Donnell*, Patrick Edward Owlett, Dhaval Anil Patel*, Garrett Brian Prenda*, Grace Kathryn Redmond*, Elizabeth Marie Ritonia*, Boomer Brendan Rollins Rose*, Brendan Michael Rose, Babak Ali Saghafi, Daniel Patrick Shaughnessy*, Trevor Austin Sheehy*, Gregory Harold Sherman*, Scott Taylor Sobel, II*, Anthony Edward Sosnoskie, Jr., Jacqueline Brittany Stein*, Edward Anderson Stevens, Jr., Katherine Anne Thomas*, Lauren Jane Thomas-Johnson, Noelle Kristine Turbitt, Sean Clemente Verfurth*, Patrick Miller Vroom*, Taylor Alexandra Walters*, Dartonia Cordell

Photo courtesy of Waterford Productions

Home schooled students graduate at Blue Ridge Bible Church last Friday.

Weedon, Dustin Edward White, Katherine Elizabeth White*, Matthew Martin Woodard* Loudoun Valley High School Graduates JOSHUA CHARLES ADAMS, SARAH MICHELLE ADLER, MACKENZIE JEAN AIKEN, LISA ERIN AITCHESON, DANIEL WALKER ALBERT, RENEE ELIZABETH ALBRO, MATTHEW JOSEPH ALIZIO, STEFAN GERMAN ALVAREZ, KELLEY SIOBHAN ANDERSON, LISSA CAITLIN ANDERSON, ALEXANDER DAVID ANDREWS, MARGARET LOUISE ARCHER, LAUREN ELAINE ARTHUR, ALLISON AMANDA ATHEY, LINDSEY LEIGH AUSTIN, ASHLEY MARIE AVILES, KATHLEEN HELEN BABARSKY, ELIZABETH JOYCE BABCOCK, CHRISTOPHER JORDAN BAKER, CAITLIN MICHELLE BAKER, CHARITY IRENE BARKLOW, JONATHAN EDWARD BARR, JESSICA MICHELLE BARR, MATTHEW CRAIG BARR, JOSEPH DANIEL BAUMGARDNER, JULIA MARIE BEACH, EMILY SUZANNE BEAMER, BROCK MONROE BELL, TIMOTHY SCOTT BELOFSKY, EVAN CHRISTOPHER BENTON, CHRISTIAN CODY BEUTTENMULLER, JONATHAN SCOTT BLAINE, MARYTERESA BOLAND, KATHERINE LEIGH BOLTZ, CLAUDIA CALLAWAY BORGELT, JEFFREY ALAN BOSWELL JR, ELYSE ASHLEY BROMSER-KLOEDEN, ROBERT ANDREW BROWER, JENNIFER BLAIR BROWN, JUSTINE MICHELLE BULLOCK, SARAH ELAINE BURDICK, PAUL RYAN BURKARD, PATRICK BREEN BURKE, MEGAN COLLEEN BURNS, MATTHEW JOSEPH BUTZ, PETER CLARENCE BUXTON, STEVEN MARSHALL CAHAN, SHANA DEANN CAMPBELL, TREVOR SCOTT CARPENTER, JOSHUA LEE CARR, CARLA KATHRYN CARROLL, STEPHEN ROBERT CAULEY, PETER WINFIELD CEO, NATALIE DAWN CHAPMAN, EMILY FLORENCE CHEEVER, BERNADETTE ELIZABETH CHEPEGA, WILL SANFORD CINELLI, SEANROBERT BEETON CLARK, SEAN MATTHEW CLARK, SAMUEL DUVALL CLAY, JOHN TYLER CLUBB, JOSHUA THOMAS COCKERILL, DANIEL RAY COHOON, TIFFANY RENEE COOMBS, TRAVIS SMITH COPE, JAMES

MITCHELL COUNSELMAN, SARAH ELIZABETH CULBERT, LESLIE ANNE CUNNINGHAM, STEPHANIE ROSE DADDIO, MARQUIECE STEPHON DAVIS, NICOLE MARIE DENSON, NISHELLE RENEA DENSON, EMILY RENEE DIETRICH, KRISTIN LEA DILLON, GARRETT RUSSELL DOERMANN, ASHLIE KATHRYN DONALDSON, DANA LYNN DOSEFF, EMILY ANNE DOWD, WHITNEY FALEN DU PLESSIS, SHENANDOAH DUDLEY, TIMOTHY WORTHINGTON DUGAN, CASSIE LYNN DURGIN, JESSE DEAN EATON, ASHTON BRITTANEY ECHOLS, SEAN MICHAE ECKENFELS, JOHN THOMAS EDDINGTON, RONALD DENNIS EDMOND, CHRISTINA JEANNE EFTHIM, JACOB HUNT ENDRES, CAMERON AFSHARI ESHGH, MATTHEW O. FAIRCLOTH, KODY GREY FARR, MARIE CHANTAL, DIOUMA FAYE, DANIEL FERDINAND FENDLASON, JENNIFER N. FERRIN, AMBER VICTORIA FINLAY, ALYSSA RENEE FISHER, NICOLE ASHLEY FITZWATER, ANDREW HUNTER FLEMING, MATTHEW STEPHEN FLEMING, NICOLAS BASEL FLEMING, AUDREY BLUE FLEMMING, CARRIE VIRGINIA FLETCHER, ANTHONY DANIEL FRAYNE, MAX FREAR, SARAH LYNN CHRISTIAN FREELAND, BRITTANY SKYE FREIBERG, COLLIN CRAIG FREND, SHAINA RENEE FRIEND, ADAM DOUGLAS FROST, BRYAN BRITTANY RICHARD GALE, SACHA GASCOIGNE, MATTHEW BRANDON GEE, WADE ALEXANDER GELBERT, AVEN SAMANTHA GENTRY, MATTHEW LUCAS GEORGE, MICHAEL ANTHONY GEORGELAS,TIFFANY ROSE GERCZAK, KAREN ANN GERNERD, RYAN SCOTT GESSAY, TITIAN GHANDFOROUSH, SALEH OMAR GHAZI, PETER NICHOLAS GIANNINO, RACHEL MARIE GILBERT, JULIA SUZANNE GINORIO, ANTONIA M MARIE GIRALDI, TANYA YVONNE GITTINGS, ANTHONY MATTHEW GLASGOW, SAMANTHA ANTHONY DAVID NICOLE GOEDEKE, GONZALES, SAMUEL DAVID GOODING, BRIAN PATRICK GRADY, TYLER GORDON, RYAN ALENE KATHERINE GRAHAM, ALECIA KRISTINE GRAHAM, CHELSEA BELLE GRAVES,

MEGAN ELIZABETH GRISH, ERIC PAUL GUSTAFSON JR, CHELSY LYN HAMILTON, JASON CHRISTOPHER HAMILTON, THOMAS PAUL HANEY, ASH LEERIN DESHIELDS HARDY, JAMES DOUGALD HARKEY, PHILLIP JAMES HARPER, ASHLEIGH NICOLE HARRIS, KEVIN MICHAEL HARTER, MICHAEL ALEXANDER HARVEY, STEVEN ROBERT HARVEY, JOHN MICH HAVENER JR, CROSSLEY DANIELLE HAWN, KEVIN ALEXANDER HAYBA, HEATHER JEAN HENDERSON, KATHERINE DAWN HESKET, SHANE RUSSELL HESKETT, ANITA PIANGFAR HILDITCH, ERIC THURMAN HILGARTNER, MATTHEW ALLEN HISER, THOMAS MICHAEL HOCKETT, CHRISTOPHER ANDREW HOCKETT, JOHN WILLIAM HOHENSTEIN, GABRIEL HOLZ, JOSHUA DAVID HOTT, JUANITA CHRISTINA HOWARD, COURTNEY COLLEEN HOWARD, ARTHUR MARTIN HOWEY III, CHARLES FREDERICK HUBERT, CHRISTIE RENEE HUFF, AMANDA RENEA HULSEY, SHANNON ELIZABETH INGEGNERI, SARA GWENDOLYN INGLIS, STEWART ARCHER INMAN, KELLIE LEANNE IRONS, JESSICA SUEHAY IZQUIERDO, KEVIN LIAM JACKSON, MARTIN LEE JACKSON, KEVIN THOMAS JACKSON, CHRISTOPHER POWERS JARVIS, JONATHAN WHITEFIELD JARVIS, CHRISTOPHER SCOTT JENKINS, KENDALL LINN JENNINGS, AMY LAUREN JOHNSON, GILBERT WADE JOHNSON, JAKE TUCKER JOHNSON, EDWARD CHARLES JOHNSTON, MICHAEL BARTON JONES, MORGAN LEE JUNCAL, AMANDA RUTH JURASCHEK, MICHAEL JOHN KANIS, MARION LEIGH KAROL, BRIAN KUPFERLE KAUFFMAN, RACHEL MARIE KEENE, MARY KATHERINE KELLNER, CAITLIN ELIZABETH KIRK, KENDRA MARYE KIRK, JEFFREY BAYLER KIRKLAND, APRIL NICOLE KIRKPATRICK, IAN RUSSELL KLINE, KIRENLEIGH KORPAN, KARL PATRICK KRAMER, TRAVIS LINCOLN KRAMMES, ELIZABETH ANTIONETTE LABRECQUE, MATTHEW ROBERT LAMBERT, SARAH KYER LAMBERT, DOMINIC VINCENT LANDI, MARY ELIZABETH LANHAM, JONATHAN C. LAUDE, JOANNA PARRIS LEE, NICHOLAS ALAN LEE,

6

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

AMY ELIZABETH LEHR, CHRISTINE GRACE LEMLEY, JENNIFER CHRISTINE LEUCK, ALEXANDRA NICOLE LEVESQUE, ALLISON LOUISE LEWANDOWSKI, JACQUELINE CHRISTINE LEWIS, JOHN BRADLEY LEWIS, JORDAN HARRISON LICKEY, NICHOLE LEE LINDSAY, LOGAN DANIEL LINGREN, JENNY MARIE LIPSCOMB, SCOTT ANDREW LONG, JACOB AARON LOVELACE, JOHANNAH JOY LOVETT, RACHEL ELIZABETH LOWE, CHRISTIAN CAMILO LUSETT, MATTHEW CAVAN LYERLY, VANESSA ALVES MACHADO, ANDREW TALIAFERRO MADDUX, JAMES ALAN MAIN, ALLEN LANE MALLORY JR, GALIN ELYSE MARKHAM, LAURA MARIE MARTIN, SHAUN CHRISTOPHER MASAVAGE, CLARE FRANCES MATHENY, MARIE KATHRYN MATUSZEWSKI, JESIAH S. MCCANN, HOLDEN PETER MCCLUNG, RUSSELL DAVID MCCLUNG, KATIE ANNE MCDERMOTT, CASSIE LYNN MCGAHA, RYAN PATRICK MCGANN, JAMES LOGAN MCINTOSH, PHOEBE ROSE MCMULLEN, CORRIE MICHELLE MCPEAK, MEGHAN JANE MCWILLIAMS, MATTHEW HARRISON MEADE, STEFAN RUSSELL MEHL, CHELSEA CHRISTINA MENDENHALL, SEAN ANTHONY MILAM, CARA SEARS MILLER, GARRETT STEVEN MILLER, KENNETH EDISON MILLER III, LOGAN JEFFREY MINER, NICOLAS MONROE MINNICH, BRADLEY DAVID MITCHELL, SAMANTHA MARIE MIZERAK, JONATHAN DAVID MONROE, JOSHUA RYAN MONROE, MATTHEW GRAHAM MONROE, ALLEN WARREN MOON Jr, THOMAS ALLEN MOORE, ROBERT CHARLES MOORE, THOMAS DANIEL MORAN, ANTHONY MICHAEL MORENO, KATHERINE DELIA MOWE, BRET THOMAS MUELLER, HOLLY A. MULLER, ERIC SCOTT MULLIN, ELIZABETH BRADLEE MURDOCK, SARAH HOFFMANN MUSIC, BETHANY DANA MYERS, EMMA CATHERINE NAGY, AUTUMN LYNSEY NAPPIER, TRACY BETH NAUHEIMER, MADISON K NEASE, EMILY ROSE NELSON, NICOLE MAR NEWCOMER, ROBERTO MICHAEL NEYRA, ANGELA FAYE NORFLEET, CHRISTOPHER RAYMOND NOVITCH, JOSEPH TAYLOR O`CONNOR, KATHERINE MARGARET ODEGAARD, RUSSELL PARKER OSBORNE, KEITH CHRISTIAN OTT, ALEX OVERMAN, WILLIAM CHRISTOPHERRYAN PADGETT, CRISTINA ARIANA PALMER, SARAH FRANCIS PAQUETTE, TIFFANY LYNNE PAYNE, ASHLEY ALYSSA PEARSON, MOLLY ANNE PELKEY, ALEXANDREA MCKENZIE PERKINS, SHANE SAMUEL PIPER, JACOB JAMES POPE, JESSICA LYNNE PORTER, KATHERINE SUSAN POTTER, CAITLIN ELIZABETH POWELL, MICHAEL CUNNINGHAM PRICE, NANCY JEAN PRUCKOWSKI, KATE LAURA PULMAN, SAMANTHA LYNN QUIRIN, BRYAN THOMAS RABUNG, JULIE DAWN RADAN, MATTHEW RYAN RAINES, NATHAN LUKE RATHJEN, JESSICA ELAINE RAY, LOUIS ALVIN RECTOR, CHELSEA ELYSE REDDING, JOSEPH

MICHAEL REGAN, JONATHAN ANDRE R E I D , GRANT RAMPTON REYNOLDS, IRIS RACHEL RICHARD, STEPHANIE DANIELLE RICHARDS, ANNA DAHEE RIZZO, LAUREN SUE ROACH, MATTHEW CRAIGHILL ROBERTS, JOAN FRANCES ROBILLARD, JON RYAN ROBINSON, ADRIANA ROCA ZELA ENCISO, SARAH ELIZABETH ROHDE, MICHELLE LINDSEY ROHRBAUG, SARAHELIZABETHROLLISON, ADAM HALL ROTHSCHILD, ALEXANDRA DYLAN ROUSE, MELISSA SARAH ROY, MELISSA MAE RUBAL, SPENCER MILES RUMFELT, MATTHEW GARFIELD RUSSELL,MICHAEL TAYLOR RUST, RACHEL EMILY SABELLA, LAYLA OUDRHIRI SAFIANI, CAMERON TINSLEY SANDS, ERIK STEVEN SANTMYER, TRACEY NICOLE SCHNEIDER, WILLIAM DAVID SCHNEIDER, JENNA MARIE SCHNIBBE, THOMAS JOSEPH SCHONDER, BRYN GAHO SEALE, BENJAMIN RUSH SEMMES, KELBY KEVIN SENGPIEHL, NICHOLAS BURNHAM SHARRER, CLAYTON MICHAEL SHAW, REBECCA CECILY SHAW ,JACOB WESLEY SHEPHERD, ZAINAB SHOJA, HEATHER LEIGH SHOUSHANIAN, DAVID STUART SIEGEL, SCOTT ROBERT SMEDILE, JEREMIAH RUSSELL SMITH, SCOTT DAVID SMITH JR., STEPHANIE ELIZABETH SMITH, MICHAEL JAY SMITH, WILLIAM SINCLAIR LAUREN SNOW, SMITHERS, SAMANTHA DANIEL JAMES SNYDER, LAUREL GRACE SNYDER, TIMOTHY HILLMAN SNYDER, MICHAEL JEFFREY SOLBERG, ALEXANDRA KRISTINE SONNENBERG, TATIANA DANIELLE SPOTTS, JOSEPH ALAN SPRANG, STEPHEN GARETH SPURLOCK, KELSEY MARIE STIDLEY, JOSHUA JAMESON STIFT, TYLER ADAM STILLER, TIMOTHY GERARD STILLER, JR., KEVIN THOMAS STONE, DANIEL LIGHTBURN STRICKLAND, JACOB ROBERT SVEDLOW, MATTHEW THAXTER SWAN, HANNAH SOUSAN SWEENY, ERICK WILLIAM TAPPAN, LEE WRIGHTSON TAYLOR, KURT WARREN TILGHMAN, TRAVIS RUSSELL TINCHER, ANDREA MICHELLE TODD, KOLBIE LEONEE TRACY, KENDRA HOPE TRUMP, KATHERINE ELIZABETH TURNER, ASHLEY LYNN UMBAUGH, DIANA LEA VAN VLEET, WILMER FRANK VANDENBURGH IV, ARIANA MAE VANDERVELDT, ARTHUR REID VAZQUEZ, WILLIAM MITCHELL VELICH, RENEE SHAWN VERA, KATHRYN AMANDA VIRTS, ALEXANDRA TESSIER VLK, BRANDON LEE WALLACE, MARISSA ELISE WARREN, ALLISON MA WATTS, MALORIE ELIZABETH WELLER, JOAN MARGARET WERLING, LAURA LOUISE WERLING, JUSTIN RAINES WHITTAKER, KINAN SEAN WHYTE, BRANDON JOHN WILHELM, LUKE JONATHAN WILKERS, KATHERINE ANNE WILKINSON, MARK CLAYTON WILLIAMS, MEGHAN COURTNEY WILLIAMS, ALEXA JEAN

Continued on page 15

JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

7

What's Your Story?

By Bobbi Carducci

MIKE CARDUCCI

I'm doing it again. Once more I am going to boldly take advantage of this wonderful forum to salute a member of my family. If you recall the profile of my father-in-law that appeared here in April 2005 you understand that I have some amazing men in my life. Today, in honor of Father's Day and in honor of stepparents everywhere I want to tell you about my wonderful husband and how he changed my world. "No man in his right mind will ever want you," my ex-husband proclaimed in moment of anger. He had a long list of reasons to back up his statement, not the least of which were my age and the fact that I was the single mother of four children. "You're not young any more," he spouted. On that day I had to agree with him. I felt as old as time. At the ripe old age of 33 my life was

falling apart and my prospects for romance were not good. Fortunately romance was the furthest thing from my mind and I was fully prepared to make a life for myself and my kids by myself. It would be hard, it would be lonely but it would be better, I knew that. What I hadn't anticipated was the surprise that life had in store for me. On a perfectly normal day in the life of a stressed out single mother God presented my little family with a gift that I will treasure for the rest of my life. I know God had a hand in this because no one else would ever have considered putting Mike and I together. Can you see this happening any other way? A single, handsome, 24 year old jewelry store manger meets a divorced 33 year old restaurant manager at the night deposit of the bank. They talk for a while and then part never suspecting that both of their lives have changed forever. A chance meeting of two unlikely souls with nothing in common. Not even in the movies

CLUES ACROSS 37. Social insect 1. Have a certain rating 38. At some prior time 6. Oil cartel 39. Military science for 10. Jujitsu planning 14. Acid 42. Ablaze 15. Blackjack 43. Fill with high spirits 16. Exploiter 44. An athlete who lifts 17. Colossus barbells 18. Shoshonean 45. Flushes 19. Carpet slipper 47. Belch 20. Musical interval of two 48. Achiever CLUES DOWN semitones 49. Man's best friend 11. Ordinary 1. Table and linen 21. Of she 50. Fail to obtain 12. Hollows 2. Utter sounds 22. Offends 54. A small lake 13. Limonite and zinc 3. An established ceremony 21. Owns 24. Juicy, gritty-textured fruit 55. Wading birds prescribed by a religion 26. Escargots 57. Smoke 23. Emotional distress 4. Neatly done 27. Greek shawl 58. Impulse 25. A winged goddess 5. Avoirdupois unit 30. Smooth fabric of silk or 59. Negatives 26. Plural of sodium chloride 6. Orange yellow rayon 60. Auto model 27. Catch 7. Low in degree Extensive landed 61. Nurture 31. 28. Resound 8. Clairvoyance property 62. Tainted 29. Persona non grata 9. Red wine 32. Speaks in two tongues 63. Checks 30. From a time 10. Where to take the 32. Teases 36. Flog plunge 33. Entity 34. Unit of measurement 35. Sneer 40. Curve 41. A way of paving 42. Zephyr 44. Marine worm 45. Gain 46. A way to perform a dance 47. Autocratic 48. Exhort 49. Day (Latin) 51. Musical composition 52. Choose 53. Geological times 56. Scarf 57. Vessel

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Gazette

would this scenario work. Five years later we were married. On that day he also accepted the most difficult role any man or woman can assume. He became a stepparent. By the time that day arrived he had already transformed out lives. We never really dated in the conventional sense. He would come to my house and spend the evening with us. Each of the kids was convinced he was there to see him or her. He brought games and laughter into our home. He helped a struggling and rather conservative woman understand her teenagers and their addiction to rock music and drama. He got down on the floor and played with race cars with my eight year old son and he submitted to wearing a head scarf and playing Barbies with my little girl. Later he would endure the snarls and ill humor of adolescence while being told, "You're not my father and I don't have to listen to you!" and he did it all with courage and with better perspective than I could maintain. "No, I'm not your father," he responded, "you have a father." "But I am the man who married you the day I married your Mom and I'm here to stay so you might as well get used to me and listen to what I have to say. I love you with all my heart. I'm looking for you today and I always will." Even a determined teen had a problem disputing that logic and somehow we all made

it through the difficult times with more love and affection than we had at the start. In a few weeks Mike will walk our youngest daughter down the aisle where she will marry another special man. Also waiting to join his life with hers will be her new stepson. I know that her life will be full of joy and opportunity and I know that when things get tough, as they sometime will, we she will remember what a special blessing a loving stepparent can be. Blended families are much more common today than they were just a few years ago offering new opportunities and new challenges for those who choose the title of parent. Today I salute fathers everywhere and in particular the amazing man I believe is the finest example of all the stepfathers who wear their title with pride and faith in their families and who don't hear how very special they are nearly often enough. If you have a special stepparent in your life, please drop me a line at [email protected] I'd love to hear your story. Bobbi Carducci lives in Round Hill, VA where she welcomes friends and family into her home for good food, good wine and lots of story telling. If you have a story to tell you can contact her via the following e-mail address: [email protected]

8

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

Last Thoughts of Abu Zarqawi

By Joseph LaFiandra (Through FOIA, The Purcellville Gazette was able to obtain a transcript of the last thoughts and words of Abu Musab Zarqawi. The NSA would not disclose the technology used, but did say, " We know what they are thinking") Zarqawi: "I'm glad that we are having this meeting to accelerate our attacks against the Iraqis and the infidel Americans. Our campaign to turn the Sunnis against the Shi'ites will continue. We will teach the Iraqis whom to respect. We will kill the new police recruits and anybody who works with the Americans. We must send more messages to the Iraqi people that they will end up like the 17 men that we beheaded last week. Those Americans are stupid; they have never been able to catch me. Their own politicians don't want their intelligence agencies to eavesdrop on our Internet and phone conversations. How dumb, they are our greatest allies. The $25 million bounty on my head will never be collected. The people will never allow it. I will never be betrayed. We have brothers in all the European countries, the United States and Canada. Our mosques and religious schools will continue to turn out martyrs in the thousands to fight against the infidels. We will destroy Israel and the Jews. Nothing will stop us. Where is my spiritual advisor, Sheik Abdel Rahman; he's late? Ah, at last he's here. "Abdel, what took you so long"? Abdel: "I wanted to make sure no one followed me". Zarqawi: "Okay, Let's get started. What's that noise? It sounds like a ... " Zarqawi: What happened? All that dust and smoke, I can't hear. Everybody around me is dead. We are being attacked, but how? This is a reinforced concrete building that will survive anything. I can't move but I am still alive. Allah is on my side. If I can just get up and move... Zarqawi: Again, more dust and smoke. I can't hear anything. Another attack! This time it feels like a large stone is on my chest. But I am still alive, Allah be praised. Who are these soldiers approaching? They are Iraqis. They are putting me on a gurney. They are trying to save my life. How stupid. I would have killed them if I were in their place. At least the Americans aren't here. No! There are Americans with them. That American is looking down at me and smiling. I must get away. He put me back on the gurney; he's also trying to save my life... What happened? Am I dead? It's dark here, but I see lights approaching me. What are they? They look like faces. There are thousands of faces of men women and children. Wait, I recognize one. He is the American I beheaded. Is that all I will see? What is going on here? Where are the 70 virgins that were promised? You know, it's getting very hot in here and smells terrible. I don't know if I can stand it... (Those were the last thoughts of Abu Musab Zarqawi; all further communications have ceased due to extremely high temperatures)

Losing It

Continued from 5

jury is still out on that one) Oh and they also picked on me for the stupid reason that my brakes didn't work. Um HELLO, they work just fine 63% of the time. Geez. So I took my car and got all the necessary repairs and came back for round #2 where I failed again. They thought the driver's seat was "jiggely" and felt my rear wiper blade didn't have the appropriate suction. Huh? The wiper blade is supposed to grace the window in a storm, not make-out with it. Good grief. Back to the mechanic again. Got the repairs and headed back to the Inspection station. Why do I even bother? As I failed for the THIRD time, I've got to admit I was feeling pretty hostile. This time they told me that my car had failed emissions due to the fact that the car wasn't hot enough. They recommended I pull around the block and gun the engine for a few minutes. If you've ever been to the DC Inspection station, you know that it is located at Half and I St, near the 100th block of K St. This is an "interesting" area to say the least. As I pulled my car around the block to gun the engine, I think I may have witnessed a drug deal go down. I was feeling very "Law & Order" when it occurred to me that I was literally staring at these people. I tried to act casual and non-suspicious but that is difficult to pull off when you're sitting in a parked car like an idiot gunning the engine. Went back to the inspection station and the fourth time was the charm. All in all, I had to miss two days of work to get all the repairs done and I spent about $1100 on car repair. My inspection sticker is good for another two years in which case my 1991 Jeep will be two years older and I cannot imagine what they will come up with then.

JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

9

Town Turnups

Guardrail Installation Requires Road Closure A much-needed guardrail will be installed on North 21st St. (Rte. 690 N) between Ashleigh Road and Hirst Road. A sense of urgency arose after the death of a motorist this past winter who veered off the road and into the stream bed below. A portion of the guardrail work will occur at the box culvert for Catoctin Creek. The guardrail must be mounted directly to the box culvert. This requires excavat-ion and concrete form work which will reduce the width of the travel lanes too much to allow the road to stay open while also providing a safe work zone. It is tentatively planned to start work on June 26th and the road closure will last for up to two weeks, weather permitting. *Please be aware that the start date could shift to a later date. Scheduling updates will be posted on the Town's website at: www.Purcellvilleva.com. Specific information regarding the detours is as follows: Southbound traffic on 690 will be detoured: 1. East on Hirst Road 2. South on Maple Ave. to Main St. Northbound traffic on 690 will be detoured: 1. East on Main Street 2. North on Hatcher Ave 3. West on Hirst Rd 4. North on North 21st St. Please see the detour schematic for additional clarity. The Town regrets any

inconvenience this may cause and appreciates your patience and cooperation during this road closure. Should you have any questions, please contact Mr. Eric Rheinsten at 540-751-2317. Branding and Marketing Consultant Presents Plan Ben Muldrow of Arnett Muldrow & Associates met with some Town staff and a handful of business owners to unveil suggestions for branding and marketing for Purcellville. Using the theme, "Feel at Home", they had designed sample ads for businesses such as for example, the Farmers Market, "Feeling Fresh; Feel at Home." Muldrow handed out graphics for The Purcellville Professional and Business Association (PBPA), Purcellville Preservation Association (PPA), Historical Triangle, Purcellville 100 Yearsand Carver Center. The colors were chosen to fit in with the color scheme of the 21st Street downtown area , those from nature, muted greens, browns and harvest gold. Those colors and theme would be used for the wayfinding signs, trailblazers (recurrent messages for four main spots), brochures, dining guides, parking directions, information guides, new residents guides, building markers, street banners, decals for businesses, business ads, letterhead, envelopes and business cards. He also presented a signature design for the word "Purcellville" to be used in all various publications and signs. Muldrow said the town shield would be preserved and said of the Gateway signs, "You have done a good job." Maybe sometime down the road the Town could change the sign

COMPLETE AUTO SERVICE & REPAIR

EUROPEAN ALL MAKES AND MODELS DOMESTIC ASIAN

---Muldrow's power point with examples for changes met with approval from the group. Extending business hours to increase the market and bringing more money into the Town is a first good step to take, Muldrow advised. "Those businesses who only stay open until 5 and not on weekends, don't buy into progressive marketing." New businesses "get it," Muldrow said such as extended hours and weekends when consumers can get there. He also recommended co-op advertising, not just individual businesses but all together. The next step is for the consultants to work with the PPA and PBPA to pore over the ideas and discuss them further. The consultants are designing a brochure for the Town as a first step in the development of the program. Any information on this project may be obtained from the Planning Department at Town Hall ­ 540-338-7421. News From Purcellville Police Department Chief Smith met with Reggie Sims from Grace Annex Church to plan "Welcome Summer" for the youth at both apartment complexes located on 16th. Street. This will be a joint effort from the Church, Police Department and Youth Safe Haven Program. The event is planned for June17th from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. that will include a cookout, moon bounce, barrel train, and other activities. Chief Smith attended an informational Pandemic Flue session at George Mason University for area department heads and Chiefs. Chief Smith attended the monthly Citizen Support Team meeting to support them and bring them up to date in upcoming events.

Officer Rob Wagner met with the Explorer Post which is gearing up for training to help out soon with the department's activities. Officers have been elected, activities are being planned and they will all be trained in directing traffic. EDC and EDAC Discuss Variety of Topics At their meeting on June 8, the Economic Development Committee discussed the following: - Branding and Marketing ­ Will set a date for the EDAC (Economic Development Advisory Committee) to make a final recommendation to the EDC. Branding and Marketing Steering Committee will get back together in June. - Public relations ­ The Town should reach out to the media - Track economic development activity through an "economic tracking report" to be created. - Possible ATM in downtown/Town Hall vicinity. At their June 6, 2006 meeting, the EDAC received information in regards to potential development of property in the downtown area. At their next meeting, the Committee is expected to address and make recommendations on the marketing and branding pieces, the Boomtown Boot Camp program, incentive packages for selected industries/businesses as well as BPOL (Business, Professional and Occupational Licenses) incentives. Loudoun Valley High School Graduation is June 17th at 10 a.m. in the Valley football stadium. Benjamin Bradlee, Vice President of the Washington Post, will be guest speaker.

We wish to thank our loyal customers for 12 years of faithful patronage. We welcome new custsomers and look forward to serving you this year!

Labor Discount

Expires June 30, 2006

10%

(540)338-1986 111 Hirst Road Purcellville

JUNE 16, 2006

10

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

Arts in the Alley Successful Again in 2006 Season

By Judy Stearns The Arts in the Alley two day event began on Friday, June 8th with a gallery exhibit of photographs from the publication, "Hallowed Ground: Preserving America's Heritage" at the historic Purcellville Train Station. The photographs were displayed on the interior walls of the train station for viewing while the Harrison Trio ( string and wind) from Lovettsville, entertained guests outside on the porch. Magnolias restaurant generously donated wine and tasty appetizers that were enjoyed as guests sat and enjoyed the music or strolled through the station admiring the beautiful photography. Kim Ross, Mangolia's Banquet Manager, did a superb job with planning and setting up the food and drink and making sure no one went away hungry. The weather was kind that evening to the large group who gathered for the event. The publication was offered for a contribution as well as limited edition prints of favorite images from the show that were signed by National Geographic cover photographer Kenneth Garrett. Garrett lives in Broad Run,Virginia. Photographer Jack Kotz who also contributed to the publication was on hand to speak with guests. Kotz moved from Virginia to Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1991. Purcellville Town Council members Vice Mayor (Mayor-elect) Bob Lazaro, Councilmen Tom Priscilla and CJ Walker attended the event. For any information about The Journey Through Hallowed Ground or to inquire about purchase of publication or images, please contact Abigail DeLashmutt, Communications Manager at 540-882-4929 (Waterford) or email her at [email protected] Information may also be obtained at www.HallowedGround.org . Saturday was another beautiful sunny day with pleasant temperatures, this time for Arts in the Alley. The event was held in July the past couple of years so the June weather was a welcome change. Carl Fischer, one of the planners and organizers, said people came and stayed longer than in the past. He said the day started with heavy crowds and continued throughout the day. Vendors reported that the same people would come back more than once over the course of the event. Music was varied. Sheila Marie sang Patsy Cline numbers, the jazz group Four Front livened up the day and residents were entertained by Oasis, a steel drum and reggae band, that also played for the Nationals baseball game later that night. Fischer figured the attendance was around 3,500. This year, he said, the break down and cleanup went very smoothly with the Town left as if nothing as large as the Arts in the Alley had occurred on 21st Street. All in all, he was very pleased with the outcome of the event that has become a popular attraction in Purcellville.

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Meet the Applicants for Purcellville Council Opening(s)

By Judy Stearns Purcellville will have a vacancy on the Town Council when Vice Mayor Bob Lazaro takes the reins as Mayor on July 1. Councilman CJ Walker has his house on the market and plans to move with his family to Georgia. That would open up another seat once he resigns as Council member. Five applicants have made bids for Lazaro's seat for now and could keep their applications open when Walker leaves. The Personnel Committee chaired by Greg Wagner with Mayor Bill Druhan and Walker as members and Karl Phillips as alternate will interview the five next week. They will have submitted ten written questions to them. The Committee will present a recommendation to the Council at its July 11th meeting. When Walker leaves, those who were not appointed do not need to go through the entire process. They could just indicate their inerest in being reconsidered. The position would have to be readvertised and new applicants would go through the questionnaire and interview process. The Gazette interviewed the five applicants and their responses appear below. All interview sessions are open to the public and will be held at Town Hall. Name ­ Janet Clarke Age ­ 43 Address ­ Burnleigh Court, Purcellville Family ­ Husband Tom, and mother of three children, ages 12, 13 and 24 Residency in Purcellville ­ 7 years Occupation - Community Coalitions Coordinator for the Loudoun County Public School System, overseeing four community anti-drug coalitions. Former Founder and Chair of COPE/Community Organization for Prevention Education. Also, while Chair of COPE, produced a Teen Activities Directory for the youth of western Loudoun and opened a Teen Center in Purcellville. Currently serving a three year appointment on the Loudoun County Community Services Board. Sit on a Loudoun Youth Initiative committee, and a member of the Community Builders Network of Virginia. Why have you applied for Council? I applied to the Purcellville Town Council because several people in the community encouraged me to do so, including my family. Issues of concern and interest to me are town safety and access, infrastructure upgrades, quality of life improvements, and community communications. Why you not run as a candidate for Council in the spring election? I chose not to run because I did not consider a council position at the time of elections, but have since analyzed the open seat opportunity as a position where I can attempt to continue work for the betterment of my community. If I become the successful candidate for this open seat I will evaluate the option of running for election in the next term. Name - Doug Harrison Age - 31 Address - Maple Avenue Family - Married with two daughters - 2 1/2 and 10 weeks (be more by the 16th Occupation - Director of Education for the Dulles Area Association of Realtors Residency in Purcellville - Two years but lifelong resident of the County - Leesburg Why have you applied for Council? Being a Lifelong Resident of Loudoun County, I have seen a lot of changes to our community. After moving to Purcellville two years ago I started getting involved by attending the PUGAMP planning session and other various town meetings. I feel that Purcellville can be a thriving and flourishing town provided we address some of the growing concerns like traffic and road improvements. Living on Maple Avenue I have difficulties crossing the street to take my family out on walks because of all the traffic. Improvements need to keep being made at Main and Maple and 23rd and 21st Streets. I would also like to see more town parks if possible. I believe in completing the Southern Collector Road project. Without finishing this road the downtown streets will always be flooded with passing through traffic. I believe the town can work with Sam Brown, the owner of Crooked Run Orchard so we can make this project happen. A solution could be advantageous to him and the Town; for him to do something for the Town and for the Town to do something for him. It will not hurt businesses. There is a lot of development south of the Town and lot of traffic coming from the south. I would be interested in working toward getting it finished. Why you not run as a candidate for Council in the spring election? I didn't run for the position during the election because my wife was expecting our second daughter, and I didn't have enough time at that point to be able to concentrate on a campaign. Name: Timothy Iversen Age: 20 years old Address: 7 Patrick Henry Circle Single Occupation: Working as a security officer at Patrick Henry College while taking classes. Residency in Purcellville: A year and a half. Why have you applied for Council? I'm applying for a position on the council because I still believe that I can help my town through working through our local government. I believe that we need to prepare Purcellville for the future, and I showed that I was, and still am, ready to help with that preparation through my campaign. I'm still going to do what I can to fight the placement of the new high school here in Purcellville. I'm also going to work to ensure our police department can continue to handle expanding gang problems from the east and the traffic challenges we face. I've been told that I had a handle on the issues here in town and that that made me a good candidate, and I believe that will also translate into making good policy decisions for the future. I thoroughly enjoyed working with the other candidates and learning the concerns of my neighbors during the campaign, so I already have the basis needed to help guide Purcellville the way we should go. I am very

Continued on page 15

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Meet the Applicants

Continued from 13

open with anyone who wants to talk, and I can be reached at [email protected] Iversen ran for Council in the 2006 election. Name - Joan Lehr Age - 52 Address - Locust Grove Occupation - Owner Purcellville Copy/McLean Copy Residency in Purcellville - 4 years Family - Husband, Greg, son at Blue Ridge Middle School and daughter at Harmony Intermediate Why have you applied for Council? The town has doubled in size since we moved to Purcellville. This places major stresses on our transportation systems, water and sewer systems and community support services (fire/rescue/police). We need to work together to find ways to improve these areas without placing a major tax burden on our residents. Increasing our local business base can assist with this. Not only by adding to our tax base, but making it easier for residents to find the additional goods and services they desire, without leaving town. Working with the county to locate the new High School in a place that works for all the students and towns, not just placing it in a location to get it built quickly. Every decision has long term effects. It is important that we look at the future. My years of corporate management, community involvement and business ownership have provided me the experience, as well as the skill sets that can allow me to contribute to the transformation the Purcellville is going through - from where we were, to what we need to become to meet the needs of our residents and businesses. I recognize the importance of doing things to benefit the town as a whole, not just the vocal minorities. The growth happened, now we need to plan for the future and maintain the town as a great place to live and work. Why you did not run as a candidate for Council in the spring election?

I liked the views of several of the people running, and chose to support their candidacies. When this new opening(s) occurred, I felt that this was a good opportunity to become more involved, and contribute to the management of our town. Name- Michael Ryan Age- 38 Occupation - Executive Director of Skatequest - Oversee two indoor ice skating facilities in Reston and Dale City, VA. Address- 140 Positano Court Residency in Purcellville- Little over a year Family - Married with 4 children daughter 11; three step-daughters, 17, 15 and 13. Pets - two dogs (Boston Terriers) named Gizmo and Moose Why did you not run as a candidate for Council in the spring election? By the time I decided to run, it was too late to mount a campaign. I intended to run during the next election. Why have you you applied for Council? I applied for a seat on the Town Council because I've always had a desire to serve the public. After moving to Purcellville in May 2005, it became clear to my wife and I that this was a town we could enjoy for many years. From the friendly citizens and quaint shops, Purcellville has a unique hometown feel that is rare to find so close to a major city. If appointed to town council, one of my goals would be to maintain this hometown feel. I believe with my management experience and leadership skills combined with my passion, commitment and enthusiasm for Purcellville, I would be a valuable asset to the Town Council. I would embrace the challenge of serving the citizens of Purcellville.

Wandering Peacock Back Home

By David Sackrider After a week of wandering a residential area of Round Hill, an Indian peacock found his way back home. Old Blue, as James Duffy calls his peacock, returned on its own accord at about the same time his sojourn in Round Hill was reported in the Gazette. After receiving a call from a Round Hill resident in whose yard Old Blue was strutting, Duffy went to the house to make sure that it was the right bird. Having made a positive identification Duffy planned to return in a day or two with his cage to transport Old Blue back to his home on Williams Gap Road. Before the capture could be effected Old Blue was back in his yard. "We missed him dearly," Duffy said of the time without Old Blue. "He's a beautiful bird." Old Blue wandered into Duffy's life two years ago, apparently having been abandoned by a family that moved from a home off of Rt. 719 without taking their peacock. Old Blue did not settle immediately with Duffy. Duffy called the sheriff's office and reported that there was a peacock on the loose. A few days later Old Blue rode to Duffy's home in the back seat of a sheriff's cruiser. Since only Duffy had mentioned Old Blue to the sheriff's office, it was assumed that the capturing officer should take the bird to Duffy. Duffy has been caring for Old Blue ever since. Care includes feeding him a mix of saffron, sunflower and commercial bird seeds. Although Duffy has built a house for Old Blue, the bird does not seem comfortable there. "If he was in there and a predator came he'd be trapped," Duffy explained. During bad weather Old Blue seems to be happy roosting on a four-by-four beam Duffy placed in a garage for this purpose. In the interest of providing companionship Duffy looked into getting a peahen. What he learned was that peahens are very hard to keep rural areas. The peahen will nest on the ground, making it vulnerable to foxes, he said. Without a mate, Old Blue must make due with the company of Alfie, Duffy's young Jack Russell terrier. Old Blue knows to stay on the quiet side of the invisible fence. Said Duffy, "They have a report, but a distant one."

Loudoun County Graduates

Continued from page 7

WILLIAMS, LINDSAY MARIE WILLIAMS, MADELEINE LAINE WILLIAMS, ERIN L E I G H WILLINGHAM, KARI ANNE WILSON, MEGAN ELIZABETH WISEMAN, CHRISTOPHER ALEXANDER WOLCOTT, DANIEL MATTHAN WOMACK, SONEY E. WRIGHT, ERIN KELSEY YARBROUGH, VERONIKA VICTOROVNA ZABOLOTNYI, JILL CHRISTINE ZELONIS, ERIC JOHNZUPKO

Photo Courtesy of Foxcroft School

Foxcroft Graduates together in white

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Local Horse to be next Breyer Horse: Cleveland Bay

just someone wanting to breed their mare with Joe," said Anna Cohen about the first call from When a teenage daughter announces she's Breyer. The family was even more excited to going to be a model, fathers panic. But what find out what the caller really wanted, do you do when your horse begins a modeling "Naturally, I was thrilled," Anna said. career? Daniel and Anna Cohen faced that Daniel and Anna, along with daughters question when they received a call from Breyer Sarah and Rachel, ages five and six, run Bay Horses asking if the company could use their Haven Farm, where they have seven purebred breeding horse Tregoyd Journeyman as a Cleveland Bay mares and two thoroughbreds. model for their next Breyer Horse. They added Joe's first foal to be born in the "I got the message and I assumed it was U.S. to the mix in January, with three more of his foals due soon. Joe bears the name of his birthplace, Tregoyd, in England, but was shipped to the U.S. in 2004 to be bred here. Anna said she hopes that bringing more of the Cleveland Bay line to the U.S. will bring the breed out of the endangered breeds list. Currently only 550 Cleveland Bay horses still exist, with only 50-60 new foals born each year. The breed is Photo Courtesy of Daniel and Anna Cohen concentrated in the `Joe' poses regally for the camera at his recent photo shoot United Kingdom, but is By Mandy Gibbs slowly growing in the U.S. "They're peasant horses, they were originally used to pull carriages when the roads were dirt, but as the roads got better, people realized they wanted a lighter horse," Anna said. Eventually the Queen got involved as an advocate of saving the Cleveland Bay from extinction, bringing new awareness about the breed. The U.S. provides many times the breeding space and population of England, meaning more hope for saving the breed. "The hardest part is getting them out thereonce people know them, they fall in love, and want several of them," Anna said. The primary reason is the Cleveland Bay's easygoing temperament. "They're really more like a puppy than a horse," Anna said. This puppy can't sit in your lap, though. The Cleveland Bay breed is also known for being sturdy, a large work horse that never tires. For all his size, though, Joe is a gentle creature. Sarah and Rachel, Anna says, lead him around and feed him, and Joe is very obedient when he needs to be. "He's very good, very well-mannered," Anna said, noting that he stood still and struck poses as he was directed while she took photos for the Breyer modeling. The photos went to artist Karen Gerhardt, who used them to create a model horse that Breyer will celebrate at the annual Breyerfest this July 28-30 at Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky. Joe will attend the event to show off his studliness to Breyer fans and give them a chance to see how closely the real horse resembles the model.

Photo Courtesy of Daniel and Anna Cohen

Joe gets frisky in the field

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On or Off the W&OD: The Heart Never Lies

By Mike Moye Cindy Deugo Carlyle trains many of her athletes at the gym I frequent. There, I try to forestall the ravages of time, seeking to keep gravity from its relentless pursuit of my body parts. Cindy normally is working on the days and at the times that I attend. She knows my passion for running; and, occasionally, when she is not engaged with a client, we chat about training regimes and races. She mentioned a couple times that my training and race performance could be greatly enhanced if I knew my Lactate Threshold (LT) and trained with a Heart Rate Monitor (HRM). My response always was something like, "It would scare me to death to know what my heart rate gets to while I'm running, especially when I'm running some of the hills in Loudoun County. I'm doing just fine without knowing my heart rate. I don't need no stinking HRM." Besides, I have read the suggested age related heart rate zones and know that the suggested target zone for my age is somewhere near walk slowly and carry a big stick. Cindy didn't press the issue but said that if I liked she would set a time to administer an LT test in the gym by outfitting me with a HRM and having me run on the treadmill. She would monitor my heart rate, ask me for perceived effort, and incrementally increase the pace on the treadmill. I respect Cindy as an individual and as an athlete. I've observed her with her clients and have seen them improve under her guidance, so eventually I reasoned that, at the least, it would be interesting to know my own LT and then ignore it. So we set the date. Some of you might be asking yourself at this point, "Okay, so what is lactic acid and where does it come from and why does it matter what my threshold for the stuff is?" All good questions. In short, the body produces lactic acid during exercise through the metabolic process. Once we thought lactic acid was a bad thing, but we have come to learn that the body is not just producing lactic acid, but also consuming it. The heart, the liver, the kidneys and inactive muscles are all locations where lactic acid can be taken up from the blood and converted back to fuel. The problem arises when we begin dumping more lactic acid into the system than the system can process, and that's why it's important to know where your threshold is. The test also will tell you where your aerobic heart rate zone is, and that's equally important. On the appointed day, I arrived at the gym, stepped on the treadmill; and, as instructed, ran at a very, very comfortable pace for about twenty minutes before the test was to start. When Cindy arrived she gave me the HRM to strap on and plunked down a chart on the treadmill. The chart consisted of a range of effort, part of which follows. 7 - walking 8 - very light (faster walk/ very slow jog) 9 - slow jog 10 - fairly light pace 11 - conversational pace 12 ­ moderate effort - muscular awareness 13 &14 - moderately hard - 3 or 4 words, broken conversation - Aerobic Threshold 20 beats below Lactate Threshold transition between aerobic work and i ncrease in lactic acid 15 ­ hard effort 16 - breathing is deep - concentration acute 16.5-17 very hard - Lactate Threshold 18 - muscular overload, breathing is l abored 19 - very, very hard 20 - total exhaustion - Max HR about 25 beats above LT Cues for LT include: 1. 5-6 bpm jump in HR within 30 secs 2. HR levels off 3. erratic HR behavior Cindy bumped up the pace at regular time intervals, kept track of my heart rate and observed my gait, my breathing and ability to converse. I was to tell her my perception of effort. She laughingly told me that I might be inclined to prevaricate but my heart never lies. At the end of the test, I learned that my aerobic heart rate zone is not near walking, but remarkably close to an average training pace. And my LT is high enough so that there is room for some more intense training zones in between. All in all, it was a gratifying result. So, enough about me. How about you? Cindy admits that there are more sophisticated tests that involve more controlled conditions, blood letting for analysis, and masks to measure oxygen consumption. They can be expensive and hard but give you more data. If you are interested solely in your maximum aerobic heart rate, you can even apply the simple 180 formula (Google ­ 180 formula aerobic). You begin by deducting your age from 180, then modifying that number by fitness factors. For Cindy the LT test she administers doesn't take you to max. She'll stop you before you get there. Also the test is less invasive.

Continued on page 23

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Book Sale Successful, Children's books a favorite find

By David Sackrider Dozens of book lovers flocked to the book sale at the Loudoun County Library Purcellville Branch June 10 for the third annual book sale. By noon, with three hours left in the sale, the receipts already exceeded the total from last year. By the end of the day approximately $3,900 were taken in, tripling the receipts from last year's sale. According to Sven Johnson, Chairman of the book sale committee of the Purcellville Library Advisory Board, customers arrived early. "They started showing up at 9 a.m., when we were still setting up. I asked them to help. I told them, the sooner we get set up the sooner we start selling." Martin Bromser-Kloeden, a member of the Advisory Board, said that the biggest single purchase was $139 worth of books sold to one of the early customers. "He told me that he'll resell the books on Amazon," said BromserKloeden. At 12:30 p.m. the price of books was cut in half. The dozen or so customers still at the tables outside the library's main entrance still had hundreds of bargain books from which to choose. Among the bargain hunters were Janet Scott from Lexington, Kentucky, and her cousin Diana Denley from Sidney, Australia. At just about half way around the globe Denley traveled the farthest of all customers. The cousins, in the area for a play reading at the Round Hill Center the next day, were looking for plays and books in the drama section. The busiest sections were children's books and paperback fiction. Bromser-Kloeden said that most of the children's books had been sold. "They're so cheap ­ only fifty cents ­ that people buy lots of them at one time," said Bromser-Kloeden. On behalf of the Advisory Board BromserKloeden expressed thanks to Johnson for his efforts in organizing such a successful sale, and to the Purcellville Food Lion for contributing the bags in which purchases were carried home. The leftovers were donated to the Loudoun County Public Library for sale at the systemwide book sale June 23-25 at Smart's Middle School in Leesburg. Proceeds from the sale of books and Tshirts go to the Advisory Board, which supports programs and special acquisitions at the Purcellville branch. For more information about the Purcellville Library Advisory Board contact the library at 540-338-7235.

Photo by David Sackrider

Book lovers and bargain hunters gather at the annual Loudoun County Library book sale.

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Nationals Should Keep Jim Bowden for the Long Term

By The Foggy Bottom Boy With the continued rejuvenation of the Washington Nationals in the 2006 season, FBB is firmly convinced that the Nats should retain the services of General Manager Jim Bowden for the long term. While the Nationals got off to a rocky start for the first six weeks of the season and were once 14 games under .500, this team is now moving toward the .500 mark . . .the Nationals are jelling and playing smart, fundamental baseball . . . . .and much of the credit has to go to the off-season moves of their General Manager, Jim Bowden. The first key acquisition that Bowden made (that he took a lot of heat for) was the trade for Alfonso Soriano. Soriano is having a sensational year . .the best year of his career. While Soriano did have a one-day temper tantrum in spring training (when he refused to play left field), once Manger Frank Robinson had a "mano-mano" discussion with Soriano (FBB believes it was a one-sided conversation), his attitude on the team has been exemplary. His market value continues to increase on a daily basis . . his fielding is still somewhat suspect in left field, but his bat more than makes up for it. Whether or not they retain Soriano for the long term will be President Stan Kasten's first real test in the eyes of National fans . .they have to find a way to keep Soriano!! Another key acquisition was shortstop Royce Clayton. At the time, he was strictly an insurance player to keep Christian Guzman motivated in the field and at the plate (following his disastrous performance last year). When Guzman was put on the disabled list for the year following surgery on his shoulder, Clayton was forced to play every day. Not only has he resurrected his career, but he has found that batting second behind Soriano causes him to see a lot of fastballs that he can hit to right field. This 36-year player wasn't really wanted by any other teams . .but he has had a profound impact on the Nationals. Bowden also added some good reserves in Marlin Anderson, Daryle Ward and Robert Fick. All three have made solid contributions relieving starters who take a day off and have also been valuable as pinch hitters. He also added Damian Jackson, and while he has had some shortcomings, he has been a "plus" to the team. While Bowden took a lot of heat when he couldn't retain pitchers Hector Carrasco and Esteban Loaiza (his hands were tied financially because of the free agent spending limitations imposed by major league baseball), he somehow went out and got Ramon Ortiz who has totally rejuvenated his career. He was a solid pitcher several years ago, but had little interest in his services during this past offseason. The Nationals got him simply because no one else wanted him and the Nationals were desperate for starting pitching.

Gardeners Tale

by David Lohmann What great weather we have been having. We definitely could use some rain but the cool night have been absolutely fabulous!! This is a great time to get your vegetable garden in if you have not done so -- it is not too late. There is nothing better than fresh picked vegetables, melons and corn from your back yard. When you are looking at varieties of tomatoes make sure and give yourself a variety. There are so many great varieties. There is nothing better than a summer salad with all different colors of tomatoes -- red, yellow, purple and pink -- it has a knockout presentation. The same thing when it comes to the peppers -- there are so many colors and varieties offered -- take advantage of the season and plant a variety. Many customers come in with questions on melons. We suggest when you plant melons, cucumbers, zucinhini, squash or any vine crop to put a foot circle of aluminum foil around the stem - this will prevent a lot insects from damaging the crown of the plant. Another way to do it is to lay an old tire in the garden, fill it with dirt and then plant the vine crop in the circle -- it will make a big difference. You may want to start giving some thought to fertilizing some of the annuals you have planted in baskets, containers or in the ground -- you may want to consider a time- released product which will only need to be applied once to make it through the season. The annuals are going to start to get stressed with the he--at and the more often you water, the water leaches the existing fertilizer out of the soil to it needs to be replaced. We have also been finding an abundance of aphids on trees and shrubs --be patient the lady bugs will be along to eat them --- Many of the beneficial insect like lady bugs have been delayed because of the cool nights -- be patient -- they will arrive to eat your problem. Last --- prepare for the invasion of the Japanese beetles -- it is coming to a yard near you in the next week or two --- stop in if your need advice on how to repel them --- happy gardening!!

W&OD

Continued from 20 According to Cindy, "It still gives me as a coach hands on data and it gives me insight into my athletes' mental perception as to how hard things are through their feedback." Cindy goes on to say that, "the results of an LT test give you the smart training zones. Most runners waste a lot of training hours by performing at too high a heart rate. They're working hard enough to feel like they're working, but they're not running slow enough to teach the body to burn fat. Also, they're not running fast enough to teach the body to really use the lactate efficiently. Consequently, they train at a high cost with very little benefit." "Ego gets in the way. Most of my athletes like to work hard and they'll work harder than they have to. My job is to rein them in. If I can put a little watch on their wrist with an alarm that says you are working too hard, it will get them to slow down, but on certain

training days, it will allow them to go into the higher training zones, and they know they are getting value." "Over time you can go faster in your aerobic zone and your lactate zones, and you can extend your time and speed in those zones. The more aerobically fit you get, the harder it is to drive your heart rate higher." With that last statement, she convinced me. I ordered my HRM the next day, and have been training with it since. Some days I have to slow my pace to stay in the right zone, but I'm counting on long term beneficial effects. Finally, if you still want proof that HRM training works, look to Mark Allen, six time winner of the Hawaii Ironman. In his early training he always tried to hit a 5 minute mile pace. He had success, winning a number of triathlons, but he couldn't win the World Championship in Hawaii. Then, a man named Phil Maffetone introduced him to the HRM training concept. Mark discovered that in order for him to stay in his prescribed aerobic zone he could only muster an 8:15 minute mile pace, three minutes slower than the pace he had tried to hit every single workout, but he persisted. At the end of four months, his pace at the same aerobic heart rate had improved by over a minute. After nearly a year of doing mostly aerobic training, his pace in his aerobic zone had improved to a blistering 5:20 mile. Mark went on to win the World Championship Triathlon five consecutive years in a row, a record. I wonder if Fred Lonas has a HRM?

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NCFCA National Tournament Returns to Purcellville

By David Sackrider The National Christian Forensics & Communications Association held its tenth national tournament at the Patrick Henry College in Purcellville. The five days of competition began on June 5 and lasted until June 9. Five hundred twenty-one home schooled students entered the competition, taking part in one-on-one or two-member team debates, or oratory divisions. When the family members and judges are included, the campus hosted approximately 2,000 people each day of the competition. During a normal day of classes Patrick Henry would have about 450 people on campus. Most of these families, coming from as far away as California and Hawaii, had to find lodging in Leesburg, the Dulles area, or Winchester. About thirty-five families in western Loudoun county opened their homes to visiting families. For instance, students Alicia and Anthony Chandler, from Saginaw, Texas, and their parents stayed with an uncle in the Purcellville area. The Chandler children teamed together in the two-person policy debates. They have been participating in the NCFCA competitions for four years. Win, lose or draw, Alicia said, "we've been through so much together that we will not get upset with the outcome." Jason Smith, an eighteen year old from Ball, Louisiana, is at the national competition for the second year in a row. His parents, Dr. Gary and Melina Smith, said that he is the youngest of their four children, all of whom have been involved in the competition. Asked about her children's enthusiasm for debating, Ms. Smith said, "We've always encouraged our children to have opinions, and voice them." "And back them up," added Dr. Smith. Another young competitor, sixteen year old Ariel Wolf from outside of Boston, Mass., brought an unusual form of support ­ the guide dog for the blind she is training, nine month old Ginny. Wolf's competition is the original oratory division dealing with Christian martyrs. She said that her category tends to be the most dramatic of the divisions, involving costuming, motion and gestures. Her mother, she said, has been her coach for the dramatic aspects of her work. This is Wolf's second year at the nationals. Asked to compare Purcellville to the previous host city, San Diego, California, she replied, "Purcellville is nice, but San Diego is really nice. They have the ocean, and Mexican food." This year she and her parents are staying in Winchester during the competition. Christy Shipe, the National Tournament Director for the NCFCA, said that the students had debated several times each of the first two days of the competition, and those selected to continue would face several more rounds in the second half of the week before the winners are selected. The first, second, and third place finishers will be eligible for scholarship awards from Patrick Henry College. Shipe also said that working with the college staff she had to arrange 65 locations on campus for debates, including dorm rooms, lounges and classrooms. Janna Bowman, events coordinator at the college, said that parking facilities had to stretch from the normal one hundred fifty to over six hundred. Additionally large tent had to be erected to provide a place to serve over a thousand people three meals a day. Shipe said that the "college staff has been great" preparing to make the tournament a success. This is the first year since the college opened that the tournament has been held in Purcellville. The first national tournament in 1977 was held in Purcellville. That year 23 students entered in the competition.

The Forno Family Jessica Smithson Henry A. (5 yrs.) Malaney Foster Jeffrey Dunson Sydney C. (6 yrs.) The Chambers Family Larry Akers Mary Ann Klaner Shannon Evans Danielle C. (5 yrs.) Ruby F.(8 yrs.) Bob Davis Hannah Torrance Cole A. S. (5 yrs.) Tess and Ian H. (7 and 9) Justine Gettman Mary Kate C. Maddy Terry Gehringer Shawn Pumphrey

Dog Finders

In the last issue of the Gazette, we hid a dog. It was on page 25. Grace Dawson was the first to find the dog hidden in the last issue of the Purcellville Gazette. Other finders were:

Sarah E. Ashworth Ita Zaky Stephen S. (11 yrs.) Jane Jen Simmons Frankie Cooper John Geidl Alexandra M. (10 yrs.) Shannon Y. (10 yrs.) Emily (11 yrs.) Sarah Shearrow Daniel Grigsby Karen Hwei Julie Burr Holly LaBrecque Glenda Cudaback Nathan D. (6 yrs.) Philip A. (8 yrs.)

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PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

Pride of Purcellville

continued from front free. Donations made at the event and proceeds from it will go to the Purcellville Volunteer Fire Department, Purcellville Volunteer Rescue Squad, and Purcellville Teen Center. Last year's festival raised $6,000 for the Volunteer Fire and Rescue Squads. "The main reason to have [Pride of Purcellville] is to have something fun for the kids to do during the day, to bring together all the businesses in town, since there are over 400 of them, and to do something for a good cause," said Magic Kayhan, the coordinator for Pride of Purcellville. Special performers will be Mr. Jimmy, Blue Ridge Thunder Cloggers, and several other surprise guest appearances. The festival will include rides like Wayout, Rapid Slides, Inflatable Slides, Berry go Round, Scrambler, Moon Walk, and more. "The Festival is not only a great opportunity to celebrate Independence Day, but a day long gala where friends and family can share together a day of fun-filled activities prior to the fireworks at Franklin Park," coordinators noted in the Pride of Purcellville website at www.prideofpurcellville.org. Games will include Basketball, Golf, Baseball, One Ball, Duck Pond, and Ballon

Dart. Sponsors of the Pride of Purcellville Festival include: Dr. Cy Katzen, Purcellville Plaza and Purcellville Shopping Center, Town of Purcellville, INOVA Medical, Purcellville Gazette, Olympus Gym, VRTA, Southern States, Mercantile Potomac Bank, Dr. Tom Grisius, Purcellville Copy, and Purcellville Business & Professional Association. Pride of Purcellville still needs more sponsors and local booth hosts. "I don't expect everybody to be able to support this, but at least hang the posters and advertising- this is for the town," Magic said, urging local businesses who may not have enough revenue to donate to at least allow the signs to be placed in their windows. To find out about sponsorship, call Magic Kayhan at (540)751-1050 or visit www.prideofpurcellville.org.

JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

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Charlie Brown Still a Good Man

the-mouths-of-babes delivery of simple truths. As for that challenge, acting like a child Grownups playing children playing at being acting like an adult, the cast pulled it off quite grownups. That is the challenge faced by Brett well under the direction of Michele Reynolds, Hansen, Molly Kay Johns, and the rest of the who is also president of The Pickwick Players. Pickwick Players in the cast of "You're a Good Hansen balanced Charlie Brown's whining with Man, Charlie Brown" during the two week run. touches of maturity in his never realized quest The show is based on the comic strip for the pretty redhead girl. Johns, playing "Peanuts" by Charles Schultz. In adapting the Charlie's main foil, Lucy, found an comic strip to the stage Clark M. Gesner kept appropriately grating voice for Lucy's taunting, the focus on "Peanuts" key feature, an out-ofvamping and misinforming. The costumes by Trina Neal and Tina Snider echoed the simple graphics of the early "Peanuts" strips. Beyond that, they cleverly managed to turn Johns and Nora Zanger as Sally from significantly adult women into five year-old girls. The very simple set also evoked the simplicity of Schultz's drawings. Lucy's psychiatric office was a dead ringer for the one drawn nearly fifty years ago. Schultz intentionally used visual simplicity to keep the reader's attention on the ideas. Working in two dimensional line drawings, this was hard enough. Recreating this simplicity in three dimensional Brett Hansen and Molly Kay Johns perform a"You're a Good Man, objects is even trickier. Lucy's Reviewed by David Sackrider

Charlie Brown".

office, the school bus and a flock of kites ­ including one high-flier ­ were rendered with great skill by Jeffrey Taylor, Michael Hale, and James and Kathy Rowley. Susie Chapman and the orchestra provided accompaniment and sound effects. They expertly synchronized the orchestra and Schroeder's piano playing as Lucy vamped on the Baby Grand. The weakest point of the show was due to the acoustics at the Farmwell Station Middle School auditorium. An orchestra pit was not a part of the plan for this auditorium, apparently. Thus Jason Jensen and Jonathan Terry had a major task balancing the sound of the miked signers and the musicians. Pickwick Players had to scramble at more or less the last minute to secure Farmwell Station after their original school auditorium was taken from them. Once again, we see the importance of a welldesigned and equipped stage reliably available to the several fine theatre troops in western Loudoun. The score itself starts to take off after a few lackluster numbers. With "My Blanket and

Me," Linus's main piece, the liveliness of the music reaches a level that remains interesting for the rest of the show. The jazzy ensemble piece "Beethoven Day" and the showy "My New Philosophy" provide the musical high points. Between intermission and the beginning of Act II the Pickwick Players treated us to a short scene and musical number performed by twelve actual children playing the "Peanuts" gang. Their delight in the jokes and enthusiasm, and talent, in their song, "Don't Be Anything Less, Than Everything You Can Be," proved again that with the right material and direction a cast of children can be a joy. You're a good company, Pickwick Players. Thank you for bringing back Charlie Brown. Pickwick Players performed "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" the first and second weekends in June at Farmwell Station Middle School, Ashburn, Virginia.

Loudoun sends two runners to state AAA track meet

By Mandy Gibbs Loudoun County sent individual runners to the state AAA track and field meet this year as Ryan Sheehan and Kody Farr took the field for the 100 Meter Dash. "They did decently- the competition was like nothing they'd ever seen," said Track Coach John Koren. Ryan and Kody took 4th and 5th place at the regional competition this year and were both on the qualifying team last year. Although Loudoun County has sent teams to the state AAA meet before, Ryan and Kody are the first individuals to qualify from Loudoun. "It was worth it, the enjoyment of watching them compete at that level. We're very proud of them," said Coach Koren, who drove the boys to the meet last Friday to compete at 2 p.m. Coach Koren said he and the team had expected that, if anyone went to the state AAA meet from Loudoun, it would be these two. "The team looked to these two for representation," Koren said. Ryan is currently a Junior at Loudoun Valley High School. He won the MVP Award this year and Koren said he has high hopes for Ryan in the future. "He's going to break lots of school records next year," Koren said, "now that he knows what he has to step up to." Kody is a Senior who shared the Coach's Award with Blake Hopkins, another runner on the team. Kody will go on to play football at James Madison University next year. Both young men have shown promise not only in track, but also on the football field and even in the classroom. Loudoun is proud to have seen these two young men represent their county at the state AAA meet. "They did better than our competition thought they would do," Coach Koren said.

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PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

Silent Auction opens

Pottery by wellknown artist David Norton

Lovettsville celebrates Independence Day

Contributed by Loudoun County Parks, Recreation and Community Services (Lovettsville, VA) ­ Organizers of the Lovettsville Independence Day Celebration, to be held on July 3, 2006, have chosen to honor the 40th Anniversary of Loudoun County Parks, Recreation and Community Services (PRCS) at this year's festivities. The parade begins at 5:30 pm the Lovettsville Elementary School and travels through town to the Lovettsville Community Center. This year the Lovettsville Community Center Advisory Board has issued a challenge to other Advisory Boards and recreation organizations to create a float for the parade that celebrates the "Spirit of Recreation ­our first 40 years". This year marks the 40th anniversary of Parks, Recreation and Community Services. "We wanted to honor this special year for PRCS in a fun way", said Kate Griffith, President of the Lovettsville Community Center Advisory Board. "The parade begins our hometown celebration and it's a great opportunity for the community to see the variety of services that PRCS offers." A special Spirit Cup will be awarded to the winning entry in this category. Cash prizes will be awarded for Most Patriotic entry, Best Antique Vehicle, Best Marching Group, Best Decorated Bike, Most Original and an overall Judges Award. It's FREE to enter a float, marching group, antique vehicle, etc. in the Lovettsville Parade; just register with Kathy Lopresti 540-8225026 or email [email protected] Get your bikes and riding toys ready for the parade at the Bike Decorating Workshop at 3:30 pm. The Workshop fee is $7 and all decorations are provided. Contact the Lovettsville Community Center at 540-8225284 to register. The Workshop is held at the Lovettsville Elementary School where the Decorated Bike Contest begins at 5:00 pm, just prior to the parade. At 6:00 pm, the family fun activities begin at the Community Center. A rock wall, inflatable amusement rides, pony rides and trackless train are just some of the activities that will be held on the ball field from 6:00 ­ 8:00 pm. Our favorite DJ, KAZman will provide music. Admission to the event is $5 for children aged 5-14 and $1 for age 14 and up. Fireworks will again be launched from the Lovettsville Park across the street from the Community Center beginning at about 9:30 pm. Event parking will be at the Elementary School and Lovettsville Game Club with a FREE shuttle bus to and from these locations and the Community Center all evening. Best fireworks viewing will be from the upper parking lot of the Community Center and the Elementary School.

Article and Photo Courtesy of Jeff Stern, Franklin Park Arts Center The work of well known Loudoun County artists will be open tour and for silent bid beginning Friday June 9th at the Round Hill Art Center, 6 West Main Street in Round hill VA. The silent auction art exhibition benefits the Western Loudoun Artists Studio Tour. Each participating tour artist has donated a piece of their artwork to be auctioned off; all artwork is being exhibited together at the Round Hill Art Center. Silent bids will be accepted throughout the two weeks leading up to the Studio Tour weekend of June 24th and 25th. The auction will be concluded during Western Loudoun Studio Tour Gala event onSaturday evening June 24th at 7pm in the Round Hill Arts Center; proceeds will help fund future Western Loudoun Artist Studio Tours. Contact Jeff Stern by phone at 540-338-7973 or online at www.franklinparkartscenter.org to visit the tour map and learn more about the participating artists.The Western Loudoun Studio Tour silent auction exhibit will feature the artwork of such

well every artists participating in this year's Studio Tour event. "The exhibit gives everyone a great opportunity to preview the talent of our tour artists," said Hope Hanes, Tour committee member. "Preview the artists work and then make a silent bid; the silent auction is a great way to both support the Studio Tour as well as purchase art at potentially great prices." Bids will be accepted Tuesday through Saturday during the two weeks leading up to the tour weekend and will be awarded on Saturday June 24th during the Studio Tour Gala. Live music and refreshments will be provided during the Gala, which is free for everyone. Tour Artists on exhibit include: Trisha Adams, Tom Boley, Jeff Hall, Shawn Grove, Richard Busch, Brian Kirk, Sarah Huntington, Judith Thompson, Alex Carr, Antonia Walker, John Raymond, David Norton, Hope Hanes, Cindy Lowther, Amy Oliver, Mary Louise Ravese, Catherine Hillis, Katy Stidley, Eric Trueblood, Liz Hall, Gretchen Frederick, Bryan Mattraw, Courtney Fair, Rose Rushbrooke, Beth Wilson For more information about The Western Loudoun Artist Studio Tour, please call Jeff Stern at 540-338-7973 or visit the website to see the tour map, www.franklinparkartscenter.org.

CLASSIFIED SECTION

Call The Purcellville Gazette today to place your classified ad! 540.662.0852

Classified Ad Rates: Want to place an ad in the Gazette for employment, treasures, or garage sales? Call the Gazette at 540.662.0852. Rates are: 40 words - $20; 20 words - $15; 10 words - $10. For longer classifieds, please call for rates.

YARD SALE ADS are

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Nanny

InCare Placements is looking for a Nanny in Hillsboro, Va. $500-$600 per We have a PT position in week. Purcellville. $300.00 a week. If you are an Energetic, fun Nanny Please call 703.922.5004. You can fill out an application online at www.incareplacements.com

staff and physician relations, and general office maintenance. Previous experience in a physician's office is required and should have managed care knowledge and excellent organizational/communication skills. Competitive salary and benefit package available to qualified candidates. Please note this ad and send/fax/email resumes to: LMG; 222 Catoctin Circle, SE, Ste 200; Leesburg VA 20175; FAX 703443-8174; [email protected] EOE

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Custom bush hogging. Lots & small acreage; also garden tiling. Call 540.822.5203

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1981 Mercedes

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Kitchen Help Needed

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231 West F. Street, Purcellville Household Items and much more!

OLD FARM TRACTORS:

Allis Chalmers Tractors preferred. Call Bob 540.942.8020

JUNE 16, 2006

PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

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PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

JUNE 16, 2006

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PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE

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30 PURCELLVILLE GAZETTE JUNE 16, 2006

1:00 PM & 3:00 PM Learn Morven Park's history from 19th century plantation to early 20th century hunt-country estate and working farm. Guided tour includes exhibits, carriage collection, Confederate huts, and outdoor walk around property. www.morvenpark.org Adults $5, Children $1. Meet at Coach House Visitor Center. Call 703-777-6034 for further information. THURSDAY, JUNE 15 Purcellville Farmer's Market 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm 21st Street, across from the Train Station FRIDAY, JUNE 16 Jaws Lovettsville Community Pool doors open at 8:00 pm and the movie will begin at 8:45 pm. $7.00 per person 13 to 18, concessions available. Art Jewelry Show and Sale 7pm-10pm at the Round Hill Arts Center. demonstration at 8pm. Refreshments served. For more information or directions call 540-454-2699 or visit www.hollylanedesigns.com. SATURDAY, JUNE 17 Vinegar Day Court of Honor for Jared Anderson, a Freshman at Loudoun County High School who has earned the rank of Eagle in the Boy Scouts of America. 3:00 p.m. at The Church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints Chapel on 15 Reid Road in Hamilton, Virginia. Spaghetti Dinner 5 pm - 7 pm Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church 11791 Mountain Road, Lovettsville VA 540.822.9117 Free will offering will be taken Building is handicap accessible "Fighting & Frolicking: The Civil War Comes to Morven Park"; Leesburg VA, 1:00 pm Confederate soldiers and civilians in replica log huts tell the story of life in camp at Morven Park following the 1861 battle at nearby Ball's Bluff. www.morvenpark.org Adults $5, Children $1. Meet at Coach House Visitor Center. Call 703-777-6034 for further information. SUNDAY, JUNE 18 Father's Day Dr. Sally Ride, 1st American Woman in Space, 1983 Loudoun Summer Music Fest- Styx on the front lawn of Belmont Country Club in Ashburn, 6 p.m. opening act, headliner at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $17 in advance through TicektsToBuy.com; $20 at the gate. Kids 12 and under free; no coolers, food or beverages, but refreshments available on the grounds. Father's Day Event for Kids at the Middleburg Farmer's Market, 8am ­12pm Decorate your own Father's Day Gift Cookies. Look for Della's tent on Marshall Street in Middleburg behind the Community Center. Dad's Day at Veramar- live music, delicious BBQ, award-wining wines, and lawn games. $25/person (children under 12 half price). Advance reservations required. 11:30-5pm, music begins at 1pm.Info: 540-955-5510 Website: www.veramar.com Email: [email protected] "From Swann's Castle to Governor's Mansion: Exploring an Old Southern Estate"; MONDAY, JUNE 19- THURSDAY, JUNE 23 SonTreasure Island Vacation Bible School: 6:30pm ­ 9:00pm Loudoun Valley Church of the Nazarene, 35834 Charles Town Pike, Hillsboro, VA 20132 Let this be your summer destination of fun learning about the greatest treasure of all, God's Love! FREE for kids age 3 ­ 12 , register online at www.LVCN.ORG or call the church office at 540 668-6357. TUESDAY, JUNE 20 Purcellville Mayor and Town Council Induction Ceremony, 7pm, Town Hall Trip to see Thomas the Tank Engine in Strasburg, Pennsylvania. The trip includes a Ride with Thomas, a visit from Sir Topham Hatt, Storytelling and live music. 8:30 am -5:00 pm. $40 per person, 2 and under $24 per person. The deadline for signing up for this trip is June 16, 2006. Contact the Lovettsville Community Center at 540-822-5284. Jennie Avila for Kids: 7:00 pm, Lovettsville Public Library Super Playgrounds: New to the area? Pack a picnic lunch and join us to discover some popular playgrounds and picnic areas. 10:30am-3:00pm. Adult must accompany children under 14. Depart/return at Loudoun Valley Community Center. Call (540)338-4122. Price: $15.00 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 1st Day of Summer Jennie Avila for Kids!- 1:00 pm, Purcellville Public Library Star Lab: This unique program from the Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum in Winchester will show you more than 3300 stars in the traveling planetarium! Show times are 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm. Lovettsville community Center The Bug Bunch (Ages 2-5) Experience the world of insects through activities, stories, and crafts. $7.00. 10:00-11:00am. Start your Business Seminar: 6:00-8:30 p.m. at the Cascades Library, 21030 Whitfield Place, Potomac Falls, VA. Highlights of the seminar will include: taxes, licensing, accounting & record keeping, business plan development, sources of financing, marketing, and insurance. The program is free of charge, but pre-registration is required. Please contact the Center at (703) 430-7222 or email [email protected] to register. THURSDAY, JUNE 22 Japanese Dance Workshop Time: 5:45pm to 7:30pm Instructor: Kellie Barr Location: Loudoun Valley Community Center, 320 W. School St., Purcellville, VA 20132 Cost: $10 for both nights (22 and 29th) For registration and more information, please email or call Lissa Cobetto [email protected] or 540-338-7973. Purcellville Farmer's Market 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm 21st Street, across from the Train Station

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Celebration 1:00 pm, Purcellville Public Library FRIDAY, JUNE 23 National Take Your Dog to Work Day The Purcellville Garden Club will meet at 12:00 p.m. for the Annual Picnic Pot Luck Luncheon. For further information please call 540-3380950 or 540-668-6701. 10th Annual Old Dominion Brewfest Old Dominion Brewing Company 44633 Guilford Drive Ashburn, VA 20147 703-724-9100 http://www.olddominion.com This three-day event features more than 50 regional breweries showcasing a wide variety of beer. Enjoy live entertainment and activities for children. Local restaurant food vendors. Friday Night Rendezvous at Veramar. extended evening hours at Veramar's wine bar. Limousine transportation available. 5­8pm Info: 540-955-5510 Website: www.veramar.com Email: [email protected] Movie Night at Veramar Vineyard. Brought to you by the "Magic Lantern Theater". Suggested donations $5 to Magic Lantern Theater, a nonprofit organization. Movie begins at dusk. Info: 540-955-5510 Website: www.veramar.com Email: [email protected] SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, JUNE 24-25 The Western Loudoun Artist Studio Tour Tour weekend provides opportunities to visit up to 19 working studios featuring 25 talented artists, the tour is free to the public. Contact Jeff Stern by phone at 540-338-7973 or online at www.franklinparkartscenter.org to visit the tour map and learn more about the participating artists. Pond Pals (Ages 2-5) Enjoy the fundamentals of fishing and discover the pond's plants and animals. $7.00 1:00-2:00 pm. SATURDAY, JUNE 24 US/Korean War Began, Anniversary, 1959 Loudoun Summer Music Fest- Blues Traveler, front lawn of Belmont Country Club in Ashburn, 6 p.m. opening act, headliner at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $12.50 in advance through TicektsToBuy.com; $15 at the gate. Kids 12 and under free; no coolers, food or beverages, but refreshment available on the grounds. National Zoo Trip-Panda Pals unite! Come check out Tai Shan and the new critters at the National Zoo. Adult must accompany children under 16. Depart and Return at Loudoun Valley Community Center. Call (540)3384122. Cost: $12.50. Time: 9:30am-3:30pm. MONDAY, JUNE 26- JULY 9 Wimbledon MONDAY, JUNE 26 UN Charter Signed, 1945 Fourth Annual Lovettsville Library Pet Parade, 4:00 pm, Lovettsville Public Library TUESDAY, JUNE 27 Decide to Get Married Day DDR Til You Drop- 2:00 pm, Purcellville Public Library Reptiles Alive- 7:00 pm, Lovettsville Public Library Playtime at Purcellville Skating Rink: 9am to noon Bring ride on toys, balls, etc. $4/child 540-338-5025 or www.pvilleskating.com

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28 Reptiles Alive: 1:00 pm, Purcellville Public Library Playtime at Purcellville Skating Rink: Bring ride on toys, balls, etc. $4/child 540-3385025 or Playtime at Purcellville Skating Rink: 9am to noon Bring ride on toys, balls, etc. $4/child 540-338-5025 or www.pvilleskating.com Branding for Small Businesses seminar6:00-8:30 p.m. at the Cascades Library, 21030 Whitfield Place, Potomac Falls, VA. You will learn: what branding is; how to start a successful branding campaign; how to deal with common problems such as budget, time and concept limitations, and; how branding can increase your sales. The program is free of charge, but pre-registration is required. Please contact the Center at (703) 4307222 or email [email protected] to register.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29 ­ JULY 2 US Women's Open Championship pre-Fourth of July Game Day 3:00 pm, Purcellville Public Library THURSDAY, JUNE 29 Japanese Dance Workshop Time: 5:45pm to 7:30pm Instructor: Kellie Barr Location: Loudoun Valley Community Center, 320 W. School St., Purcellville, VA 20132 Cost: $10 for both nights (22 and 29th) For registration and more information, please email or call Lissa Cobetto [email protected] or 540-338-7973 Purcellville Farmer's Market 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm 21st Street, across from the Train Station

ANSWERS

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