Read Reunion Book D.pub text version

Allan Baker

My Memories of the old high school:

Sociologists classify the fifties as boring beyond belief and even feel a little sorry for us. I think their sympathy is misplaced . We could walk on the footpaths and in the park day or night without fear of molestation. We weren't tempted by drugs or binge drinking. We weren't confused by the sexual freedom following the availability of the Pill. We weren't contemplating graduating from university with a HECS debt of $200,000. No - we were the lucky generation even if we didn't realise it fifty years ago.

Since 1957:

I graduated from UQ in 1963 and chose Townsville for my first posting. After twenty months doing work for State Health I was sent to Biloela and I stayed there for thirty years, twenty-eight of those in private practice. It was a very satisfying working life. In 1966 I married Claire and we have two sons - Samuel aged 38, a surgeon in Townsville, and Jeremy aged 33, an architect in Hervey Bay. We have twin grand daughters aged two. We have now retired to the Capricorn Coast, allowing me time to become a grumpy old man. We have never been busier but I have no idea what we do.

Alan Birt

Since 1957:

I worked with Marty Rock after leaving High School and at the beginning of the sixties I went to

Brisbane and worked with a land surveyor but after a while in the mid sixties changed and studied Quantity Surveying which I have been doing up until the present. I worked with the Commonwealth Department of Works and received a transfer to Sydney at the end of 1969 and stayed there until 1980 after working in private practice we decided to move back to Qld and have been in our present location since 1980. I am presently working as a consultant for various firms which I intent doing until I have had enough. I married a Brisbane girl in October of 1961 and have just past our forty sixth year of marriage. My wife has been battling breast cancer for the last couple of years and so far no reoccurrence. Unfortunately we have no family and all parents are deceased. We have been Jehovah's Witnesses since 1965 and I have been acting as a presiding minister since 1975 in Sydney and here up until the present in Ipswich. Looking through the list of names I recognised a lot - not so many of the girls but a lot of the boys.

Ann Pleasants (nee Johnman)

My Memories of the old high school:

My school life was a series of lessons, exams and holidays. I enjoyed lunch time in Queens Park with my friends. I somehow learnt to solve problems, thanks to some effective teachers. Afterwards, I was grateful that I had attended a mixed school. I had lots of trouble with prefects and gloves one seemed more than enough.

Since 1957:

After studying Mathematics, I sailed north to the United Kingdom, as did many of my friends. I lectured in Mathematics in Dundee until my marriage when I moved to Cambridge. To keep working, I started punching computer tape for the radio telescope. This was a start to a computing career. We moved to Cardiff where we had three children and lived there happily for some time. I continued to write software. In 1988, it was time to come back to Australia so I uprooted the family and we all returned to Melbourne where I lectured Software Engineering. I finished my working life lecturing in Fiji. After that, Brisbane was the obvious place to retire. South East Queensland is very beautiful. I've been around a big, big block and now enjoy doing nothing in particular.

Ayesha Boulter (nee Bryans)

My Memories of the old high school:

I have good memories of my high school days. I didn't like study much but, with a great group of friends, we had good times in and out of school. My favourite teacher was Mr Cartwright.

Since 1957:

After finishing high school I went to live with my family in various country places - Dad was a headmaster. I married in December 1960 and travelled all over the place because of my husband's work - 26 shifts in 15 years! We were in Arnhem Land before and after the cyclone. I moved back to Toowoomba in 1976 with my four children and lived with my mother. I was divorced in 1978, had a house built in 1979 and I am still there!

Beryl Ness (nee Butler)

My Memories of the old high school:

Coming from a small country school with only 40 pupils, I was a little overawed at first as none of my previous classmates attended Toowoomba High School. I quickly made new friends and settled into boarding away from home. At weekends I was able to go home to Wyreema. My worst memory was learning to swim in the old Toowoomba Baths. (They were so cold.)

... Beryl Ness (nee Butler) Since 1957:

I went to Teachers' College at Gregory Terrace for two years and graduated as a Home Science teacher. My first appointment was at Harristown High School. Each week I spent a day at the Opportunity School in Ramsay Street. I married in 1962 and moved to Dalby where I taught primary school at Dalby State School until I had my first son in 1964. I moved to Brisbane in 1967 and had my second son in 1971. Our hobbies were showing dogs. My husband and I ran a business until 2006 when we retired. We now travel around in our motor home exploring Australia.

Bob Byrne

My Memories of the old high school:

· · · · ·

Learning in Classroom 7 (corner Margaret / Hume Streets) Cyril Connell (Bronco's talent scout) and Barney Hall (Maths teacher) Home brew at Ronnie Green's place and sampling in Frog's Hollow Unforgettable times spent in cadet camps. Greatest achievement being in the First Fifteen Rugby Team for four consecutive years and being chosen as Captain in Sub-Senior and Senior years.

Since 1957:

Success in Senior enabled me to pursue a career in Surveying. I worked at Surfers Paradise on Bruce Small Developments before marriage to Barbara Murray (dec'd). We had three children - Murray (dec'd), Glenn & Helen. Employment followed at the Snowy Mountains Scheme and Moura-Gladstone railway line before settling back in Toowoomba to establish a surveying business on the Darling Downs in 1966. I remain active in Byrne Surveyors which continues to operate after 41 years and is a very busy practice. I enjoy good health and time spent with my five grandchildren as well as travelling in Australia and visiting faraway places overseas.

Bob Densley

My Memories of the old high school:

A vivid picture of "Hefty" Milne, the Principal, with trousers heaved high. "Barney" Bear and sundry disastrous Physics and Chemistry pracs. "Nutty" Nash as a demon bowler in a teacher/student cricket match (but who somehow still managed to instil in at least one student an understanding and interest in Geography). French lessons with "Madame Techeur" who implanted not much French grammar, but a certain joie de vivre, especially in the male students. Mr McCallum who inspired (or was it required?) a fascination for the written and spoken word. A fondness for an otherwise unloved Deputy Principal who happened to pass at a time when chalk in a major chalk fight hit the window, with the resultant requirement to learn 100 lines of Shakespeare. This stood me in good stead for Senior English and many other subsequent exams - when all else failed, one could quote Hamlet.

... Bob Densley

Some of the reactions of teachers to dusters tied up with string or missing under floorboards. Cadets and cold winter camps with Lionel Devine playing the bagpipes to stir up the troops. A surprising interest in rifle shooting which later became a sporting pastime. Swimming carnivals and athletic carnivals and the war-cries. The fleet-footedness of some who one never would thought of as runners. Football matches won and lost, especially against the Gatton College big forwards. The Christian Crusaders meetings which introduced me to Jesus.

Since 1957:

A degree in Agricultural Science at UQ, post graduate honours in Agricultural Economics and an Economics degree led to subsequent employment with the Queensland Department of primary Industries (QDPI) in agricultural marketing. Married first wife Christine (deceased 1995) and have three daughters - Andrea, Janine and Anne. Four grandkids and share three more with Jill. From 1970 to 1977, I was head of Planning, Economics and Marketing in the Department of Agriculture, Stock and Fisheries in Papua New Guinea. Wrote a book on Agriculture in the Economy of Papua New Guinea. Independence Medal. Returned to work in QDPI as Director of Marketing, and then Assistant Director-General. In 1991 I was appointed as Executive Chairman of the Queensland Fisheries Management Authority. Early retirement in 1994 and combined international consulting, mainly for UN agencies, with short term Christian Mission work in countries in Africa, India, Asia and the Pacific. Married Jill in 1995 and in 1996 moved to Nepal for two-year assignment with the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. Wrote and published two books on Christian doctrine for the Nepali church. On return to Australia, I continued consulting and Christian mission work overseas. In 2001 and 2002, Jill and I were volunteers with Australian Volunteers International in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea working with PNG Fisheries Authority in an advisory role. On our return we moved to Mount Tamborine. Visits to North Korea, Mauritius, Madagascar, Tonga, Samoa and Nepal. Member of the Presbyterian Church. Involved with Mount Tamborine Healing Rooms - a Christian prayer centre.

Bob Geddes

My Memories of the old high school:

The four years at Toowoomba High School must have been a significant period in my life - I can remember events of that period more clearly than many of those of more recent times! I recall many dedicated teachers and, in particular, Mr McCallum, Mr Hall and Mr Evans for whom I had great admiration. I remember enjoying Maths and Science which was fortunate for my chosen career, but struggled with English, French, etc. Engineers are often associated with having poor communication skills! The comradeship of the Cadet Corps I found most rewarding. School social activities were always a welcome diversion from study. I have pleasant memories of school dances and balls, interschool sporting trips and social functions so ably organised by class members.

Since 1957:

After leaving TSHS I studied civil engineering at the University of Queensland. I commenced work with the Water Resources Commission, a Queensland Government department, in 1962. This department was responsible for the planning, design and construction of most of the major water supply infrastructure in Queensland during this period. I spent most of my career in the civil design group of this department and was fortunate to have been

... Bob Geddes

involved in the design of many of the dams, weirs, pipelines and pump stations constructed in Queensland during this time. One of these major projects was the Wivenhoe Dam which supplies the majority of water to Brisbane and surrounding areas. I was married in 1964 and have three daughters and six grandchildren. My marriage did not survive and I was divorced in 1977. I remarried in 1985. In 2003, I officially retired after a number of years as Chief Civil Engineer of the organisation (Sun Water). I went back to work with the same organisation as a consultant, specialising in pipeline design. I am currently involved in the Western Corridor Recycled Water Project - Eastern Pipeline. This project will deliver recycled water to industrial users, two power stations and also back to Wivenhoe Dam. I have recently installed a very large rainwater tank. My current goal is to retire permanently by the end of this year.

Bob Harding

My Memories of the old high school:

· · · ·

The pranks and skylarking that took place on the balcony overlooking Hume Street. The sandshoe assault on the DP's new FJ and the creative use of the old sewing machine are personal favourites The mystery of the disappearing and reappearing blackboard dusters and the failure of the "cup-hook response". The teachers .... Just how good were they? McCallum, Wilkes, Ric Evans, Cartwright, J.A. Wolfe, etc... Who couldn't have a soft spot for "Nutty" Nash, "Barney" Hall, "Shorty" Southgate?

Since 1957:

1958: Kelvin Grove Teachers' College 1959-2000: Queensland Department of Education - Darling Downs Region, PNG (on secondment). 1969: Married Sylvia Seefeld. We have two children - Brendan (married with two little girls; a police officer with the Traffic Branch in Toowoomba) and Tamara (married and expecting #1 in December; works at Centrelink in Toowoomba ). 1970-1972: Sylvia and I taught in Rabaul until earthquakes, tidal waves and political unrest scared us back to Queensland. 1973-1975: Mackay North State School 1975-2000: Commuted daily to Oakey State School with other staff while living at 2A Mansford Street where we still reside. 2000 : Ongoing research into Cricket in Toowoomba. 2004: Published "A History of Toowoomba Cricket 1888 - 2004".

Charles Moore

My Memories of the old high school:

Great school for sport. Encouragement from teachers in classroom and on sports field, like "Barney" Hall, Col McCallum, Cyril Connell, Paddy Wilkes, Bernie Krautz and Ken Southgate. Exploding chalk prepared by KB which almost gave Mrs Buchan a heart attack.

... Charles Moore

Mr Hall sitting on loosely put together tall stool and seeing it collapse under his considerable weight. Friendships with many fellow students, especially Bob Byrne, Ron McLucas, Bob Harding, Ian Doherty, Col Wockner, John Rynne and Wal Tonkin.

Since 1957:

One year at Teachers' College (1958). Taught at Rangeville, Toowoomba North, Toowoomba East (13 years) and country schools on the Darling Downs. Appointed Deputy Principal at Tewantin State School in 1981. Stayed there until retirement in 1996. Tewantin is in Noosa Shire near the Noosa River. Remarried another teacher, Debra, in 1985. Have travelled to all Australian States, UK twice, NZ, USA, Canada and SE Asia. Have six children and five grandchildren. Play golf twice a week. Broncos Rugby League watcher.

Colin Wockner

My Memories of the old high school:

· · ·

The closeness to the city centre; the lack of facilities whereby swampy Queens Park was our playground and the old drill hall which was used for assemblies, etc; and In retrospect, the calibre of the teachers there in the 1950s

Since 1957:

In February 1958 I commenced work in Brisbane with the Commonwealth Department of Social Services (now Centrelink). During the 1960s I relieved at Townsville, Cairns, Rockhampton, Toowoomba and Canberra. Permanent transfer to Toowoomba in 1968. Retired from the Department on 31 March 1989 as Deputy Regional Manager. Between 1990 and 2000, I was employed as Administration Manager by Solicitors, Bernays and Bernays, Toowoomba. Retired on 1 December 2000 with travel, golf, tennis, etc now occupying my time. My wife, Gail, and I intend spending our retirement years here in Toowoomba.

Dierdre Tomlins (nee McLean)

My Memories of the old high school:

· · · · ·

After-school art classes that Mr Mullinder held for students not studying art. Being overawed in French classes by the very tall and preciselyspoken Mr Crouch, so that I worked hard and ended up liking French Swimming lessons at the City Baths under the watchful eye of Miss Hansen Finding that hair in a ponytail was deemed radical, and all girls with the offending hairstyle had to stand in the front of the assembly A group of friends I lost touch with and have enjoyed catching up with in the last few years.

Since 1957:

After school I did a degree in Ag. Science at UQ and then worked at the DPI's South Johnstone tropical research station. Bill and I were married in January 1964 and, with him, I went to Fiji where he

... Dierdre Tomlins

was managing a tobacco plantation near Nandi. We returned to Australia in 1965 and lived in Victoria and Cairns and were back in Brisbane by 1972. We have four children - a son and three daughters. In the early 1980s I earned a Diploma of Fine Arts from the BIA and in 1989 returned to UQ and did an Arts degree in English and History, and post grad studies in History. I worked for a time on local history projects. Earlier this year we moved from Brisbane to Caloundra and I am still painting.

Derek Volker

My Memories of the old high school:

We were lucky. The Grammar School was weak and good students who might have gone there went to TSHS. We had a lot of silvertails from Toowoomba East State School in the class who had come in the top ten in the Scholarship examination. Competition was strong, but there was good camaraderie. The school overall had a representative mix of students from across the town/city and the surrounding areas. We had the industrial component, commercial and domestic science as well as the people in the A stream. The teaching staff was very capable with most of the male teachers having been in the Armed Forces during WWII. Some were absolutely outstanding - Colin McCallum in particular. What surprised me in looking back over the teachers list is how few there were and how few had qualifications. "Nutty" Nash, "Barney" Hall and Rowley Crossman did not cite any, yet all were good teachers. One lasting memory is of Rowley in History classes walking up and down the room reciting facts and dates in a way that exemplified the John Howard approach to History learning, talking about Boulanger (rhyming with Justin Langer). It was the teaching staff rather than the Principals who were memorable. One does remember the Deputy, "Spitter" Lewis, in the early days with his injunction to Errol Sigley - "It's the whip, Sigley!" as he sprayed the class with his trigonometrical enthusiasm. There was also Principal Milne in Sub-Senior who taught Maths A and set a final exam problem from the previous year's Senior exam without giving the crucial "assume...". There were a couple of students who got it right nonetheless. In reading the ACTA magazine for 1957, I was amazed to find that there was a Council guiding the school which seemed to have no impact whatever. Perhaps we do not need to have concerns about Governance. Looking back, the school did not have good facilities. There was no gym, just a set of parallel bars and a couple of mats to put on the asphalt to deaden falls. We were close to the City Baths and to the ovals on Frogs Hollow. I can't remember if there was a library. It is hard to think of a time when there was no internet and the ability to "google" for information. Students just had to do their work without that sort of help. I suspect that our very young grandchildren have wider knowledge and capacity to find out things than we ever had. One abiding memory of the school is that it was located so that, wherever you lived, you had to ride your bike uphill to get home. When the westerlies were blowing, that could be daunting, especially if you were accompanied by the super-fit Alan Birt. The school was good at sports. We did well at Cricket and Rugby and I seem to remember the girls winning the Basketball ( as it was called then). Perhaps the greatest triumph of our time was the win in the inter-school athletics, with Alan Birt's sensational finishing burst in the one mile race still a bright memory. They were good days.

Since 1957:

I went to the University of Queensland and then to the London School of Economics and Political Science. Married Sue in 1962 and we have two children and three grandchildren. We came back to Australia in 1966 and lived in Melbourne where I was in the Commonwealth Public Service, starting as the head of the International Relations Branch of the Department of Labour and National Service. This involved a lot of time overseas at meetings of the OECD and the ILO. We moved to Canberra in 1975 where I was in the Department of Immigration and Ethnic Affairs as a Division Head and then Deputy Secretary. In 1981 I became Secretary of the Department of Veterans' Affairs and President of the Repatriation Commission. I then moved to the Department of Social Security as Secretary in 1986, and to the Department of Employment, Education and Training as

... Derek Volker

Secretary in 1993. In 1996 I became Chairman of the Government Relations Group in the national law firm Corrs Chambers Westgarth and stayed there until 2005. Since then I have been a consultant to international and national financial and IT groups and am on the boards of several companies. Other current roles are as Chair of the Oz Help Foundation, the ACT Skills Commission, and the City West Precinct Committee which is developing nine blocks of land in Canberra in a joint venture involving the ANU, the ACT Government and the private sector.

Elaine Norgaard (nee Storey)

My Memories of the old high school:

I thoroughly enjoyed my four years at TSHS. I've great memories of good friends, fun times and playing lots of sport!

Since 1957:

I began work the week after leaving school, in an office, as a Clerk/ Typist. I resigned from there in March `59 and went travelling to Europe for 8½ months with my mother. On returning to Toowoomba, I began working in the office at Eagers. I resigned from there in February `61, got married and moved to the country. We live 45 kilometres north-west of Toowoomba on the farm my husband's great grandfather settled in the early 1900s. We grow crops, pastures and run beef cattle. We were blessed with two lovely daughters. I have been very involved with the CWA, Little Theatre and various choirs so my spare time has been very full!

Enid Clanchy (nee Moy)

My Memories of the old high school:

First day ... big ... scary ... know nobody ... which classroom next? Made friends - many still in contact. Wonderful teachers. One said, "I'm here to show you doorways, and give you the keys to those doors." These keys to knowledge; huge expansion of interests, and strong encouragement to think as well as learn, were rain on dry earth. Growth rapid. Miss Hansen and Mr McCallum - English as it must be taught; care of the structure of language, and the sheer heights of joy the blossoming of our language can attain. Acting in plays, operettas, music, Mr Enchelmaier's choir,- a treasure trove, enriching to this day. History - Mr Crossman gave me a love of a subject so deep and vast (Modern & Ancient), I am never in danger of being bored. Art - Mr Mullinder; enthusiastic, meticulous: "You have a happy talent, may never be famous but it will affect all aspects of you life." So true, Mully. Thank you. Effective discipline - caught by Mr Nash sliding down stair banister. Punishment? - Repeat, shamed before growing crowd. Did NOT do it again! Our uniform - trim, neat, scrutinised by "Hannah"; such pride in it, our school and thus ourselves. Thank you so much TSHS, for taming and educating a little bush brumby; giving me so much. No wonder I wanted to become a teacher.

Since 1957:

Training college, followed by three years of teaching in Miles where I met and married fellow teacher Earl Clanchy. Transferred to Wandoan. In 1965, a dramatic change - bought the Mungallala Hotel from Earl's family and embarked on a steep learning curve - the university of pub life. Our sons, Jim, 3 years, and John, 1, hit the ground running. So did I. Family predicted death by boredom - NEVER an option. A one pub small town is the hub of the district. Heat, dust, flies, cold in winter, hard work but fun.

... Enid Clanchy (nee Moy)

Fascinating people on their way to the border, the Isa, the Gulf and Darwin, and a town with room and heart for all its locals. We loved it. Boys at boarding school - the downside of outback life galvanised me. I had been in school and town activities, now joined forum and choral group in Mitchell. Painted huge backdrops for Choral Society musicals, revues, cabarets, and for school concerts, etc. Landscaped our 1½ acres - eventually weddings, fashion parades and parties had our garden as a venue. I did supply teaching in Mitchell and Mungallala, then remedial teaching with Aboriginal children; very hard but so rewarding, for them and me. Earl and I travelled a fair bit - Thailand, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Fiji and New Zealand particularly beautiful memories. Our boys are happily married, and we have six grandchildren - four girls and two boys, aged 20 down to 14. Eden has a snake, and our snake is Earl's ill health - struck in 1974; urgent kidney removal. Again in 1984, laminectomy of spine. 1989, medivac, in a coma, and Addison's Disease diagnosed. With care we stayed another seven years in our Western paradise. The hotel had been spruced up, airconditioned and dragged into the 20th century - just as it was ending; but Earl and I were aware retirement was necessary. We love our life, the soft coastal life of Redcliffe; reading, art, writing, gardening, time for music, and friends and family, and time for each other. Strangely enough we live in Xanadu Crescent. Not quite in a Kublai Khan "Pleasure Dome", but on our own small piece of love and contentment. We never mention it as a paradise. THERE be snakes!

Faye Jones (nee Wyatte)

My Memories of the old high school:

Fifty years - imagine! It certainly DOES "feel like yesterday" since I was on the receiving end of a glare from one of the teachers for being in the street without a hat and gloves, or failing to give way to a teacher on the stairs! It is a shame that young people today are not encouraged to follow such niceties. I have fond memories of both students and teachers who, on reflection, were a very professional, dedicated lot. My favourite subject was undoubtedly English. Sincere thanks must go to Mr McCallum for the inspiration and joy he passed on to me. Four super years!

Since 1957:

What an incredible fifty years - the first thirty flashing by in a whirlwind fashion as I juggled school duties with home and family commitments. Upon completion of the Teachers' Training Course at Kelvin Grove, I commenced my teaching career at Toowoomba North State School, transferring to Acland in my third year. During that year also, I became "Mrs Kevin Jones". After a short break I resumed teaching at Holy Name Convent, Toowoomba for a couple of years before starting a family. Five years and two daughters (both now teachers) later I returned to Holy Name for a further three years. Kevin joined SGIO in 1972 and we moved to Roma where I was a lady of leisure for eighteen months doing tuckshop and other lovely things! Then we moved to Warwick where I was fortunate to teach for the next ten years at St Mary's Primary School. In 1984 Kevin moved to Head Office in Brisbane to manage a department. For the last three years in Warwick I had been engaged in remedial teaching and transferred to Brisbane schools doing similar work until 1987 when our youngest daughter completed Early Childhood Studies. Happily retired at last, I could then pursue other interests - reading, sewing, tapestry, movie going and travel within Australia and abroad. This year we took a long awaited trip to Scandinavia with the added bonus of a Baltic cruise including a visit to St. Petersburg. Since a visit to Germany in 1998, I have been studying German so as to correspond better with my German relatives, only a few of whom speak English. My life during these past fifty years has been, and continues to be, rich and rewarding.

George Bickerstaff

My Memories of the old high school:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. First week dodging initiation pranks. Efforts of the girls decorating the rooms for Carnival of Flowers. Budding chemists making small rotten egg gas generators to put into flower displays for Carnival of Flowers. Cyril Connel coaching Rugby. Hitch hiking to Brisbane with Ron Green to see Little Richard.

Since 1957:

1958 - August 1967: In Newcastle working with BHP while doing part-time degree. Graduated with B.Sc. (Chem Eng) from University of NSW. Newcastle University became autonomous in 1966. Played Rugby for the Uni. August 1967 Worked with ACF and Shirleys and all the changes of identity for 32 years before retiring. Played Rugby with GPS club in Brisbane and am still involved with the club. Married in 1972. Have a son and daughter and three grandchildren.

Heather Moss (nee Skinner)

My Memories of the old high school:

Since 1957:

· · · · · · · ·

Teachers' Training College. Teaching for three years. Married Three children - parenting. Ten grandchildren - grand-parenting. Church work. Community work. Travelling.

Jennifer Phillips (nee Noon)

I enjoyed our 4 years at Toowoomba High, but there were some things I didn't like: (i) Typing lessons, hated Typing exams ­ yet touch-typing is one skill that I have used so much through my life, still do and am thankful. (But I hated having to spend many lunch hours to do typing for Mr Wolfe in Senior year!!) (ii) Sport ­ I was hopeless at it, so didn't enjoy Friday afternoons in Frogs' Hollow!!

... Jennifer Phillips (nee Noon)

Was it Mr Nash who used to pronounce "lines" as "lions" and wondered why the whole class laughed when he talked about "lines running up and down the board"? Loved English lessons with Col McCallum. In 1977 I sent him a postcard from Tintern Abbey, thanking him for making poetry like that touch our emotions. Having done a commercial Junior, I remember how difficult it was starting Maths 2 for Senior. Mr Wolfe just tossed me a Junior Physics textbook saying, "This will help"! Luckily I sat next to Ann Johnman in Maths 2 lessons, and she gave me lots of help. Thanks Ann. Loved choir practice every Monday lunchtime. Thought Les Enchelmaier was marvellous. Loved singing with the choir in concerts, musicals and speech nights. Best memory was "Papageno" from "The Magic Flute". In Dec 1988 when in Heidelberg, Germany, I saw an advertisement for a performance of "Die Zauber Flote" ­ got the last ticket ­ magical ­ brought back so many memories.

Since 1957:

During 1957 the Dept of Education realized it needed, in a hurry, more secondary school teachers to staff the new high schools that were springing up everywhere. Applications were called for the new "S2" scholarships (1 year at Uni, 1 year at Teachers' College, then appointment at a high school). I wanted to teach general subjects, not commercial, so I applied, even though Jim Wolfe said I wouldn't get one as I was a GIRL. But I was successful, and of the 40 successful applicants, 38 were GIRLS!! 1960 ­ appointed to Bremer High School in Ipswich, its second year of operation with only junior and sub-junior students. I was teaching Maths and Geography. There were not enough commercial classes to keep the 2 commercial teachers busy, but too much for one. Mr FT Milne, our old principal but then an inspector, came to sort out the problem. He walked into the staff-room, saw me and said, "There's the solution ­ Jennifer did a commercial course, she can teach book-keeping and we'll transfer one of the commercial teachers!" Later, Ron McLucas came to Bremer as a commercial teacher. Believe it or not, I also trained the girls' swimming team (we won the interschool competition in Ipswich) and the Ball Games teams. Fortunately at Toowoomba High, I had watched Betty Smith choose and train the Ball Games teams (Captain Ball, Leader Ball, File Gap etc). (I had tried out for a team but had not been chosen!!!) So I used Betty's techniques at Bremer. Imagine my thrill when MY teams got into every final and WON them at the Qld State Secondary Schools Sports competition held at the Exhibition grounds in Brisbane. My girls earned so many points that Bremer won the trophy for Grade 2 schools at QSSSSA!! What a triumph for a girl who was hopeless at sport! I proved that, by using tips from experts, showing encouragement and enthusiasm, perseverance pays off! Years later, I told Betty about this when she was a phys ed lecturer at Kelvin Grove college. While at Bremer, I completed the uni subjects needed to gain a Certificate in Education, passed Senior French so I matriculated in the Arts Faculty, and was able to transfer from the Education Faculty to Arts. August 1963 ­ was transferred from Bremer to Stanthorpe, where I met my husband, John Phillips. End of '63, we were both transferred to Brisbane, John to Banyo, me to Balmoral where I met up with one of my classmates, Marian Gilbert, who was teaching commercial. Married in April '65 (after travelling in SE Asia for 3 months with a girlfriend.) Then taught at Aspley High for 3 years. Our daughter was born in 1968. In 1977-78 we lived in Bath, England, for 18 months. John was on sabbatical leave from lecturing in Maths at Kelvin Grove Teachers' College. On our return to Brisbane, I went back to Uni part-time to finish my Arts degree ­ graduated in 1983 with a double major in German. Then taught German and Maths for 4 years at Inala High School.

... Jennifer Phillips (nee Noon)

Dec 1987 John retired early (after 2 heart attacks) so I quit too. Since then, we've had a few trips overseas, and have done volunteer work ­ 5 years at the Wesley Hospital in Brisbane and 10 years at the Gold Coast Hospital. We moved to the Gold Coast in 1995. Our daughter is a G.P., her husband a specialist in Emergency Medicine at Gold Coast Hospital. We have 4 grandchildren ­ 3 boys aged 11, 8 and 6, and 1 girl, 20 months. During the last 10 years, my `hobby' has been Dog Obedience. Chessie, a border collie cross, and I have done obedience trials from Chermside to Coffs Harbour. She gained her Novice and Open titles, has stacks of trophies and sashes. Chessie and I really enjoyed going to all the primary schools on the Gold Coast with the Council's Animal Management staff (i.e. Dog Catchers!), teaching Responsible Pet Ownership and demonstrating obedience and tricks, the favourite with the kids. Chessie and I are now retired.

Jim Underwood

My Memories of the old high school:

· · ·

Learning how to strip, clean, assemble and fire the Vickers Medium Machine Gun. Dances at Laurel bank Park Ancient typewriters

Since 1957:

1958: Teachers' College, Kelvin Grove 1959-1988: Infantry Officer, Australian Regular Army 1989-1999: Intelligence Officer, Australian Customs Service 2000 Grandfather, Philosopher, Historian, Organic Gardner, Gentleman, Committee Member

Joan Boxall (nee Gampe)

My Memories of the old high school:

Friends. Hat, gloves, tie and stockings. Miss Hansen's eagle eye. Friends. Respect for teachers. Competition - in class and on playing fields. Bus trips to Brisbane for the culture bits. Writing "lines" using carbon paper. Exams in the Showground pavilion. School dances in RSL Memorial Hall (The Memo). "No frills" facilities:- choir with Manual Arts teacher, Mr Enchelmier, in the Methodist Church hall; assembly in the army drill hall or on army parade ground; sport and rudimentary gymnastics with Miss Betty Smith in Queens Park; locker and change room under wooden Domestic Science room, no showers. Dedicated teachers. Friends forever!

Since 1957:

1958: to Teachers' College, Brisbane. 1959: taught at Rangeville 1960 - 1962: Dutton Park Opportunity School

... Joan Boxall (nee Gampe)

1962: Married Lt. Ron Boxall, packed and followed, had three children, lived at 22 different addresses in four states, a territory and Canada. Taught here and there a further six years until lack of degree status caught up with me. Joined NAB as junior part-time teller at age 44 - checked staff spelling and geography. Had turns as secretary, treasurer and president of various army wives' clubs, P&C Associations and tuckshop committees. Along the way learned to cook, garden, drive, fill in the gaps in children's education, quilt, travel light, make the most of each new location. 1990: "We" retired to Highfields (He as a Brigadier). Too early so we bought a tyre business with me paying the bills and chatting with customers. So many interesting people! 2006: Retired again. Still learning - how to garden with little water, how to use columns in Microsoft Word, how to remember the first 17 ( of 108) moves in Tai Chi, how to use up 30 years of accumulated fabrics to make yet more quilts for six grandchildren, how to deal with health challenges as they arise ...

Joan Dean (nee Wagland)

My Memories of the old high school:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. I recall the friendships made at that time. The quality of the teachers, the discipline and the desire to achieve. The wonderful sporting events, specially playing basketball and being awarded the striped blazer of honour. Enjoyed the Home Science course which has helped my creative cooking all these years since. The old high school was centrally located in the city Our uniform which we wore with pride.

Since 1957:

1958-1961: worked in insurance and finance (in Brisbane). Married James Clayton Dean in October 1961. Moved to Bundaberg 1961-1972 . Joined service and social clubs - very active in the community. Had two children - Tony born 6/12/62 and Jenny born 29/10/67. Moved back to Brisbane 1972. Studied Real Estate and gained Real Estate Agent's Licence in 1975. Company Director and worked in our Real Estate business (current). Studied and gained my diploma as a Cosmetician (with Honours) in 1985. 1986: Counter Manager - Elizabeth Arden - for 16 years, Team Leader in the Cosmetics area for many years at Myer Carindale. Won many awards and overseas trips. 1973-1980: Australian Administrator ESA Woman Int 1979: was presented a National Award of Excellence by astronaut Neil Armstrong for Community Contributions Have travelled overseas many times, especially to USA and Japan, plus other countries and Australia. Love travel! I have two grandsons - Ashley and Zachary. Achieved the status of being listed in "Who's Who of Australian Women" in 1982. Currently, in my retirement, I'm very active with a women's group - Beta Sigma Phi International, assisting in forming new groups based on younger women e.g. 35-55 age. B.S.P. stands for life learning and friendship.

Joan Margaritis (nee Farquharson)

My Memories of the old high school:

· · · · ·

Fond memories of school - a great sense of comradeship in our group The sporting achievements The social life The great teachers The tricks the boys got up to - glue on doorknobs, hiding the dusters, chalk that exploded, advertising the school as a boarding house.

Since 1957:

Attended Teachers' College for two years. Taught in Toowoomba for eighteen months then transferred to St George where I taught for another 3½ years. Worked at doctor's surgery for next few years doing pathology, x-ray and general surgery duties. Married in 1967 - first child born in 1968. We established a kangaroo processing works in 1968 and I assisted my husband in this and continued part-time at the surgery. We also had a share in a café and I helped out there as well. In 1972 I returned to full-time teaching. I retired at the end of 1977 and my second child was born in 1978. In 1979 we opened a sports store in a block of shops we had built. I managed this shop for the next ten years and ran a small catering business on the side. I returned to full-time teaching in July 1989 and finally retired at the end of 2004. We have frequently travelled to Greece over the years and, when we leased our kangaroo business in 1990, my husband built us a house in the small village where he was born. We sold our processing works in 2000 but established a field depot and still carry on in the kangaroo industry. We still have our sports store and this keeps me occupied. I have two grandchildren, a boy aged 10 and a girl 4 months. I was awarded an Australia Day Medal for Services to Teaching.

John Rynne

My Memories of the old high school:

· · ·

A massive four-man swim team which won the Darling Downs title. Frank Adcock swam and won all the individual events and we other three were allowed to join him for the relays. Frank also took a serious step forward in his Chemistry career when he exploded Miss Hansen's stick of chalk in History class. Speaking of Chemistry - best fun of all was blowing the gas out of the school pipes (via the Bunsen burner outlets) causing the ovens to go out just after the Domestic Science girls had put their cakes in to cook. So why did I fail Junior Chemistry? How to stop Deputy Principal (Sheriff) J.A. Wolfe sneaking up behind you in Maths? ... sprinkle the aisles with sugar. Who joined the school cadets as a Private and, years later, finished as a Private. Something to do with my aversion to discipline? I loved Les "The Nut" Nash, and that's probably why I enjoyed teaching Geography for many years. "Madame Techeur" taught us lots of French (and showed us lots of French) perched up there on the front table. Bit different to my "mate" Bernie Crouch who forced me to take Senior French. I only passed because he said I couldn't and wouldn't. Col McCallum - the doyen of teachers - my inspiration to teach! How often he said to me, "keep writing that crap ... the examiner's will love it .... But I don't!" Barney "The Bear" Hall was a good guy but hated it when we tied the blackboard duster to the leg of the table.

· · · · · ·

... John Rynne Since 1957:

1958: Teachers' College at Kelvin Grove 1959: Taught most of the kids at Virginia State School to swim in their new pool ... and Grade 6. 1960: Grade 6 at Clontarf Beach State School. 1961-63: Taught Years 6, 7 and 8 (55+ students in one room) at Kippa Ring State School. 1964-67: Seconded to Redcliffe State High School teaching Year 8, 9 and 10. 1968-93: Moved to NSW to marry the lovely Jan and signed on to teach ONE year at St John's College, Woodlawn (Lismore). Stayed there for 26 years probably because Woodlawn was all boys (about 400), all boarders and all sport. Lismore was also the birthplace of our six children - all boys ... except for the five girls. 1994: Semi-retired thanks to a very successful marketing business but lectured part-time in Communications/Hospitality at TAFE College Lismore. 1995-99: Returned to Brisbane to set up and manage the new Ronald McDonald House at the Royal Women's Hospital, Herston. 1999-2002: Queensland General Manager for Ronald McDonald House Charities and continued as comanager of Herston House. In the eight years Jan and I spent at Ronald House we had 18,000 people from all parts of Queensland stay with us. 2002-04: Spent an interesting and rewarding two years as a Corporate Club Manager with the Institute of Business Leaders, Brisbane. 2005: General Manager of Endless Enterprise, a finance business focussing on providing venture capital to starting-up or expanding businesses. 2005-07: Retired from the world of business to assist Jan with raising two (of five) grandchildren full-time.

Judy Aitken (nee Routley)

My Memories of the old high school:

My years at TSHS were very happy ones filled with memories of excellent teaching, strict discipline and wonderful lasting friendships. Highlights for me include: · playing the piano for Mr Bullock's orchestra · Winning the Senior Girls' Swimming Championship · Sports and ball games with Betty Smith · Kipp's apparatus tumbling out of the second floor Science lab and the ensuing H2S aroma! · Detention from Miss Hansen for not wearing hat and/or gloves · Our carefree picnics at the Willows and dances at Laurel Bank Park Hall (with ensuing high school romances!!) We all received a good academic grounding which enabled us to pursue our chosen professions.

Since 1957:

After graduating as a teacher from Kelvin Grove Teachers' College, I taught for five years in the South West Region of Queensland (Bell, Roma, etc) before being transferred to Virginia State Primary School as a music specialist having kept up my music studies. Upon marriage and the arrival of three children, I taught piano and music theory privately, while studying and tutoring at St Lucia University, obtaining first a B.A. (history and music) and then an M.A. (Music Education). My professional music qualifications include F.T.C.L., L.Mus.A., T.Mus.A. in piano, theory and teaching of music. In 1973, I was appointed as lecturer in Music Education at Griffith University (where Betty Smith was now Dean of Women!), a position I held until retirement in 1995. I have been fortunate to have travelled extensively in Europe, Asia, Africa, North America and throughout Australia and New Zealand. Being an academic and married to a Scotsman does have its rewards!! Currently I live on acreage with my second husband, dog and cat and my activities include community work, sewing (my sewing teachers would not believe it!), travel and enjoying family and six grandchildren.

Keith Barton

My Memories of the old high school:

Most of my memories relate to sport (mostly rugby and athletics).- and to the various pranks the boys got up to.

Since 1957:

1958-66: Newcastle - BHP cadet. Graduated UNSW B.Sc. Chemical Engineering 1966-68: Sydney - UNSW Ph.D. Chemical Engineering 1969-76: Sydney - Ajax Chemicals - various positions 1977-79: Sydney - G.D. Searle (Pharmaceuticals) Business Development 1979-81: Sydney - Farley & Lewers, Business Development 1981-93: Sydney - CSR - various positions, finally Executive Director (1990-92 USA) 1993-99: Sydney - CEO James Hardie 1999- present: Sydney - Executive Director of various public companies currently Amcor, Coles, Tower Air Liquide and not for profit Vision Australia 1962, married Margaret Wilson. Three children: Melinda (1965), Kathryn (1967) and Simon (1969). 1987 divorced 1988 married Lynette Williams Currently semi-retired enjoying jogging, swimming, travelling and six grandchildren.

Loretta Ashford (nee Priest)

My Memories of the old high school:

I remember the sense of pride I felt each morning as I walked into the Hume Street school building, and how I looked forward to chatting with school friends in the quadrangle. I also remember how cold it was in the locker rooms under the Home Science building during winter. I remember our 3D and 4D form tags, which meant we were seen as not being as clever as the students taking the pure academic subjects. So I remember struggling at times to overcome my shyness when we left the shelter of the Home Science building and joined in with the academic classes. I don't recall many teachers in my junior years, but I was fascinated by two male staff members (one was Mr Nash) who crossed the road just about every lunch hour, put up umbrellas on hot days, and talked politics, then put the umbrellas down before walking across the road together at the end of lunch, to go about their `business as usual'. I remember Mr Nash in Mathematics talking about how to do algebra on Mars or if we went to the moon, and I was so busy thinking I wasn't going to go to Mars anyway, that I never listened to why X = Y. I always accepted anything we learnt but I really hated Algebra, and it is the one subject that I have never used since the day I left school. I always felt very insecure in my junior years, so I well remember Mr Enchelmier who made me feel as if I was worth something. I enjoyed walking up the road going to choir as I loved to sing, and I always felt so `;whole' after the practice. A highlight was the enjoyment I felt being part of the operettas we performed, our Eisteddfod involvement, and how I could abandon my shyness on stage. I well remember our school song and how, on speech night in the Toowoomba Town Hall, we would all sing with such gusto. Year 11 was the best school year ever as we were treated more like young adults by the staff, yet we could have fun because Senior wasn't until the year after. I also enjoyed wearing my Senior uniform. I felt a greater bond with the senior academic class in these years, and the outings and socials we did as a

...Loretta Ashford (nee Priest)

group together are still great memories. I remember more about the teachers in the Senior forms but, because I also taught at the school after graduating as a teacher, some of my memories are mixed between times. I do remember Mrs Buchan because of her long hair, who taught us English and how she called one of our boys Oliver Goldsmith. I remember our Geography teacher Miss Hanson because I tuned in when she talked about her travels. I felt I knew New Zealand well. I remember that we had a Scottish Chemistry and Physics teacher and how the Home Science girls downed tools because he gave all his attention to the "A" students. I remember Mr Bullock who would get so excited about the poem we were going to study, and then proceed to dictate copious notes about the author for days, then quickly read the poem and move on to the next poem. I mostly remember our Home Science teachers and I can truthfully say that the subjects we studied with them have been the beneficial ones in my life journey. The teacher however, who stands out most for me for the wonderful general knowledge he imparted, was Mr Mullinder, our Art teacher. However, it took me years to fully appreciate his contribution to my learning journey. When I think of our Senior years at school I still have a warm feeling, as it was a precious, carefree time, before we launched into the adult world.

Since 1957:

As a trained teacher, mother of two and grandmother of seven healthy grandchildren, I have lived an interesting life since leaving high school at the end of 1957. A few snippets of my life's journey are as follows: 1958-59: attended Teachers' College in Gregory Terrace, Brisbane. 1960: taught Home Science Year 8-11 and Adult Education at Toowoomba State High 1961-64: taught Home Science Year 6-12 and Special Education at Gympie State High 1965: married and set up home, until called back to teaching by Miss Marks 1965-66: taught Home Science Year 8-12 and Adult Education at Toowoomba State High, Mt Lofty, Toowoomba 1967: gave birth to my first daughter and found great contentment in motherhood 1969: gave birth to my second daughter and continued to be solely a wife and mother 1972-76: called back by the department (again Miss Marks) and accepted a position to teach Home Science Years 8-12 at St Saviours College, Toowoomba 1978-79: transferred as a classroom teacher to Concordia Lutheran Primary School, Toowoomba 1980: worked on the farm we purchased at Bunker's Hill, Westbrook 1981-82: worked as Head Chef at Clifford House 1983-84: owned a health food store in High Street, Toowoomba 1985: moved to Brisbane to open first health food section in Coles, Toombul 1985: called back by the department to fill in as Science and Home Economics Year 7-10 at Wavell heights, Brisbane 1986-97: went back full time as a classroom teacher at Grace Lutheran Primary School, Redcliffe, and soon appointed as an AST1 teacher 1997-98: became 3IC (third in charge) as Junior Coordinator and Leading Teacher at Grace Primary School, Redcliffe 1999:moved to South Australia after accepting position as Deputy Principal, St Martins Lutheran School, Mt Gambier, SA 2000-01: promoted to Principal, St Martins Lutheran School, Mt Gambier, SA 2002-03: transferred into Lutheran Schools Melbourne office as Education Officer for the South Eastern Region Lutheran Schools Department, and travelled extensively through Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania 2004: moved to Tarrington (western districts of Victoria) as Principal, Tarrington Lutheran School where I am presently employed.

Lorraine Hennessy (nee Wells)

My Memories of the old high school:

· · · ·

A place where we were fortunate to have some of the best teachers in the Education Department at that time. Strong friendships were formed and maintained We were encouraged to take part in extra curricular activities e.g. trips, choir, drama, etc. We were encouraged to continue our education in whatever direction we chose

Since 1957:

On leaving TSHS, I trained as a primary school teacher and gained my ATCL and ALCM in Speech and Drama teaching. I taught at Rangeville State School for two years and Quinalow State School for one year before moving to Brisbane where I taught at St Mary's School, Ipswich for a further year. During this year (1962) I married Frank Hennessy. We have three daughters and six grandchildren. I spent 13 years rearing our family, however, during this time I did some part-time teaching and relief teaching. In 1975, I re-entered the teaching profession in a full-time capacity. During the next twentytwo years I was a classroom teacher, English as a Second Language teacher, ESL Advisory Teacher, Assistant Principal and Principal, finally retiring at the end of 1997. Presently I am an Education Consultant and assess non-state schools for the Non-State Schools Accreditation Board. I also do audits of providers who provide courses for overseas students on student visas. I gained my Bachelor of Education and have always been heavily involved in literacy education. I presently am a member of an international literacy committee that works to improve literacy teaching and learning in the Pacific region.

Lucy Peter (nee Horovitz)

My Memories of the old high school:

I remember receiving an excellent education. I shall never forget Mr McCallum's interpretations of Shakespeare. The French master bestowed on me my love of French. Mr Cartwright was a lovely man. However,, I remember being bored to tears in Miss Hansen's Geography lessons. I remember detesting the foghorn voice of our PT teacher.

Since 1957:

Well, I have been living. I have spent most of my life teaching and, before that, studying. I did a B.A. with honours in French at the University of Sydney, a Doctorate on French literature at the University of Strasbourg and a Diploma of Education at the University of Zurich. I have been married with my lovely Swiss husband, Martin, for nearly 33 years. We have no children fortunately or unfortunately as you see it - but a wonderful Siamese cat, some really good friends and fantastic neighbours. Love to you all, Lucy

Mervyn Heuschele

My Memories of the old high school:

I have fond memories of riding my Indian Chief motorbike to high school. I bought it for $4 and sold it for $22. Today that motorbike, restored, would be worth $45,000. Currently I have an Indian Scout motorbike - not worth as much as the Chief. A very nice lady was dared to sit on my lap in our Junior year. We met again in 2003 at a Heuschele reunion. Turns out we are related.

Since 1957:

In 1958 I attended St Peters Lutheran College, Brisbane, catching up on Latin, Greek and German before entering Immanuel Lutheran Theological Seminary in Adelaide in 1958. Here I studied Greek and Hebrew (Maths!! was my forté) in addition to all the other subjects necessary to be ordained a Lutheran Pastor. I graduated in November 1964 and was ordained in Toowoomba in January 1965. I served as parish pastor in Townsville, Gympie and Gatton. In 1979 I was inducted as Chaplain at Concordia Lutheran College, Toowoomba and served here with much joy for twelve years. Unfortunately, I was forced to retire from full-time service because of ill health. My love of working with kids continued when I purchased a school bus run at Westbrook where we lived for fourteen years. Mary and I were married in 1963 and have a son David, a daughter Renata and four grandchildren. I met Mary in 1958 at St Peters College. My interest in things old was highlighted by the purchase of a 1929 Chevrolet sedan and 1941 Indian motorcycle, both of which I restored. Mary and I are living in a "granny flat" with our daughter and her family at Torrington, Toowoomba. I am going back to a childhood love and have a pony, "Zorro". My youngest granddaughter thinks he is hers!! I am kept busy as a retired pastor, preaching and visiting the sick.

Meryl Sander (nee Shannon)

My Memories of the old high school:

I remember school days at TSHS as a very positive experience. Everyone was very friendly and all the teachers were very helpful. The only one I remember being at odds with was Mr Bullock who said I lacked school spirit when I wanted to leave the orchestra. I often wonder how so many students managed in such a confined space compared to high schools today.

Since 1957:

· · · · · · · · · · · ·

Teachers' Training College Teaching TSHS Teaching Lockyer District SHS Teaching Fairholme PGC Husband, Ern, retired Emergency Services Officer Daughter, Kathryn, professional musician Son-in-law, Barry, professional musician Daughter, Nadene, Personnel Officer, Queensland Police Academy Self - Diploma of Creative Arts (music) USQ Private music studio Teach RE at three Toowoomba schools Home duties

Marian Gilbert

My Memories of the old high school:

Toowoomba State High School provided a good learning environment supported by qualified and caring teaching staff. The school was proud of its academic and sporting achievements.

Since 1957:

1958 1959-60 1961-71 1972-73 1974-76 1977-78 1978-92 Kelvin Grove Teachers' College Murgon State High School - Commercial teacher Balmoral State High School - Commercial teacher Lourdes Hill College (Brisbane) - Commercial teacher Full-time studies, Queensland University Seven Hills College (TAFE) - Technical teacher Gold Coast Institute of TAFE - Technical Teacher; Senior Teacher; Officer-in-Charge (Extension Programs) 1992-2006 Wide Bay TAFE - Associate Director Studies (Bundaberg); Project Officer/Auditor (Bundaberg, Maryborough, Hervey Bay) Other activities: Keen golfer, Broncos' supporter, traveller 1989 to Russia, Europe, British Isles, Canada, Alaska 1998 to China, Hong Kong 2004 - six months car trip to South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales 2006 - 2 months car trip to Northern Territory, North Queensland Retired 19 July 2006 and returned to the Gold Coast Activities: Lawn Bowls, Contract Bridge, Line Dancing, Theatre, Reading, Swimming, etc Travel: Tasmania, Melbourne (Ashes Cricket Test), Egypt, Jordan, Turkey, Greece, South Island New Zealand - skiing and 2007 Rugby League Grand Final i.e. enjoying life!!

Noel Davis

My Memories of the old high school:

I remember a cramped building and site requiring frequent use of the adjacent Drill Hall building and the playing fields and their surrounds at Frogs' Hollow across Margaret Street. A main building fronting Margaret Street with use of the main Margaret Street entrance by students being almost a capital offence. This building had an interesting upper floor layout with only half height walls separating the Chemistry laboratory from the lecture "theatre" room at the eastern end, and at the western end, the two classrooms. Access to the rooms on the Margaret Street frontage was only allowed through the adjoining rooms which produced some interesting interruptions. Most of our teachers were quality role models, some of whom went on to fill significant positions as secondary school principals, inspectors and/or Education Department administrators. I remember in particular the strong and confident Patrick "Paddy" Wilkes, Les cartwright, Eric "Ric" Evans, Col McCallum, Jim Henry, Ken Southgate, and the firm and honest Harry Hall. (How often did the latter put a Senior Maths lesson on hold while he sought out the advice of "Paddy" Wilkes on how to complete a complex problem he was unsure of, rather than confuse his students with a bluff?) Who from form 6A2 of 1957 could not remember the case of the exploding stick of chalk at the start of an English class being conducted by Leila ("Ma" or "The Bat") Buchan?

... Noel Davis Since 1957:

In 1958 I chose a PMG Engineering Cadetship over enlistment in the RAAF. (Committing to four years with the PMG versus seven years in the RAAF on completion of training was significant. In the final event, I stayed with the PMG and escaped before Telstra was invented.) After four years at University of Queensland, Faculty of Engineering, I was based with the PMG in Brisbane for seven years and was involved with pipe and cable projects state wide. In 1969 I was promoted to Townsville with the expectation of a five to six year residency. Nineteen years later I returned to Brisbane. (What a hopeless predictor of time spans!) In Townsville, the PMG (Telecom from 1975) Engineering activities expanded into all fields of communications and just grew and grew; various promotions came along; North Queensland was a great place to live and raise a family, so why leave? Sometimes I still wonder why we did and almost every year, come July/August, Pat and I return north for a few weeks to catch up with old friends and recharge the batteries. The Telecom restructure of 1988 (Restructure 4 of about 24 involving me) saw me based back in Brisbane but spending almost all the working week in Melbourne. This continued until about 1994 when "enough was enough" and I escaped by taking a (slightly contrived) redundancy package. Since 1994 I have enjoyed a largely unstructured retirement. I mostly do the things that interest me the way I want to do them and when it suits me to do them. What with home, garden and related maintenance, family history research, lawn bowls, occasional lunches, travel and other family events there is always plenty to do and time often runs out. In 1963, I married Pat Kelleher, a past student of St Saviours Convent, Toowoomba who still thinks she is "the one who should be obeyed". Our oldest daughter , her husband and family of three live at Byron Bay and our second daughter, her husband and family of three live at Clayfield. We see the Clayfield family very frequently and have family reasons for several trips to Byron Bay each year. As well as Townsville visits, about every two years we head south (Sydney, Melbourne, etc.) to catch up with friends and, during alternate years, sometimes make an overseas trip. We keep in reasonable health, although occasionally a couple of wheels may go a bit square for a while.

Paul Clark

My Memories of the old high school:

As co-editor of the school news sheet, and un-athletic, I tended to be an observer rather than a participant in events. I have many memories of my high school days - most of them pleasant, and many hilarious. Highlights would probably be our Carnival displays, and the concert arranged by our class to buy art works for the school. Most of us studied hard at high school but, even so, our fertile minds found time for numerous diversions, some of which were quite bizarre. In our Sub-Senior year, we had the "invisible" games. This stated out with several people pushing (with great effort) invisible bricks off the edge of the desk. A thump of a foot on the floor simulated its landing. This then evolved into someone on the right side of the room filling an invisible bucket from an invisible tap on the wall, and passing it across the room to someone on the left side of the room who "emptied" it out of the window and passed it back for "refilling". All this happened mostly when the teacher was writing on the blackboard. The game came unstuck when two of the boys started playing invisible tennis, and someone (I think it was Ron Green) leapt up for a "high ball" and fell backwards over the desk behind. This made so much noise that Helen Williams, the teacher at the time, could not help hearing it. I cannot remember the explanation for the event, but it stopped this game. Then in senior year, there were the unfortunate events with female teachers and chalk. The first occurred when someone found out that you could throw chalk by putting it between the tips of crossed fingers and, when they were flicked apart, the chalk flew. Unfortunately, he sat at the back of the room at the end of an aisle, and when he tried it, the chalk flew the length of the aisle and hit Miss Hanson on the back of the leg. She stormed down the aisle as it was obvious who had thrown it. As I recall, his detention was to write out the whole of the Geography book, including illustrations.

... Paul Clark

The second event was with Mrs Buchan (The Bat). Someone dipped a piece of chalk in potassium iodide, and got Frank Adcock to put it under the blackboard with all other chalk bits removed. Most of us knew about it but obviously some didn't. We thought it would explode as soon as she hit the blackboard with it, but she got right to the last letter of the word "AUSTRALIA" before it went off. We had just begun to think it was a dud. When it went off, Loretta Priest behind me let out a loud shriek, thinking someone had been shot. The scream frightened me more than the explosion. The explosion burned a patch of paint off the blackboard so we were reminded of it until the end of term. Frank owned up to the stunt and took the punishment, but Mrs Buchan left us in no doubt that she was sure someone else was responsible. The Chemistry and Physics laboratory provided more entertainment. The labs were supplied with town gas for the Bunsen burners, and someone discovered that, if you put a hose into a tap, it was possible to blow down the pipe. This then caused any burner using the line to go out. One day, one of the boys decided to load the pipe and put quite a bit of air into it. We found out later that day that this put out the ovens in the Domestic Science block where the girls were cooking a roast lunch for staff. Lunch was a bit late that day as they did not realise the stoves were off until all the meals were supposed to be ready. Another rather embarrassing stunt in the lab was to fill a hose with water, put a finger over one end and slide the other end into someone's trouser pocket before releasing the water. Early in the year we had some rather lengthy school parades, and some people had fainted in the heat. They and their helpers then got to sit in the shade until parade was over, so, one hot morning, Charlie Moore arranged to "faint" early in the parade. Bob Byrne and Bob Harding managed to catch him before he fell and dragged him off the parade, dragging his boots loudly through the gravel to the shade. It looked realistic, but "Barney" Hall expressed his doubts that it was genuine. These are just a few of the diversions in our class which made school interesting. I can remember many more, and there are doubtless many more that I have forgotten, or did not know about. It would be interesting to get all of these together, if only for a laugh.

Since 1957:

As my father died in August 1957, not long before Senior, my "career" plans sort of fell apart. I worked in the export division of the Toowoomba Foundry for 29 years, during which time I got married, built my house myself, and had four children. After the company was taken over, I was laid off. I spent three years as assistant ranger on South Stradbroke Island, then returned to Toowoomba for about 18 months after a work injury. During rehabilitation, I worked for Martin Sand & Gravel, then went to the John Flynn College at James Cook University in Townsville to work on building and grounds maintenance. After seven years, my job (and others) were let out to contractors so I drove taxis for five years until retirement. I now do voluntary work for two days a week at Meals On Wheels and do woodwork and art.

Peter Brownlee

My Memories of the old high school: I have many lasting memories of my time at TSHS - some resurfacing recently when I looked back over my copies of ACTA for this article. The names and faces took me back fifty years to simpler and more relaxed times which laid the foundation for my life skills and personal development. Just a few: · Our English teacher, Mr C McCallum, who planted the seed of literature in me. Over the years I · ·

have seen many performances of Hamlet but I can still recall the visit to Brisbane in 1957 with the Senior Form to see the performance at Her Majesty's. Our delightful French teacher, Madame Techeur, who opened my eyes to French culture but only left me enough French to cope with the average menu. Football training and matches on wet and muddy fields on cold Toowoomba afternoons, applications of iodine to numerous tag marks, and continuous post-mortems for days later.

... Peter Brownlee

· Preparations for the annual school dance and memories of Mr and Mrs Cleary at the Trades Hall

valiantly attempting to impart some expertise in ballroom dancing to the students.

Since 1957:

After completing Senior in 1957, I started pharmacy studies, initially by apprenticeship and correspondence in Toowoomba through the Queensland Pharmacy College and finally in Brisbane in 1960. I worked in community and hospital pharmacy until 1967 when I commenced a degree course in Chemical Engineering at the University of Queensland. On graduating in 1970, I joined Pfizer in Sydney and spent the next ten years with them in management positions in engineering, quality assurance and plant management in Australia and eventually overseas. After returning to Australia in 1981 I worked in manufacturing positions with a number of pharmaceutical and other companies in Melbourne and Brisbane until 1998. I then left corporate life and returned to hospital and community pharmacy in Brisbane, initially on a full time basis but now on a semi-retired part time basis. I married my wife Olga in 1970, had two children Susie and Andrew, and recently celebrated 37 years of very happy married life.

Ron Green

My Memories of the old high school:

Someone tying the school bell under one of the teachers' cars. Rotten egg gas in the laboratory.

Since 1957:

I spent a short time working for Darcy Walters but soon got into the Rock and Roll scene. My music career has been going for nearly 48 years and, in that time, the band has recorded fourteen albums of dance music. We have three Gold Discs, one Queensland Division Platinum Award and many other awards, as well as recognition from the Council. Our life story has been recorded in the archives in Canberra for our contribution to dance music in Australia. At the age of 39 I took up running and over the next decade or so ran fifteen marathons and biathlons, many half marathons, 10k runs, etc. On one such Ultra Run, I did 72.6 kilometres in eight hours, earning myself a trophy for first place in my age group. My wife, Carmel, and I have been married for 42 years. We have two daughters, Judy and Jeni. Judy has a son, 15 years of age and Jeni and Ray have twelve children aged 18 years down to two months. In 2003, I suffered a severe electric shock at a Ball in Warwick. My health declined rapidly as the shock triggered Parkinson's Disease. It destroyed co-ordination in my hands, preventing me from playing much on the guitar but I am still able to sing so Ronny and the Ramblers are still working as a two piece band at a reduced number of gigs. After having a knee replacement, I still enjoy walking. P.S. My first vehicle was an AJS motor bike which I traded in on a Morris Z ute.

Ron McLucas

My Memories of the old high school:

(1) The Principals: (a) When we commenced at High School in the latter part of January 1954, the Principal was Mr F Cafferky. Everyone must still have vivid and amusing memories of him walking along the Hume Street footpath adjacent to the school resplendent in his white tiger shooting outfit (complete with white shoes and white helmet) on his way to his office towards the front of the building - an office from which he emerged only to go home at the end of the school day. As he passed along the footpath, some students such as the irreverent Barry Coutts would endeavour to secrete themselves near the inside of the fence from where they would call out, "Grrr! Grrr! Tigers in here!" To this day, I still have no idea how they ever got away with such behaviour, especially in an era when discipline was infinitely more strict than the nonsense that currently masquerades as discipline in state secondary schools. In addition, punishments were severe and often painful and this tended to act as a significant deterrent to disrespectful behaviour. (b) Once Mr Cafferky had been pensioned off to a supposedly quiet Brisbane high school (from memory, I think that it could have been Wynnum State High School which was relatively small at that time), Mr F T Milne arrived as the new Principal. Those of you who were in his Maths I class in 1956 will no doubt remember his unique method of erasing information from the blackboard. In the early 1960's, I worked with an elderly gentleman who had, many years earlier, worked with "F T" for quite a period of time. He always referred to him as "Roy Milne". This had me very much intrigued. How could "Roy" be represented by either "F" or "T"? So, for those of you who have wondered for more than fifty ears what the "F T" stood for, you now have the answer - "F T" was "Fitzroy Thomas". You can thank our Charlie Moore for this information which came to light in an ancient edition of the "Education Office Gazette" which he discovered in the school press when he was teaching at either Ramsay or Inveramsay State School (I am not unable to recall with certainty now at which school he made this discovery). When "F T" was promoted to the Inspectorate, his place was taken by Mr Alan Werman who was the Principal when we left at the end of the 1957 school year.

(c)

(2) The Teachers: (a) Having spent all my working life teaching in secondary schools, I can now look back on the performance of our teachers and make a fairly accurate assessment of the quality of the instruction that we received from them. There is no doubt in my mind that we received an excellent education from a very dedicated and well qualified group of teachers with a very high level of expertise in their special subject areas. Some of those who stand out in my mind are: · · Merv Hoskins - Commercial subjects · · Roly Crossman - History · · Col McCallum - English · · Jim Henry - English · · Cyril Connell - Footballer and sometimes Maths teacher · · Clem Adams - Commercial subjects · · Charlie Crasswell - Commercial subjects · · Lit Bullock - History Then there were the others that we probably now remember as "characters". Some of this group would be Les "Nutty" Nash, "Simple" Symond, Harry ("Barney") Hall ("Is thoo trying to mimic me, Toots?" - a statement addressed to Barry Coutts who was being his usual disruptive and disrespectful self.) (3) The students: (a) The life-long friendships I made at this school.

... Ron McLucas Since 1957:

I spent forty-three years working for Education Queensland. For about thirty-five years, I taught commercial subjects in state high schools while the remaining eight years were spent on administration work (payrolls, leave, superannuation, workers' compensation, etc) in the local regional office of the department. I completed a commerce degree part time from the University of Queensland and obtained professional accounting qualifications (C.P.A.). I was the joint author of some substantial Accounting textbooks and have also assisted the writing and production of two books on collectables (mainly related to the early advertising memorabilia used to promote the products of distilleries or breweries). I have been very involved in our family history and have travelled overseas to carry out some of this research. Of more recent years, my major interest has been building a substantial collection of early (preferable pre World War I) whisky and ale advertising memorabilia.

Wal Tonkin

My Memories of the old high school:

(1) Never owning any facilities viz assembly hall (25th Battalion property), parade ground (25th Battalion property), swimming pool (Toowoomba City Council property), playing fields (Frogs' Hollow, Toowoomba City Council). A good staff of teachers, some with idiosyncratic sayings and behaviours - Col McCallum, Les Cartwright, Ian Mackie, Eric (Ric) Evans, Harry Hall, "Rolly" Crossman, Les (Nutty) Nash, F T Milne - Principal, Jim Wolfe - D.P. Sporting trips and excursions by bus to Warwick, Gatton and Brisbane. Interesting happenings and comic relief: · Harry Halls angry purple face as he dragged himself up off the floor after a "reconstructed" stool in the engineering block collapsed under his weight. · A forged absentee form sent home to Bob Harding's residence inquiring why he was absent from school. (He was studying for test.) · "Nutty" Nash telling class that his Geography notes were the best in Queensland. (Senior results proved otherwise.) · F T Milne's face covered in spittle and chalk dust, and two inches of underwear above trousers.

(2) (3) (4)

Since 1957:

Completed teacher training in 1958. taught at various schools in Toowoomba and the Darling Downs region. Completed university studies in 1975 and was seconded to DDIAE (now USQ) for a year to help with in-service work for classroom teachers (1976). Returned to the classroom and taught until the end of 1995 when I opted for early retirement. Did some supply teaching until 2000 when I gave up teaching completely. (40 years was enough!) Married my wife Jan in 1965. Best man at wedding was Peter Brownlee. Have three daughters, two of whom live in Brisbane and one in Canberra. Four grandchildren. In retirement, have become interested in woodwork and travel.

Warren Lane

My Memories of the old high school:

I remember a grand brick building beside a military forces parade ground. A large swimming baths was located opposite in the corner of Queens park. Boys and girls had separate shops they had to go to for lunches. I think there were about 600 students. I joined an all boys class in Form 3 Industrial Course thus segregation in a co-ed school. Students had to respect teachers by stopping for them to pass on the stairways; but we had nicknames for quite a few of those same teachers. The standard for achieving well in exams was to study for three hours ach day - a pattern that remained for over a decade. I remember the school dance and other Toowoomba dances where youths and girls fraternised regularly. I left TSHS after Form 4 and worked for six months at Southern Cross and six months at Duncan Thompson Sports Store. The next year I returned to TSHS and rejoined my old classmates in Form 6 in 1957.

Since 1957:

In 1957, I joined the Queensland Government as a cadet Draftsman, attended Technical College at night studying for an Associate Diploma Civil Engineering. Graduated in 1964. During this time I bought an allotment in Brisbane and Esther and I had our home built in time for our marriage in 1964. Esther was teaching so we delayed our family for nearly three years, then we had four daughters in four years. As an engineer I was responsible for ground water investigations in S.E. Queensland for many years. In 1983, I was appointed Farm Water Supplies Engineer, designing farm dams and irrigation systems. Later, I was involved in surface water hydrology and flood studies. In 1986 I was appointed Manager of Forward Planning, investigating future dams and water supply schemes for urban water supplies, irrigation, power stations and mining projects. A very satisfying working career. I resigned from the Queensland Government in 1999 and we travelled around Australia before going to South Korea where we taught English language in a Language Institute over 2½ years. We travelled extensively around Korea, Europe and visited family in England, New Zealand and Australia. The next overseas visit is planned to visit our daughter in Chicago in USA. Our daughters have all graduated from university, married professional husbands and have presented us with 14 grandchildren (2-16 years). We have taken on board the notion that "your retirement is the beginning of your new career" and currently manage a suite of rental properties for our income. We look forward to many exciting experiences in the future. We are devoted to our family.

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Reunion Book D.pub

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