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VOLUME THREE

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

THE RIVERWAY PROJECT CONSORTIUM

COX RAYNER C&B GROUP GHD GAMBLE MCKINNON KLEINHARDT RIDER HUNT architects, planners, urban designers, public art consultants planners, project managers & consultation facilitators civil & building engineers landscape architects & urban designers financial & operational analysts cost planners

CONTENTS

CONTENTS VOLUME 3: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 SECTION 2: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES ........................................................................... 4 SECTION 3: BIODIVERSITY ................................................................................................................. 8 SECTION 4: SITE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ........................................................................... 12 SECTION 5: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PUBLIC LANDSCAPE PRECINCTS ..................................... 16 SECTION 6: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PIONEER PARK RESIDENTIAL PRECINCTS ......................... 24 SECTION 7: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR COMMERCIAL PRECINCTS ............................................... 30 SECTION 8: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR CULTURAL CENTRE AND LAGOON PRECINCT P1 ................. 38 SECTION 9: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR SPORTS BUILDING + GROUNDS .................................... 48 SECTION 10: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND LANDSCAPING ........................................ 56 SECTION 11: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND MULTI USE FACILITY ................................ 60

APPENDIX A: Water Sensitive Urban Design for the Riverway Project ............................................................... 68

A1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................................................... 70 A2 WATER CONSERVATION INITIATIVES ............................................................................................................................................... 70 A2.1 Dual Reticulation .......................................................................................................................................................................... 70 A2.2 Irrigation Management .................................................................................................................................................................. 71 A2.3 Community Awareness ................................................................................................................................................................ 71 A2.4 System Pressure Control .............................................................................................................................................................. 71 A2.5 Water Saving Devices ................................................................................................................................................................... 71 A2.6 Recycled Water for Fire Fighting .................................................................................................................................................... 72 A2.7 Alternative Systems for Household Fire Lighting ............................................................................................................................. 72 A3 WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES ...................................................................................................................................... 72 A3.1 Water-Use Efficient Toilet Systems ................................................................................................................................................. 72 A3.2 Waste Separation Vacuum Toilets .................................................................................................................................................. 73 A3.3 Composting Toilets ....................................................................................................................................................................... 73 A3.4 Household Sewerage Balance Tanks .............................................................................................................................................. 74 A3.5 Untreated Greywater Reuse ......................................................................................................................................................... 74 A3.6 On-Site Sewerage Treatment and Reuse ....................................................................................................................................... 74 A3.7 Hybrid Sewerage Systems ............................................................................................................................................................. 75 A3.8 Smart Sewers ............................................................................................................................................................................... 75 A3.9 Vacuum Sewers ............................................................................................................................................................................ 75

A4 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES ..................................................................................................................................... 76 A4.1 Rainwater Tanks ............................................................................................................................................................................ 76 A4.2 Extended Detention Basins ........................................................................................................................................................... 77 A4.3 Constructed Wetlands and Ponds .................................................................................................................................................. 77 A4.4 Vegetated Swales .......................................................................................................................................................................... 77 A4.5 Bioretention Filter ......................................................................................................................................................................... 78 A4.6 Infiltration Trenches ....................................................................................................................................................................... 78 A4.7 Porous Pavements ........................................................................................................................................................................ 78 A4.8 Landscape Initiatives ...................................................................................................................................................................... 79 A4.9 Stormwater Harvesting ................................................................................................................................................................. 79 A4.10 Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) ........................................................................................................................................... 79 A5 SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 80 A6 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES ..................................................................................................................................... 81

APPENDIX B: Existing Vegetation Schedule ..................................................................................................... 86

B1 B2 EXISTING VEGETATION SCHEDULE ........................................................................................................................................... 87 EXISTING VEGETATION PLAN ..................................................................................................................................................... 92

APPENDIX C: Pioneer Park Planting Concept ................................................................................................... 94 APPENDIX D: Loam Island Planting Concept ................................................................................................... 98 APPENDIX E: Extract from `Thuringowa City Pest Management Plan 2001/2004': Pest Plants of Thuringowa City..... 102 APPENDIX F: Vegetation Management Strategy - Pioneer Park.......................................................................... 106 APPENDIX G: Extract from `Revegetation Strategy for the City of Thuringowa': Threatened Ecosystems, Flora and Fauna of the Thuringowa City Council Area ................................. 110

G1 G2 THREATENED ECOSYSTEMS, FLORA AND FAUNA OF THE THURINGOWA CITY COUNCIL AREA....................................... 111 LEGISLATIVELY PROTECTED FLORA AND FAUNA POTENTIALLY OCCURRING IN THE THURINGOWA REGION .............. 112

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

CONTENTS

1.0 INTRODUCTION

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

The revitalisation of Pioneer Park and Loam Island will be an exemplar of environmental sustainability. It is an intention of Thuringowa City Council that the advancements of the Riverway project in respect of sustainability will be acknowledged around Australia and possibly worldwide.

It is expected that all stakeholders ­ public and private ­ will have a long term commitment to environmental sustainability, rather than just incorporate strategies for others to monitor and manage. It is therefore fundamental that records are kept of the achievements on an annual basis and published widely as encouragement to other waterfront parkland revitalisation projects and as a source of knowledge for those projects.

As part of this assessment strategy, the following energy rating schemes The project will not only attain exceptional environmental design standards but will, wherever possible, express the strategies visually so that the community of Thuringowa and visitors to the precincts will be constantly reminded of the environment and its preciousness. In this way, the strategies will be educational tools which promote environmental design in future development throughout the city. · For commercial buildings, 4 stars under AGBRS (Australian The term `sustainability' has come to mean a combination of ecological, social and economic sustainability. The latter two are implicit in the Master Plan and Urban Design Strategy in the following ways: The formulation of the Environmental Design Guide was assisted by a consultation process culminating in an Environmental Sustainability · The socio-cultural diversity of the project. Pioneer Park combines cultural, sports, recreational, residential and commercial activity such that they interact and are mutually supportive. Loam Island combines local community organisation activity with public recreation and ecological conservation such that they too interact and are mutually supportive. · The planning and design of all buildings and landscape spaces to be `inclusive', that is, physically accessible and welcoming in character to people of all cultural backgrounds, age groups and all kinds of disability. · Adherence of all components of Pioneer Park and Loam Island to a development cost plan which has been assessed by Council as justified on the basis of sound economic investment for the city, notwithstanding potential tourism benefits which will accrue over time. · The application of the highest standards of design code requirements and adherence to accepted guidelines, such as the CPTED Principles of crime prevention by design. Workshop held at Thuringowa City Council on 8 July 2003. The project team wishes to express its gratitude to those involved in the workshop, and to representatives from the State Government Environmental Protection Agency for their assistance prior to the workshop. The outcomes of the workshop were collated and used by the consultant team to inform this report. The workshop attendees are listed in the accompanying chart. Greenhouse Building Rating Scheme). · For residential buildings, 4.5 stars minimum under NATHERS (National Housing Energy Rating Scheme). are proposed to be applied:

The benefits of environmental design achieved in Pioneer Park and Loam Island are proposed to be exhibited in an interpretive centre to be located either in the `energy tower' on the Pioneer Park riverfront or in an `information and interpretation' centre in the Village. This facility is also intended to acknowledge the contributions and participation of all stakeholders in the process.

Rob Hunt David Waller Lyndon Hodges Damon Newling Greg Jackson Michael O'Brien Kym Seebohm Emma-Jane Ford Roger Uebe Paul Snell Malcolm Gregory Angela Willet

Manager Environment, NQ Water Destination Developer, Tourism Queensland Principal Technical Adviser, EPA Sustainable Industries Townsville Senior Environmental Officer, EPA Sustainable Industries Townsville Sustainable Water Systems and Technology, EPA Sustainable Industries Brisbane EPA Sustainable Industries Brisbane Principal Projects Manager, Department of Premier and Cabinet Tourism and Environmental Development Officer, Townsville Enterprise Limited Ergon Energy Ergon Energy Acting Director, Townsville State Development Centre Communication and Catchment Coordinator, NAREF (Natural Resources & Environment Forum for the Townsville Thuringowa Coastal Plain).

David Reed Andrew Scovell Andrew Green Paul Graham Jose Foruria Michael Rayner Tim Morgan Peter Hale Ingrid Richards Cr Les Tyrell Cr Deanne Bell Cr Jenny Lane Cr Brian Hewett Karin Hartog Desmond Moseley Shaun Warner Alan Walker Lisa Dobson Robert Bartlett Lyonelle Lane Brian Bailey Gavin Lyons Damon Frew

NAREF Conservation Volunteers GHD (Cox Rayner Consortium) Gamble McKinnon (Cox Rayner Consortium) GHD (Cox Rayner Consortium) GHD (Cox Rayner Consortium) Cox Rayner Cox Rayner Cox Rayner Cox Rayner Mayor, City of Thuringowa Councillor, City of Thuringowa Councillor, City of Thuringowa Councillor, City of Thuringowa Riverway Project Manager, City of Thuringowa Co-Ordinator Technical Services, Thuringowa Water COT Environmental Officer ­ Land Protection, City of Thuringowa Drainage Engineer, City of Thuringowa Product Development Officer, City of Thuringowa Director Commercial & Economic Development, City of Thuringowa Manager Environmental Management, City of Thuringowa Director Infrastructure, City of Thuringowa Director Community Services, City of Thuringowa Riverway Project Officer, City of Thuringowa

Volume 3 is to be read in conjunction with Volume 1 which sets out Design Guidelines for each precinct in Pioneer Park and Loam Island.

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

page 2

2.0 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES

SECTION 2: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES

2.1 PRINCIPLES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

The seven major principles for the project are:

-

Involve traditional owners in integrating landscape of importance to the indigenous community

-

Restrict or manage the use of powerboats to minimise noise disturbances and riverbank erosion

3. WASTE EFFICIENCY

Utilise detention basins and swales for drainage Create and implement a Construction Waste Management Plan Establish, if viable, an on-site waste treatment facility Reuse construction debris, where possible, in fill and pavements Create and implement a Development Waste Management Plan for the ongoing operation of Pioneer Park and Loam Island

1. WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN

Reuse stormwater for landscape irrigation Minimise reliance on treated potable water Prevent pollutants from entering the river Concentrate stormwater to be held on site for as long as possible (to prevent erosion) Facilitate stormwater infiltration into the ground and retain in soil for landscape growth Optimise the use of permeable pavements, using crushed recycled materials where appropriate Collect roof runoff from large buildings for internal use, if found feasible

-

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Focus upon energy strategies which are measurable and able to be monitored over time Optimise passive energy efficiency by north-south building orientation, thermal design, natural ventilation planning and façade protection systems Minimise reliance upon air conditioning Encourage the shared use of energy across different buildings and / or within buildings

Treat recycled effluent to a high standard for irrigation and irrigate at night -

-

Employ dual reticulation systems Utilise high efficiency rated water reticulation systems, outlets and appliances Maximise the penetration of daylight and reduce the need for artificial lighting Meet a minimum of NATHERS 4.5 star rating for residential buildings and 4 star rating under AGBRS for commercial buildings Utilise alternative energy systems ­ solar and wind ­ wherever practical and viable / promote the use of renewable energy

-

Please refer Appendix A - Water Sensitive Urban Design

2. ENRICH BIODIVERSITY

Nurture the natural environment - 250 advanced trees (3-4m high) to be planted at Loam Island and approx 300 advanced trees to be planted in Pioneer Park. Rehabilitate riparian ecosystems. Retain existing trees (including retaining 197 from 204 trees on Pioneer Park) and riparian and riverine ecosystems. Develop a Flora and Fauna Management Plan Balance recreational activity with conservation of the natural environment including plant, animal, bird and aquatic life Undertake a program of weed removal in Ross River and Loam Island Manage fishing recreation to avoid depletion of fish stocks and damage to riverbanks Contain the extent of area where pets are permitted on Loam Island to the Savannah Recreation Precinct and require leashes Plant only endemic species as per the Landscape Strategy in Volume 1

-

Where formal rating systems are not available for a particular type of building, benchmarking has been established via the setting of preliminary kg CO2/sqm.annum that must be achieved. The kg CO2/ sqm.annum is the method used by the Australian Building Greenhouse Rating Scheme (the scheme proposed for the commercial office energy component) and is appropriate because it allows standardised comparison between various solutions with respect to a key global warming parameter. For example, grid electrical power used for direct heating emits 1.1 kg CO2 for every kWhr of energy used, natural gas produces in the order of 0.29 kg CO2 for every kWhr of energy used, thereby providing sustainability credits for the use of gas in this instance rather than electricity (despite the fact the same amount of energy may be used).

-

Utilise the Cultural Centre as the flagship environmental design project of Pioneer Park with the construction of an Environmental Interpretation Centre

-

Minimise energy wastage during fabrication of building components and during construction

-

Require all building components and landscape components to place the highest design priority upon the visibility of energy efficienct systems

-

Derive the architectural character of buildings from environmental design strategies

5. RECYCLING OF MATERIALS

Maximise the use of recycled materials in construction of building and in operations thereafter Optimise the use of materials which can be recycled

6. SOCIO CULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS

Maximise the accessibility of public facilities by locating them at ground level without steps Provide access ramps at grades of 1:20 or greater Prioritise legibility and clarity of accessways to facilities Devise methods to encourage multicultural community participation such as via events, public art strategies and design building that are welcoming and non-imposing Incorporate a degree of affordable housing opportunity Incorporate a degree of ground level `inclusive access' housing Design for a wide range of disabilities including sight impairment, and for all age groups Adhere to the principles of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) Establish a heritage trail extending Harmony Park along the river edge to the Pioneer Park Lagoon and involve local cultural organisations

7. COMMUNICATION AND EDUCATION

Establish an interactive Environmental Interpretation Centre in Pioneer Park Establish network links with other waterfront urban parks and environmental wetland precincts in Australia and overseas to share knowledge and for mutual promotion Develop a program of schools and community involvement in the upgrading of the natural environment. Educate staff and management involved in both public and commercial development so that they can act as `environmental ambassadors' Monitor environmental performance over the life of the project for continuous improvement, and disseminate findings widely Establish a Riverway Environmental Management Committee comprising all stakeholders (tenants, other users, body corporates, building managers) to maintain and improve environmental performance

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 2:

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRICIPLES

page 6

3.0 BIODIVERSITY

SECTION 3: BIODIVERSITY

3.1 EXISTING VALUES

Pioneer Park currently exists in a transformed state with significant plantings of the exotic Rain Tree (Samanea saman) and ficus species. There are also stands of Moreton Bay Ash and Poplar Gums which have been described as belonging to vulnerable and of concern ecosystems respectively. Paperbarks (Melaleuca sp) are distributed along the waters edge. It exists as a valuable recreational resource for residents and visitors to the city. The transformed habitat will be significantly ameliorated though the extensive planting of local provenance species. Planting works will primarily be undertaken as part of the building works however the possibility exists for some community involvement. A schedule and plan of the existing vegetation is documented in Appendix B. The Pioneer Park Planting Concept is outlined in Appendix C.

· · ·

Do not place spoil from excavations against tree trunks. Prevent wind-blown materials such as cement from harming trees. Prevent damage to tree bark. Do not attach stays, guys and the like to trees.

·

Do not remove topsoil or excavate within the drip-line of trees unless otherwise specified. If it is necessary to excavate within the drip-line, use hand methods to preserve root systems intact and undamaged. Open up excavations under tree canopies for as short a period as possible.

·

Do not cut tree roots exceeding 50mm diameter unless otherwise directed. Where it is necessary to cut tree roots, ensure all such cuts are clean and even so that the cutting does not unduly disturb or rock the remaining root system. Immediately after cutting, apply an approved bituminous fungicide sealant to the cut surface to prevent the incursion of root rot disease.

·

Back fill to excavations around tree roots with topsoil. Add fertiliser at the rate specified. Place the backfill layers, each of 300mm maximum depth, compacted to a dry density similar to that of the original or surrounding soil. Do not backfill around tree trunks to a height greater than 100mm above the original ground surface. Immediately after backfilling, thoroughly water the root zone surrounding the tree.

The existing vegetation of Loam Island has not been mapped, however it is known to be a degraded habitat of native species also containing environmental weeds and exotic species. It is however believed to have significant environmental values which will be improved through revegetation works which offer the opportunity of the involvement of community groups. Some revegetation work has already been undertaken and this work will be integrated into the new conservation and rehabilitation works. The Loam Island Planting Concept is outlined in Appendix D.

A diagram outlining the existing trees to be retained / removed is documented in Appendix C.

3.4

WEED CONTROL STRATEGY

The following weeds have been identified as being prevalent in the region:

3.2

THREATENED SPECIES

·

Tribulus terrestris

Goat's Head Burr Prickly Acacia Khaki Burr Giant Rats Tail Grass Cabomba (aquatic weed) Water Hyacinth Milkweed

· Acacia nilotica · · · · · Alternanthera pungens Sporobolus spp. Cabomba carolinian Eichornia crassipes Euphorbia heterophylla/ cyathophora

Lists of endangered species of flora and fauna have been sourced from the "Revegetation Strategy for the City of Thuringowa" and the "Thuringowa State of Biodiversity Report and Guidelines". Refer Appendix F. These reports must be adhered to in the development of Pioneer Park and Loam Island.

3.3

PROTECTION OF EXISTING TREES

· ·

Hymenachne amplexicaulis Jatopha gossypifolia Lantana sp Leucaena leucocephala Parthenium hysterophorus Cryptostegia grandiflora Pennisetum setaceum Prosopis spp. Salvinia molesta Thunbergia grandiflora Limnocharis flava Bryophyllum spp.

Hymenachne Bellyache Bush Lantana Leucena Parthenium Weed Rubber Vine Fountain Grass Mesquite Salvinia/Water Fern Blue Thunbergia Yellow Burr Head Mother of Millions

In order to ensure survival of existing trees during future construction works in Pioneer Park and Loam Island, the following procedures should be followed:

· · · ·

·

Trees to be retained are to be fenced-off during construction at the extent of the dripline, and where work within the drip line is necessary, the trunk of the tree is to be protected with metal sheeting.

· · · · · ·

·

Do not store, stockpile, dump or otherwise place under or near trees, bulk or harmful materials including oil, paint, waste concrete, clearings, boulders and the like.

· · · · · · · · · ·

Parkinsonia aculeata Annona glabra Senna obtusifolia Wedelia trilobata Pistia stratiotes Thevetia peruviana Caltropis procera

Parkinsonia Pond Apple Sicklepod Singapore Daisy Water Lettuce Yellow Oleander Calotrope

·

Plant Species ­ chosen from review of available species within the proposed planting palette

·

Planting Method and Location ­ selected as appropriate for chosen species and available resources

·

Mulching Materials and Technique ­ formulated from observations of the existing vegetation and available resources, possibilities include organic materials and mulch mats

Xanthium occidentalis/pungens Noogoora Burr Zizyphus mauritiana Chromolaena ororata Chinese Apple Siam Weed

·

Timeline for Planting Works - as informed by climate and the availability of resources

· If these species are identified within Pioneer Park or Loam Island they are to be removed using a combination of methods including:

Maintenance Regime ­ resulting from chosen species and availability of resources, particularly water and labour

This site management plan will guide the progress of the revegetation · mechanical removal - using bulldozers, slashers and hand removal · physical removal - including the use of fire and flame weeders · chemical removal - including foliar, basal bark and injected herbicides · biological removal ­ including stem boring, seed or leaf eating insects and fungal pathogens · site management ­ including controlled grazing levels and shading by restored tree canopy works. The palette of plant species used in these works would include threatened flora as identified in the `Revegetation Strategy for the City of Thuringowa' ­ Refer Appendix G. Special attention in the revegetation works would be given to ensure that habitats are restored for native fauna, in particular, those identified in the "Revegetation Strategy for the City of Thuringowa' ­ Refer Appendix G.

3.6

COMMUNITY GROUP PARTICIPATION

The rehabilitation of Loam Island allows the opportunity for community These methods have been adopted from the `Thuringowa City Pest Management Plan 2001/2004', which also contains a comprehensive list of weed species requiring removal and appropriate methods for additional reference. Refer Appendix E for a comprehensive list of pest plants of Thuringowa City. group participation. Community Groups have already contributed significantly to the conservation and rehabilitation of the Ross River riparian zone, including the Strategic Rehabilitation of Ross River exercise involving a partnership between the Tropical Urban Production and Landcare Group and the City of Thuringowa Council, and also in the construction of the Booroona Walking Track. To draw on their considerable local

3.5

LOAM ISLAND REVEGETATION STRATEGY

expertise and experience, the numerous community revegetation groups involved in these schemes would be invited to participate in the conservation and revegetation work on Loam Island. There is also the possibility of integrating the Community Jobs Program and Green Corp crews as was successfully achieved with the Booroona Walking Track.

The first stage in the revegetation of Loam Island will involve a comprehensive site assessment identifying soil types, topography, existing vegetation, drainage and site accessibility in addition to a review of available local resources including plants, materials and labour.

The site assessment will inform the formulation of site-specific revegetation techniques which will be illustrated in a site management plan. This plan will address the necessary erosion control (stabilisation), existing vegetation protection, site preparation, and weed control measures.

Possible works that could start in the near future could include the collection and propagation of native seed and preliminary weed control measures. Community Groups could also be involved in the comprehensive site assessment and formulation of site management plans. As each stage of the project progresses community groups could increasingly carry out works involved in the eradication of environmental

It will also resolve the following issues:

weeds according to the weed control strategy and the planting of native seedlings.

·

Planting Densities ­ as established from a review of the composition of existing vegetation and a review of maintenance requirements

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 3:

BIODIVERSITY

page 10

4.0 SITE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

SECTION 4: SITE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

The existing landscape and the development of the new strategies are intrinsic to the success of the urban design of Pioneer Park and Loam Island. As these areas are ecologically sensitive the implementation of Environmental Management Plans for each of the precincts during both construction phases and ongoing works and maintenance is necessary. The following considerations must be incorporated in all detailed precinct Environmental Management Plans.

4.3

DUST CONTROL

Ensure all practicable control measures are taken to limit dust. Maintain on site at all times during the duration of the Works sufficient plant and labour to control smoke or dust and ensure that smoke or dust nuisance is not created.

4.4

VEHICLES ENTERING AND LEAVING THE SITE

Remove mud and debris carried by vehicles entering or exiting the site.

4.5

CONTROL OF FIRE ANTS

4.1

TEMPORARY DRAINAGE AND SEDIMENT CONTROL

Ensure no vehicles entering the site have been in an area where fire ants have been identified or suspected. A written declaration will be required

Plan and carry out the work so as to avoid erosion, contamination and sedimentation of the site, surrounding areas, and drainage systems. Ensure all practicable control measures are taken to limit the amount of site disturbance, to control run-off and to prevent increased movement of sediments into any waterways.

from the Contractor prior to receiving construction plant, materials and/ or fill from vehicles entering the site. If materials and/or machinery have originated from an area which may be infested such machinery and/or materials must be fumigated in accordance with local and State authority guidelines.

Adopt such measures as necessary for erosion control, including the following where applicable: · · · Stage operations (eg .clearing, stripping). Progressively restore disturbed areas. Provide temporary drains and catch drains and/ or dispersal of concentrated water flows. · Divert and disperse concentrated flows to points where the water can pass through the site without damage. · Disperse concentrated run-off using spreader banks or other structures: · Construct and maintain silt traps to prevent discharge of scoured material to downstream areas. · · Use temporary fencing. After each rain, inspect, clean and repair if required, temporary erosion and sediment control works. · Remove temporary erosion control measures at the completion of works.

4.6

STOCKPILE MANAGEMENT - TOPSOIL AND ORGANIC MULCH

Ensure all practicable needs are taken to protect stockpiles from winds and water erosion. Ensure that no noxious weeds (groundsel, lantana, nut grass etc.) exist in the topsoil. Take necessary control measures to protect stockpiles from theft.

4.7

CHEMICAL AND FERTILISER USAGE

Ensure all practicable measures are to be taken in the use of chemicals and fertilisers such that no contamination can occur to ground or water bodies. Remove any soil or material contaminated by toxins, chemicals, solvents or substances detrimental to human or plant growth in a safe manner. Use chemicals and herbicides according to manufacturer's instructions and in compliance with Agricultural Chemicals Distribution Act 1966, 1978, 1983 and Regulations.

4.8

REINSTATEMENT OF COMPACTED AREAS

4.2

DEWATERING

Deep rip to 300mm all planting and turfed areas compacted during the course of the Works.

Keep groundworks free of water. Provide and maintain slopes, crowns and drains on excavations and embankments to ensure free drainage. Place construction, including fill, masonry, concrete and services, on ground from which free water has been removed. Prevent water flow over freshly laid work. Maintain adequate soil moisture around any trees to be retained. At regular intervals remove all rubbish, plant containers, spoil etc. Keep all road surfaces free of soil, mulch and other associated debris.

4.9

RUBBISH REMOVAL

4.10

SITE RESTORATION

Rectify any ground surface damaged during the course of the Works.

4.5

BARRIERS

Conform with all the regulations as required by the Workplace Health & Safety Act 1995.

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 4:

SITE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

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5.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PUBLIC LANDSCAPE PRECINCTS

SECTION 5: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PUBLIC LANDSCAPE PRECINCTS

This section describes the ESD principles which are relevant to the planning and design of the public areas of Pioneer Park as a whole, and in particular to the Cultural Centre and Lagoon, the Sports Centre and the Village precinct.

In addition to these principles, the following strategies should be tested for feasibility and practicality:

· Incorporating a flood detention basin within the Open Space Frame and bioretention filters within adjacent development sites. · Incorporating a wetland or water quality pond as part of the Lagoon. · Utilising on-site wastewater for irrigation of passive recreation areas subject to community acceptance.

5.1

PIONEER LANDSCAPE PRECINCTS P3, P5, P6

This report is to read in conjunction with Volume 1. Design Guidelines for these precincts found in chapters : 1.6 - Village Spine 1.8 - River Edge 1.9 - Open Space Frame

With relation to Pioneer Park this subsection relates to the three landscape precincts:

· Village Spine · River Edge · Open Space Frame Other issues with respect to the Landscape precincts are discussed in Section 1.2 Landscape Strategy, where the priority actions are:

The Open Space Frame extends through a range of environments which can be defined as Public Carparking, Landscape Buffer and Residual Open Space.

Fundamental water efficiency principles which apply to all of these precincts are:

· Limit disruption and pollution of natural water flows by managing stormwater run-off and drainage. · Undertake a detailed soil and climate analysis to determine appropriate landscape species for the microclimatic `dry tropics' environment. · Utilise stormwater collection for irrigation and consider the use of greywater for irrigation. · Incorporate mulching strategies which contribute to water and irrigation efficiency. · Select irrigation systems which optimise efficiency, such as subsurface drip irrigation. · Maximise the use of porous pavements for absorption.

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Preservation of major trees on the site. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY The only trees to be removed are those where there is no feasible alternative. The current analysis indicates that only 7 of approximately 200 mature trees are likely to be removed or relocated. However, several trees to be retained are close to the Lagoon and to buildings such that a management plan for construction will be necessary to ensure their ongoing preservation. FEASIBILITY Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

ISSUES Shade structures + BBQ's etc should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not post-modern, Mediterranean, etc). SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles. FEASIBILITY Essential

3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Environmental sustainability. Recycled Materials SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Demonstrable use of renewable materials ­ walls, ground surfaces, structural members It is intended to utilise recycled materials as much as is feasible for the formation of pavements and for fill below raised levels. This strategy will require analysis to ascertain the source of materials. Preferred treatments: - natural / stained timber e.g. renewable special plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu coloured concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - metal rainwater goods - stonework natural - metal roofs with low glare - coloured concrete with exposed aggregate in cream or warm grey - precast pavers - timber boardwalk - natural stone Use construction waste in roads and paving or natural materials. Select materials with low embodied energy, low pollution in manufacture, low transport costs, minimal maintenance, non-hazardous and eco-labelled. FEASIBILITY Essential Investigate

Shade structures and BBQ's to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape.

Essential

Paving

Essential

Recycling priority. Low-embodied energy

Essential Essential

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

SECTION 5:

SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PUBLIC LANDSCAPE PRECINCTS

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4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Optimise Energy Performance - Passive Energy Strategies Natural cooling techniques · Existing trees to be retained as per tree planning strategy · Trees to be planted along bermed embankments to sports fields to reduce heat of breezes and provide shading to seating areas · Shading required in particular, to paved areas North/South orientation sporting fields Efficient HID lighting throughout including zoned lighting to each area (e.g. carpark, sports field, pathway, village spine, landscape precinct) with each zone incorporating security and full operating modes. Essential

Orientation Reduce lighting energy

Essential Essential

Renewable Energy ­ Active Energy Strategies Solar power Green Energy Supply Solar powered light fittings to external areas Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval). Provide a BMCS to automatically control, manage and report on the plant for improved energy efficiency. Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. Investigate Essential

Building Management and Control System (BMCS) Monitor, report and display

Essential Essential

5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Reduce Water Use Conservation Landscape Initiatives SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Use soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of ground water discharge to prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Operational Waste Management SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins throughout parklands. Screen bin stores from external view. Create waste recycling holding areas. Construction Waste Management Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. Implement Construction Waste Management procedures that minimise construction wastage and recycle materials into the development. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Desirable Essential

7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Avoid imported species. Preservation of major trees on the site. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Plant only species which are indigenous to locality. The only trees to be removed are those where there is no feasible alternative. The current analysis indicates that only 7 of approximately 200 mature trees are likely to be removed or relocated. However, several trees to be retained are close to the Lagoon and to buildings such that a management plan for construction will be necessary to ensure their ongoing preservation. Protect existing trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. It is intended to retain the existing gardens at the Ross River Road / Upper Ross River Road intersection. These gardens were installed prior to any environmental design strategies and will need to be reviewed with respect to irrigation and integration with the new landscape strategies. Approx 150 advanced trees are proposed to be planted in the precincts as follows: P3 - 17; P5 - 44; P6 - 86. Trees are to be a minimum of 3 metres in height. Plant trees on all building sides and between buildings. The River Edge precinct is particularly sensitive as it is the major precinct concerning the biodiversity of Pioneer Park. The detailed implementation strategy is to be developed in schematic design phase to document conservation of the existing banks, as well as the precise configuration of boardwalks and their supporting structures in order to ensure minimal disturbance to the marine environment. Allow public pedestrian movement to occur between buildings. Minimise width of vehicular carriageways and avoid kerb and gutter edges. Design of water efficient gardens. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Preservation of Existing trees Retention of Gardens

Essential Review

Soften appearance from beginning of life.

Essential

Soften appearance. River Edge

Essential Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave. Continuous appearance of road surface with landscape; minimise visual impact of road intrusion. Water efficiency in gardens

Essential Essential

Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Develop Building Management System for site to effectively optimise environmental efficiency. FEASIBILITY Essential

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6.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PIONEER PARK RESIDENTIAL PRECINCTS

SECTION 6: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR PIONEER PARK RESIDENTIAL PRECINCTS

The Guidelines contained in this section itemise initiatives which developers are expected to demonstrate in designing the Residential Precincts East (P7) and West (P8). These will act as a checklist to assist Council in selecting a preferred developer or developers for these projects. They will also assist in regard to the Village Precinct (P4) motel and residential development over a retail ground floor that is proposed for sub-precincts 4D and 4E.

Residential West (P8) is also highly visible from Upper Ross River Road and Residential East (P7) from Weir School and the Sports Ground. The visual and aesthetic impression of the buildings from these aspects is therefore equally of high priority.

This report is to be read in conjunction with Volume 1. Design Guidelines for these precincts can be found in chapters: 1.10 Precinct 7 + 8 - Residential Precincts 1.7 - Village

The base requirement for the residential precincts is a demonstrated achievement of 4.5 stars under the National Housing Rating Scheme (NATHERS) rating scheme (or comparable rating scheme).

The checklist is grouped into 8 categories as follows:

1. Planning and massing 2. Building design 3. Building materials 4. Energy efficiency 5. Water management 6. Waste management 7. Landscape design 8. Monitoring and implementation

It is recognised that prospective developers may choose to incorporate strategies which are innovative or which have a particular environmental quality outside conventional strategies. A further list is provided of the kinds of items which may be investigated but which is not exhaustive. There will be favourable consideration given to proposals that utilise unconventional / innovative individual initiatives where positive impacts for the environment can be demonstrated.

Notwithstanding the checklist requirements, it is essential that design proposals visually and aesthetically exhibit environmental design priority and are sympathetic to their natural environmental setting. Both precincts contain substantial mature trees of spectacular beauty and designs should be integral with the treescape. Both precincts are highly visible from the river and the proposals must be designed to minimise their visual impact.

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Levels SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Dwellings and Carparks to not be below RL of 15:9 (Q100 Flood Level) Minimise western heat loads. Create `staggered' planning which reduces the effect of a continuous wall of development. Avoid anti-social appearance. Buildings orientated north-south through to north eastsouth west Essential FEASIBILITY Essential

Development not to be fenced is essential. Individual ground level private gardens may be fenced as long as fencing is not continuous Height limited to 4 storeys maximum with a minimum of 15% of development at 3 storeys or less. Significant stepping of buildings in plan with view corridors between buildings. Minimise building footprints to present low visual impact. Preservation of major trees on the site.

Essential

Maintain scale relationship with larger trees. Prevent a relentless skyline. Minimise visual impact from significant aspects such as the primary school, Upper Ross River Road and the river. Tree retention

Essential Essential

Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

ISSUES Provide shade to living areas. Optimise use of climate. Suggest main balconies minimum 16m2 with bedrooms to have `Juliet' balconies or larger. View from school not to be of bland facades. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Extensive provision of large balconies to all levels FEASIBILITY Essential

`Rear' side of building not to be treated as backs, must be highly articulated with extensive glazing. Life cores to be internalised or set well in on staggered, diagonal building edges. Roofs to cantilever well beyond walls as a dominant expression. Glazing on non-balcony faces to be screened and / or have awnings and to be deeply recessed. Balconies to be recessed into footprint or, if partially projecting to be screened along sides. Rainwater goods to be integral with structural members Windows to be continuous as much as possible (horizontally and vertically), and not to appear as individual `holes' in walls. Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles.

Essential

Shade building as a whole. Generate tropical image. Solar control to create fenestration articulation. Ensure privacy. Create articulation. Screen direct sun penetration. Integrated design Preclude arbitrary placement of glazing.

Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

Buildings should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not postmodern, Mediterranean, etc).

Essential

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3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Environmental sustainability. Building to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Demonstrable use of renewable materials ­ walls, ground surfaces, structural members. Preferred treatments: - coloured render on block or brick - painted or natural FC - natural split face blockwork - natural / stained or painted timber e.g. renewable special plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu precoloured or natural concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - stained or painted timber or clear or charcoal anodised windows - non reflective glazing (may be slightly tinted) - stonework natural - metal roofs with low glare - metal rainwater goods ­ either concealed or recessed, or continuously attached to structural members - mid to dark grey Colorbond wide pan profile, metal deck roofing - battened screening to maximum 50% of balconies - Balustrades to be custom designed Non Preferred treatments: - painted surfaces and surfaces which appear as granular paint - plastic rainwater goods - fibrous cement cladding - metal cladding to walls - face brick - simulated finishes - tiled roofs Low-embodied energy Select materials with low embodied energy, low pollution in manufacture, low transport costs, minimal maintenance, non-hazardous and eco-labelled. Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation. Use zero CFC's and HCFC's in refrigerants and Halon fire suppression systems. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Essential

Essential

Atmospheric Air Quality

Essential Essential Investigate Essential Essential

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES Minimum Energy Performance Developers are to demonstrate dedication to environmental sustainability Achieve minimum 4.5 star rating under National Housing Rating Scheme (NATHERS) for residential and for motel achieve maximum CO2 emissions from energy use of 135 kg CO2/sqm.annum averaged over building gross floor area (Refer CO2 outline in section 2.4 Energy Efficiency Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY ACTION

Passive Energy Strategies Reduce energy costs of lighting through natural lighting techniques · Linear footprints · Shaded skylights · Light shelves to reflect light into interiors · North/South facing orientation. · Create linear buildings · Install diffuse light only skylights · Louvered clerestory windows near the top of the roof that act as a thermal chimney · Public area lighting (incl. Carparks and external) to be fluorescent. Self ballasted warm white lamps to all residential/motel light fittings (make and model equal to that available from retail hardware store(s) within Thuringowa). · Single loading of apartments preferred · Wide roofed verandah with fly screens · Cross flow ventilation via 180 opposed façade operable components to min 80% of residences and motel rooms: other 20% to incorporate 90o opposed façade operable components or single room depth to maximum 6 m (excluding laundry/bathroom/WC). · Optimise use of natural/ stack/ venturi ventilation through apartments. Promote natural ventilation · Naturally ventilate carparks where possible and screen cars from external view · Incorporate CO2 monitoring and variable speed fans to carparks Reduce use of air-conditioning · Insulation to roofs + walls to meet regulatory requirements and NATHERS rating. · Optimise use of natural/ stack/ venturi ventilation through apartments. · Install ceiling fans to all rooms · Wide eaves to provide year round shading to all glass · Sunscreening to all facades · Recessed glazing with frame and glass types to meet WERS star recommendations for dry tropical environment · If heating is to be provided it shall be via reverse cycle air conditioning or gas · All air conditioning to include adjustable auto/off timer occupant control Thermal mass & diurnal analysis Utilise exposed thermal mass to living spaces to improve night ventilation effectiveness for reduced diurnal temperature swings and reduced reliance on air conditioning. Thermal mass to be on internal walls/ceiling/floors not influenced by daily temperature maxima but in cross flow ventilation path.

o

Essential Investigate Investigate Essential Essential Investigate Investigate Essential

Promote daylight penetration.

Develop a framework of high efficiency lighting for submission with development proposals.

Promote cross ventilation

Essential Essential Essential

Investigate Essential Essential Essential Investigate Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

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Performance of equipment Utilise efficient technologies Air quality

Use of 4 star rated white goods as a minimum Use of gas cook tops Ventilate roof Investigate via computer energy model techniques and provide fixed apertures and non-motorised ventilation levels that minimise year round overall building energy. Energy metres to measure consumption of all residential units, public spaces, administration areas and group of motel rooms separately. Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. LCD public display at each building (e.g. (as a minimum) monthly energy use versus target).

Essential Investigate Investigate

Promote Efficiency

Essential

Monitor, report and display

Essential

Active Energy Strategies Photovoltaics · Each building primary entry incorporates visible PV array for year round solar capture sized to produce energy equal to ground floor entry foyer light yearly energy use or 600kWhr (which ever is greater). · Use of solar hot water heaters sized for 100% solar contribution from October to February (inclusive) Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval). Essential

Solar Hot Water Green Energy Supply

Essential Essential

5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Stormwater Stormwater Conservation SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Retain minimum 70% of stormwater on site for reuse Prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Intergrated Swales Bioretention Filter Infiltration Trench Collect rainwater from roofs for use in irrigation and toilet flushing. Provide AAA rated water efficient tap and shower fittings. Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Utilise infrared sensors on urinals. Utilise dual flush toilets Recycled water or alternative system for fire fighting - On site sewerage treatment and alternatives - Hybrid sewerage system - Smart sewers Use soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of ground water recharge FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Investigate Investigate Investigate Investigate Essential Essential Essential Investigate Investigate

Conserve tapwater. Efficiency. Efficiency. Efficiency. Efficiency. Sewerage

Landscape Initiatives

Essential

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Operational Waste Management SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins. Screen bin stores from external view. Create waste recycling holding areas. Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. Contruction Waste Management Implement Construction Waste Management procedures that minimise construction wastage and recycle materials into the development. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Desirable Essential

7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Avoid imported species. Soften appearance from beginning of life. Soften appearance. Existing trees Soften appearance. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Plant only species which are indigenous to locality. Approx 20, 3-4m, advanced trees are proposed to be planted in the residential precincts Plant trees on all building sides and between buildings. Protect existing trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. Use natural materials on landscape walls e.g. stone, natural render coloured, stained / clear timber (recycled, renewable). Do not use paint. Use construction waste in roads and paving or natural materials. Use predominantly light warm grey/cream paving colours. Allow public pedestrian movement to occur between buildings. Minimise width of vehicular carriageways and avoid kerb and gutter edges. Design of water efficient gardens. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

Recycling priority.

Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave. Continuous appearance of road surface with landscape; minimise visual impact of road intrusion. Water efficiency in gardens

Essential Essential

Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Develop Building Management System for owners / body corporate's to effectively optimise environmental efficiency. Develop owners and tenants sustainability and maintenance guide. Separate water and energy meters to measure consumption of each residential unit. FEASIBILITY Essential

Maintenance Tracking

Essential Essential

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7.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR COMMERCIAL PRECINCTS

SECTION 7: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR COMMERCIAL PRECINCT

This section describes the ESD principles which are relevant to the planning and design of the Village Precinct which is to be largely delivered by the private sector and requires that its developers embrace the same philosophies and standards as for the Cultural Centre.

The outline checklist should not be regarded as exhaustive and each proposal must be accompanied by an ESD proposal which makes clear commitments to ESD measures under the following headings:

1. Planning and massing 2. Building design 3. Building materials 4. Energy efficiency 5. Water management 6. Waste management 7. Landscape design

7.1

VILLAGE

8. Monitoring and implementation

The Village presents significant opportunities for environmentally sustainable design.

Developers are also to commit to the preparation of an Environmental Management Manual which measures and monitors environmental performance over a minimum 10 year period, and to outline the contents

However, the achievement of high environmental standards is more complex than for the other Pioneer Park precincts because it is likely to involve more than one developer, and it is a mixed use development precinct including retail, restaurants, offices, a motel and possibly residential apartments. It is therefore imperative that all developers adhere to the robust set of ESD guidelines.

of the manual.

This report is to be read in conjunction with Volume 1. Design Guidelines for this precinct can be found in chapter: 1.7 - Village

For commercial buildings, it is a requirement that each building meets a minimal standard of 4 star rating under the AGBRS (Australian Greenhouse Building Rating Scheme). However, this scheme applies to a limited range of environmental initiatives which developers can incorporate regarding water sensitive urban design and wastewater efficiency. Therefore the accompanying requirements should be read in conjunction with Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design, contained in this Volume.

It is equally considered vital that the buildings convey by their architectural expression and the priority on environmental design. For this issue, reference is to be made to Volume 1.

The following guidelines are intended to act as an outline checklist to assist developers in the preparation of design proposals for consideration for each of the sub-precincts 4A, 4B, 4C, 4D and 4E referred to in Volume 1.

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Levels Minimise western heat loads. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Habitable spaces and basement carparking to be at minimum RL of 15.9 (Q100 Flood Level) Buildings orientated north-south through to north eastsouth west. Commercial plan depth restricted to 12m. Development to be integrated with streetscape and footpaths in the creation of enjoyable public gathering spaces. Height limited to 4 storeys maximum with a minimum of 15% of total Precinct 4 development at 3 storeys or less. Significant stepping of buildings in plan with view corridors between buildings. Unified with consistent glazing treatment (to retail) and awnings at street level. Preservation of major trees on the site. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Avoids anti-social appearance.

Essential

Maintain scale relationship with larger trees. Prevent a relentless skyline. Create visual continuity

Essential Essential

Tree retention

Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

(For Residential Areas in Precinct 4 - Village, Refer Section 5: Sustainability Guide for Residential Precincts)

ISSUES Provides shade to office areas. Optimises use of climate. View from all aspects not to be of bland facades. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Extensive provision of openings and large balconies to all levels. `Rear' side of buildings not to be treated as backs, must be highly articulated with extensive glazing. Life cores to be internalised or set well in on staggered, diagonal building edges. Roofs to cantilever well beyond walls. Rainwater goods to be integral with structural members Windows to be continuous as much as possible (horizontally and vertically), and not to appear as individual `holes' in walls. Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Shade building as a whole. Generate tropical image. Integration Precludes arbitrary placement of glazing.

Essential Essential Essential

Buildings should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not postmodern, Mediterranean, etc). Atmospheric Air Quality

Essential

Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation. Use zero CFC's and HCFC's in refrigerants and Halon fire suppression systems.

Essential Essential Investigate Essential Essential

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3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Environmental sustainability. Building to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Demonstrable use of renewable materials ­ walls, ground surfaces, structural members. Preferred treatments: - coloured render on block or brick - natural / stained timber e.g. renewable special plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu coloured concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - metal rainwater goods - timber or metallic anodised windows - stonework natural - metal roofs with low glare Non Preferred treatments: - painted surfaces and surfaces which appear as granular paint - plastic rainwater goods - fibrous cement cladding - metal cladding to walls - face brick - simulated finishes - tiled roofs Timber Low-embodied energy For timber, use only plantation, recycled or eco-labelled products. Select materials with low embodied energy, low pollution in manufacture, low transport costs, minimal maintenance, non-hazardous and eco-labelled Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Essential

Essential Essential

Atmospheric Air Quality

Essential Essential Investigate Essential

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES Minimum Energy Performance Developers are to demonstrate dedication to environmental sustainability Achieve minimum 4 star rating under Australian Building Greenhouse Rating Scheme (ABGRS) offices and for retail achieve maximum CO2 emissions from energy use of 315 kg CO2/sqm.annum averaged over building gross floor area. Refer CO2 outline in Section 2.4 Energy Efficency Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Passive Energy Strategies Reduce energy costs of lighting through natural lighting techniques · · · · Shallow footprints Shaded skylights Light shelves to reflect light into interiors North south facing orientation. Essential Investigate Investigate Essential Essential Essential

Promote daylight penetration.

· Create linear buildings which promote deep daylight penetration · Provide continuous lengths of glazing, with operable shading systems, which facilitate daylight penetration

· Set sill levels for offices at a maximum height of 600mm above FFL to optimise daylight penetration · Providing glazing with minimum VLT of 60% Develop a framework of high efficiency lighting for submission with development proposals. Promote cross ventilation Electronically ballasted T5 fluorescent lighting with daylight sensing and dimming controls throughout all occupied spaces except amenity spaces which require fluorescent lights with occupancy sensor only. Maximum 12m width to commercial developments with operable areas of minimum 30% wall area to minimum two opposite façade · Insulation to roofs + walls · Optimise use of natural/ stack/ venturi ventilation · Wide eaves to provide year round shading to all glass. · Sunscreening to all facades · · · · · General Air Conditioning Issues Recessed glazing with minimum parameters VLT as above SC 0.45 max. U 5 max Provide Low-e

Essential Essential Essential

Essential

Reduce use of air conditioning

Essential Investigate Essential Essential Essential

· Economiser required on all systems to utilise outside air when temperatures are appropriate in preference to recycled air and refrigerated cooling · C02 monitoring to introduce (and therefore heat/cool) only enough outside air as required to maintain indoor air quality · Ensure air conditioning systems are controllable in zones that match usage patterns and therefore can be switched off when not required · Heat recovery between outside and building relief Energy metres to measure consumption of each tenant and common facilities arranged for energy readings directly applicable as confirmation of ABGRS ratings and CO2/sqm. annum targets Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. LCD Public display at each building (e.g. (as a minimum) monthly energy use versus target) Provide a BMCS to automatically control, manage and report on the plant for improved energy efficiency. Tenant lease to require fitout operation and compliance to star rating and CO2/sqm. annum targets noted

Essential

Promote efficiency

Essential

Monitor, report and display

Essential

Building Management and Control System (BMCS) Tenant lease

Essential Essential

Renewable Energy ­ Active Energy Strategies Utilise efficient technologies · Use of photovoltaics to generate energy · Each building primary entry incorporates visible PV array for year round solar capture sized to produce energy equal to ground floor entry foyer light yearly energy use or 600kWhr (which ever is greater). · Use of solar hot water heaters sized for 100% solar contribution from October to February (inclusive) Green Energy Supply Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval). Essential Essential Essential Essential

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5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Conserve tapwater. Efficiency. Efficiency. Efficiency. Conservation SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Collect rainwater from roofs for use in irrigation and toilet flushing. Provide AAA rated water efficient tap and shower fittings. Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Utilise infrared sensors on urinals. Utilise dual flush in toilets. Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Intergrated Swales Bioretention Filter Infiltration Trench Prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. Hybrid sewage system smart sewers FEASIBILITY Investigate Essential Essential Essential Essential Investigate Investigate Investigate Essential Alternative systems to be investigated.

Stormwater Sewage

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Construction waste management SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY · Design out waste in the design stage. · Implement an on-site recycling system for waste materials including separation of types (timber for reuse, concrete blocks for crushing, steel for recycling). Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. General waste management Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins. Create waste recycling holding areas. Screen bin stores from external view. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Investigate Essential Essential Essential

7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Species suitability SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Plant only species which are indigenous to locality ­ refer to the approved planting list. Select plants which require minimal watering. Select plants specific to their location (e.g. under existing trees in full shade, along edges in full sun). Soften appearance from beginning of life. Protect Soften appearance. Plant 8 trees at minimum of 3 metres height. Minimum as shown in Masterplan Protect existing Trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. Use natural materials on landscape walls e.g. stone, natural render coloured, stained / clear timber (recycled, renewable). Do not use paint. Use construction waste in roads and paving or natural materials. Use predominantly light warm grey or cream paving colours. Allow public pedestrian movement to occur between buildings. Minimise width of vehicular carriageways and avoid kerb and gutter edges. Design of water efficient gardens. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

Prevent glare.

Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave. Continuous appearance of road surface with landscape; minimise visual impact of road intrusion. Water efficency in gardens

Essential Essential

Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Prepare a Building Management System Outline for submission during tender which describes the full ESD strategy initiatives and commitments. Commit to the preparation of an Owners and Tenants Sustainability Maintenance Manual. Separate water and energy meters to measure consumption of each tenancy. FEASIBILITY Essential

Maintenance Tracking

Essential Essential

ENERGY LEGEND kg CO2/sqm = kilograms CO2 per square metre per annum kg CO2/sqm a. targets are preliminary estimates and will be determined in consultation between all parties with respect to detailed spatial make up, facility operational scenarios/times and local benchmarks to be determined. Targets shall be based on a 20% reduction from current standard practicae (e.g. excluding passive design elements sustainability techniques, etc.) VLT = Visible light tranmission SC = shading coefficient U = U-value Low-e= Low emissivity glass PV = Photovoltaic

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8.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR CULTURAL CENTRE + LAGOON PRECINCT P1

SECTION 8: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR CULTURAL CENTRE AND LAGOON PRECINCT P1

This precinct entails an implicit sustainability strategy in the integration of the Cultural Centre and Lagoon and their mutual support and interaction. The broad sustainability benefit of the combined facility is the interaction between cultural and recreational community activity. Specific attributes include:

· the use of the Lagoon as a spectacular landscape space fronting the Cultural Centre and capable of being used for cultural activities (events, performances) as well as for swimming. · the use of roof extensions from the Cultural Centre out over the Lagoon to complement other shade structures to be installed. · the location of Lagoon public amenities where they may be utilised for general public access from other facilities including the Cultural Centre.

These strategies will form part of a comprehensive ESD Manual which should be developed for the project taking into account construction, delivered project and ongoing performance operation, monitoring and improvement over time. The manual should also evaluate the pay back period performance of the initiatives.

This report is to be read in conjunction with Volume 1. Design Guidelines for this Precinct is found in chapter: 1.4 - Cultural Centre and Lagoon

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Levels SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY No habitable spaces to be minimum RL of 15.7 (with plant equipment at RL 16.5). Habitable spaces to be minimum of RL of 15.9 (Q100 Level). Cultural Centre and Lagoon to be intrinsically linked with respect to fingering planning Significant stepping of buildings in section to relate to the topography Height limited to 2 storeys maximum at any point Development not to be fenced. Building to be terraced toward the large performance space volume to reduce lengths of two store walls Preservation of major trees on the site. Energy tower to create visual environmental impact FEASIBILITY Essential

Integration with the landscape Maximises visual impact of the building as an integrated culturally and environmentally sustainable building Maintains scale relationship with larger trees. Avoids anti-social appearance.

Essential Essential

Essential Essential

Tree retention Significant built element

Essential Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

ISSUES Cultural Centre facades to be integrated into the landscape Shading to building as a whole. Generates tropical image and blurs boundary between cultural centre and lagoon Solar control. Creates fenestration articulation. Building should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not postmodern, Mediterranean, etc). Precludes arbitrary placement of glazing. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY `Rear' side of building not to be treated as backs, with berming linking landscaping with roof forms and create alternative amphitheatre spaces Roofs to cantilever well beyond walls to provide shade to lagoon Additional shade structures to reinforce the fingering of the plan Glazing to be screened and / or have awnings and to be deeply recessed. Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles. FEASIBILITY Essential

Essential

Essential Essential

Windows to be continuous as much as possible (horizontally and vertically), and not to appear as individual `holes' in walls to maximise the visual amenity of the lagoon and surrounding parkland

Essential

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3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Building materials to be prioritised on the basis of: SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY · renewable and/or recycled timbers · materials requiring low embodied energy in their manufacture · Utilise locally sourced building materials where possible to shorten transport distances and to support local employment/business · recyclability when the building's life is completed · aesthetic harmony with the natural environment · durability and resistance to vandalism and impact by active users Preferred treatments: - coloured render on block or brick - natural / stained timber e.g. renewable special plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu coloured concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - metal rainwater goods - timber or metallic anodised windows - stonework natural - metal roofs with low glare Non Preferred treatments: - painted surfaces and surfaces which appear as granular paint - plastic rainwater goods - fibrous cement cladding - metal cladding to walls - face brick - simulated finishes - tiled roofs Environmental sustainability. Demonstrable use of renewable materials ­ walls, ground surfaces, structural members Select materials that are non-hazardous and eco-labelled. Specify low-VOC materials for carpets, adhesives, sealants and paints Establish a project goal for FSC certified wood including using plantation timber and wood / agrifibre products that do not contain urea-formaldehyde resins. Utilise renewable materials, including products that incorporate recycled content, and products such as wool carpets, strawboards, sunflower seed board, cotton batt insulation, linoleum flooring and wheatgrass cabineting. Atmospheric Air Quality Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation. FEASIBILITY Essential

Building to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape. Cultural Centre and Lagoon to have similar material palette

Essential

Essential

Essential Essential Essential Essential

Essential

Essential Essential Investigate Essential

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES Minimum Energy Performance Consultant Team to undertake C02/sqm rating analysis Achieve maximum CO2 emissions from energy use of 170kg CO2/sqm. annum averaged over building gross floor area Refer CO2 outline in Section 2.4 Energy Efficency. Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Optimise Energy Performance - Passive Energy Strategies LAGOON Reduction of natural heating to pool Shading to be provided to the lagoon in the form of · Built roofs · Existing mature trees Essential

CULTURAL CENTRE Natural cooling techniques Cultural Centre arranged adjacent to Lagoon + Ross River to induce the N to SW breezes for a natural cooling effect. Locate spray water features and play areas in natural air path Architect and engineers to document detailed design interaction so that spaces can be both naturally ventilated and air conditioned. · Skylights to incorporate operable ventilation openings · High level + Low level louvres to glazed walls to promote air movement (some motorized openings may be required to facilitate occupant take up of natural ventilation opportunities). · Large areas of concertina style openings to foyer/ gallery/cafe Operable glazing to smaller internal spaces to reduce need for AC · Shaded glazing year round to all facades · Shaded skylights · Light shelves · Roofs + walls to be insulated to meet regulatory and energy performance requirements · Green roofs also reduce need for sound insulation Electronically ballasted T5 fluorescent lighting with daylight sensing and dimming controls throughout all occupied spaces except amenity spaces which require fluorescent lights with occupancy sensor only. Utilise exposed thermal mass to occupied spaces to improve night ventilation effectiveness for reduced diurnal temperature swings and reduced reliance on air conditioning. Thermal mass to be on internal wall/ceiling/floors not influenced by daily temperature maxima but in cross floor ventilation path. Reduce waste production Solar power Recycling Bins to building. · Solar powered light fittings to lagoon via energy tower. · Solar energy panels to be located on roof. Each building primary entry incorporates visible PV array for year round solar capture sized to produce energy equal to ground floor entry foyer light yearly energy use or 600kWhr (which ever is greater). · Solar hot water heaters sized for 100% solar contribution from October to February (inclusive). Essential Essential Investigate Essential

Mixed Mode/ Hybrid Air conditioning: Optimise use of natural ventilation through foyer/ gallery/ café/ back of house areas to reduce air conditioning utilisation.

Essential

Hybrid Ventilation to office/ workshop spaces Minimize need for artificial light and maximise lighting by daylight wherever possible Insulation

Essential Essential Essential Investigate Essential Investigate Essential

Develop a framework of high efficiency lighting for submission with development proposals. Thermal mass and diurnal analysis

Essential

Essential

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General Air Conditioning Issues

· Economiser required on all systems to utilise outside air when temperatures are appropriate in preference to recycled air and refrigerated cooling · C02 monitoring to introduce (and therefore heat/cool) only enough outside air as required to maintain indoor air quality · Ensure air conditioning systems are controllable in zones that match usage patterns and therefore can be switched off when not required · Heat recovery between outside and building relief

Essential

Essential

Essential

Essential Essential

Monitor, report and display

· Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. · LCD public display at each building (e.g. (as a minimum) monthly energy use versus target).

Essential Essential Essential

Building Management and Control System (BMCS) Green Energy Supply

Provide a BMCS to automatically control, manage and report on the plant for improved energy efficiency. Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval).

ENERGY TOWER (all features REQUIRED) · Energy tower to create an iconic focal point for the precincts sustainable energy ethos (based on a budget allowance of $300,000); the energy tower acknowledges that, whilst the Principal is not an `energy supply authority' and therefore will encourage an/or mandate the purchase of green energy for the site rather than large scale on-site production, there is enormous benefit of producing highly visible yet economically responsible levels of iconic reference to sustainable power production on the site, · The mix of technologies in the energy tower will be adequate to produce in the order of 13,500 kWhr per year of energy and this would be approximately equivalent to the energy consumed by selected feature area lighting around the Cultural Centre, Lagoon and Energy Tower. · In addition to the generation technologies noted, incorporate sophisticated interactive energy displays. This important feature (as opposed to components people can view only) includes collection of site data, reports in tabular and graphic form, scrolling displays, web interface and associated designs, touch screen user interface. · It is noted that payback periods for small scale site generation are expected to be lengthy (in excess of 15 years) far more effective paybacks (less than 10 years) are available from passive features and system efficiency enhancements outlined through this document and the energy tower includes displays and education in this regard. Nevertheless, strong visible references throughout the precinct with respect to site energy harvesting (wind and solar) are included as important iconic features. Wind power One wind turbine of approximately 15kW located at the energy tower at 20 to 30 m height studies to be undertaken to ensure height is adequate to negate effects of structures and landscape features within Pioneer Park.

Solar power

· 30m2 photovoltaic array with the following features: · Utilise technology that minimise embodied energy. · Benefits by creating a highly visible sustainability reference for improved energy culture of the occupants of the facility and the wider community.

5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Conserve tapwater. Conserve tapwater. Conserve tapwater. Efficiency. Ground water control Prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. Community awareness Stormwater Harvesting Public Amenities Sewerage Systems SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Collect rainwater from roofs for use in irrigation and toilet flushing. Provide AAA rated water efficient tap and shower fittings. Utilise infrared sensors on urinals Utilise dual flush toilets Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Vegetated Swayles Energy Tower to also incorporate educational text regarding water management analysis. Incorporate with Lagoon Waste seperation vacuum toilets Hybrid Sewerage Systems Smart Sewers FEASIBILITY Ivestigate Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Investigate Investigate Alternatives to be investigated Landscape Initiatives Use soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of ground water recharge Essential

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Construction Waste Management SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Implement Construction Management Procedures that minimise construction wastage and recycle materials into the development. Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins. Screen bin stores from external view. Create waste recycling holding areas. Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. FEASIBILITY Essential

Operational Waste Management

Essential Essential Essential Essential

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7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Avoid imported species. Soften appearance from beginning of life. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Plant only species which are indigenous to locality. Plant 23 trees at minimum of 3 metres height as a minimum. Protect existing trees. Protect existing trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. Soften appearance. Use natural materials on landscape walls e.g. stone, natural render coloured, stained / clear timber (recycled, renewable). Do not use paint. Use construction waste in roads and paving or natural materials. Use predominantly light warm grey and cream paving colours. Allow public pedestrian movement to occur throughout site. Minimise width of vehicular carriageways and avoid kerb and gutter edges. Minor service road access to Lagoon equipment services to be reinforced grass rather than paving Design of water efficient gardens. Essential Essential FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Recycling priority.

Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave. Continuous appearance of road surface with landscape; minimise visual impact of road intrusion. Water efficency in gardens

Essential Essential

Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Develop Building Management System for Cultural Centre Management, Lagoon Management and tenancies to effectively optimise environmental efficiency. Develop management and tenants sustainability and maintenance guide. Separate water and energy meters to measure consumption of Lagoon and Cultural Centre services/ amenities. FEASIBILITY Essential

Maintenance Tracking

Essential Essential

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9.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR SPORTS BUILDING + GROUNDS

SECTION 9: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR SPORTS BUILDING + GROUNDS

The Sports Centre Precinct comprises a new oval capable of staging local to national level AFL and cricket matches, a hockey field adjacent to the oval and a Grandstand on the western side of the oval. A further important aspect of the design of the Grandstand is its visual integration with the landscape such that its impact on the landscape is minimised. The principal requirement in this respect is that it is seen as a seamless continuation of the berm surround to the oval, with one The primary environmental sustainability strategies for the precinct are: contiguous roof extending over the whole facility and casting deep shadows along the east and west edges of the building. Further impact · Water sensitive urban design, particularly with respect to the playing arenas and focussed upon a cohesive strategy encompassing selection of grasses, cut-and-fill balance of earthworks, drainage and irrigation (refer Appendix A). · Passive energy design of the Grandstand, together with the use of materials and construction techniques which minimise wastage and reduce the loss of embodied energy. This report is to be read in conjunction with Volume 1 . Design Guidelines for this precinct are found in chapter: 1.5 - Sports Centre reduction is to be provided by the planting of reasonably mature trees along the western edge.

For the Grandstand component, the principal measures are:

· Design of walls and screens along the western edge to protect interior spaces from western heat loads. · Planning of the ground level player and management facilities, and of the upper level club bar area such that natural ventilation is optimised. · Extension of the roof on all sides such that it provides shelter and shade to both the open areas and to enclosed spaces. · Design of the roof in a continuous raking plane such that it collects rainwater in tanks for reuse in the building and for localised irrigation around the building. · The use of high efficiency appliances (lighting, tapware, etc.) that are the optimum of their type in minimising wastage. · The use of crushed construction material waste to form paving around the building.

These principal measures are to be supported by a program of environmental constraints on the selection of materials and surfaces which foster minimal maintenance and maximum durability, local availability, optimum internal air quality, non-toxicity and vandal resistance.

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Flood Level Integration with the landscape. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Sports field to allow for drainage. Sports Centre and fields to be intrinsically linked with respect to curvilinear plan. Significant stepping of buildings in length to relate to the created topography of the bermed Sporting fields. Height limited to 2 storeys maximum. To reduce impact of perimeter Main Field fencing, planting is designed to outside face of the bermed field perimeter. Preservation of major trees on the site. Berming and building to reinforce curvilinear planning treatment throughout site. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Maintains scale relationship with larger trees. Avoids anti-social appearance.

Essential Essential

Tree retention. Site impact.

Essential Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

ISSUES Sports Centre facades to be integrated into the landscape. Form of building as a whole. blurs boundary between Sports Centre and Landscape. Solar control to create fenestration articulation. Building should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not postmodern, Mediterranean, etc). Precludes arbitrary placement of glazing. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Entry side of building not to be treated as a blank façade. Grandstand Roof to cantilever elegantly berming to link landscaping with built roof/ wall elements. Glazing to be screened and / or have awnings and to be deeply recessed. Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential

Essential Essential

Windows to be continuous as much as possible (horizontally and vertically), and not to appear as individual `holes' in walls to maximise the visual amenity of the surrounding parkland.

Essential

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VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

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3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Building materials to be prioritised on the basis of: SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY · renewable and/or recycled timbers · materials requiring low embodied energy in their manufacture · Utilise locally sourced building materials where possible to shorten transport distances and to support local employment · recyclability when the building's life is completed · aesthetic harmony with the natural environment · durability and resistance to vandalism and impact by active sports-orientated organisations Preferred treatments: - coloured render on block or brick - natural / stained timber e.g. renewable special plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu coloured concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - metal rainwater goods - timber or metallic anodised windows - low reflective metal cladding to walls - stonework natural - metal roofs with low glare Non Preferred treatments: - painted surfaces and surfaces which appear as granular paint - plastic rainwater goods - fibrous cement cladding - face brick - simulated finishes - tiled roofs Environmental sustainability. Select materials that are non-hazardous and eco-labelled. Specify low-VOC materials for carpets, adhesives, sealants and paints Establish a project goal for FSC certified wood including using plantation timber and wood / agrifibre products that do not contain urea-formaldehyde resins. Utilise renewable materials, including products that incorporate recycled content, and products such as wool carpets, strawboards, sunflower seed board, cotton batt insulation, linoleum flooring and wheatgrass cabineting. Atmospheric Air Quality Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation. Use zero CFC's and HCFC's in refrigerants and Halon fire suppression systems. FEASIBILITY Essential

Building to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape.

Essential

Essential

Essential Essential Essential

Essential

Essential Essential Investigate Essential Essential

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES Minimum Energy Performance Consultant Team to undertake C02/sqm rating analysis Achieve maximum CO2 emissions from energy use of 60 kg C02/sqm. a averaged over building gross floor area Refer CO2 outline section 2.4 Energy Efficency. Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Optimise Energy Performance - Passive Energy Strategies SPORTS CENTRE Optimise use of natural ventilation through club lounge areas + bar to reduce air conditioning utilisation. Reduced ventilation and air conditioning energy Comfort for viewers to be a priority. Orientation Minimize need for artificial light and maximise lighting by daylight wherever possible. Insulation Develop a framework of high efficiency lighting for submission with development proposals. · Skylights to incorporate operable ventilation · High level + Low level operable louvres to glazed walls to promote air movement · Large areas of concertina style openings · Natural Ventilation to toilet + change room spaces · Operable glazing to smaller internal spaces to reduce need for AC. Shading to Grandstand Orientation of the grandstand to ensure majority of shade after 2pm (summer). · Shaded glazing year round to all facades · Shaded skylights · Light shelves Roofs + walls to be insulated. · Efficient HID lighting to playing surface with switching modes to include: ­ Security only ­ 50% illumination level to full field ­ 100% illumination level to full field ­ Individual min/50%/100% control to each bank/tower · HID external lighting (stadium seating general spectator areas, perimeter) to be zoned with each zone incorporating security, reduced operating and full operating modes. · Fluorescent internal lighting with occupancy sensor non-security light switching capability to amenities and change areas Reduce waste production. SPORTS FIELDS Natural cooling techniques. Trees to be planted along bermed embankments to reduce heat of breezes and provide shading to seating areas. North/South orientation of the field as sporting requirement. Essential Recycling Bins to building Essential Essential Essential Essential

Essential Essential Essential Essential Invesigate Essential Essential

Essential

Essential

Essential

Orientation

Essential

Renewable Energy ­ Active Energy Strategies The Sports Centre and grounds will benefit primarily from passive cooling and ventilation techniques as well as the following. Solar power · Use of solar hot water heaters sized for 100% solar contribution from October to February inclusive (single AFL match demand) · Solar energy panels to be located on grandstand roof Essential

Investigate

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· Each building primary entry incorporates visible PV array for year round solar capture sized to produce energy equal to ground floor entry foyer light yearly energy use or 600kWhr (which ever is greater). Monitoring, report and display · Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. · LCD public display at each building (e.g. (as a minimum) monthly energy use versus target). Green Energy Supply Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval). Provide a BMCS to automatically control, manage and report on the plant for improved energy efficiency.

Investigate

Essential

Essential Essential

Building Management and Control System (BMCS)

Essential

5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Sports Fields Irrigation management. Conserve tap water. Reduce sediment load on waterway. Groundwater management. Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Collect rainwater from roofs for use in irrigation and toilet flushing. Grass swayles Bioretention Filters Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. Landscape Initiatives Grandstand water conservation. Efficency Use soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of ground water recharge. Utilise AAA rated water efficient tap and shower fittings. Utilise infrared sensors on urinals. Utilise dual flush toilets. Utilise infrared sensors on urinals. Waste Separation vacuum toilets. Hybrid Sewerage Systems Smart Systems. Use soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of groundwater recharge Essential Investigate Essential Investigate Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Public Amenities. Sewerage Systems. Landscape initiatives

Investigate Alternatives to be investigated. Essential

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Construction Waste Management. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Implement Construction Management Procedures that minimise construction wastage and recycle materials into the development. Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins. Screen bin stores from external view. Create waste recycling holding areas. Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. FEASIBILITY Essential

Operational Waste Management.

Essential Essential Essential Essential

7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Natural cooling techniques SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY · Existing trees to be retained as per tree planning strategy · Trees to be planted along bermed embankments to sports fields to reduce heat of breezes and provide shading to seating areas North/South orientation sporting fields. Plant only species which are indigenous to locality. Over 100 new trees are to be incorporated into the sports precinct. Plant trees at minimum of 3 metres height. Protect existing trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. Use natural materials on landscape walls e.g. stone, natural render coloured, stained / clear timber (recycled, renewable). Do not use paint. Use construction waste in roads and paving or natural materials. Use predominantly light warm grey and cream paving colours. Reduce imapct of fence with planting to perimeter berm. Minimise width of vehicular carriageways and avoid kerb and gutter edges. FEASIBILITY Essential

Orientation Avoid imported species. Soften appearance from beginning of life.

Essential Essential Essential

Protect existing trees. Soften appearance.

Essential Essential

Recycling priority. Prevent glare.

Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave. Continuous appearance of road surface with landscape; minimise visual impact of road intrusion.

Essential Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Develop Building Management System for Sports Centre Management and tenancies to effectively optimise environmental efficiency. Develop management and user groups sustainability and maintenance guide. Separate water and energy meters to measure consumption of field and Sports Centre services/ amenities. FEASIBILITY Essential

Maintenance Tracking

Essential Essential

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VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

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10.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND LANDSCAPING

SECTION 10.0: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND LANDSCAPING

Loam Island differs from Pioneer Park in that it will have only a small component of building development in Precinct 1, and the majority of the land is proposed to be an environmental rainforest and wetland. The redevelopment of Loam Island should, however, be designed and implemented so that the two precincts form part of an integrated and holistic environmental design strategy.

These active recreational pursuits will be complemented by the creation of a Savannah Grassland. The Savannah Grassland will integrate additional shade trees such as the Burdekin Plum (Pleiogynium timorense) and the Poplar Gum (Eucalyptus Platyphylla) with existing vegetation. The area will cater for family sports, picnics and gatherings, weddings and outdoor concerts, carparking. A boat ramp and fishing piers are being considered.

All Loam Island precincts will require a strong ESD commitment in their design, implementation and operation due to high potential human intervention. In addition, this area is intended to accommodate the total carparking for the island to be located on existing cleared land. This area is proposed to be designed to be porous in surface and not to incorporate traditional stormwater run-off treatments.

The triple bottom line ethos ­ environmental, social and economic sustainability ­ applies to Loam Island in that its future entails conservation of natural environment, the use of part of that environment for active and passive recreation, and the need for the island to require a minimum of maintenance to be economically viable given that it offers little revenue potential.

Design of the Environmental Activities Precinct will establish a natural setting for riverside activity. It will enhance the islands' environmental qualities so as to facilitate educational and recreational opportunities and create a spectrum of vegetation communities. Approximately 150 mature trees (3-4 metres) are to be planted.

3. WETLAND / RAINFOREST PRECINCTS

10.1

1.

PRECINCT APPROACH

These precincts to the north of Loam Island are considered to be conservation zones with public access to be predominantly via boardwalks elevated above the terrain. The subdivision of the precinct into `wetland'

MULTI USE COMMUNITY FACILITY PRECINCT

Design of the Community Centre will establish the character of Loam Island, and provide the foundation for the implementation of increased community and public recreation space. It will provide adequate orientation facilities for users and be integrated into the circulation network of the Riverway.

and `lowland' rainforest is proposed as a microcosm of the natural tropical environment. It is also considered that these zones become highly educational in their use, incorporating a walking trail which reveals the biodiversity in flora and fauna and provides innovative interpretation facilities along the route.

This precinct to the south end of Loam Island is proposed to accommodate a community clubhouse building for Scouts and Guides with rowing facilities. Viewing tiers are to be provided for rowing regattas and a 2000 metre international rowing course is to be investigated. Approximately 25 new trees are to be planted (3-4 metres). Refer Section 10 for detailed guidelines.

Covering the northern half of Loam Island, this precinct is to involve a comprehensive rehabilitation of the existing landscape and vegetation in order to form an environmental park. In particular, the interface between shoreline and river is to be sensitively managed to promote indigenous plant and marine species to flourish. Revegetation of this zone will employ riparian species such as the Weeping Paperbark (Melaleuca leucadendra) and the Swamp Mahogany (Lophostemon grandiflorus). Fringed by the

2. SAVANNAH RECREATION PRECINCT

riparian vegetation along the river, the lowlying portion of this precinct will be revegetated with local provenance wetland species including sedges,

This precinct is to be clearly defined as the open space area where passive recreation ­ family outings, fishing, boating, leashed dog walking, etc ­ is proposed to be permitted. A long term feature of the creek edge is proposed as an `archipelago' incorporating children's play pools, environmental art and installations which combine to form an environmental education playground.

grasses and rushes and tree species such as the Cabbage Palm (Livistona decipiens) and the Leichardt Tree (Nauclea orientalis). More elevated areas will contain Lowland Rainforest species consisting of a high diversity of species including the Kapok (Cochlospermum gillivraei) and the Beach Almond (Terminalia catappa). Approximately 75 mature trees (3-4 metres) are to be planted.

It is aimed that the rehabilitation of these vegetation communities will provide a habitat for a diversity of fauna. Boardwalks will link Fauna hides, which, fitted with innovative interpretation exhibits will allow for observation and eductation. The inclusion of public art is proposed in order to offer interactive education concerning the environment.

The long term intention is to reinstate the creek that formerly separated the island from the mainland and is presently blocked and congested by vegetation. It is anticipated that the creek reinstatement will need to be undertaken by a contractor rather than by voluntary or community labour as the task is major. This work will need to be executed to a purposemade ESD strategy to minimise dredging impact upon indigenous natural

Carparking is not to be permitted in this precinct, fishing activity and pets are also not to be allowed.

habitats and vegetation.

Staging of development and upgrading of the 4 precincts can occur

10.2

ENVIRONMENTAL PRINCIPLES

simultaneously, however it is anticipated that it will progress from south to north, with the multipurpose community facility constructed first, followed

The upgrading of Loam Island is proposed to be guided by its key objective of demonstrating the harmonious interrelationships that can occur between community / recreation use and the natural environment. This objective entails the following aims:

by installation of the proposed new carparking area in Precinct 2, to replace existing infrastructure.

The likely staging sequence is as follows:

· Preserve, conserve and reinforce the biodiversity of Loam Island including its native vegetation, native fauna and aquatic habitats. · Educate the public ­ generally, community organisations, schools, etc ­ as to the optimum ways in which natural environments can co-exist with recreational uses. · Become a major social focus within Thuringowa catering for a wide diversity of activities including rowing, organised community recreation, passive recreation, dog walking, educational outings, picnics and family gatherings. · Act as a State-relevant focus of ecological research and investigation into wetland environmental conservation. · Contribute to the aesthetic and ecological quality of the Riverway project and to Ross River as a whole. · Demonstrate how a community building can be integrated in aesthetic and ecological terms with the natural environment, and become a demonstration model of innovative ESD strategies.

1. Construction of Multipurpose Community Facility with vehicular access from the main road and areas for boating access to the river.

2. Consolidation and provision of carparking on the island with landscaping in and around the carpark. Clearing of unwanted weed vegetation.

3. Construction of boardwalks and interpretation facilities to Precincts 3 and 4 in combination with clearing of unwanted vegetation, conservation of native vegetation and planting of new native vegetation.

4. Construction of river edge boardwalks, fishing nodes and reinforcement of native fauna and marine habitats.

5. Dredging of the creek and creation of the Precinct 2 education archipelago. (This place could be earlier if funds become available.)

10.3

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

COMMUNITY GROUP PARTICIPATION

It is anticipated that implementation of the Loam Island strategy will occur in stages as funds become available. Much of the landscape and conservation work is also intended to be undertaken by voluntary community effort and/or contribution by community clubs ­ community group participation is outlined further in Section 3: Biodiversity.

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11.0 SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND MULTI USE FACILITY

SECTION 11: SUSTAINABILITY DESIGN GUIDE FOR LOAM ISLAND MULTI USE FACILITY

11.1 PRECINCT APPROACH

11.3 MULTIPURPOSE COMMUNITY BUILDING GUIDELINES

The Multi use Community Building has been schematically designed in consultation with representatives of local Scouts, Guides and Rowing organisations.

The following guidelines are provided to assist in the detailed design of the building and are to be read in conjunction with Volume 1. Design This precinct is the most actively used precinct, incorporating a community building for Scouts, Guides and Rowing Club purposes. The building is to be sited off the island itself with a vehicular connection to the island and a separate vehicular connection to the main road. It is proposed to be a lightweight structured and clad building demonstrating environmental sensitivity physically and visually with features including: Guidelines are found in chapter 2.4 - Multi Use Community Facility.

· roofs collecting rainwater into tanks for use in irrigation, toilet flushing and in other appliances; · use of recycled and plantation timbers in structure and classing; · use of the landscape and vegetation to reduce heat gain; · natural ventilation and no air conditioning; · solar hot water generation and solar paneling for cooking and heat supply; and · Extensive use of roof overhangs and other screen devices for passive energy control.

Land below and above the facility is to be used for vehicular access and it is imperative that the treatment of these areas demonstrates further environmental responsibility. Other areas are proposed to be used for outdoor cooking, parades, rowing regattas and passive waterfront recreation and will also require environmental sensitivity, particularly when major events are staged.

11.2

ENVIRONMENTAL PRINCIPLES

The creation of the Loam Island Multi use Community Centre is guided by its key objective of demonstrating the harmonious interrelationships that can occur between community / recreation use and the natural environment. This objective entails the following aims:

· Educate the public ­ generally, community organisations, schools, etc ­ as to the optimum ways in which natural environments can co-exist with recreational uses. · Become a major social focus within Thuringowa catering for a wide diversity of activities including rowing, organised community recreation, passive recreation, dog walking, educational outings, picnics and family gatherings.

1. PLANNING AND MASSING

ISSUES Food Level Existing Site Excavation to be minimised Maintains scale relationship with larger trees. Tree retention SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Locate the habitable building on the mainland above flood-prone level. Eco toilets to not be below 15.5. The building to have a linear configuration to accord with existing contours and to facilitate natural cross-ventilation. The structure to be framed with minimum excavation of the ground. Height limited to 2 storeys maximum from the water edge Preservation of major trees on the site. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

2. BUILDING DESIGN

ISSUES Security SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Unprotected fenestration to be minimised due to vandalism risks; solid sliding or tilt-up walls to be used to open up interiors to the outside. Glazing to be screened and / or have awnings and to be deeply recessed. Contemporary design aesthetic with no reference to styles. FEASIBILITY Essential

Solar control. Creates fenestration articulation. Building should have an overriding impression of being climatically responsive, not `stylistic' (e.g. not postmodern, Mediterranean, etc). Precludes arbitrary placement of glazing.

Essential Essential

Windows to be continuous as much as possible (horizontally and vertically), and not to appear as individual `holes' in walls to maximise the visual amenity of the surrounding parkland

Essential

3. BUILDING MATERIALS

ISSUES Building materials to be prioritised on the basis of: SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY · renewable and/or recycled timbers · materials requiring low embodied energy in their manufacture · Utilise locally sourced building materials where possible to shorten transport distances and to support local employment · recyclability when the building's life is completed · aesthetic harmony with the natural environment · durability and resistance to vandalism and impact by active sports-orientated organisations FEASIBILITY Essential

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Building to appear `low-key' and harmonious with landscape.

Preferred treatments: - coloured render on block or brick - natural / stained timber e.g. renewable special, plantation timbers, recycled timbers - insitu coloured concrete - applied finishes which appear natural - metal rainwater goods - timber or metallic anodised windows - stonework natural - metal cladding,to be galvanised or other natural appearance - metal roofs with low glare - timber framed structure (plantation species) or reinforced concrete frame, - glazing to be non reflected, high efficiency clear or intended, protected from vandalism - low maintenance metal louvers to be used in lieu of glazing wherever possible - plantation timber, recycled timber, Non Preferred treatments: - painted surfaces and surfaces which appear as granular paint - plastic rainwater goods - fibrous cement cladding - metal cladding to walls - face brick - simulated finishes - tiled roofs

Essential

Essential

Environmental sustainability.

Select materials that are non-hazardous and eco-labelled. Specify low-VOC materials for carpets, adhesives, sealants and paints Establish a project goal for FSC certified wood including using plantation timber and wood / agrifibre products that do not contain urea-formaldehyde resins. Utilise locally sourced building materials where possible to shorten transport distances and to support local employment.

Essential Essential Essential

Atmospheric Air Quality

Provide mechanical means of pest control. Provide door seals. Provide insect screening to openings. Optimise natural through-ventilation.

Essential Essential Investigate Essential

4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY

ISSUES Minimum Energy Performance Consultant Team to undertake C02/sqm rating analysis Achieve maximum CO2 emissions from energy use of 35 kgC02/sqm. a averaged building over gross floor area Essential SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY FEASIBILITY

Optimise Energy Performance - Passive Energy Strategies Optimise use of natural ventilation through all spaces · Skylights to incorporate operable ventilation · High level + Low level operable louvres to glazed walls to promote air movement · Operable glazing to smaller internal spaces Overhangs to verandah spaces · Shaded glazing year round to all facades · Shaded skylights · Light shelves Roofs + walls to be insulated Efficient HID external lighting incorporating security and operating modes. Trees to be embankments to reduce heat of breezes and provide shading to seating areas Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Investigate Essential Essential

Comfort for users to be a priority Minimize need for artificial light and maximise lighting by daylight wherever possible Insulation Develop a framework of high efficiency lighting for submission with development proposals. Natural cooling techniques

Essential

Renewable Energy ­ Active Energy Strategies The Multi Use Facility will benefit primarily from passive cooling and ventilation techniques as well as the following: Solar power · Solar Hot water systems sized for 100% solar contribution from October to February (inclusive) · Solar energy panels · Each building primary entry incorporates visible PV array for year round solar capture sized to produce energy equal to ground floor entry foyer light yearly energy use or 600kWhr (which ever is greater). · Integrate monitoring, reporting and display into the Pioneer Park centralised real time monitoring, reporting and display system. · LCD public display at each building (e.g. (as a minimum) monthly energy use versus target). Green Energy Supply Mandate minimum 15% green energy supply levels for building owners/operators and occupants/tenants and include this mandate in operating/sale/lease documentation (include site wide review capability to Thuringowa City Council approval). Provide a BMCS to automatically control, manage and report on the plant for improved energy efficiency. Essential

Investigate Essential

Monitoring, report and display

Essential

Essential Essential

Building Management and Control System (BMCS)

Essential

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5. WATER MANAGEMENT

(Please Refer Appendix A: Water Sensitive Urban Design)

ISSUES Collection SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY It is proposed that rainwater is collected for use in irrigation around the building, for toilet flushing and for use in appliances where appropriate. The adequacy of this system will need to be calculated during detail design to see if it can replace or augment conventional water supply. A range of wastewater technologies will need to be considered during detail design, such as composting toilets and waterless urinals for the purpose of reducing wastewater volumes. Consideration should also be given to reusing stormwater and grey water for sewerage conveyance or for on-site wastewater treatment. While it is intended to utilise collected rainwater for irrigation, native plant species for landscaping should be selected which have low water needs. Irrigate landscape with rainwater and install timers with soil moisture sensors. Groundwater Management Lay porous pavements and direct run-off into gardens. Prevent stormwater from filtration into river system. Water saving devices Provide AAA rated water efficient tap and shower fittings and aerator taps Utilise infrared sensors on urinals Utilise dual flush toilets Appliances 4 star minimum rating FEASIBILITY Investigate

Waste water

Investigate

Irrigation management

Essential

Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

6. WASTE MANAGEMENT

ISSUES Construction Waste Management SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Implement Construction Management Procedures that minimise construction wastage and recycle materials into the development. Separate rubbish shutes for collection in `general' and `recyclable' rubbish bins. Screen bin stores from external view. Create waste recycling holding areas. Recycle construction waste e.g. in paving. FEASIBILITY Essential

Operational Waste Management

Essential Essential Essential Essential

7. LANDSCAPE

ISSUES Revegetation Natural cooling techniques Avoid imported species. Soften appearance from beginning of life. Protect existing trees. Soften appearance. SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Refer Section 3.5 Loam Island Regeneration Strategy Existing trees to be retained Plant only species which are indigenous to locality Plant trees at minimum of 2 metres height. Protect existing trees and do not build within area of extent of foliage. Use natural materials on landscape walls e.g. stone, natural render coloured, stained / clear timber (recycled, renewable). Do not use paint. Allow public pedestrian movement to occur between road/ buildings/ water edge. FEASIBILITY Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential Essential

Create permeability and avoid sense of enclave.

Essential

8. MONITORING

ISSUES System SPECIFIC IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Develop Building Management System for Multi Use Community Centre Management/ user groups, to optimise environmental efficiency. Develop management and user group sustainability and maintenance guide. Separate water and energy meters to measure consumption of services/ amenities by user groups FEASIBILITY Essential

Maintenance Tracking

Essential Essential

ENERGY GLOSSARY kg CO2/sqm = kilograms CO2 per square metre per annum kg CO2/sqm a. targets are preliminary estimates and will be determined in consultation between all parties with respect to detailed spatial make up, facility operational scenarios/times and local benchmarks to be determined. Targets shall be based on a 20% reduction from current standard practical (e.g. excluding passive design elements sustainability techniques, etc.) VLT = Visible light tranmission SC = shading coefficient U = U-value Low-e= Low emissivity HID = High Intensity Discharge

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APPENDIX A : WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

APPENDIX A: Water Sensitive Urban Design for the Riverway Project

A1 INTRODUCTION A2 WATER CONSERVATION INITIATIVES A2.1 A2.2 A2.3 A2.4 A2.5 A2.6 A2.7 Dual Reticulation Irrigation Management Community Awareness System Pressure Control Water Saving Devices Recycled Water for Fire Fighting Alternative Systems for Household Fire Lighting

A3

WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES A3.1 A3.2 A3.3 A3.4 A3.5 A3.6 A3.7 A3.8 A3.9 Water-Use Efficient Toilet Systems Waste Separation Vacuum Toilets Composting Toilets Household Sewerage Balance Tanks On-Site Sewerage Treatment and Reuse Hybrid Sewerage Systems Smart Sewers Vacuum Sewers Untreated Greywater Reuse

A4

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES A4.1 A4.2 A4.3 A4.4 A4.5 A4.6 A4.7 A4.8 A4.9 A4.10 Rainwater Tanks Extended Detention Basins Constructed Wetlands and Ponds Vegetated Swales Bioretention Filter Infiltration Trenches Porous Pavements Landscape Initiatives Stormwater Harvesting Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR)

A5

SUMMARY

A6

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A2 A1 INTRODUCTION

This preliminary report has been prepared to provide an overview of the range of possible urban water management practices that could be considered for incorporation into the options for the Master Plan for Pioneer Park, in the City of Thuringowa, North Queensland.

WATER CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

The water conservation initiatives include strategies that aim at minimising reliance on potable water supply. They include alternatives such as dual reticulation of recycled water, better management and control of irrigation systems, demand management measures, and alternative fire fighting approaches.

The Master Plan has been developed with environmental sustainability as one of its key objectives. Stormwater management will adopt the principles of "Water Sensitive Urban Design", as follows:

A2.1

DUAL RETICULATION

Description

·

Provision of reclaimed water service to individual buildings for specific uses, in addition to the potable water service;.

· · · ·

Reuse stormwater in building and landscape irrigation; Minimise reliance on treated potable water; Prevent pollutants from entering the river; Increase the time of concentration so that stormwater is held for longer periods on site, thereby preventing scouring and erosion;

· ·

Potential to supply the proposed residential and commercial precincts, and the sports and recreation ground; Specific uses could include garden watering, toilet flushing and other external maintenance uses;

·

Improve infiltration of stormwater into the ground and retain water in the soil for landscape growth;

·

This initiative has the potential to significantly reduce the demand of potable water and reduce releases to waterways.

·

Make permeable pavements by using crushed recycled materials. Advantages

·

Increase reuse of recycled water; Reduced direct release of effluent to waterways; Reduce overall potable water demand; Reduce peak potable water demand; Possible decrease in potable water pipe sizes; Potential source of water for fire fighting; Potential relaxation of water restrictions.

Meeting the above objectives will require the implementation of a range

·

of management practices, aiming at minimising water use and production

·

of wastewater for off-site treatment, and incorporating stormwater

·

mitigation measures. Several strategies are available for incorporation

·

into the Pioneer Park Project. A selection of the most suitable strategies is

·

presented here, with the strategies arranged as follows:

·

· ·

Water conservation initiatives, to help minimise water use; Wastewater, to help minimise production of wastewater for off-site

Disadvantages

·

Higher level of treatment required; Health risks (possible cross connection, public contact); Additional cost due to additional plumbing requirements; Additional service for Council to operate and maintain; Potential regulatory and legislative constraints; Negative public perception; Potential for recycled water run-off.

treatment; and

· ·

Stormwater Management, to enhance storage and / or reuse of

·

stormwater, and minimise pollutant export to Ross River.

· · · ·

Comments This initiative could only be implemented if wastewater was supplied to the park either from local on-site sewerage treatment, or through delivery infrastructure built by Council as part of a larger effluent re-use scheme (eg. as part of the proposed Condon STP effluent reuse).

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A2.2

IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT

A2.4

SYSTEM PRESSURE CONTROL

Description Reducing water use through implementation of a number of possible systems, including:

Description

·

Decreasing the required design pressure in the potable water supply system;

· ·

This has the potential to reduce overuse of water, water wastage and unaccounted for system losses without reducing levels of service.

Minimisation of water losses through implementation of management practices such as: ­ ­ ­ plant selection mulching water-efficient irrigation systems, such as sub-surface drip irrigation ­ installing soil moisture sensors to determine irrigation demand ­ weather stations to control irrigation in wet or windy weather ­ automatic irrigation control and scheduling systems

Advantages

· · · ·

Reduced water consumption (average and peak); Lower energy costs; Reduced system losses which are left unaccounted for; Lower maintenance costs.

Disadvantages

· · ·

Householder resistance; Maintenance of pressure control devices; Dedicating resources.

Advantages

· ·

Improved water use efficiency; Reduce wastage.

Comments This initiative could only be implemented at a much larger scale (eg. for the whole catchment) and is probably not suitable for the proposed

Disadvantages

·

development.

Cost to Council.

Comments Appropriate irrigation management is critical to the sustainability of the proposed development and should be implemented.

A2.5

WATER SAVING DEVICES

Description Reducing water use through implementation of a number of possible systems, including:

A2.3

COMMUNITY AWARENESS

· · · · · ·

Low flow shower roses; Low flow faucets; More efficient dual flush toilets; Front loading washing machines; Incentive schemes; Systems that control the output of water while waiting for the water to heat;

Description

· ·

Promoting to the public better water conservation practices; These would include information on water use, wastewater disposal and stormwater management;

·

This has the potential to change behaviour regarding water usage that would have positive effects on all systems.

·

Water saving systems such as Gem Flow and Meter Beater (valves installed in the tap valve to reduced the pressure);

Advantages

· · ·

Improved levels of public awareness and acceptance; Better understanding by community of water usage issues; Greater community ownership of water resources.

·

Reducing water demand has the potential to reduce the capacity requirements on both water supply and sewerage systems, and therefore the cost and could allow deferral of major infrastructure items.

Disadvantages

· ·

Advantages

· · ·

Cost to Council; Information overload to the public.

Reduced water consumption (average and peak); Reduced wastewater flows; Reduced short and long-term system costs; Reduced operating costs.

Comments Community awareness could be promoted through displays within the Cultural Centre.

·

Disadvantages

· · · ·

Advantages

· ·

Potential reduction in the quality of service; Acceptance by consumers; Cost to individuals; Potential for long-term behaviour change (rebound/fatigue).

Reduced potable water reticulation pipe sizes; Provides an automatic fire-fighting system that does not wait for fire service to arrive;

·

Potential to provide a more secure fire fighting supply.

Comments Implementation of such initiatives would be through a concerted and persistent education and marketing effort from Council, which is not limited to the development area but could take place throughout the City of Thuringowa. The Cultural Centre could be used to spread this type of information.

Disadvantages

· · · · ·

Transfers fire fighting costs into cost of housing; Increased direct costs to the householder; Regulation issues ­ sprinkler systems are regulated; Lack of policy for recycled water use for in-house sprinklers; Use of recycled water can only be adopted if there is a dual reticulation system;

·

Potential OH&S issues of pathogen transfer via aerosols etc. Reliability issues due to reliance on electricity for rainwater tank pump.

A2.6

RECYCLED WATER FOR FIRE FIGHTING

·

Description

· ·

Use of recycled water from a dual reticulation system for fire fighting; The use of recycled water for fire fighting has the potential to significantly reduce the water supply reticulation infrastructure sizing due to reduced peak design flow rates;

Comments The key to adoption of this strategy is the presence of rainwater tanks with sufficient supply (see Section 4.1) or a dual reticulation system (see Section 2.1).

Advantages

· ·

A3

WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES

Reduced potable water reticulation pipe sizes; Potential to provide a more secure fire fighting supply. The wastewater initiatives can propose alternative approaches to toilet systems (water-use efficient toilets, composting toilets), collection systems

Disadvantages

· · ·

(eg. adoption of the `smart sewer' concept), or treatment systems (on-site or off-site treatment). Although it is currently planned to extend the existing wastewater infrastructure, the strategies below list new technology that can be used to reduce wastewater loads, thereby reducing infrastructure requirements. In addition, there is scope for incorporating some of these measures within the new residential or commercial developments.

Lack of policy for recycled water use; Acceptance by fire fighting authorities and by fire fighters themselves; Use of recycled water for fire fighting can only be adopted if there is a dual reticulation system;

·

Potential OH&S issues of pathogen transfer via aerosols etc.

Comments In April 2003, the Queensland Fire Rescue Authority has issued a standard procedure indicating acceptance of recycled water for fire fighting, subject to meeting minimum quality requirements. The key to adoption of recycled water for fire fighting is the presence of a dual reticulation system (see Section 2.1).

A3.1

WATER-USE EFFICIENT TOILET SYSTEMS

Description

·

Provide waterless urinals in place of conventional water flushed urinals for commercial developments;

·

These toilets allow for the elimination of water use for urinal flushing, reducing the demands for water and the load on the sewerage system.

A2.7

ALTERNATIVE SYSTEMS FOR HOUSEHOLD FIRE FIGHTING

Advantages

· ·

Description

· ·

Reduced demand on potable water resources; Reduced wastewater flows.

Provision of in house sprinkler systems for residential fire fighting; The sprinkler system could be supplied either from a rainwater tank or a recycled water dual reticulation system;

Disadvantages

· · ·

·

The use of rainwater or recycled water for fire fighting has the potential to significantly reduce the water supply reticulation infrastructure sizing due to reduced peak design flow rates.

Acceptance - social and developers; Possible additional costs; Behavioural changes required.

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A3.3

Comments This strategy is probably not feasible, as many of the commercial activities will be providing services to the community (eg. restaurants).

COMPOSTING TOILETS

Description

· ·

Provide composting toilets as an alternative to conventional flush toilets; Composting toilets receive toilet waste only (faeces, urine and paper) and generally have no flushing mechanism;

A3.2

SEPARATION VACUUM TOILETS

·

Waste is allowed to compost naturally over time and is periodically removed for disposal as a fertiliser / soil improver;

Description

·

Provide waste separation toilets as an alternative to conventional flush toilets;

·

A separate system is required for collection and treatment of greywater, ie wastewater from kitchen, bathroom and laundry;

·

Waste separation vacuum toilets separate solids from liquids within the toilet;

·

This would reduce the amount of water used as wastewater discharged to a centralised system, potentially reducing the size of the systems.

·

The toilets use a physical separator within the bowl, i.e. solids to the back, liquid to the front, and two separate pipes from the rear of the toilet; Advantages

·

Provide human waste disposal systems that do not use water, chemicals or heat and have no polluting discharge;

·

Liquid waste is stored for 3 months to ensure microbiological safety then applied as fertiliser for farming;

·

Reduced water demand; Reduced sewerage flows; Reduced infrastructure costs for water supply and sewerage disposal; System managed on-site; Decreased O&M costs for centralised services; All waste contained within allotment.

·

The solid waste is transported to a centralised anaerobic digester and converted to energy (methane) then used as fuel for heating;

· · · · ·

·

This type of system offers the opportunity to minimise unnecessary flushing of urine, reducing water use and maximises the opportunities for beneficial use of wastes.

Advantages

· ·

Reduced load on wastewater collection system; Reduced costs for transport, treatment and reuse due to reduction in number of flushes and water volume; Disadvantages

· · · · ·

Social acceptance; Limited track record in urban development; Paradigm shift required; Potential odour problems in operation; Potential health and safety concerns, especially associated with disposal of compost;

· ·

Reduction in the levels of phosphorus and nitrogen; Potential reduction in wastewater overflows due to reduced volumes of liquid waste;

· ·

Less environmental impact; Standard vacuum system benefits of reduced infiltration and required depths.

· ·

Potential environmental concerns associated with disposal of compost; Reliance on householder for operation and maintenance of system.

Disadvantages

· · · · · · ·

Social acceptance; Council acceptance; Policy changes required; Potential health issues with handling two waste streams; Additional household infrastructure; Additional treatment costs; Additional house owner maintenance costs.

Comments This strategy is suitable where loads are low and evenly distributed. Within the residential and commercial buildings, loads are likely to be too high to allow implementation of such toilets. Within the public facilities of the park, loads are likely to be intermittent with periods of intensive use. Hence, composting toilets are probably not feasible within the proposed development.

Comments This strategy may be suitable for the public facilities within Pioneer Park, but may not be suitable within the proposed commercial or residential buildings.

A3.4

HOUSEHOLD SEWERAGE BALANCE TANKS

Disadvantages

·

Requires separate wastewater and blackwater collection and handling systems;

Description

·

Household storage tanks that hold sewerage for up to 1 day to allow more uniform discharge of sewerage to the sewerage system;

· ·

Requires additional storage capacity; Additional cost to householders to install household greywater collection and reuse system;

·

This would reduce the amount of wastewater discharged to the centralised system, potentially reducing the size of system components.

· ·

Operation and maintenance cost to householder to run the system; Current regulations may not allow greywater reuse; Potential odour problems in operation; Potential health and safety concerns, especially associated with irrigation of untreated greywater;

Advantages

· ·

Improved control of flows to sewerage pumping stations, wastewater treatment and recycling facilities;

·

· · · · ·

Potential to reduce wastewater peak flows;

·

Potential environmental concerns associated with greywater irrigation; Reliance on householder for operation and maintenance of system.

Potential to reduce pipe and pump sizes;

·

Potential to reduce overflows; Better ability to control the wastewater treatment process; Potential to reduce environmental impact. Comments At present, use of untreated greywater is not legal in Queensland, although a review of current legislation is foreshadowed. This strategy could be

Disadvantages

· · · · · ·

suitable if legislation was amended.

Asset ownership issues - responsibility for O&M during life of system; Additional high cost due to construction of holding tanks; Additional O&M costs from collection and disposal of septic waste; Potential blockage issues if gravity flow system used; Additional costs if pump system is used; Potential odour issues.

·

A3.6

ON-SITE SEWERAGE TREATMENT AND REUSE

Description

·

Treatment of sewerage from individual buildings with reuse of effluent on the same property; The potential benefit of this approach is to remove the need for centralised wastewater collection, treatment and disposal systems, significantly reducing the servicing cost to the development.

Comments Whilst household sewerage balance tanks would reduce peak loads to the sewerage collection system, their use is unlikely to be practical because of problems associated with discharge control, solid settlement and odour management.

· ·

Advantages Eliminates cost for transport, treatment and reuse (for Council); Easy to stage; Maximises reuse of treated water on-site; Greater application for higher density zones, ie a number of townhouses or one block of units to one common treatment plant.

A3.5

UNTREATED GREYWATER REUSE

· ·

Description

·

Use of greywater from on-site systems for some household reuse applications (e.g. watering lawns and gardens);

·

Greywater is wastewater, excluding toilet and possibly kitchen wastes, ie mainly bathroom and laundry wastewater;

Disadvantages

· · ·

Requires paradigm shift with respect to provision of wastewater systems; Social acceptance may be difficult to achieve; Ongoing O&M costs to property owner; On-site systems cannot produce water of the same quality as centralised treatment plants, especially with respect to nutrients and disinfection;

·

This has the potential to reduce demand on the potable water supply and reduce flows to the wastewater system.

Advantages

· · · ·

·

Reduced demand on water supply systems; Reduced load on sewerage system; Potential sewerage system size reductions; Allows beneficial reuse on-site.

· ·

On-site systems notorious for poor operation and maintenance; Potential odour issues;

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· · · ·

Potential impacts to groundwater; Requires adequate available land area; Disposal issues i.e. blocked spray nozzles; System capacity to withstand shock loads.

A3.8

SMART SEWERS

Description

·

Smart sewers are systems designed to a modified design criteria compared with existing `traditional' reticulated gravity sewerage systems.

·

The main features of the modified criteria include: ­ ­ ­ ­ reduced peak wet weather flow allowance the use of modern pipe materials provision of smaller and less frequent access structures replacement of access chambers with non-accessible inspection

Comments This strategy would be suitable for the Pioneer Park Project if correctly integrated within the development, without adverse impact such as odours, soils or groundwater contamination.

·

openings The concept of a smart sewerage system takes advantage of modern materials and design and construction approaches to produce a lower cost collection system without any loss in the quality of service to customers.

A3.7

HYBRID SEWERAGE SYSTEMS

Description

·

High standard on-site treatment and disposal on individual lots with excess treated effluent collected in centralised system; Advantages

·

The potential benefit is to take advantage of the benefits of on-site treatment and disposal while avoiding the main disadvantage, ie overloading of the effluent disposal field.

· · ·

Reduced capital cost for system construction Reduced O&M costs Reduced sewerage costs may offset the increased cost associated with other initiatives

Advantages

· · ·

Eliminates cost for transport, treatment and reuse (for Council); Easy to stage; Maximises reuse of treated water on-site without environmental risks.

· · · ·

Less stormwater and groundwater inflow and infiltration Less saline infiltration Less corrosion Longer service life Less obtrusive system

Disadvantages

·

·

Requires paradigm shift with respect to provision of wastewater systems; Disadvantages

· · ·

· · ·

Social acceptance may be difficult to achieve; Ongoing O&M costs to property owner; On-site systems cannot produce water of the same quality as centralised treatment plants, especially with respect to nutrients and disinfection;

No comprehensive design guidelines exist Requires paradigm shift in industry Increased supervision and quality cost control Less capacity for illegal connections Increased risk to householder using LPS

· ·

· · ·

On-site systems notorious for poor operation and maintenance; Potential odour issues; Requires adequate available land area.

Comments The principal benefits of smart sewers are a reduction in stormwater infiltration and lower construction costs. Whilst these benefits are usually more significant for large scale developments, the concept is applicable to

Comments As with on-site sewerage treatment and reuse, this strategy would be suitable for the Pioneer Park Project if correctly integrated within the development, without adverse impact such as odours, soils or groundwater contamination. However, the hybrid sewerage system can address some of these adverse impacts by reducing the hydraulic load on soils.

small scale development such as that proposed.

A3.9

VACUUM SEWERS

Description

·

Provide vacuum sewerage systems as an alternative to conventional gravity systems;

·

Vacuum systems are based on a small diameter shallow collection

system that is maintained under negative pressure using a number of centralised vacuum pumping stations. Groups of 6-8 houses drain to a single pit incorporating a vacuum valve to control sewerage flow into the pipeline;

·

A4.1

RAINWATER TANKS

Description

·

Provision of rainwater tanks to collect runoff from the roof for water supply and for stormwater attenuation;

Vacuum sewerage systems have the potential to reduce system costs and stormwater and groundwater infiltration.

·

Collected rainfall could be used for all non-potable water uses, including toilet flushing, laundry and garden watering;

Advantages

·

·

A connection to the potable water supply would be retained for potable uses as well as supply back-up;

Potentially cost-effective system, especially in areas difficult to sewer (low lying, flat topography);

·

Stormwater attenuation would be achieved by maintaining the tanks partially full to allow capture and slow release of roof runoff.

·

Lower infiltration and inflow.

Disadvantages

· · · · ·

Advantages

· ·

Vacuum pits and valves may add significantly to system cost; Each house must be drained to communal pit; Relatively high energy user; May generate more greenhouse gasses; May not be cost effective under normal servicing conditions.

Reduced demand on potable water supply; Possible reduction of potable water pipe sizes (depends on fire fighting issues);

·

Potential to capture full rainfall event (with the exception of the first flush);

·

Reduced runoff; Can be considered to be a direct contribution by individual householders to water conservation.

Comments These vacuum sewers are probably not an option as the development focuses on saving energy as well.

·

Disadvantages

A4

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES

· ·

Area requirements for location of tank, particularly on small lots; High seasonal rainfall variability which may limit the amount of water that can be collected and reused;

The principles of Water Sensitive Urban Design for stormwater management are to (Urban Stormwater, Best Practice Environmental Management Guidelines, Victorian Stormwater Committee, 1999):

·

Associated costs of supply, installation, operation and maintenance ­ tanks, pumps and pipes;

·

Protect and enhance natural water systems within urban developments;

·

Potential for contamination of stored water, by airborne pollutants, animal wastes, etc;

·

Use stormwater in the landscape by incorporating multiple use corridors that maximise the visual and recreational amenity of developments;

· · ·

Potential public health issues, such as mosquito breeding; Need to provide first flush exclusion devices; Comprehensive guidelines for rainwater tanks do not yet exist.

· ·

Protect the quality of water draining from urban development; Reduce peak flows from urban development by local detention measures; and Comments The proposed residential and commercial precincts are suitable for implementing collection of roof water in tanks. If agreed to, rainwater tanks should be included in the design of these precincts at the earliest stages of planning.

·

Add value while minimising development costs, and minimise the drainage infrastructure cost of development.

The measures described below are available to help the Pioneer Park Project meet the above objectives.

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX A

WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

page 76

A4.2

EXTENDED DETENTION BASINS

·

A constructed wetland requires pre-treatment or removal mechanisms at the inlet, large land areas and reliable inflows, and has the potential to

Description A basin constructed to store runoff, draining over a period of 1-2 days after a rainfall event and remaining essentially dry between storm events.

impact on public health and safety.

Comments The inclusion of constructed wetlands and water quality ponds is another

Advantages

· · ·

important consideration in the development of an integrated stormwater management plan. These are generally built either within or next to stormwater channels and are designed to intercept fine sediments and attached pollutants. It is generally recognised that wetlands are more efficient at removing pollutants than water quality ponds (including suspended solids, nitrogen and phosphorus). Integrating a constructed wetland or pond within the Cultural Centre could be investigated. Issues that could limit the suitability of this strategy are insufficient and unreliable runoff, and excessive

Retention of flood flows to reduce downstream flooding impacts; Can sometimes be utilised as a sports field (ie multi-purpose use); Can achieve medium to high sediment and bacteria removal efficiencies;

·

Can be constructed in areas not appropriate for wetlands.

Disadvantages

· · ·

evaporation rates.

Limited removal of dissolved pollutants (eg nutrients); Outlet structure prone to clogging (if no pre-treatment provided);

A4.4

Potential for erosion or re-suspension of deposited sediment on the basin floor;

·

VEGETATED SWALES

Description

·

Potential for mosquito breeding, maintenance problems and safety hazards.

An alternative to the traditional roadside kerb and channel stormwater system, where kerb and channel is replaced by vegetated `V' drains located in the road shoulder, with the intention of treating runoff near the source by slowing the flow of stormwater, thereby depositing

Comments Extended detention basins are most commonly constructed for flood

·

particle matter in the swale; The swales reduce the suspended sediment load on downstream waterways, thereby improving the health of those waterways.

mitigation purposes. However, their functions as water quality devices for sediment removal should not be ignored. They are often appropriate in areas where constructed wetlands cannot be sustained owing to insufficient or unreliable runoff, excessive evaporation rates or highly permeable soils.

Advantages

· · · ·

Improved water quality as sediments are captured near the source; Encourage local groundwater recharge; Reduced runoff peaks; Reduced infrastructure costs compared with traditional stormwater systems.

A4.3

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND PONDS

Description A pond is a permanent and relatively deep body of water, possibly with littoral macrophytes (reeds). A constructed wetlands generally comprises a pond coupled with a permanent shallow water body with extensive emergent vegetation.

· ·

Disadvantages Acceptance by civil engineers; Potential erosion problems, particularly in channel invert; Complications with underground service locations and access issues for post delivery, garbage collections and pedestrians;

·

Advantages

·

·

Can potentially achieve high sediment and nutrient removal efficiencies;

More difficult to integrate swales with properties, driveway and other access points;

·

Can be incorporated into the urban landscape, providing improved habitat, recreation and visual amenity.

·

Probable increase in maintenance costs.

·

Can include flood storage to attenuate downstream flows. Comments

Disadvantages

·

Swales are usually deemed more appropriate in larger scale residential development than that proposed at Pioneer Park, but there is scope for

A pond has the potential for occasional nuisance problems (such as odours), mosquito breeding and eutrophication;

their implementation within the proposed residential and commercial developments.

Disadvantages

· · ·

Potential siltation problems; Potential aesthetic problems; Maintenance responsibility; Potential increase in maintenance costs.

A4.5

BIORETENTION FILTER

·

Description

·

A dry detention structure that is vegetated with various species, to improve the quality of runoff and decrease runoff rates prior to release into the receiving environment;

Comments This strategy is deemed suitable for implementation within the proposed residential and commercial developments.

·

The size of the structure can vary significantly, depending on its location and the catchment area it is treating;

A4.7

POROUS PAVEMENTS

·

This initiative minimises the impact of stormwater discharges on downstream environments and could contribute to improved waterway health. Description

· ·

Special type of pavement which allows rainfall to pass through it; The porous pavement surface is typically placed over a highly permeable layer of gravel, which act as a storage reservoir for runoff. A filter fabric is placed beneath the gravel and stone layers to screen out fine soil particles.

Advantages

· · · ·

Reduced stormwater flow rates; Reduced cost of downstream systems; Improved water quality; Encourages groundwater recharge.

Advantages

·

Helps maintain water quality through pollutant retention; Increases groundwater recharge; Improved road safety because of better skid.

Disadvantages

· · · ·

· ·

Space requirements; Public safety; Maintenance; Potential additional construction costs.

Disadvantages

·

Many pavement engineers and contractors lack expertise with this technology;

Comments This strategy is deemed highly suitable for implementation within the

· ·

Some building codes may not allow for its installation; Porous pavements have a tendency to become clogged if improperly installed or maintained;

proposed residential and commercial developments.

A4.6

INFILTRATION TRENCHES

·

There is some risk of contaminating groundwater, depending on soil conditions and aquifer susceptibility;

Description

·

Gravel-filled trenches at the front or rear of individual lots which collect rainwater tank runoff and overland flow;

·

Fuel may leak from vehicles and toxic chemicals may leach from asphalt and/or binder surface. Porous pavement systems are not designed to treat these pollutants.

·

This has the potential to reduce flow to the stormwater system and increase the water quality of discharges. Comments The implementation of porous pavements would be subject to the

Advantages

· · · · · ·

assessment of their impact on groundwater quality (also refer to Section 4.10).

Encourages groundwater recharge; Treats stormwater close to source; Decreases flows to stormwater system; Has the potential to reduce the size of stormwater structures; Improves water quality of discharges; Has the potential to reduce cost of downstream systems.

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX A

WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

page 78

A4.8

LANDSCAPE INITIATIVES

A4.10

AQUIFER STORAGE AND RECOVERY (ASR)

Description

·

Description

· · ·

Using soft landscaping to capture overland flows and increase levels of groundwater recharge such as: ­ ­ ­ ­ Soil preparation Mulching Hydro-absorbants Plant selection

Use natural aquifers for the temporary storage of water for later reuse; This could include harvested stormwater or recycled water; The benefit of ASR is that it can provide a very cost-effective way to provide a large volume of storage.

·

This has the potential to reduce flow to the stormwater system and improve the quality of discharged water.

Advantages

· ·

Uses natural aquifers; Avoids the need for large open storage basins; Increases the potential to reuse wastewater; Relatively low capital cost; Low water losses from storage.

Advantages

· · ·

· · ·

Increases groundwater recharge; Potential increase in water quality of discharges; Improves community aesthetics.

Disadvantages Disadvantages

· · ·

May be difficult to find natural aquifers that have the right characteristics of permeability and extent, and that are not used for any other purpose;

Possible increase in maintenance costs; Possible increase in construction costs

· ·

Relatively high energy and O&M costs for pumping; May be community objection to this use.

Comments This strategy is highly recommended, and is also explored in Section 2.2. Comments According to Ian Boyce, from the Townsville Office of the Department

A4.9

STORMWATER HARVESTING

of Natural Resources & Mines (NRM), there is an extensive alluvial plain from the Ross River to the Bohle River, extending from Pioneer Park to

Description

·

Mount Louisa. The aquifer under Pioneer Park has quite high transmissivity with water levels varying between 6 m (when the aquifer is full) to 30 m (when the aquifer is at its most depleted). Many bores have been installed throughout the park, and all have high yield. Based on these local geological characteristics, the following comments were made:

Collection and storage of stormwater generally in open surface water storage structures for specific uses such as passive recreation, local irrigation and fire fighting;

·

Replaces use of other sources of water thereby reducing the size and cost of reticulated water infrastructure.

·

The aquifer underlying Pioneer Park is hardly ever depleted, and fills up quickly after rainfall events;

Advantages

· · ·

Reduced discharge to downstream systems; Reduced cost on downstream systems; Reduced demand on other sources of water.

·

Storing stormwater runoff would not be feasible as the aquifer would not provide the required volume of storage;

·

Irrigating from groundwater bores and / or Ross River could be sustainable, as long as the irrigation scheme is designed according to best management practices (see Sections A2.2 and A4.8).

Disadvantages

· · · · ·

Space requirements; Public safety; Maintenance; Potential additional cost; Guidelines for use may need to be developed.

Comments: The compatibility of stormwater harvesting with the integrated swimming lagoon and other recreational water bodies should be investigated.

A5

SUMMARY

The strategies described above are summarised in the following tables, with an assessment of the feasibility and likelihood of integration within the Pioneer Park Project, as follows:

:

The strategy is suitable, and its implementation within the Pioneer Park Project is recommended;

: The strategy could be suitable, but its suitability should be investigated further; : The strategy is unlikely to be suitable.

Table 1 Potential Water Conservation Initiatives WATER CONSERVATION INITIATIVES Water Management Initiative Potential Implementation Dual Reticulation Residential development Irrigation Management Community Awareness System Pressure Control Water Savings Devices Recycled Water for Fire Fighting Alternative Systems for Household Firefighting Table 2 Potential Wastewater Management Initiatives WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT Water Management Initiative Water Use Efficient Toilet Waste Separation Vacuum Toilets Composting Toilets Household Sewerage Balance Tanks Untreated Greywater Reuse On-Site Sewerage Treatment and Reuse Hybrid Sewerage Systems Smart Sewers Vacuum Sewers Potential Implementation Commercial development Public amenities Public amenities Residential development Residential development Residential development Residential and commercial development, Public amenities Residential and commercial development, Public amenities Residential and commercial development, Public amenities Feasibility All park Cultural Centre All park Residential development Residential development Residential development Feasibility

Table 3 Potential Stormwater Management Initiatives STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Water Management Initiative Rainwater Tanks Extended Detention Basins Constructed Wetlands and Ponds Vegetated Swales Bioretention Filter Infiltration Trenches Porous Pavements Landscape Initiatives Stormwater Harvesting Aquifer Storage and Recovery Potential Implementation Residential development Passive community recreation space Integrated Cultural Centre & Swimming Lagoon Residential and commercial development Residential and commercial development Residential and commercial development Residential and commercial development, Car parks All park Integrated Cultural Centre & Swimming Lagoon Aquifer Feasibility

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX A

WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

page 80

A6

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MEASURES

The strategies presented in the previous sections give a wide range of options for urban water management practices that could be considered for incorporation within Pioneer Park. Some of these options are current best management practices, whilst other options will require a paradigm shift in the way Council, developers and the community think about water management.

It is recommended that the options that are deemed feasible for the site and that are currently considered as best management practices be incorporated in the preliminary design of Pioneer Park. These relate mainly to water conservation and stormwater management practices, namely:

· · · · · · ·

Irrigation management and landscape initiatives; Community awareness; Water saving devices, particularly dual-flush toilets; Rainwater tanks; Constructed wetlands or water quality ponds; Bioretention filter; and Infiltration trenches.

With regards to wastewater management, it is suggested that there are advantages to on-site treatment of wastewater, with the treated water being integrated in the development's water cycle. The key decision to make relates to the feasibility and acceptability of on-site treatment and reuse. Whilst on-site treatment and reuse is technically feasible, there may be reservations from the community, the developers or Council regarding its implementation. Typical issues that may be of concern relate to its impact on aesthetics, odour, safety and cost.

If on-site treatment is rejected, selection of the most suitable collection systems can be pursued with developers. In addition, the supply of water for irrigation can be sourced from stormwater, wastewater treated on site or treated wastewater supplied from a larger reuse scheme, such as the proposed Condon STP reuse scheme. Selection of the most suitable option(s) will depend on the feasibility of the proposed schemes.

Assuming on-site treatment and reuse is to be implemented, the following table describes the recommended strategy, the issues that need to be addressed, and the actions that are required to ensure sustainable implementation of each measure.

Precinct All Park

Residential

Issues Plant selection Incorporation of mulching Selection of irrigation system (eg. Sub-surface drip irrigation) On site wastewater treatment Community and developer acceptance and reuse Minimisation of impact of treatment plant (1) Aesthetics (2) Odour (3) Noise Sustainable and safe reuse of treated water (1) Treatment standard (2) Hydraulic load (3) Nutrient load (4) Disinfection standards (5) Impacts on soils and groundwater (6) Irrigation systems (7) Disposal of excess effluent Water savings devices Appropriate policy and incentives (1) Dual flush toilets (2) Low flow showers & faucets (3) Front loading washing machines Rainwater tanks Design criteria for tanks (eg. size) discharging into either (1) Infiltration trench Feasibility of discharging excess runoff from tanks into wetland (2) Wetland / Water quality Feasibility of wetland or water quality pond pond integrated into swimming lagoon complex Grassed swales or Cost and benefit of each option Bioretention filters Assess design criteria for developers

Proposed Strategies Irrigation Management

Actions Draft irrigation management plan describing plants, irrigation system and irrigation rates etc. Community consultation and design criteria for developers Engineering analysis for appropriate design and selection of treatment technology Irrigation management study, including hydrological study and soil assessment.

Develop draft policy

Draft design Engineering analysis for appropriate design Hydrological study Hydrological and water quality study Engineering analysis for appropriate design Investigate available technologies Community consultation and design criteria for developers Engineering analysis for appropriate design, selection of treatment technology Irrigation management study, including hydrological study, soil assessment

Commercial

Water use efficient toilets Assess design criteria for developers On site wastewater treatment Community and developer acceptance and reuse Minimisation of impact of treatment plant (1) Aesthetics (2) Odour (3) Noise Sustainable and safe reuse of treated water (1) Treatment standard (2) Hydraulic load (3) Nutrient load (4) Disinfection standards (5) Impacts on soils and groundwater (6) Irrigation systems (7) Disposal of excess effluent Rainwater tanks Design criteria for tanks (eg. size) discharging into either (1) Infiltration trench Feasibility of discharging excess runoff from tanks into wetland or water quality pond (2) Wetland / Water quality Feasibility of wetland or water quality pond pond integrated into swimming lagoon complex Grassed swales or Cost and benefit of each option Bioretention filters Assess design criteria for developers

Draft design Engineering analysis for appropriate design Hydrological study Hydrological and water quality study Engineering analysis for appropriate design

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX A

WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

page 82

Lagoon / Cultural Centre Car Parks

Wetland / Water quality pond Feasibility of wetland or water quality pond integrated into swimming lagoon complex Feasibility of displays in cultural centre Impact on groundwater

Hydrological study

Community education Porous pavements or Grassed swales combined with proprietary device Passive Use as extended detention Recreation basin Sports Ground On site wastewater treatment and reuse

Design Hydrological and water quality study

Rainwater tanks discharging into either (1) Infiltration trench (2) Wetland / Water quality pond Grassed swales or Bioretention filters

Feasibility of flood detention and water quality Hydrological study control within this space Community and developer acceptance Community consultation and design criteria for developers Minimisation of impact of treatment plant (1) Aesthetics Engineering analysis for appropriate (2) Odour design, selection of treatment (3) Noise technology Sustainable and safe reuse of treated water (1) Treatment standard Irrigation management study, (2) Hydraulic load including hydrological study, soil (3) Nutrient load assessment (4) Disinfection standards (5) Impacts on soils and groundwater (6) Irrigation systems (7) Disposal of excess effluent Design criteria for tanks (eg. size) Draft design Feasibility of discharging excess runoff from tanks into wetland or water quality pond Feasibility of wetland or water quality pond integrated into swimming lagoon complex Cost and benefit of each option Assess design criteria for developers Engineering analysis for appropriate design Hydrological study Hydrological and water quality study Engineering analysis for appropriate design

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THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX A

WATER SENSITIVE URBAN DESIGN FOR THE RIVERWAY PROJECT

page 84

APPENDIX B : EXISTING VEGETATION

APPENDIX B1: Existing Vegetation Schedule

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX B

EXISTING VEGETATION SCHEDULE

page 88

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX B

EXISTING VEGETATION SCHEDULE

page 90

B2: Existing Vegetation Plan

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX B

EXISTING VEGETATION SCHEDULE

page 92

APPENDIX C : PIONEER PARK PLANTING CONCEPT

APPENDIX C: Pioneer Park Planting Concept

pioneer park planting concept

Riverine Characterised by riparian tree species such as the Weeping Paperbark (Melaleuca leucadendra) suited to the rich alluvial soil fringing the river. Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash Eucalyptus platyphylla Poplar Gum Eucalyptus terecticornis Blue Gum Lophostemon grandiflorus Swamp Box Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark Melaleuca viridiflora Broad Leaved Paperbark Mimusops elengi Red Coondoo Nauclea orientalis Leichardt Tree Terminalia muelleri Mueller's Damson

Beach Ridge Consisting of a combination of species associated with waterbodies such as the Cabbage Palm (Livistona decipiens). Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash Eucalyptus terecticornis Blue Gum Livistona decipiens Cabbage Palm Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark Melaleuca viridiflora Broad Leaved Paperbark Mimusops elengi Red Coondoo Pandanus tectorius Beach Screw Pine Sterculia quadrifida Peanut Tree Terminalia catappa Sea Almond Terminalia muelleri Mueller's Damson

Dry Rainforest Made up of rainforest species such as the shade tree Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis anacardiodes). Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash Brachychiton australis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree Canarium australianum Melville Island White Beech Cupaniopsis anacardiodes Tuckeroo Deplanchea tetraphylla Golden Bouquet Harpullia pendula Tulipwood Mallotus phillipensis Red Kamala Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum Sterculia quadrifida Peanut Tree

Closed Woodland Containing closed forest species with dense canopies such as the White Fig (Ficus virens). Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash Brachychiton australis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree Cochlosoermum gillivraei Kapok Deplanchea tetraphylla Golden Bouquet Ficus racemosa Cluster Fig Ficus virens White Fig Harpullia pendula Tulipwood Mallotus phillipensis Red Kamala Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum

Riverine Characterised by riparian tree species such as the Weeping Paperbark (Melaleuca leucadendra) suited to the rich alluvial soil fringing the river.

Beach Ridge Consisting of a combination of species associated with waterbodies such as the Cabbage Palm (Livistona decipiens).

Dry Rainforest Made up of rainforest species such as the shade tree Tuckeroo (Cupaniopsis anacardiodes).

Closed Woodland Containing closed forest species with dense canopies such as the White Fig (Ficus virens).

Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash

Livistona decipiens Cabbage Palm

Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash

Brachychiton australis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree

Eucalyptus platyphylla Poplar Gum

Mimusops elengi Red Coondoo

Canarium australianum Melville Island White Beech

Cochlosoermum gillivraei Kapok

Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark

Pandanus tectorius Beach Screw Pine

Cupaniopsis anacardiodes - Tuckeroo

Ficus racemosa Cluster Fig

Melaleuca viridiflora Broad Leaved Paperbark

Terminalia catappa Sea Almond

Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum

Ficus virens White Fig

Nauclea orientalis Leichardt Tree

Terminalia muelleri Mueller's Damson

Sterculia quadrifida Peanut Tree

Mallotus phillipensis Red Kamala

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX C

PIONEER PARK PLANTING CONCEPT

page 96

APPENDIX D : LOAM ISLAND PLANTING CONCEPT

APPENDIX D: Loam Island Planting Concept

loam island planting concept

Savannah Characterised by large areas of native grassland with scatterd shade trees such as the Poplar Gum (Eucalyptus platyphylla). Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash Brachychiton australis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash Cupaniopsis anacardiodes Tuckeroo Eucalyptus terecticornis Blue Gum Eucalyptus platyphylla Poplar Gum Harpullia pendula Tulipwood Mimusops elengi Red Coondoo Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum

Environmental Wetland

Eucalypt Woodland

Lowland Rainforest Typically containing a high diversity of woody vines, epiphytic ferns, figs and deciduous trees. Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash Canarium australianum Melville Island White Beach Cochlospermum gillivraei Kapok Cupaniopsis anacardiodes Tuckeroo Deplanchea tetraphylla Golden Bouquet Meliocope (Euodia) elleryana Corkwood Ficus virens White Fig Mallotus phillipensis Red Kamala Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark Melaleuca viridiflora Broad Levaed Paperbark Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum Sterculia quadrifida Peanut Tree Terminalia catappa Beach Almond

Dominated by a diverse range of Made up of Eucalypt and sedges, grasses and rushes and Corymbia species with a grassy riparian tree species such as the understorey. Weeping Paperbark (Melaleuca leucadendra). Alphitonia excelsa Eucalyptus platyphylla Red Ash Poplar Gum Brachychiton australis Eucalyptus terecticornis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree Blue Gum Cochlospermum gillvraei Ficus Racemosa Kapok Cluster Fig Corymbia tessellaris Livistona decipiens Moreton Bay Ash Cabbage Palm Eucalyptus platyphylla Lophostemon grandiflorus Poplar Gum Swamp Box Eucalyptus terecticornis Melaleuca leucadendra Blue Gum Weeping Paperbark Melaleuca viridiflora - Broad Melaleuca viridiflora Leaved Paperbark Broad Leaved Paperbark Mimusops elengi Mimusops elengi Red Coondoo Red Coondoo Pleiogynium timorense Pandanus tectorius Burdekin Plum Beach Screw Pine

Savannah Characterised by large areas of native grassland with scatterd shade trees such as the Poplar Gum (Eucalyptus platyphylla).

Environmental Wetland Dominated by a diverse range of sedges, grasses and rushes and riparian tree species such as the Weeping Paperbark (Melaleuca leucadendra).

Eucalypt Woodland Made up of Eucalypt and Corymbia species with a grassy understorey.

Lowland Rainforest Typically containing a high diversity of woody vines, epiphytic ferns, figs and deciduous trees.

Alphitonia excelsa Red Ash

Ficus Racemosa Cluster Fig

Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash

Canarium australianum Melville Island White Beach

Brachychiton australis Broad Leaved Bottle Tree

Livistona decipiens Cabbage Palm

Eucalyptus terecticornis Blue Gum

Cochlospermum gillivraei Kapok

Corymbia tessellaris Moreton Bay Ash

Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark

Eucalyptus platyphylla Poplar Gum

Ficus virens White Fig

Eucalyptus platyphylla Poplar Gum

Nauclea orientalis Leichardt Tree

Melaleuca viridiflora Broad Leaved Paperbark

Sterculia quadrifida Peanut Tree

Eucalyptus terecticornis Blue Gum

Pandanus tectorius Beach Screw Pine

Pleiogynium timorense Burdekin Plum

Terminalia catappa Beach Almond

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX D

LOAM ISLAND PLANTING CONCEPT

page 100

for

APPENDIX E: EXTRACT FROM `THURINGOWA CITY PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN 2001/2004' PEST PLANTS OF THURINGOWA CITY

APPENDIX E: Extract from `Thuringowa City Pest Management Plan 2001/2004: Pest Plants of Thuringowa City

Achievability A = Could be eradicated from the City / specific area B = Could be significantly reduced in area (plants) or numbers (animals) in the City / specific area C = Could be contained / prevented from spreading (plants) or could prevent major / rapid increase in numbers (animals) D = Could be managed effectively with an acceptable level of biological control STRATEGIC IMPORTANCE G 3 1 4 2 4 3 3 2 1 1 3 2 1 2 3 1 3 2 3 1 3 2 2 4 3 3 2 3 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 4 3 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 3 3 1 1 2 1 2 3 4 2 4 2 3 Res Cons Rec Hort USL, U'man, Infra-struc Waterways / Wetlands ACHIEVABILITY PRIORITY DECLARATION HIGH HIGH B B HIGH HIGH C B A A A C/D B B HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH HIGH Not declared Class 2 Not declared Class 2 Class 2 Class 2 Class 3 Class 2 Class 2 Class 3 Not declared Class 2

Threat 1 = Critical 2 = Threatening 3 = Moderately threatening 4 = Little threat

Scientific Name

Common Name

Tribulus terrestris

Goat's Head Burr

Acacia nilotica

Prickly Acacia

B (In recreational & residential areas) A

Alternanthera pungens

Khaki Burr

Sporobolus spp.

Cabomba caroliniana

Eichhornia crassipes

Giant Rats Tail Grass Cabomba (aquatic weed) Water Hyacinth

Milkweed

Euphorbia heterophylla / cyathophora Hymenachne amplexicaulis Jatropha gossypifolia

Hymenachne

Bellyache Bush

Lantana camara

Lantana

Leucaeana

Leucaena leucocephala Parthenium hysterophorus

Parthenium Weed

Threat 1 = Critical 2 = Threatening 3 = Moderately threatening 4 = Little threat Achievability A = Could be eradicated from the City / specific area B = Could be significantly reduced in area (plants) or numbers (animals) in the City / specific area C = Could be contained / prevented from spreading (plants) or could prevent major / rapid increase in numbers (animals) D = Could be managed effectively with an acceptable level of biological control STRATEGIC IMPORTANCE G 1 2 1 4 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2 4 2 3 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 3 2 1 3 2 3 2 1 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 2 3 3 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 3 C A A B C B B A C B 2 1 2 2 3 1 A 2 2 3 2 4 2 A 4 2 2 3 3 2 B 3 1 1 3 1 2 A HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH MEDIUM HIGH HIGH MEDIUM MEDIUM MEDIUM MEDIUM HIGH MEDIUM HIGH 3 2 3 3 3 2 C MEDIUM 4 1 3 4 2 1 B HIGH Res Cons Rec Hort USL,U'man, Infra-struc PRIORITY Waterways / ACHIEVABILITY Wetlands DECLARATION Class 2 Not declared Class 2 Class 2 Class 2 Class 1 Class 2 Class 2 Class 2 Class 2 Class 3 Not declared Not declared Not declared Class 2 Class 2

Scientific Name

Common Name

Rubber Vine

Cryptostegia grandiflora Pennisetum setaceum Prosopis spp.

Fountain Grass

Mesquite

Salvinia molesta

Salvinia/Water Fern

Thunbergia grandiflora Limnocharis Flava

Blue Thunbergia

Yellow Burr Head

Bryophyllum spp.

Mother of millions

Parkinsonia aculeata

Parkinsonia

Annona glabra

Pond apple

Senna obtusifolia

Sicklepod

Wedelia trilobata

Singapore Daisy

Pistia stratiotes

Water lettuce

Thevetia peruviana

Yellow oleander

Caltropis procera

Calotrope

Xanthium occidentalis/pungens Ziziphus mauritiana

Noogoora Burr

Chinee Apple

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

G = Grazing, Res = Residential, Cons = Conservation, Rec = Recreation, Hort = Horticulture, U'man =unmanaged, Infra-struc = infrastructure

page 104

APPENDIX E

PEST PLANTS OF THURINGOWA CITY

APPENDIX F : VEGETATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY - PIONEER PARK

APPENDIX F: Vegetation Management Strategy - Pioneer Park

Existing Rain Tree Existing Eucalypt Existing Ficus Existing Melaleuca Existing Tree (Other) Existing Tree to be Removed

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

Existing trees to be retained Existing trees to be removed Total number of existing trees

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

197 7 204

page 108

APPENDIX F

VEGETATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGY - PIONEER PARK

APPENDIX G : EXTRACT FROM `REVEGETATION STRATEGY FOR THE CITY OF THURINGOWA' THREATENED ECOSYSTEMS, FLORA AND FAUNA OF THE THURINGOWA CITY COUNCIL AREA

APPENDIX G: Extract from `Revegetation Strategy for the City of Thuringowa': Threatened Ecosystems, Flora and Fauna of the Thuringowa City Council Area

G1 ENDANGERED AND OF CONCERN REGIONAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE THURINGOWA REGION

VMA status NCA status Status under Vegetation Management Act 1999 E - endangered O ­ of concern Status given by Queensland Environmental Protection Agency E - endangered O ­ of concern

Sources: Environmental Protection Agency, Queensland Herbarium, Department of Natural Resources and Mines.

RE number 7.1.2 7.1.3 7.2.4 7.3.1 VMA EPA status status O O O E O O O E Community description Wet Tropics Bioregion Salt meadow/ herbfield on coastal lowland hyper­saline alluvial soils. Bulkuru (Eleocharis dulcis) swamp on poorly drained acid peats. Open forest/woodland vegetation mosaic (Corymbia spp., Lophostemon suaveolens, Eucalyptus pellita, Acacia spp.) of wet lowlands on old stranded dune ridges on sands. Sedgeland (Cyperus spp., Eleocharis dulcis, Baumea spp., Scleria poiformis) and grassland (Ischaemum villosum, Imperata cylindrica, Cynodon dactylon) freshwater swamp of seasonally inundated coastal lowlands. Alexandra palm (Archontophoenix alexandrae) swamp vine forest on very wet poorly drained fertile lowlands. Swamp paperbark (Melaleuca quinquenervia) open forest on very wet and wet poorly drained lowlands. Swamp paperbark (Melalueca quinquenervia) open forest/vine forest Complex on a variety of very wet poorly drained lowlands . Coastal floodplain forest red gum/melaleuca (Eucalyptus tereticornis/Melaleuca spp.) open forest complex on moist to very wet poorly drained lowlands. Gympie messmate (Eucalyptus cloeziana) or white mahogany (Eucalyptus acmenoides) open forest on dry well drained piedmont fans. Notophyll to mesophyll riparian vine forest on dry well drained lowland alluvial levees. Red tea­tree (Melaleuca dealbata) riparian open forest on moist fertile moderately drained lowland alluvia. Weeping tea­tree (Melaleuca fluviatilis), Melaleuca leucadendra, Moreton Bay ash (Corymbia tessellaris) open forest with notophyll riparian vine forest spp., on levees. River oak (Casuarina cunninghamiana) riparian open forest. Carbeen (Corymbia tessellaris), forest red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis), swamp mahogany (Lophostemon suaveolens), red tea­tree (Melalueca dealbata) riparian open forest on levees. Riparian herbfield/shrubland on river and stream bed alluvia. Einasleigh Uplands Bioregion Lakes on Tertiary sand plains Yellow jacket (Eucalyptus similis) woodland on deep red earths on plains Dry vine forest on deep red earths on Tertiary sandstone plateaus Narrow-leaved ironbark (Eucalyptus crebra) woodland on yellow earths on plains Silver-leaved ironbark (Eucalyptus melanophloia) woodland on yellow earths on plains Lancewood (Acacia shirleyi) or bendee (Acacia catenulata) open forest on red earths or skeletal soils on plateaus and plateau margins Dry vine forest and associated woodland on rock outcrop and shallow loams on limestones Dry vine forest on dolerite Brigalow Belt Bioregion Sedgelands on marine clay plains. Eucalyptus platyphylla-Corymbia tessellaris woodland on sandy coastal plains. Complex of Spinifex sericeus, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Casuarina equisetifolia grassland and herbland on foredunes. Microphyll vine forest ("beach scrub") on sandy beach ridges.

7.3.3 7.3.5 7.3.6 7.3.7 7.3.21 7.3.23 7.3.24 7.3.25 7.3.26 7.3.27

E O E E O O E E E O

E O E E O O E E E O

7.3.28

E

E

9.3.7 9.5.1 9.5.2 9.5.3 9.5.4 9.7.2 9.11.8 9.11.9

O O O N N N O O

O O O O O O O O

11.1.3 11.2.1 11.2.2 11.2.3

O O O O

O O O O

RE number 11.2.4 11.3.4 11.3.7 11.3.11 11.3.13 11.3.25 11.3.27 11.3.31 11.3.33 11.3.34 11.12.8 11.12.10 11.12.11 11.12.12 11.12.14 11.12.15 11.12.16 11.12.18 11.12.19

VMA EPA status status O O Lagoons in swales. O N E O N N N O N O O O O O O O O O O O E E O O O E O O O O O O O O O O

Community description

Eucalyptus tereticornis and/or E. camaldulensis tall woodland on alluvial plains. Corymbia spp. woodland on alluvial plains. Sandy soils. Semi-evergreen vine thicket on alluvial plains. Grevillea striata on alluvial plains. Eucalyptus tereticornis or E. camaldulensis, Casuarina cunninghamiana fringing woodland on alluvial plains. Freshwater wetlands. Ophiuros exaltatus, Dichanthium spp. grassland on alluvial plains. Eremophila mitchellii open woodland on alluvial plains. Acacia tephrina woodland on alluvial plains Eucalyptus shirleyi woodland on igneous rocks. Corymbia clarksoniana woodland on igneous rocks. Melaleuca spp. woodland on igneous rocks. Lowlands. Araucaria cunninghamii woodland on igneous rocks (boulder-strewn coastal hills). Lophostemon spp. woodland on igneous rocks; coastal hills. Allocasuarina torulosa, Livistona drudei woodland on igneous rocks; coastal hills. Acacia spp. low woodland on igneous rocks; coastal hills. Montane shrubland on igneous rocks; mountain tops. Eucalyptus exserta, E. moluccana, E. crebra, Corymbia citriodora woodland on igneous rocks; steep hills and ranges.

G2 LEGISLATIVELY PROTECTED FLORA AND FAUNA POTENTIALLY OCURRING IN THE THURINGOWA REGION

EPBC status NCA status Status under Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 E - endangered V - vulnerable Status under Nature Conservation Act 1992 E - endangered V - vulnerable R - rare

Sources: Queensland Herbarium; Queensland Museum; Environment North 2003; Russell Cumming pers. comm.; Earthworks Environmental Services records.

(a) Flora:

Species name Common name Family Mimosaceae Mimosaceae Euphorbiaceae Aponogetonaceae Sapindaceae Caesalpiniaceae Hymenophyllaceae Euphorbiaceae Orchidaceae Sapindaceae Elaeocarpaceae Myrtaceae Orchidaceae Acanthaceae EPBC status NCA status R R R R R R R V R R P V P R Recorded locality Bohle River, Pinnacles Paluma Range Mt Cataract Ephemeral wetlands Fanning River Paluma Range Paluma Range Reid River, Magnetic Island Paluma Range Paluma Range Pinnacles Pepper Pot Mountain Paluma Range Reid River, Mt Ellenvale

Acacia jackesiana Betsy's wattle Acacia longipedunculata Actephila sessilifolia Aponogeton queenslandicus Queensland lace plant Atalaya calcicola Cassia sp. (Paluma Range G.Sankowsky+ 450) Crepidomanes majoriae Croton magneticus Dipodium ensifolium Dodonaea uncinata Dubouzetia saxatilis Eucalyptus paedoglauca Gastrodia urceolata Graptophyllum excelsum

V

Mt Stuart ironbark

V

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX G

THREATENED ECOSYSTEMS, FLORA + FAUNA OF THE THURINGOWA CITY COUNCIL AREA

page 112

Grewia graniticola Leucopogon cuspidatus Livistona drudei cabbage palm

Tiliacea Epacridaceae Arecaceae V

R V V

Marsdenia brevifolia Myrmecodia beccarii

ant plant

Asclepiadaceae Rubiaceae

V V

V V

Oldenlandia polyclada Palmeria hypotephra Parsonsia lenticellata Peripleura scabra Schizomeria whitei Wrightia versicolor

Rubiaceae Monimiaceae Apocynaceae Asteraceae Cunoniaceae Apocynaceae

R R P R R R

Magnetic Island, Mt Norman Pinnacles, Paluma Range Lowland creeks and wetlands north of Black River Herveys range Paperbark woodland north of Leichhardt Creek Reid River Paluma Range Mt Cataract, Pinnacles Mt Black Paluma Range Reid River

(b) Fauna

Species name Common name EPBC status NCA status Habitat preference QM collection locations -0Mt Spec Bambaroo

Mammals Dasyurus maculatus gracilis Spotted-tailed quoll E Sminthopsis leucopus Petaurus gracilis White-footed dunnart Mahogany glider

E R

Closed forest (mostly upland) Closed forest Medium to low open woodland on swampy coastal plains, beach ridges and swales Closed forest (mostly upland) Open forest, woodland Rocky outcrops Closed forest to low open woodland (caves, abandoned mines, rock fissures) Closed forest to open woodland (caves, disused mines) Closed forest to woodland (caves) Open forest, woodland Forest to coastal plains (disused mines, sea caves, boulder piles, rock fissures) Closed forest (mostly lowland) Closed forest Open forest, woodland, shrubland (caves, abandoned mines, houses) Mangrove forest Coastal and island waters with seagrass

E

E

Pseudochirops archeri Bettongia tropica Petrogale sharmani Macroderma gigas

Green ringtail possum Northern bettong Sharman's rockwallaby Ghost bat

R E E R V

Mt Spec -0-0-0-

Rhinolophus philippinensis

Large-eared Horseshoe-bat Diadem leafnosedbat Bare-rumped sheathtail-bat Coastal sheathtailbat

E

R

-0-

Hipposideros diadema Saccolaimus saccolaimus Taphozous australis

R E R V

-0-0-0-

Kerivoula papuensis Murina florium Chalinolobus picatus

Golden-tipped bat Tube-nosed insect bat Little pied bat

R V R

-0-0-0-

Xeromys myoides Dugong dugon

False water rat Dugong

V

V V

-0Shelly Beach; Toolakea Beach; Saunders Beach -0-

Megaptera novaeangliae Sousa chinensis Orcaella brevirostris

Humpback whale Indopacific humpback dolphin Irrawaddy river dolphin

V

V R R

Coastal waters

Bays, occasionally rivers -0Coastal, estuarine, riverine waters Toolakea Beach

p Birds Casuarius casuarius Tadornah radjah Nettapus coromandelianus Phaethon rubricauda Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus Southern cassowary Radjah shelduck Cotton pygmygoose Red-tailed tropicbird Black-necked stork E E R R V R Closed forest Most shallow waters Deeper freshwater swamps Tropical seas, islands and coasts Coastal wetlands, floodplains, irrigated lands Forest to low open woodland Open forest, woodland Closed and open forest

Open woodland Low open woodland, saltmarsh Open undisturbed beaches Estuaries, lakes, low open woodland Low open woodland, saltmarsh Intertidal rocky and coral reefs Coastal waters, sewage ponds, saltmarsh Near water in grassed woodlands Closed forest, adjacent woodland Closed forest (mostly lowland occ. upland) Forests, open woodlands

-0-0Ross R; Bohle R Abattoirs -0-0-

Lophoictinia isura Erythrotriorchis radiatus Accipiter novaehollandiae Falco hypoleucos Rallus pectoralis Esacus neglectus Numenius madagascariensis Rostratula benghalensis Haematopus fuliginosus Sterna albifrons Geophaps scripta scripta Cyclopsitta diophthalma macleayana Ninox rufa queenslandica Tyto novaehollandiae kimberlyi Collocalia spodiopygius

Square-tailed kite Red goshawk Grey goshawk Grey falcon Lewin's rail Beach stone-curlew Eastern curlew Painted snipe Sooty oystercatcher Little tern Squatter pigeon (southern subsp.) Double-eyed figparrot (Macleay's) Rufous owl (southern subsp.) Masked owl (northern subsp.) White-rumped swiftlet Black-chinned honeyeater Painted honeyeater Star finch Crimson finch E V V

R E R R R V R R R E V V V V V R

-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-

Melithreptus gularis Grantiella picta Neochmia ruficauda Neochmia phaeton Reptiles Crocodylus porosus Caretta caretta Chelonia mydas Eretmochelys imbricata Lepidochelys olivacea Natator depressus Dermochelys coriacea Delma labialis

R R E V

Airspace (isolated caves, -0cavities between boulders) Open forest, woodland -0Mistletoes in open forest/woodland Open woodland near water Open woodland near water Coastal rivers, swamps Coastal waters Coastal waters Coastal, reefal waters Coastal waters Shallow coastal waters Coastal, estuarine, riverine waters Open forest, woodland -0-0-0-

Estuarine crocodile Loggerhead turtle Green turtle Hawksbill turtle Olive Ridley turtle Flatback turtle Leatherback turtle Single-striped delma Rusty monitor Limbless snaketooth skink Saxicoline sunskink E V V E V V V

V E V V E V E V

-0-0-0-0-0-0-0Paluma to Bruce Hway turnoff -0Paluma; Twin Falls; Mt Spec -0-

Varanus semiremex Coeranoscincus frontalis

R R

Mangrove forest Closed forest, under fallen timber or in decaying logs Closed forest to woodland on granitic rocks Open forest, woodland usually associated with rock outcrops Open forest, woodland

Lampropholis mirabilis

R

Lerista karlschmidti

Lesser robust finelined slider Faint-striped blind snake

R

-0-

Ramphotyphlops broomi

R

-0-

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX G

THREATENED ECOSYSTEMS, FLORA + FAUNA OF THE THURINGOWA CITY COUNCIL AREA

page 114

Species name Furina barnardi

Common name Yellow-naped snake

EPBC status

NCA status Habitat preference R Open forest, woodland

Simoselaps warro

North-eastern plain-nosed burrowing snake New Guinea Tree Frog Torrent tree frog

R

Open forest, woodland

QM collection locations Environmental Pk, Quarantine stn; Paluma road; Balgal Bch Bluewater Beach; Bohle River -0Mt Spec; Paluma; Twin Falls; Mt Halifax Mt Spec; Paluma Mt Spec; Paluma Bluewater Ra; Mt Halifax -0-0-0-

Frogs Litoria genimaculata Litoria nannotis

R E E

Closed forest Closed forest in fastflowing water and waterfalls Closed forest in streams

Nyctimystes dayi

Sphenophryne robusta

Lace-eyed tree frog, Australian lacelid Sweet-whistling frog

E

E

R

Closed forest (mostly upland)

Butterflies Chaetocneme porphyropis Libythea geofroy nicevillei Philiris diana diana

Purple brown-eye Australian beak Diana moonbeam

V V E

Closed forest Open forest, woodland Closed forest

THURINGOWA RIVERWAY

VOLUME THREE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT POLICY

APPENDIX G

THREATENED ECOSYSTEMS, FLORA + FAUNA OF THE THURINGOWA CITY COUNCIL AREA

page 116

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