Read Grading Procedures text version

Pupil Progression Plan

Format and Content

John White State Superintendent of Education Revised April 2012

LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

1.877.453.2721

www.louisianaschools.net

State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education

Ms. Penny Dastugue President Member-at-Large Mr. Charles E. Roemer Vice President 6th BESE District Mr. James D. Garvey, Jr. Secretary/Treasurer 1st BESE District Ms. Kira Orange Jones 2nd BESE District Ms. Lottie P. Beebe 3rd BESE District Mr. Walter Lee 4th BESE District

Mr. Jay Guillot 5th BESE District

Ms. Holly Boffy 7th BESE District

Ms. Carolyn Hill 8th BESE District

Mr. John L. Bennett Member-at-Large Ms. Connie Bradford Member-at-Large Ms. Catherine Pozniak Executive Director

For further information, contact: Nancy Beben or Jeanette Hildago Division of Curriculum Standards (225) 342-3355 [email protected] [email protected]

The Louisiana Department of Education (LDOE) does not discriminate on the basis of sex in any of the education programs or activities that it operates, including employment and admission related to such programs and activities. The LDOE is required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX) and its implementing regulations not to engage in such discrimination. LDOE's Title IX Coord. is Patrick Weaver, Deputy Undersecretary, LDOE, Exec. Office of the Supt.; P.O. Box 94064, Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064; 877-453-2721 or [email protected] All inquiries pertaining to LDOE's policy prohibiting discrimination based on sex or to the requirements of Title IX and its implementing regulations can be directed to Patrick Weaver or to the USDE, Asst. Sec. for Civil Rights.

This public document was published at a cost of $260.00. Two hundred fifty (250) copies of this public document were published in this first printing at a cost of $260.00. The total cost of all printings of this document, including reprints, is $260.00. This public document was published by the Louisiana Department of Education, Division of Curriculum Standards, P. O. Box 94064, Baton Rouge, LA 708049064 to disseminate information and provide technical assistance to all LEAs or school districts for revising their Pupil Progression Plans. This material was printed in accordance with the standards for printing by State Agencies established pursuant to R.S. 43:31.

INTRODUCTION

This guide is a supplementary tool to be used in conjunction with the Policies and Procedures in Bulletin 1566 (Revised March 2010). The format for writing the Pupil Progression Plan (PPP) has been updated (April 2011). The following information will explain the format and how to use it. Anything printed in green is to be included in your PPP, while anything printed in black is explanation. Include all district policy and responses in blue. PAGE SECTION I ­ FORMAL SUBMISSION STATEMENT...........................................1 INCLUDE IN THIS SECTION GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPMENT, APPROVAL, AND REVISION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT PUPIL PROGRESSION PLAN a formal submission statement a local contact information page a listing of the committee of educators appointed by the superintendent a listing of the parents appointed by the school board documentation of input into the PPP by educators/parents, and copies of the public notice of the PPP prior to approval of PPP (dates and location) SECTION II ­ STATE AND DISTRICT POLICIES................................................ 3 I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. Placement ............................................................................................ 3 Attendance Policy................................................................................. 7 Grading Policy ...................................................................................... 8 Promotion K-8 ...................................................................................... 9 Promotion 9-12 ................................................................................... 11 Retention Policy ................................................................................. 15 Acceleration ....................................................................................... 15 Remediation ....................................................................................... 16 Alternative Schools/Programs/Settings .............................................. 20 Other Policies and Procedures ........................................................... 20

APPENDIX A ­ DEFINITION OF TERMS ......................................................... 24 A. State B. Local C. Include additional information with Appendix B.

3

Pupil Progression Plan

for

Terrebonne Parish School System

for

2012-2013

Submitted to Louisiana Department of Education

______August 24, 2012_____

(Date Submitted)

4

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION I.................................................................................................................................... 7 Formal Submission Statement .................................................................................................. 7 LEA Contact Info ...................................................................................................................... 8 PPP Committee Members ........................................................................................................ 9 Parent Committee Members.....................................................................................10 SECTION II................................................................................................................................. 12 State and District Policies ....................................................................................................... 12 I. Placement ....................................................................................................................... 12 K & 1st Grade Entrance & Screening ........................................................................ 12 Transfer Students ..................................................................................................... 13 Transfer Policies for Students with Disabilities ......................................................... 16 Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students ................................................................ 17 Review of Placement ................................................................................................ 19 II. Attendance Policy ........................................................................................................... 19 III. Grading Policy................................................................................................................. 21 K-8 Grading Procedures ........................................................................................... 22 9-12 Grading Procedures ......................................................................................... 33 Special Grading Policies K-12 .................................................................................. 37 Grading Policy for End of Course (EOC) Tests ........................................................ 42 Promotion K-8........................................................................................................... 43 LEAP Requirements ................................................................................................. 43 High Stakes Testing Policy ....................................................................................... 45 Elementary Program of Studies Requirements ........................................................ 49 IV. K-8 Promotion Requirements.......................................................................................... 50 V. Promotion 9-12 ............................................................................................................... 51 Carnegie Credit Time Requirements ........................................................................ 51 9-12 Promotion Requirements.................................................................................. 52 High School Graduation Requirements .................................................................... 53 Scheduling ................................................................................................................ 55 VI. Retention Policy .............................................................................................................. 56 District RTI Plan......................................................................................................... 56 VII. Acceleration .................................................................................................................... 57 Honors Program 7-12 ............................................................................................... 57 High School Credit for College Courses ................................................................... 58 Early College Admissions Policy .............................................................................. 58 Alternative Grades 9-12............................................................................................ 59 Gifted Program K-12................................................................................................. 59 Talented Program K-12 ............................................................................................ 60 Carnegie Credit for Middle School Students............................................................. 60 Early Graduation....................................................................................................... 60 Accelerated Student Achievement Pathway Program .............................................. 61 VIII. Remediation.................................................................................................................... 61 School Year Intervention/Remediation Program ...................................................... 63 Summer Remediation Program ................................................................................ 63

5

GEE, LAA2, & EOC Remediation ............................................................................. 68 IX. Alternative Schools/Programs/Settings........................................................................... 70 Alternative School Program ...................................................................................... 70 Connections Process................................................................................................ 72 X. Other Policies and Procedures ....................................................................................... 73 Policies on Records and Reports ............................................................................. 73 Policies on Due Process........................................................................................... 75 Other Curricular Program Requirements .................................................................. 87 Early Childhood Program.......................................................................................... 87 Sex Education........................................................................................................... 87 Appendix A................................................................................................................................ 92 Definition of Terms...................................................................................................................... 92 Appendix B................................................................................................................................ 99 Terrebonne Parish School Board Members ............................................................................... 99 Pupil Progression Committee Meeting and Announcement Documents SBLRC Forms and Guidelines Promotion to 9th Grade Foreign Language Waiver LEP / Home Language Survey Form LEP Accommodation Form LEP Participation Guide Honor Roll Honor Courses Offered

6

SECTION I

FORMAL SUBMISSION STATEMENT

Include the following information in this section: FORMAL SUBMISSION STATEMENT LEA contact information a listing of the committee of educators appointed by the Superintendent a listing of the parents appointed by the School Board documentation of input into the PPP by educators/parents, and copies of the public notice of the PPP prior to approval of PPP (dates and location)

The formal submission statement is a formal submission of the LEA's Pupil Progression Plan in compliance with the policies and procedures set forth by the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. It must be signed by both the LEA Superintendent and the President of the School Board.

Formal Submission Statement

Assurance is hereby made to the State Department of Education that the Terrebonne Parish School System's Pupil Progression Plan has been developed in compliance with the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education's Policies and Procedures (Bulletin 1566), (R.S. 17:24.4), with all applicable policies and standards of Bulletin 741 and Bulletin 1706, and with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. If any local policy outlined in this plan conflicts with state and/or federal guidelines and/or regulations, the state and/or federal regulations/guidelines will supersede the local policy. All documentation relative to the development of this Pupil Progression Plan shall be maintained on file by the local education agency. Assurance is thereby made that this school system shall not discriminate in the rendering of services to and/or employment of individuals because of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other non-merit factor.

Superintendent

School Board President

Date

Date

7

LEA CONTACT INFORMATION

LEA Contact Person (Primary) Stacy V. Solet/Carol W. Davis Telephone Number (985) 876-7400 Ext. 229 or Ext. 219 E-mail Address [email protected] /[email protected] If Applicable: LEA Contact Person (Secondary) Philip Martin Telephone Number ( 985 ) 876-7400 E-mail Address [email protected]

__________________________________ (Primary Signature)

________________________ (Date)

8

2011-2012 Pupil Progression Plan Committee Members

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Carol Davis, Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum & Instruction Nason "Tony" Authement, Supervisor of Secondary/Adult Education/Vo-Tech Art Joffrion, Supervisor of Special Education Ernest Brown, Supervisor of Child Welfare & Attendance Linda Joseph, Supervisor of Child Welfare & Attendance Debra Yarbrough, Supervisor of Personnel Marie LeBlanc, Pupil Appraisal Coordinator Geri Schexnayder, Math Curriculum Specialist Rochelle Walker, Social Studies Curriculum Specialist Flordine Williams, English Curriculum Specialist Alesia Blanchard, Reading Curriculum Specialist - Literacy Focus Pam McCann, Principal - Broadmoor Elementary Denise Bourgeois, Supervisor of Federal Programs Madge Gautreaux, Assistant Principal - South Terrebonne High School Kelly Burlette, Master Teacher - Evergreen Jr. High School Graham Douglas, Principal - Terrebonne High School

Meetings: Sub-committees (which included teachers, administrators, and parents) have met since May, 2012 on pupil progression, curriculum and pacing issues, CCSS, GLE's, instructional calendars, RTI plans, and grading procedures. Notice for recommendations on the Pupil Progression Plan was sent to all schools on April 9, 2012. The Pupil Progression Plan committee met again on May 11, 2012 to discuss recommendations. Throughout June and July, instructional staff met to review and/or update various parts of the Pupil Progression Plan including revisions to match state changes. The committee met again on June 26, 2012 to finalize the plan. Those recommendations for change that were approved are included in the document; others are being studied during the 2012-13 school session. Documentation is on file at the Central Office. The Pupil Progression Plan for the Terrebonne Parish School System was presented to the Terrebonne Parish School Board (See Appendix B for listing of School Board members) on August 21, 2012 by Richard Jackson, Chairman of the Education and Policy Committee, Mrs. Carol W. Davis, Assistant Superintendent, and Mrs. Stacy Solet, Supervisor of Elementary Education/Assessment. It was approved by the Terrebonne Parish School Board on August 21, 2012. See Appendix B for copies of: documentation of input into the Pupil Progression Plan by educators / parents copies of public notice of the Pupil Progression Plan prior to approval of Pupil Progression Plan

9

2011-2012 Parent Committee Members

Terrebonne Parish School District

School Acadian Acadian Bayou Black Bayou Black Boudreaux Canal Boudreaux Canal Bourg Bourg Bourgeois, H. L. Broadmoor Broadmoor Caldwell Caldwell Coteau-Bayou Blue Coteau-Bayou Blue Dularge Elem. Dularge Elem. Dularge Middle Dularge Middle East Houma East Houma Ellender Elysian Fields Evergreen Evergreen Gibson Gibson Grand Caillou Elem. Greenwood Greenwood Honduras Honduras Houma Jr. High Houma Jr. High Lacache Lacache Legion Park Legion Park Lisa Park Lisa Park Montegut Elem. Montegut Middle Montegut Middle Mulberry Mulberry

First Name Holly Kim Heather Nichole Mary Ronnie Dawn Tiffany Courtney Susan Courtney Charlotte Tina Kelly Stacey Thawiwan Richard Nicole Lois Amber Kristy Thomas Ida Jill Claudia & Kristina Winnie Maria Lisa Suzi Ida Signa Michelle Shannon Mia Carla Sandra Tatum Lauri Lawrence Denise Trisha Nikki Geneva Susan

Last Name Fanguy LeBoeuf Bonvillain Marcel Robichaux Forest Lajaunie Bourg Freeman Guerrero Freeman Marcel Use' Rodrigue Donnelly Lovell Chen Bourg Jones Green Verdin Martinez Parfait Davis Mike Ryder Bourgeois Theriot Pierre Honeycutt Chaisson Fitch Andino Belanger Vitrano Nelton Babin Brown Adams Bergeron DeHart Bergeron Lapeyrouse LaFleur Shults Waldron

City Houma Houma Houma Houma Chauvin Chauvin Bourg Bourg Houma Houma Houma Thibodaux Schriever Houma Houma Theriot Houma Houma Houma Houma Houma Raceland Houma Houma Houma Gibson Gibson Houma Schriever Gibson Houma Houma Houma Houma Chauvin Chauvin Houma Houma Houma Houma Montegut Bourg Bourg Houma Houma

State LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA

10

Oaklawn Oaklawn Oakshire Oakshire Pointe-Aux-Chenes Pointe-Aux-Chenes Schriever Schriever SEC SEC South Terrebonne South Terrebonne Southdown Southdown Terrebonne High Terrebonne High Upper Little Caillou Upper Little Caillou Village East Village East West Park West Park

Cynthia Rena Dawn Maisha Brandy Sandra Andrea Crystal Lydia Callie Angela Tonya Debbie Christina Rosa Paula Gwen Norma Wanda Albertha Megan Angelena

Jones Shoffner Bizzle Davis Authement Naquin Messina Foret-Billiot Griffin Trosclair Hebert Harris Smith Jackson Bolden Shows Lirette Charpentier Callaway Francois Bellanger Lucinario

Houma Houma Gray Houma Montegut Montegut Schriever Schriever Houma Bourg Bourg Bourg Houma Houma Houma Houma Chauvin Chauvin Houma Houma Houma Houma

LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA

70361

The Parent Committee consists of a parent from each school site nominated by the school's parent group and administrator. These parents serve for the school session and advise the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent on various matters including the Pupil Progression Plan. Letters are sent to each parent encouraging their review and participation in recommended changes annually. This committee meets monthly, as warranted, with the Superintendent on the second Thursday of the month.

11

SECTION II

STATE AND DISTRICT POLICIES The Pupil Progression Plan is the comprehensive plan developed and adopted by each LEA. The plan is based on student performance on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program and is aligned to state laws and BESE policies. I. Placement

A. Kindergarten and First Grade Entrance and Screening Requirements 1. Every child, as a prerequisite to enrollment in any first grade of a public school, shall meet one of the following criteria (Bulletin 741 §1107 B): a. Have attended a full-day public or private kindergarten for a full academic year; or b. Have satisfactorily passed academic readiness screening administered by the LEA at the time of enrollment for first grade. Name the academic readiness screening instrument used for those students who are entering first grade without attending a full-day public or private kindergarten for a full academic year. (This must be consistent with the instrument used for students being promoted from kindergarten.) DIBELS Next Reading Assessment 2. The minimum age for kindergarten shall be one year younger than the age required for that child to enter first grade. (Bulletin 741 §1111 C) a. The age at which a child may enter the first grade of any public school at the beginning of the public school session shall be six years on or before September thirtieth of the calendar year in which the school year begins. (Bulletin 741 §1111 D.) b. Each local educational governing authority, by rule, may provide for a child of younger age to enter kindergarten, provided that such child has been evaluated and identified as gifted in accordance with the regulations of the DOE for such evaluation. Any child admitted to kindergarten pursuant to this paragraph shall be eligible to enter first grade upon successful completion of kindergarten, provided all other applicable entrance requirements have been fulfilled. (Bulletin 741 §1111 C.1.)

12

Describe the LEA's policy on early entrance into kindergarten for those students identified as gifted, if applicable. Not applicable due to district compliance with age requirements for grades 1, K, and PK in Bulletin 741. c. Any child transferring into the first grade of a public school from out-of-state and not meeting the requirements herein for kindergarten attendance shall be required to satisfactorily pass an academic readiness screening administered by the LEA prior to the time of enrollment for the first grade. (Bulletin 741 §1111 C.2.) Name the academic readiness screening instrument used for those students from out-of-state who are entering first grade and not meeting the requirements herein for kindergarten attendance. The Developing Skills Checklist and/or DIBELS Next Reading Assessment 3. Each LEA shall require that every child entering kindergarten for the first time be given a nationally recognized readiness screening. The results of this screening shall be used in placement and for planning instruction. The pupil progression plan for each LEA shall include criteria for placement. (Bulletin 741 §325 C) Name the nationally recognized readiness screening instrument used for every child entering kindergarten for the first time. Developing Skills Checklist B. Transfer Students 1. A student transferred from a state-approved school, in- or out-of-state, public or nonpublic, shall be allowed credit for work completed in the previous school. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript, showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, immunization, and the units of credit earned, shall be required. (Bulletin 741 §707) a. Records, including evaluation information for exceptional students transferring from another system, shall be reviewed by pupil appraisal and approved by the Supervisor of Special Education before the student is enrolled in a special education program. b. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any in-state nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the state-selected LEAP placement test. 2. Local school officials from any state-approved school receiving a student from an unapproved school, in- or out-of-state, approved home study programs, or foreign schools will determine the placement and/or credits for the student through screening, evaluations, and/or examinations. (Bulletin 741 §707) 13

a. The LEA may require the student to take an examination on any subject matter for which credit is claimed. b. The school issuing the high school diploma shall account for all credits required for graduation, and its records will show when and where the credit was earned. c. Students in grades five and nine transferring to the public school system from any in-state nonpublic school (state-approved and unapproved), or home schooling program, or Louisiana resident transferring from any out-of-state school, shall be required to pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics portions of the state-selected LEAP placement test. d. The LEA PPP shall govern whether exceptions to High Stakes Testing Policy will be considered for nonpublic and home schooled students who do not participate in both spring and summer administrations of the LEAP test and/or do not attend summer remediation. Describe the policies for nonpublic and home schooled students in fourth and eighth grades who do not participate in both spring and summer administrations of the LEAP test and/or do not attend summer remediation. Nonpublic and home schooled students must take the LEAP Placement Test provided by the State Department of Education for the appropriate grade level and show evidence of having passed the previous grade level criteria. 3. Credits earned by students in American schools in foreign countries shall be at face value. (Bulletin 741 §707) Describe the policies for the placement of all students, including kindergarteners, transferring from all other systems and the provisions for awarding credit for elementary students (K­8) and secondary students (9­12), including: o Approved schools within the state (public/nonpublic) Records of students in grades K-8 and 9-12 transferring within the state (public/nonpublic) will be sent to the receiving school. Records will be reviewed and decisions made for awarding credit. o Approved out-of-state schools (public/nonpublic) GRADES K-8: Students transferring from accredited out-of-state schools (public/nonpublic) will be initially placed at the level specified until the student's school records indicating grade level are received by the principal. GRADES 9-12: A secondary student, transferring from an accredited out-ofstate school, is tentatively assigned classification status and placed in an appropriate schedule. Tentative placement shall be the result of age level and oral evidence of previously earned Carnegie Units as given by the student until the student's certified transcript, exhibiting total academic credits, has been received by the principal. At that time, student placement adjustments may be made to meet the needs of the student as well as mandates of the parish school system and state. 14

Exception: Students entering Grade Five or Grade Nine must pass the LEAP exams in English Language Arts and mathematics prior to placement. The LEAP Placement Exam may be substituted according to state guidelines. o Home Study and Unapproved schools (public/nonpublic) A student transferring from a non-accredited school or having no obtainable record may initially be given a specified test(s). School personnel shall give the student and/or parent/guardian an explanation of the Carnegie Units necessary for secondary students. In addition, school personnel shall explain the school age attendance law to the student, if applicable, and shall recommend student placement in accordance with written policy. A secondary transfer student whose previous school absence exceeds the stipulated attendance requirement in this parish and/or state must present written documentation of extraordinary circumstances prior to receiving school entrance approval from the Supervisor of Child Welfare and Attendance. Provisions for LEAP/iLEAP Students Home study students and students from unapproved schools are required to be administered the LEAP test (grades 4 & 8) or the iLEAP test (grades 3, 5, 6, & 7) during the scheduled time and place that regular education students are administered the test if they wish to reenter the public school system the next school term. Grade level placement will be based on factual grade level results for appropriate placement. Names of the entrance tests used to determine grade placement LEAP, iLEAP, LEAP Placement Test (for students entering grades 5 or 9), DIBELS NEXT (K-3), SCANTRON, STAR Reader, STAR Math The procedure used for determining Carnegie credit for high school students Home study students and students from unapproved schools must pass Proficiency Exams to be eligible for any Carnegie Unit credit.

List the placement test(s) administered to the above-mentioned transfer students, if applicable. LEAP Placement Test, STAR Reader, STAR Math C. Transfer polices for students with disabilities 1. Districts will follow the procedures described in Bulletin 1706: Regulations for the Implementation of the Children with Exceptionalities Act for enrollment of a transferring student with disabilities. 15

a. IEPs for Students who Transfer from Public Agencies in the Same State. If a student with a disability (who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous public agency within Louisiana) transfers to a new public agency within Louisiana, and enrolls in a new school within the same school year, the new public agency (in consultation with the parents) shall provide a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to the student (including services comparable to those described in the student's IEP from the previous public agency), until the new public agency either: 1) adopts the student's IEP from the previous public agency; or 2) develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP that meets the applicable requirements in §320 through §324. (Note: refer to Bulletin 1706 §323) b. IEPs for Students who Transfer from Another State. If a student with a disability (who had an IEP that was in effect in a previous public agency in another state) transfers to a public agency in Louisiana, and enrolls in a new school within the same school year, the new public agency (in consultation with the parents) shall provide the student with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the student's IEP from the previous public agency), until the new public agency: 1) conducts an evaluation pursuant to §305 through §307 (if determined to be necessary by the new public agency); and 2) develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP, if appropriate, that meets the applicable requirements in §320 through §324. (Note: refer to Bulletin 1706 §323) c. The Interim IEP shall be developed for students who have severe or low incidence impairments documented by a qualified professional concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation according to Bulletin 1508, Pupil Appraisal Handbook. In addition: 1) An interim IEP may also be developed for students who have been receiving special educational services in another state concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation; and 2) An interim IEP may also be developed concurrent with the conduct of an initial evaluation for a student out-of-school, including students ages three through five, who are suspected of having a disability and for former special education students, through the age of twenty-two, who have left a public school without completing their public education by obtaining a state diploma. (Note: refer to Bulletin 1530 §111) Describe the procedures for Interim IEPs. For students who transfer from a district outside of Louisiana within the same academic year, and who had an IEP in effect, Terrebonne Parish School System will provide FAPE, including services consistent with the previous IEP, in consultation with parents, until the new LEA conducts an evaluation, if determined to be necessary, and develops a new IEP that is consistent with federal and state law. Students who have a documented severe or low-incidence impairment documented by a qualified professional shall be initially enrolled in a special education program concurrent with the conduct of the evaluation. This enrollment process, from the initial entry into the LEA to placement, shall occur within ten (10) school days. 16

Parents of infants and toddlers with disabilities who have an IFSP and who transfer to this parish will contact the Child Search Coordinator. The child will be eligible to receive special instructional services in Terrebonne Parish. D. Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students 1. The requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 are as follows: a. Establish procedures to identify language minority students. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to identify language minority students. All students entering the school system for the first time must complete the Home Language Survey which identifies language minority students. The completed survey is part of the permanent record of every student in the district. Any student whose completed Home Language Survey indicates use of a home language other than English is considered a language minority student and is screened for English language proficiency. Students who first learned a language other than English or who speak another language most of the time are also screened for English language proficiency. b. Establish procedures to determine if language minority students are Limited English Proficient. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to determine if language minority students are Limited English Proficient. The LAS (Language Assessment Scales) is administered to all identified language minority students. Limited English proficiency criteria is met if the score is third level or below. To be considered English proficient and exit Limited English Proficient (LEP) status, a LEP student must score as follows: 1. For Grades K ­ 2: a. Two (2) years at composite level 5 on the English Language Development Assessment (ELDA); or b. in the same year, one (1) year at composite level 5 on ELDA and at grade-level benchmark/low risk on a standardized reading assessment such as DIBELS NEXT or STAR Reader. 2. For Grades 3 ­ 12: a. Composite level 5 on ELDA; or b. One (1) year at composite level 4 on ELDA and at proficient level (Basic or Above) on English Language Arts portion of the iLEAP, LEAP, GEE, LAA 1, or LAA 2.

17

3. Students with disabilities who are unable to meet the above exit criteria after 4 years or more, who are in LEP status because of their disability, may be exited from LEP status ONLY as decided by a consensus of the members of the School Building Level Committee/IEP committee (SBLC/IEP). These students will still be required to take statewide assessments. c. Establish procedures for age-appropriate placement and determine the specialized language services or program the district will use to address the linguistic and cultural needs of the Limited English Proficient student. Describe the procedures for age-appropriate placement and the specialized language services or program the LEA will use to address the linguistic and cultural needs of the Limited English Proficient student. If a LEP student enters the school system with no academic records, the student is placed in a grade corresponding to his or her age. For SECONDARY non-English students with records the following will apply: Evaluation of student's transcript by a qualified counselor; Student placement in the appropriate grade level is based on earned credit; Students fifteen years or older are placed in appropriate high school program of studies. Students are serviced in the general education classroom and the ESL program. Student progress and placement needs are evaluated at frequent intervals to meet changing needs of students. The Instructional model for ESL is designed to teach English language skills, study skills, content vocabulary and cultural orientation. Medium of instruction is English with little or no use of native language. Parents have the right to refuse LEP services. d. Establish procedures to monitor former Limited English Proficient students for two years. Describe the procedures the LEA has established to monitor former Limited English Proficient students for two years. Report card grades and State Assessment results are reviewed for 2 years on students who exited the program because of attaining full English proficiency on the ELDA. Students may be reclassified as LEP if progress is not maintained. e. No LEP student shall be retained solely because of limited English proficiency. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Title VI prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, color, or national origin by recipients of federal financial assistance. The Title VI regulatory requirements have been interpreted to prohibit denial of equal access to education because of a language minority student's limited proficiency in English. (See: Louisiana District and School Administrators English Language Learners Program Handbook)

18

E. Review of Placement 1. Review of promotion and placement decisions may be initiated by the local school superintendent and/or parent or guardian (R.S. 17:24.4 G). 2. Each local school board may adopt policies whereby it may review promotion and placement decisions, in order to ensure compliance with its local plan (R.S. 17:24.4 G ). Describe the LEA's policy that addresses how promotion and placement decisions are monitored periodically to determine that the LEA's policies are being implemented uniformly across the system. Explain how, upon request, an individual, such as a parent, teacher, principal, superintendent, etc., could initiate an individual review. To assure uniformity in the implementation of the Terrebonne Parish School System's placement policies and/or decisions as set forth in this document, the Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction has given the principals, as well as teachers, the responsibilities of: 1. following guidelines concerning placement decisions; 2. activating, enforcing, and checking within their respective schools for accuracy of the contents of the plan; 3. creating a School Building Level Review Committee to make decisions relative to student placement; 4. using proper forms in writing and maintaining student records concerning placement decisions; 5. adhering to the Due Process Procedure on student placement; and 6. releasing student placement information to only parent, guardian, or other qualified individual. Monitoring of promotion/placement decisions is conducted by the principal and is on-going if necessary. Monitoring by designated central office personnel is documented through the SBLRC form (See Appendix), which is submitted during the session if grade placement is changed, with mandatory submission at the end of the session. Review of promotion and placement may be initiated by the local board, Superintendent, and/or parent or guardian. (See Due Process)

II. Attendance Policy

A. Elementary students shall be in attendance a minimum of 167 six-hour days or 60,120 minutes a school year. In order to be eligible to receive grades, high school students shall be in attendance a minimum of 30,060 minutes (equivalent to 83.5 six-hour school days), per semester or 60,120 minutes (equivalent to 167 six-hour school days) a school year for schools not operating on a semester basis. 1. To receive Carnegie credit for a course, the minimum amount of time students must be present shall be as follows: a. 10,020 minutes for a six-period schedule; b. 8,589 minutes for a seven-period schedule; and 19

c. 7,515 minutes for an eight-period or 4x4 block schedule. d. For other schedule configurations, students must attend a minimum of 7,515 minutes. (Bulletin 741 §1103. See Bulletin 741 §1103 and §1105 for policy on attendance and absences)

III. Grading Policy

A. No school board member, school superintendent, assistant superintendent, principal, guidance counselor, teacher, or other administrative staff member of the school or the central staff of the parish or city school board shall attempt, directly or indirectly, to influence, alter, or otherwise affect the grade received by a student from his/her teacher. (Bulletin 1566 §501 C.) B. LEAs shall use the following uniform grading system for students enrolled in all grades K-12 for which letter grades are used. LEAs may use other grading scales for honors, gifted, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or other types of courses for which special grading policies exist. (Bulletin 741 §2302) Grading Scale for Regular Courses Grade Percentage A 100-93 B 92-85 C 84-75 D 74-67 F 66-0 Describe grading policies for grades/courses for which letter grades are not used. See next page for ALL grading procedure documents (pp. 21-43).

20

TERREBONNE PARISH SCHOOL DISTRICT

Grading Procedures

Grades K8

20122013

Superintendent Philip Martin

21

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8 741 Minimal Time Requirements for Instruction Please note that daily schedules should reflect the following: Subject Language Arts Math Science/Social Studies PE Health, Music, Arts, Crafts Subject Language Arts Math Science Social Studies PE Health, Music, Arts, Crafts

741 Notes: It is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED that teachers INTEGRATE LITERACY (skills and comprehension) THROUGHOUT ALL CONTENT AREAS. **For students in Grades 14 who have been identified as READING BELOW GRADE LEVEL, the minimum time requirements in health, music, and arts and crafts are suggested in lieu of required. ** For students in Grades 5 ­ 8 who have scores BELOW THE BASIC LEVEL ON LEAP FOR THE 21ST CENTURY IN ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS OR MATHEMATICS, the minimum time requirements in health and physical education, music, arts and crafts, or electives are suggested in lieu of required. **FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIFIC NEEDS, teachers may increase the weekly time in English language arts or mathematics by reducing instructional time in other subjects, subject to the review and approval of the principal. Terrebonne Parish School District Notes: For students in Grades 13 who are BELOW THE SUCCESSMAKER MATH TARGET LEVEL the minimum time requirements in health, music, and arts and crafts are suggested in lieu of required.

Grades 1, 2, and 3 Minimum minutes per week 975** 300** 225 150 150 Grades 4, 5, and 6 Minimum minutes per week 750** 300** 225 225 150 150

Minimum per day 195** minutes 60** minutes 45 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes

Minimum per day 150** minutes 60** minutes 45 minutes 45 minutes 30 minutes 30 minutes

22

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8

KINDERGARTEN

The following grading procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. The following symbols are to be employed for recording pupil progress in each area of skill development: P ­ Proficient DV ­ Developing N ­Needs Improvement Kindergarten teachers must maintain a record of stages of skill development by use of the parish kindergarten grade book/progress report. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

II.

III.

IV.

23

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8

GRADE 1 The following grading procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. Recording of grades will be done in the following manner: A. In Grade 1, the symbols A B C D F are to be used for recording grades in Reading, English Language Arts, Spelling, Mathematics, and Conduct. The symbols S, N, and U are to be used in Social Living (Science and Social Studies). The symbols S and U are to be used in areas of Health & Physical Education, and Music, Arts & Crafts. The symbols L or NL will be used to denote legible or not legible Handwriting. II. A teacher shall have a minimum of six (6) grades per student in his/her grade book for each subject in a nine week period. All grades MUST reflect GLE's (Grade Level Expectations) and CCSS (Common Core State Standards). A. A minimum of six (6) grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade. One (1) additional grade may be combined from activities such as homework, class work, quizzes, AR, AM, etc. and account for no more than 15% of the final grade. B. EXCEPTION for 1st Grade Reading and English: Reading o 1st and 2nd Nine Weeks 50% Comprehension minimum of 4 grades 50% Skills minimum of 4 grades o 3rd and 4th Nine Weeks = 10 grades 40% Comprehension = 4 grades 40% Skills = 4 grades 20% Fluency = 2 grades English o 50% Written Composition ­ minimum of 3 grades o 50% Grammar ­ minimum of 3 grades III. The grading of all tests should be in letter symbols (ABCDF) except for the subjects that require S, N, and U marks. A. Numerical value of symbols: N: 67 74 U: 66 or below S: 75 100 B. A student in Grade 1 must earn satisfactory (S) grades for three nine weeks grading periods in Social Living (Science and Social Studies), Health & Physical Education, and Music, Arts & Crafts in order to receive a satisfactory mark (S) for the yearly average. IV. Standards to be used in computing nine weeks and final grades: A. Numerical value of symbols: A: 93 100 B: 85 92 C: 75 84 D: 67 74 F: 66 or below

24

B. Each symbol has the following point value: A 4 B 3 C 2 D 1

F ­ 0

C. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining nine weeks averages. A gradepoint average of not less than 1.0, with a corresponding mark of absolute D, is required as a passing mark for the nine week period. In computing nine weeks grades other than the minimum D explained above, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. D. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining final averages. The sum of the quality point value of the four nine week grades is to be divided by 4 in determining final grades. A resulting grade point average of not less than 1.0 is required as a passing mark for the year. Fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent, while fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent, in computing all averages other than the minimum D explained above. E. The final average required to pass Reading must be a C or above. However, any first grade student earning a D or an F in the last nine weeks in Reading must be referred to SBLRC for promotion/retention determination. A student who earns grades that equal 1.0, showing sustained improvement (F, F, C, C) and is reading onlevel may be referred to SBLRC for promotion. F. A student who fails the work of the fourth nine weeks period may be failed for the session regardless of prior grades received. However, such action must have the concurrence of the SBLRC. V. VI. A plus (+) or a minus () will not be used in conjunction with the grades A B C D F on the report card. Parents of students making D's, F's, N's and/or U's, as well as others reading below expected level at the halfway point (22nd day) of the nine weeks' period, must be notified of their child's deficiency. In the event of a child's sudden drop in grades or change in behavior, teachers should inform parents at any time during the nine weeks' period. When the letter grade on either the academic report or the conduct report is below average (D or F) it is mandatory that the dual system be used. Any grade of D or F must be accompanied by the numeral which best explains or clarifies the below average grade. The use of the numeral requesting a parent/teacher conference is highly recommended. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

25

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8

GRADE 2 The following grading procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. Recording of grades will be done in the following manner: A. In Grade 2, the symbols A B C D F are to be used for recording grades in Reading, English/Written Composition, Spelling, Mathematics, and Science/Social Studies. The symbols S, N, and U are to be used in areas of Health & Physical Education and Music, Arts & Crafts. The symbols L or NL will be used to denote legible or not legible Handwriting. II. A teacher shall have a minimum of six grades per student in his/her grade book for each subject in a nine week period. Written Composition should have a minimum of four grades. All grades MUST reflect GLE's (Grade Level Expectations) and CCSS (Common Core State Standards). A. A minimum of six (6) grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade. One (1) additional grade may be combined from activities such as homework, class work, quizzes, AR, AM, etc. and account for no more than 15% of the final grade. B. Exception for 2nd Grade Reading and English: Reading o 50% Comprehension minimum of 4 grades o 25% Skills minimum of 4 grades o 25% Fluency = 2 grades English o 50% Written Composition minimum of 4 grades o 50% Grammar minimum of 2 grades III. The grading of all tests should be in letter symbols (ABCDF) except for the subjects that require S, N, and U marks. A. Numerical value of symbols: U: 66 or below S: 75 100 N: 67 74 B. A student in Grade 2 must earn satisfactory (S) grades for three nine weeks grading periods in Health & Physical Education and Music, Arts & Crafts in order to receive a satisfactory mark (S) for the yearly average. IV. Standards to be used in computing nine weeks and final grades: A. Numerical value of symbols: A: 93 100 B: 85 92 C: 75 84 D: 67 74 F: 66 or below B. Each symbol has the following point value: A 4 B 3 C 2 D 1 F ­ 0

26

V. VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

C. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining nine weeks averages. A gradepoint average of not less than 1.0, with a corresponding mark of absolute D, is required as a passing mark for the nine week period. In computing nine weeks grades other than the minimum D explained above, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. D. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining final averages. The sum of the quality point value of the four nine week grades is to be divided by 4 in determining final grades. A resulting grade point average of not less than 1.0 is required as a passing mark for the year. Fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent, while fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent, in computing all averages other than the minimum D explained above. E. A student who fails the work of the fourth nine weeks period may be failed for the session regardless of prior grades received. However, such action must have the concurrence of the SBLRC. A plus (+) or a minus () will not be used in conjunction with the grades A B C D F on the report card. Parents of students making D's, F's, N's and/or U's, as well as others reading below expected level at the halfway point (22nd day) of the nine weeks' period, must be notified of their child's deficiency. In the event of a child's sudden drop in grades or change in behavior, teachers should inform parents at any time during the nine weeks' period. When the letter grade on either the academic report or the conduct report is below average (D or F) it is mandatory that the dual system be used. Any grade of D or F must be accompanied by the numeral which best explains or clarifies the below average grade. The use of the numeral requesting a parent/teacher conference is highly recommended. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

27

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8

GRADE 3 The following grading procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. Recording of grades will be done in the following manner: A. In Grade 3, the symbols A B C D F are to be used for recording grades in Reading, English/Written Composition, Spelling, Mathematics, and Science/Social Studies. The symbols S and U are to be used in areas of Health & Physical Education and Music, Arts & Crafts. The symbols L or NL will be used to denote legible or not legible Handwriting. II. A teacher shall have a minimum of six grades per student in his/her grade book for each subject in a nine week period. All grades MUST reflect GLE's (Grade Level Expectations) and CCSS (Common Core State Standards). A. A minimum of six (6) grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade. One (1) additional grade may be combined from activities such as homework, class work, quizzes, AR, AM, etc. and account for no more than 15% of the final grade. B. Exception for 3rd Grade Reading and English: Reading o 50% Comprehension minimum of 4 grades o 25% Skills minimum of 4 grades o 25% Fluency minimum of 2 grades English o 50% Written Composition minimum of 4 grades o 50% Grammar minimum of 2 grades III. The grading of all tests should be in letter symbols (ABCDF) except for the subjects that require S, N, and U marks. A. Numerical value of symbols: U: 66 or below S: 75 100 N: 67 74 B. A student in Grade 3 must earn satisfactory (S) grades for three nine weeks grading periods in Health & Physical Education and Music, Arts & Crafts in order to receive a satisfactory mark (S) for the yearly average. IV. Standards to be used in computing nine weeks and final grades: A. Numerical value of symbols: A: 93 100 B: 85 92 C: 75 84 D: 67 74 F: 66 or below B. Each symbol has the following point value: A 4 B 3 C 2 D 1 F ­ 0

28

V. VI.

C. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining nine weeks averages. A gradepoint average of not less than 1.0, with a corresponding mark of absolute D, is required as a passing mark for the nine week period. In computing nine weeks grades other than the minimum D explained above, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. D. Each letter grade must be converted to its point value in determining final averages. The sum of the quality point value of the four nine week grades is to be divided by 4 in determining final grades. A resulting grade point average of not less than 1.0 is required as a passing mark for the year. Fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent, while fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent, in computing all averages other than the minimum D explained above. E. A student who fails the work of the fourth nine weeks period may be failed for the session regardless of prior grades received. However, such action must have the concurrence of the SBLRC. A plus (+) or a minus () will not be used in conjunction with the grades A B C D F on the report card. Parents of students making D's, F's, N's and/or U's, as well as others reading below expected level at the halfway point (22nd day) of the nine weeks' period, must be notified of their child's deficiency. In the event of a child's sudden drop in grades or change in behavior, teachers should inform parents at any time during the nine weeks' period. When the letter grade on either the academic report or the conduct report is below average (D or F) it is mandatory that the dual system be used. Any grade of D or F must be accompanied by the numeral which best explains or clarifies the below average grade. The use of the numeral requesting a parent/teacher conference is highly recommended. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

29

Terrebonne Parish School District Grading Procedures for Grades K ­ 8

GRADES 4 ­ 8 The following procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. Recording of grades will be done in the following manner: A. The symbols A B C D F are to be used for recording grades in all subject areas. However, in grades 4 6 inclusive, S or U grades will be given in Health/Physical Education and Music, Arts and Crafts. B. In departmentalized and blocked classes, each teacher must determine grades and arrange them systematically in preparation for entering into the computer system for processing student report cards. A very limited amount of instructional time (not to exceed fifteen minutes) should be used in recording these grades. II. A teacher must have a minimum of six (6) grades recorded in his/her grade book for each grading period for each student per subject. Health and Physical Education should be considered as a single subject. All six grades must reflect GLE's (Grade Level Expectations) and CCSS (Common Core State Standards). A. Non 4 X 4 schools: A minimum of six (6) grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade. One (1) additional grade may be combined from activities such as homework, class work, quizzes, AR, AM, etc. and account for no more than 15% of the final grade. B. 4 X 4 Schools A minimum of four (4) of the six required grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade for the grading period. The remaining grades (two minimum), i.e. homework, class work, quizzes, etc. shall be combined and account for no more than 15% of the final grading period. C. Exception for Reading, English, ELA Connections Reading (4th through 8th Grade) o 75% Comprehension minimum of 4 grades o 25% Skills minimum of 2 grades English (4th through 8th Grade) o 75% Written Composition minimum of 4 grades o 25% Grammar minimum of 2 grades ELA Connections (8th Grade) o Minimum of 6 grades per grading period o Reading 75% Comprehension ­ a minimum of three (3); teachers should attempt to assess comprehension four times during each grading period. 25% Skills ­ two vocabulary/skills assessments o English 75% Written Composition ­ minimum of 4 grades 25% Grammar ­ minimum of 2 grades

30

III. IV.

Midterm and final examinations are not given in grades 4 through 8. The computing of grading period averages and final averages should be in letter symbols (ABCDF) except as noted above. A. Numerical value of symbols: A: 93 100 B: 85 92 C: 75 84 D: 67 74 F: 66 or below B. Each symbol has the following point value: A 4 B 3 C 2

D 1

F 0

V. VI.

C. In determining grading period averages, convert the letter grade to its point value. A grade point average of not less than 1.0, with a corresponding mark of absolute D, must be required as a passing mark for the grading period. In computing grading period averages other than the minimum D explained above, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. D. The session grade is obtained by calculating the sum of the point values of each of the four grading period grades and dividing that sum by 4. The resulting quotient is the grade point average. A grade point average of not less than absolute 1.0 is required as a passing mark for the session. Fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent in computing all averages other than the minimum D explained above. E. A student in grade 4 6 must earn satisfactory (S) grades for three nine weeks grading periods in Health & Physical Education and Music, Arts & Crafts in order to receive a satisfactory mark (S) for the yearly average. Numerical values of symbols: S: 75 ­ 100 N: 67 ­ 74 U: 66 ­ or below F. A student who fails the work of the fourth grading period may be failed for the session regardless of the prior grades received. However, such action must have the concurrence of the SBLRC. A plus (+) or a minus () is not to be given in conjunction with any symbol. Parent Notification ­ Progress Reports A. Non 4x4 Schools Parents of students making D's or F's at the halfway point (22nd day) of the nine weeks period must be notified of their child's deficiency. A sudden drop in grades or change in behavior should give teachers cause to inform parents at any time during the nine weeks period.

B. 4x4 Schools Parents of students making D's or F's at the midway point of each quarter must be notified of their child's deficiency (unless weekly reports are issued). A sudden drop in grades or change in behavior should give teachers cause to inform parents at any time during the grading period. Dual System of Reporting A. The use of the dual system of reporting (letter grade and the numeral calling attention to certain factors affecting the letter grade) is recommended and encouraged. Evaluating and reporting pupil

VII.

31

achievement and progress is a very important part of a school's activities. This dual system of reporting enhances the clarity and completeness of these reports. B. When the letter grade on either the academic report or the conduct report is below average (D or F) it is mandatory that the dual system be used. Any grade of D or F must be accompanied by the numeral which best explains or clarifies the below average grade. The use of the numeral requesting a parent/teacher conference is highly recommended. C. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. D. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

32

TERREBONNE PARISH SCHOOL DISTRICT

Grading Procedures

Grades 912

20122013

Superintendent: Philip Martin

33

Terrebonne Parish Public Schools

Grading Procedures for Grades 9 12 The following procedures will be used in the public schools of Terrebonne Parish: I. Recording of grades will be done in the following manner: A. The symbols A B C D F are to be used for the computing and recording of all grades in all subject areas for grading period averages as well as final averages. These symbols should be used on student tests, in the grade book, and on the report card. B. Each teacher must have determined grades and arranged them systematically in preparation for entering into the computer system for processing student report cards. A very limited amount of instructional time (usually not to exceed fifteen minutes) should be employed in this recording. II. Midterm exams are not given in grades 912. III. Teachers are required to have a minimum of six (6) grades for each grading period recorded in his/her grade book. ELA/literacy and math grades must reflect the 20122013 transitional GLEs (Grade Level Expectations) / and CCSS (Common Core State Standards). A. A minimum of four (4) of the six required grades shall come from major assessments and/or projects and shall account for 85% of the final grade for the grading period. The remaining grades (two minimum), i.e. homework, class work, quizzes, etc. shall be combined and account for no more than 15% of the final grade. B. EXCEPTION for 9th Grade Reading I and ELA Prep Reading I ­ minimum of 6 grades per grading period o 75% of the Reading I grade should reflect assessments such as unseen reading comprehension, vocabulary skills, writing as a response to literature compositions/essays, research reports, and proofreading passages. o 25% of the grade should reflect class work /homework grades and weekly quizzes (from Journeys III curriculum). English Language Arts (ELA) Prep ­ minimum of 6 grades per grading period o Reading 75% Comprehension ­ a minimum of three (3); teachers should attempt to assess comprehension four times during each grading period 25% Skills ­ two vocabulary/skills assessments o English 75% Written Composition minimum of 4 grades 25% Grammar minimum of 2 grades IV. In averaging a group of marks expressed in letters, the use of quality points is required. Therefore, the following method of converting letter grades to quality points is to be employed: A. Numerical value of symbols: A: 93 100 B: 85 92 C: 75 84 D: 67 74 F: 66 or below B. Each symbol has the following point value: A 4 B 3 C 2 D 1 F 0

34

V. VI.

VII.

VIII.

IX.

X.

XI.

XII.

XIII.

C. EXCEPTION: See Special Grading Policies for Advanced Placement (AP) course quality points. Grades shall be recorded without reference to pluses () or minuses (). A student who fails to meet minimum attendance requirements will receive a grade of F for the session and will receive no credit for the course. In order to insure continuous effort on the part of the students throughout the school year, all students are required to have a passing mark on the fourth grading period or on the final examination regardless of the previous grades. Any student who deliberately or willfully evades or fails a semester or final examination or the quarterly period prior to the examination may receive a mark of F for the semester or session (year). In computing the grading period average, convert the letter grade to its point value. A grade point average of not less than absolute 1.0 with a corresponding average of absolute D (1.0) is required as a passing mark. In computing grading period averages other than the minimum D explained above, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or more are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. The session average in any subject is obtained by taking the sum of the point value of the four grading periods and final examination and dividing that sum by 5. The resulting quotient is the average point value, which will indicate the average letter grade for the session. A resulting quotient of not less than absolute 1 is required as the passing mark for the session. In computing session averages, other than the minimum D, fractions of less than five tenths (.5) are to be rounded off to the lower letter grade equivalent; fractions of five tenths (.5) or above are to be rounded off to the higher letter grade equivalent. The final average for halfunit courses is obtained by doubling the sum of the point value of the two grading period marks and adding the value of the examination and dividing that sum by 5. A resulting quotient of not less than absolute 1 with the corresponding mark of absolute D (1.0) is required as a passing mark. All students are required to have a passing mark for the last grading period or the examination for that course. Rounding off is to be employed only in computing each grading period average and the session average. End of Course Exams (EOC) A. Students enrolled in a course for which there is an EOC test must take the EOC test. B. The EOC test shall serve as the final exam for the course. C. Each quarter grade in EOC courses will count for 20% of the grade (4 quarters= 80% of the final grade), and the EOC test shall count for the other 20% of the final grade. 1. EXCEPTION: For LAA2 students taking the EOC test, the EOC test shall count for 5% of the students' final grade.

35

XIV.

D. If the student passes the course and fails the EOC test, the student may retake the EOC test at a later date but the score from the retest will not count in the student's final grade. E. The grades assigned for the EOC test achievement levels shall be as follows: EOC Achievement Level Grade Excellent A Good B Fair C Needs Improvement D or F Calculation for Perfect Attendance Exam Exemption: When computing final grades for students exempt for perfect attendance in a full unit course, take the sum of the value of the four grading periods and divide that sum by four (4). The average is to be computed as a tenth. Roundingoff is to be employed only in computing each grading period average and the final session average. The resulting quotient is the average point value, which will indicate the average letter mark for the session. A resulting quotient of not less than absolute one (1.0) is required as the passing mark. Parent Notification Progress Reports A. Parents of students making D's or F's at the midway point of each quarter must be notified of their child's deficiency (unless weekly reports are issued). A sudden drop in grades or change in behavior should give teachers cause to inform parents at any time during the grading period.

XV.

Dual System of Reporting B. The use of the dual system of grading (the letter grade and the numeral calling attention to certain factors affecting this letter grade) is recommended and encouraged. Evaluating and reporting pupil achievement and progress is a very important part of a school's activities. This dual system of reporting enhances the clarity and completeness of these reports. C. When the letter grade on either the academic report or the conduct report is below average (D or F), it is mandatory that the dual system be used. Any grade of D or F must accompanied by the numeral which best explains or clarifies this below average grade. The use of the numeral requesting a parent/teacher conference is highly recommended. XVI. A grade may not be changed "unless it is determined that the grade is an error or that the grade is demonstrably inconsistent with the teacher's grading policy as per R.S. 17:414.2", and has been substantiated upon investigation, by the appropriate supervisory personnel, that there is a deviation from application of the official Terrebonne Parish School Board Grading Procedures. XVII. Refer to Pupil Progression Plan 201213 regarding Special Grading Policies.

36

Describe grading scales and policies for honors, gifted, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or any other type of course for which special grading policies exist. (pp. 35-39)

TERREBONNE PARISH SCHOOL DISTRICT

Special Grading Policies

Grades K12

20122013

Superintendent: Philip Martin

37

Terrebonne Parish Public Schools Special Grading Policies K12

SPECIAL GRADING POLICIES I. Grading Procedures For Major School Projects In order to insure continuous effort on the part of the students throughout the grading period while working on major class projects, the following will apply: Students who fail to turn in a major class project will receive two F's for the project. If the project is worked on in class for a majority of the grading period, the student will receive an F for the grading period regardless of other grades received for that grading period. Major projects will be determined by the school administration with a written policy being given to each student outlining the value of each project. Ex.: "F" for the grading period Ex.: Two "F's" for the project 1. Leaf collection 1. Clothing unit FACS 2. Science project 2. Term paper 3. Social Studies project 3. Woodworking Project 4. Insect collection II. Senior Project Plan The Senior Project Plan (Revised June, 2011) will be presented by Honors and Gifted English IV seniors to a panel of judges. Procedures are located in the TPSD Senior Project Plan directive. Procedures in Grading: High Level Classes Inasmuch as the course work in all highlevel classes will be appropriate for the abilities and needs of the students, teachers are expected to construct their tests and make their value judgments in such a way that the students' grades reflect accurately their levels of accomplishment and the quality of their work. To compensate for difficulty between the work in highlevel classes of a subject and that in other classes of the same subject, the grading scale will be adjusted for highlevel classes, as follows: Points Grade 90100 A 8089 B 7079 C 6069 D Weighted Grading Scale for Advanced Placement Courses Quality points shall be awarded to students who are enrolled in an Advanced Placement Course as follows: Grade Points A 5 B 4 C 3 D 2 F 0

38

III. Procedures in Grading: Final Exam Exemption A. In full unit courses, students who have attained an A in every grading period will be exempt from the final exam in that course. B. In full unit courses, students who maintain perfect attendance and have a passing grade for the final period will be exempt from the final exam in that course. The definition of perfect attendance in this instance is a student must be in attendance each day the class is in session, exclusive of school related activities. C. For EOC and AP classes there will be NO EXAM EXEMPTION! D. A student that meets exemption criteria may elect to take the final exam. Grading Procedures for ALL GRADE LEVELS Regarding Makeup Work A. When a student returns to school after an absence he/she must: 1. To receive credit for makeup work, written documentation with the reason for the absence must be received within 5 days of return to school. Work not made up will result in an automatic F. 2. Arrangements to make up work must be made with the classroom teacher. 3. Makeup work must be completed within five (5) days of his/her return to school. 4. Extended periods of absence will be handled on an individual basis. V. Procedure for Repeating Courses A. Students are allowed to repeat courses as long as they do it in a timely manner (immediately following their first attempt of the course) and before taking any subsequent course in that area. B. A student who fails a course but passes the EOC test for the course must retake the course, either by repeating the whole course or through credit recovery. At the completion of the course that student will take the EOC test again. If the student does not score Fair or above, the student would retain the higher achievement level as defined by the Double Jeopardy Rule, in Bulletin 118. Credit Recovery Procedures A. Attendance Recovery Attendance can be recovered on a time for time basis by successfully participating in an approved afterschool credit recovery setting before the student completes that course. B. Grade Recovery With teacher approval students can recover a failing marking period grade by successfully attending and participating in an approved after school credit recovery setting before the

IV.

VI.

39

student completes that course. Students must attend and successfully complete the Terrebonne Parish School District approved academic software package course with a minimum of 80% success. Upon successful completion the subject area teacher will adjust the grade to a maximum grade of C for that marking period. C. Unit Recovery Students can recover a failed unit by attending and successfully completing the Terrebonne Parish School District approved academic software package course with a minimum 80% success and then passing a Louisiana Department of Education approved final exam. The maximum attainable credit recovery grade is C. VII. Modified Grading Procedures in Reading for Students with Disabilities Classified as LAA 2 In an effort to keep students with disabilities (SWD) in their least restrictive environment, the Special Education Office has developed the following grading procedures. A. Assessing Reading Skills and Vocabulary (Grades 1 12) 1. Students with disabilities should take the same assessments as their grade level peers. Individual accommodations and modifications should be provided as stated in their IEP. B. Assessing Comprehension (Grades 112) 1. After consultation with administration and special education facilitator, students with consistently failing grades and documented interventions may qualify for a modified grading procedure in regards to unseen comprehension. 2. Special education teachers may give comprehension assessments on both grade level material and instructional level material. An equal number of each type of assessment (grade level vs. instructional level) should be given each grading period. According to Terrebonne Parish Policy, a minimum of four comprehension assessments should be administered each grading period. For students following the modified grading procedure, this would include two grade level comprehension assessments and two instructional level comprehension assessments. 3. Use the FleschKincaid Readability tool on the Microsoft Tool Bar to determine the readability of the passage (see attachment for directions on how to use). The comprehension skill and/or strategy taught during the weekly lesson should be included in reading comprehension assessment at an application level. C. Assessing Fluency (Grades 1 3 ONLY) 1. After consultation with administration and special education facilitator, students with consistently failing grades and documented interventions may qualify for a modified grading procedure in regards to fluency assessments. 2. Special education teachers may give fluency assessments on both grade level passages and instructional level passages. An equal number of each type of assessment (grade level vs. instructional level) should be given each grading period. According to Terrebonne Parish Policy, a minimum of two fluency assessments should be administered each grading period. For students following the modified grading procedure, this would include one grade level fluency assessment and one instructional level fluency assessment. 3. Use the FleschKincaid Readability tool on the Microsoft Tool Bar to determine the readability of the passage (see attachment for directions on how to use). When assessing on instructional level, teachers should use the rubric that corresponds with that student's determined instructional level. For example, if the student's instructional level has been determined to be 2nd grade, teachers will use the second grade fluency rubric when assessing fluency on student's instructional level.

40

D. Determining Instructional Level (Grades 1 ­ 12) 1. Instructional level is defined for this purpose as the highest grade level at which the student can score at or above the 25th percentile. AIMSweb passages should be used to determine instructional level. Reading probes should be kept as evidence to document appropriate instructional level. These scores should NOT be put in the AIMSweb database. E. Averaging Reading Grades / Documentation (Grades 1 ­ 12) 1. Teachers must use the district's computerized grading program using the weighted percentages for the student's enrolled grade. It should be noted on report cards that students following the modified grading procedure are working below grade level. This can be done by using the comment "working below grade level" on the report card. When conducting review IEPs, it should also be noted that the student is working below grade level in the section regarding progress in the general education curriculum. F. Enabling Readability Statistics MICROSOFT WORD Click the File tab, and then click Options Click Proofing Under When correcting spelling and grammar in Word, make sure Check grammar with spelling is selected Select Show readability statistics After you enable this feature, open a file that you want to check, and check the spelling. When Outlook or Word finishes checking the spelling and grammar, it displays information about the reading level of the document. VIII. Grading Procedures for LEP (Limited English Proficient) A. No LEP student will be retained solely on lack of English proficiency. B. The LEP student who cannot comprehend the language of instruction must not be assigned failing grades. C. There are two kinds of grades that may be given to LEP students: LEP/Participation Grades or Achievement Grades. 1. LEP/Participation Grades 1. Participation grades of A, B, C, D, or F are given to LEP students who speak little or no English and generally have ELDA or LAS scores ranging from 13. A LEP grading rubric is included in Addendum B of the Pupil Progression Plan. This rubric will assist teachers in assigning LEP/Participation grades based on cooperation, effort, and participation in classroom assignments to the degree the student's English language proficiency allows. The acronym LEP or the assigned comment number representing Limited English Proficient should be referenced in the comment section of the computergenerated report card. These students, within their language capabilities, should be expected to: a. Pay attention in class; b. Follow directions;

41

c. Have required materials; d. Participate in activities; and e. Complete homework assignments with reasonable expectations. 2. Achievement Grades 1. Achievement grades of A, B, C, D, and F are given to LEP students who speak and comprehend language and generally have ELDA or LAS scores ranging from 35. An Achievement grade is not to have the acronym LEP or the assigned LEP comment number found in the comment section on the report card. The LEP grading rubric is not used. If a LEP student is able to perform the skills in a particular subject, i.e., math, he/she should be given an achievement, not participation, grade in that subject. Grading procedures as found in Pupil Progression for the assigned grade level are used for these students. D. It is possible to have some content areas that contain LEP participation grades and some content areas containing achievement grades. The LEP teacher assigned to each school may help in determining the type of grades a LEP student receives. E. Authentic assessments should be used to assess content knowledge for LEP students, if necessary. F. If a LEP student is passing with or without accommodations, the letter grade (A, B, C, D) should be used. This is a LEP Achievement grade and the LEP number comment is not used. G. If a student is receiving instructional accommodations in the regular classroom and is not passing but is trying to participate to the best of his/her language abilities, the LEP grading rubric is used to determine the appropriate grade and a LEP Participation grade is given on the report card. The LEP number comment is used. H. Although LEP students may receive a number of instructional and testing accommodations in the classroom; only approved testing accommodations may be used on state testing. Approved instructional and state testing accommodations are listed on the student accommodation form (See Pupil Progression Addendum B). Modified/shortened weekly assessments are permissible when applicable in the classroom. I. J. K. For students completing work and tests with accommodations as determined by the SBLC and LEP teacher, these accommodations shall be reviewed and modified as the student progresses during the year. The grading, promotion or retention of regular or special education LEP students must comply with established criteria in the Pupil Progression Plan. If the student is receiving instructional accommodations in the regular classroom and making no attempt at course work, the grade earned is issued.

42

L. LEP students working on grade level may be on the honor roll. Students must be reading on grade level to qualify for the Honor Roll. M. Retention for LEP Students 1. Students in grades K8 cannot be retained if their deficiencies are the result of limited English proficiency. Students in grades 912 receive credit only if they pass course work, although the end of the year work may be weighed more heavily than the beginning. They can receive credit even though the first half of the year was graded with LEP Participation grades.

C. Grading Policy for End-of-Course (EOC) Tests 1. Students enrolled in a course for which there is an EOC test must take the EOC test. a. The EOC test score shall count as a percentage of the student's final grade for the course. b. The percentage shall be between 15% and 30% inclusive, and shall be determined by the LEA. i. For students with disabilities identified under IDEA who meet the LAA 2 participation criteria prior to taking the first EOC test, the EOC test score shall count for 5 percent of the students' final grade for the course. c. The grades assigned for the EOC test achievement levels shall be as follows EOC Achievement Level Excellent Good Fair Needs Improvement Grade A B C D or F

d. The DOE will provide conversion charts for various grading scales used by LEAs. (Bulletin 741 §2318) Describe the LEA's grading policy for students taking courses with EOC tests. Include in the grading policy the percentage (15% to 30%, inclusive) of the final grade that the EOC test will count. Students enrolled in a course for which there is an EOC test must take the EOC test. The EOC test shall serve as the final exam for the course and the score shall count for 20% of the student's final grade for the course. If the student passes the course and fails the EOC test, the student may retake the EOC test at a later date but the score from the retest will not count in the student's grade. Each quarter grade in those courses will count for 20%of the grade (4 quarters = 80% of the final grade) and the EOC test shall count for the other 20% of the final grade. A student, who fails a course but passes the EOC test for the course, must retake the course either by repeating the whole course or through credit recovery. At the completion of the course, that student will take the EOC 43

test again. If the student does not score Fair or above, the student would retain the higher achievement level as defined by the Double Jeopardy rule, in Bulletin 118. Describe the LEA's grading policy for LAA 2 students taking courses with EOC tests. Include in the grading policy how the final grade will be computed with the EOC test score counting 5% of the final grade. For students with disabilities eligible under IDEA who meet the LAA2 participation criteria prior to taking the first EOC test, the EOC test score shall count for 5% of the student's final grade for the course. If the student passes the course and fails the EOC test, the student may retake the EOC test at a later date but the score from the retest will not count in the student's grade. Each quarter in those courses will count for 5% of the grade (4 quarters = 95% of the final grade) and the EOC test shall count for the other 5% of the final grade. A student, who fails a course but passes the EOC test for the course, must retake the course either by repeating the whole course or through credit recovery. At the completion of the course, that student will take the EOC test again. If the student does not score Fair or above, the student would retain the higher achievement level as defined by the Double Jeopardy rule, in Bulletin 118.

IV. Promotion K ­ 8

Based upon local school board policy pursuant to these guidelines, each teacher shall, on an individualized basis, determine promotion or placement of each student [Act 750, R.S. 17:24.4 (G)]. Local school board policies relative to pupil progression will apply to students placed in regular education programs, as well as to exceptional students and to students placed in alternative programs. Placement decisions for exceptional students must be made in accordance with the least restrictive environment requirements of state and federal laws. A. Requirements of the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program 1. A Pupil Progression Plan shall require the student's proficiency on certain tests as determined by the BESE before he or she can be recommended for promotion. (R.S. 17:24.4) 2. In addition to completing a minimum of 23 or 24 Carnegie units of credit as required by BESE, the student shall meet assessment requirements to earn a standard high school diploma. (Bulletin 741 §2318 and §2319) 3. A student who is a first-time 4th or 8th grader must score at or above the Basic achievement level on the English Language Arts or Mathematics components of the LEAP and at or above the Approaching Basic achievement level on the other (hereafter referred to as the passing standard) to be promoted to the fifth or ninth grade. (Bulletin 1566 §701)

44

4. All placement and promotion requirements for 4th and 8th graders shall be aligned with current BESE guidelines as outlined in the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §701) 5. Students with disabilities participating in LEAP must be provided with accommodations as noted in the students' IEPs. (Bulletin 1566 §701) 6. Students eligible for services under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 should have accommodations as noted on their individual accommodation plan (IAP). 7. Students with disabilities who participate in the LEAP Alternate Assessments (LAA 1 and LAA 2) shall have promotion decisions determined by the School Building Level Committee (SBLC). (Bulletin 1566 §505 A.) 8. LEP students shall participate in statewide assessment. The SBLC shall be granted the authority to waive the state's grade promotion policy for a LEP student. A LEP student who was granted a waiver at the 4th grade level is ineligible for a waiver at the 8th grade level. (Bulletin 1566 §707 E) Describe the function of the SBLC as it relates to student promotion and retention. A School Building Level Review Committee (SBLRC) at each school shall be comprised of two selected teachers of the student(s), the principal and/or assistant principal and/or administrative designee, if available. The SBLRC may place students in the next grade and/or into an appropriate program. Such decisions should be based on a careful review of factors affecting a student's progress including the High Stakes Test Policy for Grades 4 and 8. The school system's curriculum specialists and pupil appraisal personnel, when warranted, will be available to assist the committee in arriving at a proper decision if requested by the school principal. All students in danger of failing must be reviewed by the SBLRC. An SBLRC form must be filed in the student's folder and a copy sent to the Central Office. (See Appendix B for a copy of the SBLRC forms and directions.) Describe how the SBLC determines the progression of students with disabilities participating in the LEAP Alternate Assessments. List the specific criteria that will be used by the SBLC. Students with disabilities who participate in the LEAP Alternate Assessments (LAA 1 and LAA 2) shall have promotional decisions determined by the School Building Level Review Committee (SBLRC). Progression: Students Participating in Alternate Assessment - Special Education LAA 1 students are progressed based on the following criteria: Special education students participating in LAA 1 Alternate Assessment will progress from one grade level to the next with the recommendation of the SBLRC, as follows:

Homeroom Grade K Age 6

45

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18-21

Students in LAA 1 must meet the following assurances for progression: 1. The student must meet the attendance requirements according to Bulletin 741. 2. The student must complete 70% of his/her annual goals. 3. Transition planning at an appropriate age must be addressed by the student and documented by the teacher. Students participating in LAA 1 are working towards a Certificate of Achievement. Types of LEA Certificates available are: 1. Terrebonne Parish Certificate of Course Work/Activities Completion 2. Terrebonne Parish Certificate of Skills Completion High Stakes Testing Policy (excerpt from B. 1566)-LAA 2: 1. Students with disabilities who participate in the LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level (LAA 2), shall have promotion decisions determined by the SBLRC. 2. Students with disabilities in grades 4 and 8 who participate in both LEAP ELA and Math along with LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 (LAA 2) will be held to the high stakes testing policy. Refer to the chart below for all the other combinations.

ELA LEAP LEAP LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 Math LEAP LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 Science LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 Social Studies LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LEAP LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 LAA 2 LEAP LAA 2 Held to High Stakes Testing Policy Yes Yes Yes No No Yes No No No No No No No No No No

46

B. High Stakes Testing Policy 1. The decision to retain a student in the fourth or eighth grade more than once as a result of his/her failure to achieve the passing standard on the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP shall be made by the LEA in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan. (See Chapter 7 of Bulletin 1566 for additional policies regarding High Stakes Testing.) Describe the LEA's procedure for determining if a 4th or 8th grade student will receive a Mastery/Advanced waiver from the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 A.) Policy Override ­ Grade 4 & 8 The local school system (LEA) may override the State policy for students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English or mathematics if the student scores at the Mastery or Advanced level in the other provided that: The decision is made in accordance with the Pupil Progression Plan, which shall include a referral to the School Building Level Review Committee (SBLRC). The student has participated in both the Spring and Summer administration of LEAP and has attended the summer remediation program offered. (The student shall participate in the Summer retest in only the subject which he/she scored at the Unsatisfactory achievement level during the Spring test administration.) Parental consent is granted. Describe the LEA's procedure for determining if an 8th grade student is granted the U/B waiver from the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 B.) The local school system (LEA) may override the State policy for students scoring at the Unsatisfactory level in English or mathematics if the student scores at the Basic level in the other provided that The student scored Approaching Basic or above on the Science and Social Studies components of LEAP; The student had an overall 2.5 grade point average on a 4.0 scale; The student had a minimum 92% attendance during the school year; The decision is made in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan, which may include a referral to the School Building Level Committee (SBLC) The student has participated in both the spring and summer administrations of LEAP and has attended the summer remediation program offered by the LEA (the student shall participate in the summer retest only on the subject that he/she scored at the Unsatisfactory achievement level during the spring test administration); and Parental consent is granted. If a student meets the criteria for this override, and is promoted with an Unsatisfactory, the student shall participate in and pass a high school remedial course in the Unsatisfactory subject before enrolling in or earning Carnegie credit for English or mathematics. 47

Describe the LEA's criteria for determining if an 8th grade student will receive a AB/AB waiver from the High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707 C.) After the summer retest, a school system, through its superintendent, may consider a waiver for an 8th grade student who has scored at the Approaching Basic level on BOTH the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP. This waiver must be in writing to the Superintendent. The district may grant the waiver in accordance with the local Pupil Progression Plan provided the following criteria are met: The student may be promoted (AP) to the 9th grade, provided that he or she has scored at the Approaching Basic level on both the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of LEAP, has attended the LEAP summer remediation program offered by the District, and has taken the summer retest administered at the conclusion of the summer program. (AB/AB) The student must retake the component(s) (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) of the retest on which a score of Approaching Basic or below was attained on the spring test. Describe the LEA criteria that determine if a student is retained in 4th grade more than once as a result of failure to score at or above the required Basic/Approaching Basic achievement level on LEAP. Retention of a student is open to review under the guidelines of Due Process by a parent, guardian, other qualified agency, principal, local school board, superintendent and/or designee of the superintendent. (See Policies on Due Process) Students who fail to meet the promotional criteria in Section II, Grade 4 Promotion Criteria, shall be retained. Students shall not be assigned to the same grade for more than two years. If the student is eligible for Transition 4th, an Administrative placement (AP) will be made to Transitional 4. Describe the criteria that determine to what grade a student will be promoted if he/she has repeated the 4th grade at least once as a result of failure to pass LEAP and if he/she will be 12 years old on or before September 30th of the next school year. (Bulletin 1566 §703 C.) The student would be Administratively Placed (AP) in the 5th grade and be provided with a remediation program on 4th grade GLE's and CCSS. Describe the LEA's criteria for determining which 4th grade student(s) will be granted a Twenty Point Appeal, as outlined in the High Stakes Testing Policy. Describe the criteria used by the SBLC to grant the appeal. (Bulletin 1566 §707 D.) Only as stated in the High Stakes Test Policy: After the student has met the requirements of LEAP Summer School attendance and retest, and has scored within the 20 point range, a written request can be made for an appeal if the student has a "B" or higher in the subject on the final report card for grade 4. 48

(The six criteria below are applied to the request and used in decision making by the SBLRC.) APPEALS PROCESS FOR GRADE 4 After the summer LEAP retest, a school system, through its superintendent, may consider granting an appeal on behalf of individual students, provided that all of the following criteria have been met: The student's highest score in English Language Arts and/or mathematics on either the spring or summer LEAP must fall within twenty (20) scaled score points of the cutoff score for Basic. The student shall have a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale in the subject(s) for which the appeal is being considered. The student must have attended the LEAP summer remediation program. The student must have taken the LEAP retest given after the LEAP summer remediation program has been concluded. The student must have met State-mandated attendance regulations during the regular school year and the locally mandated regulations during the summer remediation program. The principal and the School Building Level Review Committee (SBLRC) must review student work samples and attest that the student exhibits the ability of performing at or above the Basic achievement level in the subject for which the appeal is being considered. The appeal must be in writing from the school principal, verified by the Supervisor of Assessment, and signed by the Superintendent for the placement to occur. Documentation of actual scores and other information should accompany the appeals request. (A copy of this appeal must be placed in the student's cumulative folder.) All appeals should be sent to the Office of Supervisor of Assessment. Describe the fourth grade transitional program required for students who meet the criteria. (Bulletin 1566 §703 B.) The Transitional 4th Grade Program will be available for students who qualify. The students will be taught 5th grade GLE's/CCSS and will participate in an After-School Tutorial on 4th grade GLE's/CCSS and in some cases be tutored during the school day. 1. 4th GRADE TRANSITION PROGRAM: Fourth-graders who score below Basic on the English and math portions of the LEAP Test will enter the Fourth Grade Transition Program, which takes place during the course of the school year. To quality for the Transition Program, the student must: Score Approaching Basic in both English and math Attend summer remediation and take the retest Be remediated on subjects in which they scored below Basic. 49

2.

After completing the Transition Program, that student will be promoted to the sixth grade, if he/she meets the following requirements: Scores Basic/Approaching Basic in English and math on the fourth grade LEAP Scores at least Approaching Basic in science and social studies on the fourth grade LEAP Meets the district requirements for passing to the sixth grade. After Summer School and retest, students may be placed in the Transition Program for one year, unless the district decides to retain them. If a student, who has completed the Transition Program, does not meet all of the requirements (as stated above) to move on to the sixth grade, he/she will be placed in the fifth grade the following year. Students participating in the Transition Program are placed in a fifth grade classroom. Data Processing will give out enrollment directions for T-4. Students participating in the Transition Fourth Grade Program will receive remediation during the school day and/or after school during LEAP after-school tutoring.

3.

4.

Describe the locally-mandated attendance requirements for summer remediation that are used as a criterion for exceptions to High Stakes Testing Policy. (Bulletin 1566 §707) The student must attend a minimum of 16 days in the 17 day LEAP/GEE Summer School, consisting of 3 and ½ hours per subject per day , to meet summer school attendance requirements and be eligible for policy waivers, appeals, and overrides. A minimum of 50 hours is required for LEAP Summer School. The system offers 56 hours per subject. C. Elementary Program of Studies Requirements 1. The elementary grades shall provide a foundation in fundamentals of English Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies, Science, Health, Physical Education, and the Arts. (Bulletin 741 §2313) 2. Each elementary school shall provide 63,720 minutes of instructional time per year. (Bulletin 741 §333) 3. Each grade level, grades one through eight, shall teach the content subject areas outlined in Bulletin 741, ensuring strict adherence to the Louisiana Content Standards and Grade-Level Expectations and the Louisiana Comprehensive Curriculum or a locally-developed and approved curriculum. (Bulletin 741 §2301) 4. Each LEA should adhere to the suggested and required minimum minutes for elementary grades. (Bulletin 741 §2313) 5. Elementary schools shall offer an articulated foreign language program for 30 minutes daily in grades four through six and 150 minutes per week in grades seven and eight. (Bulletin 741 §2313) 50

List detailed and specific LEA promotion requirements by grade level for K-8. If promotion criteria for 4th and 8th grade students exceed the state requirements of passing LEAP, list any additional requirements. To be eligible for advancement from one grade level to another, a student must exhibit a level of achievement at the end of the school session commensurate with the specified grade level promotional criteria. The School Building Level Review Committee in each school shall serve to render specified and impartial student placement decisions if deemed necessary. ­ See page 22 for Minimal Time Requirements for Instruction.

Kindergarten Promotional Standards Kindergarten pupils will be promoted to the first grade based on the following: 1. Adequate progress toward mastery of Common Core State Standards 2. Teacher recommendation and principal concurrence The student's placement is open to review by parent, guardian, other qualified agency, principal, local school board, superintendent and/or designee of the superintendent. First Grade Promotional Standards 1. 2. 3. 4. Receive a final grade of at least C in reading for the year. Pass mathematics with at least a D. Pass English Language with at least a D. 167 days of required school attendance.

Second Grade Promotional Standards 1. Receive a final grade of at least D in reading for the year. 2. Pass mathematics with at least a D. 3. Pass English Language with at least a D. 4. 167 days of required school attendance. Third Grade Promotional Standards 1. Receive a final grade of at least D in reading for the year. 2. Pass mathematics with at least a D. 3. Pass English Language with at least a D. 4. 167 days of required school attendance. Fourth Grade Promotional Standards 1. Pass four of five major subjects: (reading, English, math, science, social studies) with at least a D. 2. Pass the LEAP 21 exam scoring Basic on either English/Language Arts or math and Approaching Basic on the other subject. Students failing the LEAP test will be required to go to summer school. 51

3. 167 days of required school attendance. Fifth Grade Promotional Standards 1. Pass four of five major subjects: (reading, English, math, science, social studies) with at least a D. 2. 167 days of required school attendance. Sixth Grade Promotional Standards 1. Pass four of five major subjects: (reading, English, math, science, social studies) with at least a D. 2. 167 days of required school attendance. Seventh Grade Promotional Standards 1. Pass four of five major subjects: (reading, English, math, science, social studies) with at least a D. 2. 167 days of required school attendance. Students on a 4x4 schedule may not fail more than one major subject. Eighth Grade Promotional Standards 1. Pass four of five major subjects: (reading, English, math, science, social studies) with at least a D. 2. Pass the LEAP 21 exam scoring Basic on either English/Language Arts or math and Approaching Basic on the other subject. Students failing the LEAP test will be required to go to summer school. WAIVER INFORMATION: No student will be eligible for consideration for the waiver unless the student has attended summer school and retaken the LEAP test. 3. 167 days of required school attendance. 4. See Appendix: Promotion to 9th Grade Describe the elementary foreign language program for academically able students in grades 4­8 There are no schools offering a foreign language program in grades 4-8 at this time. o Explain the local definition of the term "grade level" or "on grade level." Elementary students in grades 4 - 8 who are identified as "academically able" for the purpose of receiving foreign language instruction shall be those students who score at or above the State required performance levels on the Louisiana Criterion referenced Grade Level Tests or were promoted without conditions the preceding year. o List the model program sites. No schools are presently participating. 52

o List the designated subject area(s) for foreign language. N/A

o

If your LEA was granted a waiver from full implementation of the elementary foreign language program, include a copy of the approval letter in the appendix. 2012­ 2013 Elementary Foreign Language Program Waiver requested and approved.

V. Promotion 9 ­ 12

A. Carnegie Credit Time Requirements 1. Since each school shall provide 63,720 minutes of instructional time per year, the minimum amount of instructional time required for one Carnegie credit to be earned shall be as follows: (Bulletin 741 §907) a. 10,620 minutes for a six-period schedule; b. 9,103 minutes for a seven-period schedule; and c. 7,965 minutes for eight-period or 4 x 4 block schedules. d. For other schedule configurations, a minimum of 7,965 minutes of instructional time must be met for one Carnegie credit to be earned. e. For credit recovery courses, follow the policy in §2324 of Bulletin 741. f. For distance learning courses, time requirements do not apply. (Bulletin 741 §2395 A.2.) List detailed and specific LEA Carnegie unit requirements and promotion requirements by grade level for grades 9-12. ENTERING NINTH GRADE REQUIREMENTS: Remediation Math and Remediation English 2012- 2013 Any student entering 9th grade having scored Unsatisfactory in math or English on the 8th grade LEAP test must enroll in and pass a high school remedial course in the unsatisfactory subject before earning Carnegie credit for any other English or math course. Terrebonne Parish will use the following courses for these students. Course Title ELA Prep 9th grade (state developed) Remediation Math Prep 9th grade (state developed) Remediation Course Code 120003 160003

As a follow-up course to the Prep classes, Reading I and Algebra 1, Part 1 may be used. Ninth grade students who scored Approaching Basic on the 8th grade LEAP ELA or Math will be scheduled into Algebra I, Part 1 and Reading I for the fall term. They will be scheduled into Algebra I, Part 2 and English I in the spring term. 53

REFUSAL TO SCHEDULE THESE COURSES WILL REQUIRE A PARENTAL SIGN-OFF. GRADE CLASSIFICATION As determined by each teacher, a student's classification is based on the student's ability to receive, at the end of each school session, at least a "D" average in each course taken with the total units of course credit equaling specified classification status below. A. Promotion/Classification Sophomore or tenth grade status Junior or eleventh grade status Senior or twelfth grade status Graduation* Units 5 units; 11 units; 17 units; 23 units for Career Diploma 24 units for College and Career beginning with the incoming freshman class of 2008-09 and beyond.

*Participation in the graduation exercises requires that all fourth year seniors schedule a minimum of two units per term, or be enrolled in an approved university, technical college, or the military. Describe the LEA's policy for awarding ½ unit of credit. Students at schools utilizing 4 X 4 Format will adhere to the following attendance guidelines: Students must be present a minimum of 42 days in order to get credit for a half (1/2) unit course. Students must take a final exam in the course. Students must earn 2.5 quality points. B. High School Graduation Requirements 1. General requirements for a high school diploma and a Certificate of Achievement may be found in §2317 of Bulletin 741 (revised 2012). 2. A Louisiana state high school diploma cannot be denied to a student who meets the state minimum high school graduation requirements; however, in those instances in which BESE authorizes an LEA to impose more stringent academic requirements, a school system diploma may be denied. (Bulletin 741 §2317) 3. Graduation requirements for the College and Career Diploma may be found in §2318 of Bulletin 741, including the requirements for the following students: a. Students who entered the ninth grade prior to 2008-2009, b. Students entering the ninth grade in 2008-2009 and beyond who are completing the Louisiana Core 4 Curriculum, and c. Students entering the ninth grade in 2008-2009 and beyond who decide after their second year of high school to complete the Basic Core Curriculum. 4. Graduation requirements for the Career Diploma may be found in §2319 of Bulletin 741. 54

a. Any student who is at least fifteen years of age or will attain the age of fifteen during the next school year who scored at least at the Approaching Basic level on either the English Language Arts or Mathematics component of the eighth grade LEAP test and meets the criteria established in the Pupil Progression Plan of the LEA where the student is enrolled may be promoted to the ninth grade for the purpose of pursuing a career diploma. (Bulletin 1566 §503) i. The student must successfully complete the LEAP summer remediation program in the subject area of the component of the eighth grade LEAP test on which he/she scored at the Unsatisfactory level and must take the summer retest. ii. Acceptable Attendance Standards: For the 2009-2010 school year, students must meet the attendance requirements in the Pupil Progression Plan. For 2010-2011 and following, students must meet the state minimum attendance requirements to be eligible to receive grades. iii. Acceptable Behavior Standards: Students must meet the behavior requirements in the Pupil Progression Plan. iv. A student must participate in a dropout prevention and mentoring program approved by the BESE during his first year in high school. Acceptable programs include research-based dropout prevention programs such as Jobs for America's Graduates Multi-Year Program, Graduation Coach Program, or the school district may submit to the DOE a proven-effective, research-based dropout prevention and mentoring program other than the two listed above for approval by BESE. All programs must include the following components: (a) An academic catch-up component to address all the areas of student deficiency, (b) An adult mentoring component with an emphasis on workforce awareness and readiness, (c) Work awareness and work readiness skills component, and (d) A work-based learning component, such as job shadowing/job exploration/paid internships. b. Every student who seeks to pursue a career diploma shall have the written permission of his/her parent or other legal guardian on the Career Diploma Participation Form after a consultation with the school guidance counselor or other school administrator. The student and parent must be informed of the advantages and disadvantages of the different diploma pathways. The signature of the student and parent or guardian indicates that a determination has been made that the pursuit of a career diploma is appropriate and in the best interest of the student. The school principal shall also sign the form, acknowledging that appropriate counseling has taken place. (Bulletin 1566 §503) List the acceptable behavior requirements for students who are being promoted to the ninth grade in the career diploma pathway and who have not met the LEAP promotional standard for entering the ninth grade. Terrebonne students in the career diploma program shall follow the behavior requirements set forth by the district for all students as indicated in the Terrebonne Parish Code of Conduct manual. 55

List any other local requirements for students entering the career diploma pathway who are at least fifteen years of age or will attain the age of fifteen during the next school year and who did not meet the promotion standard, but who score Approaching Basic on either the math or English component of the eighth grade LEAP test. Students shall follow the same remediation course requirements as other students who are entering ninth grade and have not passed the LEAP test. They are required to pass the remediation course(s) needed before entering Carnegie Unit courses in the same subject area. Remediation courses consist of SDE ELA and/or Math Prep courses. 5. Prior to the beginning of the school year, students may switch from the Career Diploma pathway to the College and Career Diploma pathway or vice versa, provided all requirements are met. (Bulletin 741 §2317 G. and H.) 6. All ninth graders in the College and Career Diploma pathway will be enrolled in the LA Core 4 curriculum. After the student has attended high school a minimum of two years, the student, with parental permission, may choose to complete the LA Basic Core Curriculum, provided all the requirements are met. (Bulletin 741 §2318 A.) 7. In addition to completing a minimum of 23 or 24 Carnegie credits, students must meet the assessment requirements to earn a College and Career diploma or a Career Diploma. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) a. Incoming freshmen prior to 2010-2011 must pass the English Language Arts and Mathematics components of the GEE or LAA 2 and either the Science or Social Studies components of the GEE or LAA 2 to earn a high school diploma. i. Students with disabilities identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act shall be eligible for a waiver if the student meets all other graduation requirements and is able to pass two of the three required components of GEE or LAA 2, if the DOE review determines the student's disability significantly impacts his/her ability to pass the final required GEE test. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) b. Incoming freshmen in 2010-2011 and beyond must pass End-of-Course Tests in the following categories: i. English II or English III ii. Algebra I or Geometry iii. Biology or American History c. Students with disabilities identified under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act shall be eligible for a waiver if the student meets all other graduation requirements and is able to pass two of the three required EOC tests, and if the DOE review determines the student's disability significantly impacts his/her ability to pass the final required EOC test. (Bulletin 741 §2318 B. and §2319 B.) 8. Any student entering the ninth grade having scored Unsatisfactory in math and/or English on the eighth grade LEAP test must enroll in and pass a high school remedial course approved by BESE in the Unsatisfactory subject(s) (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) before earning Carnegie credit for any other English or mathematics course. (Bulletin 1566 §503 B.) 56

C. Scheduling 1. The purpose of scheduling within available time frames and staff resources shall be to meet the educational needs of students. (Bulletin 741 §901) a. A copy of the daily/weekly schedule of work providing for all subject areas in the curriculum shall be on file in the principal's office and shall be posted at all times. 2. Prior to student scheduling each year, each middle, junior, or high school shall provide the parent/guardian/legal custodian with a listing of course offerings, the content of each, and high school graduation requirements, where appropriate. a. By the end of the eighth grade, each student, including students with disabilities, shall develop, with the input of his family, an Individual Graduation Plan (IGP). Such a plan shall include a sequence of courses that is consistent with the student's stated goals for one year after graduation. b. Each student's IGP shall be reviewed annually thereafter by the student, parents, and school advisor and revised as needed. c. Every middle, junior, or high school shall require that the parent/guardian/legal custodian sign his/her child's schedule form and IGP for students in grades 812. 3. Student scheduling shall be individually appropriate and flexible to allow entry into and exit from courses and course sequences that are available for meeting curricular requirements.

VI. Retention Policy

State the number of times a student may be retained in each grade or level. Students shall not be assigned to the same grade for more than two (2) years at any grade level. Describe any additional LEA policies that may determine student retention. If Attendance requirements are not met, a parent, principal or school level review committee may request an appeal from the Student Services department, if the student shows success in the curriculum area. All retentions of students shall be within the following limitations: Grades K - 3* Allows for 1 retention only- (Five year maximum) Grade 4 Allows for 1 retention only- (Two year maximumLEAP High Stakes) Grades 5 - 7 Allows for 1 retention only-For students retained less than 2 times in lower grades (Four year maximum) Three year maximum for students retained 2 times in lower grades. Grade 8 Allows for 1 retention - (Two year maximum- LEAP High Stakes Testing Policy) Describe the intervention/remediation strategies to be used to prevent retention or in lieu of student retention at the lower grades. 57

The District RTI Plan for early intervention and remediation for any student performing below grade level reflects the following: Intervention is provided for all students who are not making the expected progress within a grade level utilizing a tiered process. Tier 1 ­ The Core Curriculum The Grade-Level Expectations, Transitional Grade-Level Expectations and the Common Core State Standards comprise the core curriculum for all students at each grade level. This core curriculum should be taught to all students through the use of instructional materials, including textbooks that are aligned to the GLEs and based on strategies that are supported by research. Research documents 80-90% of students will be successful at this tier of instruction without further intervention. Tier 2 ­ Strategic Intervention Based on universal screening assessments and progress monitoring, students are identified for additional assistance. Tier 2 intervention involves more targeted, short-term intervention that is provided in addition to, not in place of, Tier 1 instruction. Tier 2intervention is delivered in smaller groups and provides additional targeted instruction in skills or concepts from Tier 1 that specific students in the group are having difficulty mastering. Generally, 5-10% of students require this level of intervention in addition to Tier 1 or the core curriculum. Note that this tier generally involves short term intervention and that students enter and exit based on frequent progress monitoring during this intervention. Tier 3 ­ Intensive Intervention Lack of success based on frequent progress monitoring results while in Tier 2 will result in some students' needing even more intensive intervention in even smaller group sizes, more substantial blocks of time, a more highly trained interventionist, or explicit and systematic targeted instructional materials.

VII. Acceleration

Describe the policies and procedures that address the placement of students who demonstrate that they will benefit more from the instructional program at an advanced grade level. Address criteria for both grades K­8 and grades 9­12. Grades Seven through Twelve - Honors Program Initial placement of a student in any honors class will be based on: A. Student placement Initial placement of a student in any honors class for a specific subject will be based on the following: 1. The formula will use the most current test scores and final grades for the last three years, weighting those totals* and arriving at an index score. 2. Student scores on LEAP or iLEAP will be based on the Achievement Level in the subject tested as follows: 3 X Achievement Level = __________points Values of Achievement Levels scores are Advanced (5 points), Mastery (4 points), and Basic (3 points). 58

3. Students' final grade for the subject will be as follows: 1 X the Sum of the Final Grade (3 years) = _________points (Based on Quality points of grade) 4. Total Maximum points (Index) = _____________points [Add items (2) and (3) together] Total maximum points = 27 5. HONORS = 21 + POINTS, or with Teacher Recommendation = 18 - 20 points. If participation is in the best interest of the student, he/she may be placed in an honors class. Explanation: *Weighting the two totals gives comparable value to performance on one test and final grades for three years in the subject area. Once placed in an honors class, students will continue, in the succeeding years, to be placed in honors classes of the same subject as long as they are successful or until re-evaluation shows their proper placement to be at another level. Re-evaluation of any student's placement may be requested by the student, by his/her parents, or by teachers, administrators, or other professional school personnel. A committee composed of the administrator, the honors course teachers, school counselor, and parent will determine student placement. Conferences and meetings with parents to explain or discuss student placement will be held as needed. High School Credit for College Courses A. Prior to graduation from high school, students of high ability may be permitted to substitute college courses for high school credit provided the following conditions are met: 1. The granting of high school credit for college courses shall be limited to students who have earned 12 or more high school units of credit toward graduation. These students shall be in attendance in at least one high school class while enrolled in college courses. 2. A student shall meet the entrance requirements established by the college. 3. The principal of the school shall approve the advanced offering to be taken by the student in college. 4. The principal shall verify that the contents of the college course meet the standards and grade-level expectations of the high school course for which the student is receiving credit. 5. The student shall earn at least two or three college hours of credit per semester. A course, consisting of at least two college hours, shall be counted as no more than one unit of credit toward high school graduation. 6. The high school administrator shall establish a procedure with the college to receive reports of the student's class attendance and performance at six or nine week intervals. 7. College courses shall be counted as high school subjects for students to meet eligibility requirements in order to participate in extracurricular activities governed by voluntary state organizations. 8. Students may participate in college courses and special programs during regular or summer sessions. 59

9. For gifted students, entry into a college course for credit shall be stated in the student's IEP. Early College Admissions Policy A. High school students of high ability may be admitted to a college on a full-time basis. B. A student shall have maintained a "B" or better average on all work pursued during three years (six semesters) of high school. C. The student shall have earned a minimum composite score of 25 on the ACT or an SAT score of 1050; this score must be submitted to the college. D. A student shall be recommended by his/her high school principal. E. Upon earning a minimum of 24 semester hours at the college level, the student shall be eligible to receive a high school diploma. 1. Forms provided by the DOE and completed by the college registrar certifying that the student has earned 24 semester hours of college credit; and 2. A Certificate of High School Credits. F. A student not regularly enrolled in the current school year in the high school shall be automatically eliminated from participation in all high school activities, with the exception of high school graduation ceremonies. (R.S. 17:183.5) Alternative - Grades 9 - 12 Students may earn high school credit through Proficiency Examinations or Correspondence courses as well as dual enrollment as allowed through Bulletin 741. Describe the LEA criteria for acceleration, including who is involved in the decisionmaking process, what evaluation criteria are used, and other local policies. Terrebonne Parish School District Acceleration Administrative Procedures govern the placement of students who meet the prescribed criteria for placement in appropriate classes. A committee of educators involving supervisory level personnel met on June 30, 2006 to determine procedures and evaluation criteria to be used. The Acceleration Placement Committee shall be composed of the student's classroom teacher, parent or guardian, the principal, and the guidance counselor. Describe any applicable policies and procedures for grade "skipping." Students may be referred by a classroom teacher or parent. Students shall have been identified as an exceptional child as validated by Louisiana Bulletin 1508 criteria. The referral must provide background on the student's academic status and differentiation strategies used to meet the academic needs of the student. A school-based Acceleration Placement Committee shall meet to review the referral. Acceleration options for consideration include such practices as grade skipping and acceleration in one or more specific content areas. Describe any policies governing services for gifted students. Gifted Program - Grades K - 12 Gifted students are those who demonstrate abilities that give evidence of high performance in academic and intellectual aptitude which are determined by the criteria 60

set forth in Louisiana Bulletin 1508. The students follow the regular education curriculum at an individualized pace with additional opportunities for enrichment as designated through an Individualized Educational Plan (IEP). The implementation of an IEP for each student provides the basis for instruction with emphasis upon individualized capabilities in both the provision of enrichment activities and the rate of presentation in all areas of which the student has strengths. Because of the unique needs of gifted students, their curriculum must be differentiated in content, process, and product. These students should become actual investigators of real problems or topics by using appropriate methods of inquiry to add new knowledge, ideas, or products to their fields of study. A. The curriculum will be built around the four program goals, which are as follows: 1. To develop the desire and ability to apply higher level thinking skills in solving problems. 2. To develop creative thinking processes. 3. To allow the child to pursue areas and topics of interest according to his own unique talents and abilities. 4. To introduce the child to curriculum and experiences not part of the regular classroom program. Talented Program - Grades K - 12 Students who possess measurable abilities that give clear evidence of unique talent in the visual and performing arts and have been identified as Talented in accordance with Bulletin 1508 for special education classification are enrolled in a talented program to meet their needs. The program allows students the opportunity to pursue individualized goals and objectives established in the Individualized Education Program (IEP). The implementation of the IEP for each student provides the basis for instruction with emphasis upon individualized capabilities in the areas of which the student is identified talented. A. Carnegie Credit for Middle School Students 1. Students who intend to take a GLE-based course for Carnegie credit in middle school should successfully complete a seventh grade course in that content area that addresses both the seventh and eighth grade GLEs. Upon completion of the course, the LEA shall administer a test based on the eighth grade GLEs. The LEA shall publish in its Pupil Progression Plan the criteria for placement of students in the Carnegie credit course, one of which shall be the student's performance on the eighth grade GLE test. Other suggested criteria include the student's performance in the seventh grade course, standardized test scores, and teacher recommendation. All policies regarding Carnegie credit for middle school students are found in Bulletin 741 §2321. List the LEA requirements for placement of middle school students in Carnegie credit courses. In order for middle school students in Terrebonne Parish School District to be considered for Carnegie credit courses, students must complete a seventh grade course in that content area that addresses both the seventh and eighth grade 61

GLE's/CCSS. Following completion of the course, students will be administered a placement test to determine student readiness for the Carnegie Unit Course. B. Early Graduation 1. Each LEA shall develop an early graduation program allowing students to accelerate their academic progress, complete all state graduation requirements, and receive a high school diploma in less than four years. a. The early graduation program may include distance education (§2395), dual enrollment (§2327), and Carnegie credit earned in middle school (§2321). b. LEAs shall not have any policies or requirements that would prevent students from graduating in less than four years. Describe the components and requirements of the local early graduation program. Students will be provided an opportunity to graduate in less than 4 years provided that the minimum requirements for graduation from high school as set forth by BESE are met. A diploma may be denied, however, in those instances in which BESE authorizes an LEA to impose more stringent academic requirements. The early graduation program may include distance education, dual enrollment, and Carnegie credit earned in middle school. Further, the use of flexible course scheduling, distance learning and online courses will be encouraged to facilitate graduating in less than four years. C. Accelerated Student Achievement Pathway Program 1. The Accelerated Student Achievement Pathway (ASAP) Program is an intervention process of the College and Career Readiness (CCR) Office. This process is designed to allow students the opportunity to accelerate the attainment of Carnegie units required for high school graduation. If participating, describe the components and requirements of the local ASAP Program. Students will be provided an opportunity to accelerate the attainment of Carnegie units required for high school graduation through the implementation of a distance education program. The distance education program shall incorporate the foundation skills of the State content Standards and shall comply with all policies set forth by BESE as stated in current Bulletin 741, with the exception of ~907, Secondary Class Times and Carnegie Credit.

VIII. Remediation

A. Legal Authorization 1. R.S. 17:24.4 G provides that those students who fail to meet required proficiency levels on the state administered criterion-referenced tests of the Louisiana 62

Educational Assessment Program shall receive remedial education programs that comply with regulations adopted by BESE. 2. R.S. 17:394­400 is the established legislation for the remedial education programs. 3. A program of remedial education shall be put into place by local parish and city school systems following regulations adopted by BESE pursuant to R.S. 17:24.4. All eligible students shall be provided with appropriate remedial instruction. (R.S. 17:395 A). B. Purpose 1. The intent of remedial educational programs is to improve student achievement in the grade-appropriate skills identified as deficient on the state's criterion-referenced testing program for grades 4 and 8, the Graduation Exit Examination, and the Endof-Course Tests. (R.S.17:395 B and BESE Policy). C. State Mandatory Requirements 1. Any public elementary or secondary student, including a student with a disability participating in LEAP, who does not meet the performance standards established by the Department and approved by BESE, as measured by the State criterionreferenced test, shall be provided remedial education. (R.S. 17:397) a. For the Graduation Exit Examination (GEE) and LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 (LAA 2) 50 hours of remediation per year shall be provided to students in each content area (English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies) they do not pass. For End-of-Course (EOC) tests, 30 hours of remediation per year shall be provided for students who do not pass. b. Remediation in the form of summer school (50 hours of instruction per subject) shall be provided to both 4th and 8th grade students who score at the Approaching Basic or Unsatisfactory achievement level on the spring LEAP (English Language Arts and/or Mathematics) tests. i. Summer remediation and end-of-summer retests must be offered by school systems at no cost to students who did not take the spring LEAP tests or who failed to achieve the required level on LEAP. ii. All students with disabilities who participate in LEAP testing should receive services along with regular education students in summer programs, with special support provided as needed, including accommodations. iii. Students with disabilities who participate in LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 1 (LAA 1), are not eligible to attend the LEAP summer remediation programs.

63

iv. Students with disabilities who participate in LEAP Alternate Assessment, Level 2 (LAA 2), are eligible to attend LEAP summer remediation programs. c. Remediation shall be provided to students who score at the Unsatisfactory level on the LEAP Science and Social Studies tests. d. Remediation is recommended for 4th and 8th grade students who score at the Approaching Basic level on the LEAP Science and Social Studies tests. e. Each LEA shall provide transportation to and from the assigned LEAP Remediation summer site(s) from, at a minimum, a common pick up point. D. Local Program Development and Evaluation

1. In addition to any state guidelines, the remediation plan should describe clearly

how the remedial education program will be implemented for each grade level and for each test area of the LEAP/CRT. The plan must describe how all students, including students with disabilities, will be provided remediation to overcome their educational deficits, as identified through the results of the LEAP/CRT.

School Year Intervention/Remediation Program

Purpose: A program of remedial education shall be put into place by the local parish system following regulations adopted pursuant to R.S. 17:24.4(G) & R.S.17.394-400). All eligible students shall be provided with appropriate remedial instruction. (R.S. 17:395A). The intent of remedial educational programs is to improve student achievement in the grade appropriate skills identified as deficient on the state's LEAP criterion-referenced testing program in grades 4 and 8. (R.S. 17:395 B and BESE Policy) All Remedial Education Programs are designed to assist students, including identified students with disabilities, to overcome their educational deficits identified as a result of the state's criterion-referenced testing program for grades 4 and 8. o List the objectives for your school year intervention/remediation program. Elementary Remediation A. English/Language Arts Sixty percent (60%) of the students who scored Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic" on the LEAP English Language Arts test for Grades 4 or 8 and/or were retained in Grades 4 or 8 will demonstrate proficiency in previously deficient areas by scoring Basic or better in those areas on the re-administered LEAP test. B. Mathematics Fifty percent (50%) of the students who scored Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic on the LEAP mathematics test for Grades 4 or 8 will demonstrate proficiency in previously deficient areas by scoring Basic or better in those areas on the re-administered LEAP test. 64

o Describe the criteria used to determine which 4th and 8th grade students, including students participating in LAA 2, are eligible for school year intervention/remediation. Student Eligibility: A Remedial Education Program for the Terrebonne Parish School System, will be provided for students who do not meet the state performance standards of Basic or above as measured by the LEAP tests for Grades 4 and 8 in ELA and Mathematics. Eligible students in identified special education programs will be included in the program. LAA 2 students participate in both the after-school tutoring program and during the school day remediation programs. o Does the district suggest or require a minimum pupil/teacher ratio for remediation programs at each individual school? If so, what is the pupil/teacher ratio at each grade level? A pupil teacher ratio of 15/1 or less is recommended. Many fourth grade classes are about 8/1. o Does the district suggest or require a minimum number of remediation services hours each school should provide to its eligible students? If so, what is the minimum? A minimum of 50 hours of remediation shall be provided in Grades 4 and 8, and GEE in ELA and Math. A minimum of 30 minutes per week is provided for grades 4 and 8 in Science and Social Studies. o Approximately when will the school year intervention/remediation programs begin in your district? The program for Grades 4 and 8 begins during the month of October near the end of the nine weeks. o Describe the criteria used to select teachers and/or paraprofessionals who provide instruction in the school year intervention/remediation. Teacher Qualifications Teachers will possess the appropriate certification/qualification (R.S. 17:398 A) as required by the Louisiana State Board. Services for which teachers will be paid will include time for teaching in 90 minute blocks. Experienced fourth and eighth grade teachers, if available, will be hired to tutor in this program. If the students are participating in remediation classes in the 4 X 4 setting, the class becomes part of the teachers' regularly scheduled day. All attempts are made to hire only certified teachers. We have also asked principals to schedule their best teachers in these remedial classes. o Describe the materials and methodology to be used throughout the district in school year intervention/remediation. Parents will be given prior written notice of the student's program placement and a copy of the letter will be placed in the student's cumulative folder. The plan is to provide an AFTER-SCHOOL TUTORIAL for no more than two days a week. Experienced fourth and eighth grade teachers, if available, will be hired to tutor 65

in this program. Transportation will be provided. Under special circumstances some students may be provided tutoring during the fine arts and/or physical education periods. Students will be provided one hour each in ELA and Mathematics and thirty minutes each in Science and Social Studies (90 minutes per tutoring day). Students will receive instruction to remediate the skills in which he/she is deficient on LEAP or iLEAP in individual and/or small group settings based on numbers of registered students for the program. Efforts are also to maintain the other skills tested on the LEAP test of the respective grade level. Each student's program will be individualized to provide for specific needs. Added skill maintenance and reinforcement will be received through regular classroom instruction. Classes in Basic Mathematics and Basic English will be offered at the junior high level. We have also added the Scantron Benchmark Assessments to assist teachers in identifying weak skill areas. (*ISR= LEAP: Individual Student Report) Program implementation is scheduled for two days per week. (LEAP Tutoring Program) A variety of materials and equipment, including local and state curriculum documents, textbooks, workbooks, skill packets, computer software, and a double-dose curriculum approach, will be employed to promote student interest and achievement in addition to meeting program objectives. Regular classroom teachers and remedial teachers of the students will coordinate their work as much as possible and will maintain communication relative to each student's academic performance in the required subject area. Student progress will be assessed and documented throughout the program using teacher-made and commercial tests and quizzes. (Written nine-week progress reports will be issued to students and parents.) A list of eligible students shall be maintained at the schools and in the central office. Teachers will use the SDE Tutoring Guide activities, and selected commercial test prep materials such as Buckle Down, Achieve LA, and the Coach series from Triumph Publishing Co., as well as, Success Maker Computer Software. These along with teacher made materials and the La. Tutoring Guides online, EAGLE, PASS, and Newton are also used as resources. o Describe the form of documentation collected from students/parents who refuse school year remediation services. Should a parent or legal guardian of a student refuse to permit the student to attend/participate in the remedial education class, the parent or legal guardian must go to the school to sign and date a "Refusal to Accept Remediation Statement" following an explanation of Louisiana's Tests requirements leading to the receipt of a high school diploma. A copy of the signed statement will be given to the parent and the original copy placed in the student's cumulative folder. o Describe how science and social studies remediation is implemented. A minimum of 30 minutes per week is provided for grades 4 and 8 in Science and Social Studies. The Social Studies component is combined with the day of 66

ELA and the Grade 4-"SRA Social Studies Skills Handbook" is taught for 30 minutes. The Science portion is combined on the day of Mathematics tutoring and the Grade 4-"SRA Science Skills Handbook" is used for instruction. o Describe the district's plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for school year remediation. Local funds will be utilized in the day-to-day operation of this program through payroll; purchase of materials and supplies; enrollment and participation of remedial education students in other federally-funded projects, i.e. After-School Tutorials, Title I programs, special ed., etc.; usage of local buildings, utilities, equipment, long distance telephone calls, accounting services for program, and providing a portion of the salary for a LEAP Remediation Data Clerk, as warranted. o Describe the district's plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students who are participating in school year remediation. Student Assessment Students scoring Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic on the LEAP language arts or mathematics test for Grades 4 or 8 shall participate in a remedial program during the after-school tutorial as documented by attendance records. Students may utilize the EAGLE system, as well as, the PASS program. Also the Scantron Assessment which is given four times a year will be a tool to measure growth and assessment of skills. The SuccessMaker software program also has printouts of individual skill assessment. Program tests in language arts and mathematics will be used to determine the extent of student achievement following remediation. A student must score at least sixty-seven (67%) percent or above on the skills in which he/she was found to be deficient. Commercial and locally structured teacher-made written Composition activities and/or related topics, quizzes, and tests on which students must score sixty-seven percent (67%) or above will be used in the program. The program will include the use of integrated science and social studies skill material, computer software programs, both commercial and teacher-made activity, quiz, and test materials on which a student must score 67% or above to exhibit skill proficiency. Student assessment will also be based on the LEAP Test(s) results of those 4th and 8th, grade students who were retained for the year.

Summer Remediation Program

o List the objectives for your summer remediation program. A. English/Language Arts 50% of the students who scored Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic on the LEAP English Language Arts test for Grades 4 or 8 and/or were retained in Grades 4 or 8 will demonstrate proficiency in previously 67

deficient areas by scoring Basic or better in those areas on the readministered LEAP test. B. Mathematics 50% of the students who score "Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic" on the LEAP mathematics test for Grades 4 or 8 will demonstrate proficiency in previously deficient areas by scoring "Basic" or better in those areas on the re-administered LEAP test. o Describe the criteria used to determine which 4th and 8th grade students are eligible for summer remediation. Student Eligibility: A LEAP Summer Remedial Education Program for the Terrebonne Parish School System, as mandated by Louisiana R.S. 17:399 A, will be provided for students who do not meet the state performance standards of Basic or above as measured by the LEAP and LAA 2 tests for Grades 4 and 8 in ELA and Mathematics. Eligible students in identified special education programs will be included in the program. The program is based on students who score Unsatisfactory and Approaching Basic during LEAP Spring testing annually. o Does the district suggest or require a minimum pupil/teacher ratio for summer remediation programs at each individual school? If so, what is the pupil/teacher ratio at each grade level? A pupil teacher ratio of 15/1 or less is recommended. Many fourth grade classes are about 8/1 ratio especially in the summer. o Describe the schedule for your summer remediation program. Please be reminded that the district must schedule a minimum of 50 hours per subject at both 4th and 8th grade levels. LEAP 21 Summer School - Grades 4 and 8 A LEAP summer school program will be conducted from May 28, 2013 to the date on which the state will administer LEAP retest (June 25-27). (Classes end June 24, 2013.) This allows for 16 days of instruction (4 days per week), three and a half hours a day in ELA and Mathematics (56 hours). All students scoring Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic in English/Language Arts and/or Mathematics will be eligible to participate at no cost to the student. o Describe the criteria used to select teachers and/or paraprofessionals who provide instruction in the summer remediation. Please be reminded that all teachers selected must be certified. Teacher Qualifications Teachers will possess the appropriate certification/qualification (R.S. 17:398 A) as required by the Louisiana State Board. Services for which teachers will be paid will include time for teaching and instructional preparation on a per hour basis. An application process is used about one month before the start of summer school. Teachers are ranked by experience teaching in grades 4 or 8 and other criteria on a rubric and hired according to need based on the 68

number of students as well as the subject area. Every effort is made to hire certified teachers only. o Describe the materials and methodology to be used throughout the district in summer remediation. Students are taught in three and a half hour blocks per subject area. Students' spring test results are reviewed in instructional planning. Targeted areas are identified and instruction and review is planned based on weak areas identified on the students' test profiles. Instructional materials used are varied and include LEAP Tutoring Guides (SDE), Strategies for Success in Reading and Mathematics, Problems Plus, Coach, Achieve LA, Soaring Scores in ELA and Mathematics, Write Source books and kit, local Math Manipulative Kits (Grade 4) and the SuccessMaker software program. Teacher direct instruction is expected along with practice and writing, and especially instruction on how to respond to a constructed response question. Training is conducted with teachers setting expectations for the type of instruction needed prior to Summer school beginning. o Describe the form of documentation collected for students and parents who refuse summer remediation services. Should a parent or legal guardian of a student refuse to permit the student to attend/participate in the remedial education class, the parent or legal guardian must go to the school to sign and date a "Refusal to Accept Remediation Statement" following an explanation of Louisiana's LEAP Tests /High Stakes requirements leading to the receipt of a high school diploma. A copy of the signed statement will be given to the parent and the original copy placed in the student's cumulative folder. o Describe the district's plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for summer remediation. Local funds will be utilized in the day-to-day operation of this program through payroll; purchase of materials and supplies; enrollment and participation of remedial education students in other federally-funded projects, i.e. After-School Tutorials, Title I programs, special ed., etc.; usage of local buildings, utilities, equipment, long distance telephone calls, accounting services for program, and providing a portion of the salary for a LEAP Remediation Data Clerk, as warranted. o Describe the district's plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students who are participating in summer remediation. Student Assessment Students scoring Unsatisfactory or Approaching Basic on the Spring LEAP language arts or mathematics test for Grades 4 or 8 shall participate in a LEAP Summer remedial program for a minimum of fifteen instructional days as documented by attendance records. The Summer Test results will be compared in August annually for student growth in achievement and success in meeting the Basic or above level proficient performance. The goal is a 50% or better success rate in the summer program. 69

GEE, LAA 2, and EOC Remediation

o Describe the GEE, LAA 2, and EOC remediation provided for students. Include the following: o Program Description Student selection criteria Student Eligibility The Remediation Education Program mandated by Louisiana R. S. 17:398 B in the Terrebonne Parish School System will be provided for secondary students, including students in special education programs, who do not meet the performance standards established by the Department and approved by the State Board, as measured by the mandated State tests. The program is offered at no cost to students. Pupil/Teacher ratio A pupil teacher ratio of 15/1 is recommended. The maximum in GEE remedial classes should be no greater than 20/1 ratio especially in the summer. Instructional time A GEE Summer Program will be conducted from May 2013 to June 2013, (16 days/4 days per week) prior to the June retest dates - June, 2013. Each subject area is offered in the summer in three and one-half hour blocks. A total of 56 hours in each subject are offered. (Minimum - 50 hours) An EOC Summer Program will be conducted on the same dates for any students needing remediation in EOC courses. A minimum of 30 hours is required. Selection criteria for teachers and/or paraprofessionals The range of class size will be from seven to twenty students per teacher who will possess the appropriate certification/qualifications as required by the Louisiana State Board. Teachers will be employed for one and one-half hours per day/a class period, which will allow time for instructional preparation in the designated subject area. Teachers should be certified in the subject area they will teach. A rubric is used to evaluate the teacher application process in selecting teachers. Materials and methodology to be used GEE Remediation Classes/ GEE and EOC Summer School: A variety of materials, including state Comprehensive Curriculum Standards, SDE-GEE 21 Lesson Guides, American Book Co.'s Preparing for the GEE in ELA and Mathematics, GEE Coach materials, textbooks, workbooks, skill packets, software, computers, etc., will be employed to promote student interest and achievement in addition to meeting program objectives. EOC preparation books will be used which address the GLEs / CCSS (American Book Company Preparing for the EOC in English, Algebra, Geometry, Biology, and U. S. History). 70

Program type ­ Examples: remediation courses, after-school tutoring, Saturday tutoring, summer school, other: List all that apply GEE Summer school is conducted annually. Classes are in three and a half hour blocks per subject area. Classes are conducted for 16 instructional days, preceding the retest dates. EOC classes are also conducted during the summer school session for any subject areas needed by students. Parents will be given prior written notice of the student's program placement (schedule). A copy of the letter (schedule) will be placed in the student's cumulative folder. Remediation classes will be available on the preceding dates in (all) subject areas tested during the fall and spring semester. Students needing remediation in more than one subject area may need more than one remedial course. The instructional component of the Secondary Remedial Education Program will provide for as much current course content as feasible aligned with the student's skill needs being addressed on the GEE ISR - Individual Student Report and based on state standards (GLE's)and benchmarks. However, when prerequisite skill teaching (individualized or small group) is necessary, indication of such will be documented in writing on each student's record. This may be provided by work in a computer Lab or through other alternative computer programs. As a means of keeping abreast regarding students' current course content, subject area teachers, ancillary program teachers, and teachers of students in the program will maintain communication relative to the student's academic performance and well being.

Documentation of students' and parents' refusal to accept remediation Should a parent or legal guardian of a student refuse to permit the student to attend/participate in the remedial education class, the parent or legal guardian must go to the school to sign and date a "Refusal to Accept Remediation Statement" following an explanation of Louisiana's LEAP/EOC Tests /High Stakes requirements leading to the receipt of a high school diploma. A copy of the signed statement will be given to the parent and the original copy placed in the student's cumulative folder. Plan for coordination of state, federal, and local funds for remediation Local funds will be utilized in the day-to-day operation of this program through payroll; purchase of materials and supplies; enrollment and participation of remedial education students in other federally funded projects, Title I programs, special ed., etc.; usage of local buildings, utilities, equipment, long distance telephone calls, and accounting services for program. 71

Evaluation plan for documenting evidence of achievement/growth of students To meet guidelines issued by the Louisiana Department of Education and determine program effectiveness, an evaluation will be completed at the end of the program based on GEE /EOC retest results.

IX. Alternative Schools/Programs/Settings

A. Definition 1. Alternative schools/programs serve students who are not succeeding in the traditional educational setting and offer a venue which aids in preventing these students from dropping out of school. Alternative schools/programs provide educational and other services to students who have a variety of behavioral and other needs which cannot be met adequately in a traditional school setting. (Refer to Bulletin 741 §2903 and Bulletin 131: Louisiana Alternative Education Standards) List the written policies for all alternatives to regular placements. The primary goal of the Alternative Program is to promote reform, innovation, and continuous improvement in alternative education to ensure that students acquire the skills and knowledge they need to meet challenging state academic standards and to prepare them for a successful future. The long-range effects of this program will be the reduction of unsupervised children engaging in criminal activity because of out-of-school suspensions and to continue a student's instructional program despite not sitting in the traditional classroom. The student's daily progress and matrix history, in regards to behavior, attendance, and academics, is used to measure a student's achievement of the goals. The goal is for the student to exit the program back into the traditional program with success through meeting promotional standards, behavior and attendance criteria to succeed in traditional programs. Student achievement is measured in all courses daily, weekly and monthly. Students are identified for GED eligibility and provided preparation and opportunity to take the GED with progress documented and/or remediation provided. Students may earn Carnegie units for high school graduation. Student progress is charted on a daily, weekly, monthly basis and upon exit from the program to determine student's achievement of individual goals. Special Education shall review all placements of special education students at any time. Review to be conducted by alternative school administrator, teacher and staff. Review by CWA supervisors. The review involves attendance; following rules/expectations; academic achievement and the ability to respect others. The review for minor referrals may take place after thirty days. All mandatory placements must finish assign times or appeal to the Terrebonne Parish School District Board for early readmission back to the base school. Give a brief description of each approved alternative school/program/setting operating in the LEA, including the entrance and promotion criteria. Grades K through Twelve ­ East Street Alternative Program An Alternative Disciplinary Program is offered for students in grades K-12 at East Street Program: 72

The program's goal is to continue with educational services by enrolling students with behavioral issues at the alternative site. As mandated by R.S. 17:416.2, placement of all suspended /expelled students in grades K ­ 12 as follows: 1. Tier I East Street Program Long Term for K-12 Regular and Special Education expulsion including drugs, weapons, and behavior. Juvenile Detention Center Placement of students through the judicial system

2. Tier II -

Describe the LEA's procedures for placement in adult education programs. The requirements for students to enter the adult education program in Terrebonne Parish are as follows: 1. Students must be 18 years of age or older to enroll in the adult education program. 2. The parent or a guardian responsible for the school attendance of a child who is under the age of 18, and who is enrolled in school beyond his/her sixteenth birthday may request a waiver from the district superintendent for the child to exit school to enroll and attend the adult education program. A request for waiver may be granted for one of the following hardships: a. Pregnant or actively parenting; b. Incarcerated or adjudicated; c. Institutionalized or living in a residential facility; d. Chronic physical or mental illness; e. Family and/or economic hardships. B. Connections Process 1. Connections is a one-year process for over-age students to receive targeted instruction and accelerated remediation. Students who are 15 years of age by September 30th and 2 or more grade levels behind are eligible to enter the process. Describe the local process for placing students in the Connections Process. Students who are 15 years of age by September 30th (beginning in 2001) and are two or more grade levels behind academically are reviewed in May annually. Student academic records and test histories are gathered and a committee of educators including school administrators, counselors, and district supervisors (including Special education, Assessment, and Secondary) meet to review the student data gathered and make a decision based on a consensus of the committee regarding placement. Once the student is declared eligible and selected to be offered placement into the Connections program, the decision is discussed with the student and parent. A required orientation meeting including the parent, student and school committee (administrator, master teacher, JAG specialist, special education teacher, etc.) is conducted. Describe the components and requirements of the local Connections Process. 73

1. All students in the Connections program will be in the 8th Grade and are required to take all four parts of the 8th grade LEAP or LAA 2 test (if eligible). 2. Instructional objectives for Connections students will be used to provide intervention strategies for English and math skills for the entire school year. In addition, Connections students will be allowed to schedule none-core elective Carnegie unit courses. 3. Connections students will be housed on a campus where 9th grade Carnegie units are taught, in order for them to be scheduled into elective Carnegie unit classes.

X. Other Policies and Procedures

A. Policies on Records and Reports 1. Local school systems shall maintain permanent records of each student's placement, K-12. Each record shall be maintained as a part of the student's cumulative file. 2. Student records for the purposes of these Guidelines shall include the following: Course grades; Scores on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program; Scores on local testing programs and screening instruments necessary to document the local criteria for promotion; Information (or reason) for student placement (See definition of placement.); Documentation of results of student participation in remedial and alternative programs; Special education documents, as specified in the approved IDEA-Part B, LEA application; A copy of the letter informing the parent of either the placement of the student in or the removal of the student from a remedial program; and A statement regarding written notification to the parent concerning retention and due process procedures. (Bulletin 741 §703)

Describe any additional local policies that relate to the maintenance of records and reports that affect student promotion and/or retention. Policies on Records and Reports The principal shall be responsible for keeping an accurate and complete record of the work done by each pupil during each year that he/she attends school 74

under the jurisdiction of said principal. While this responsibility may be delegated to a teacher or a secretary, the final responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of these records shall rest with the principal. The Terrebonne Parish School System shall maintain permanent records of each student's placement, K-12. Each record shall be kept as a part of the student's cumulative file. A. Cumulative Cards and Folders 1. If a child transfers from one school to another within the parish, the principal of the second school attended by the child should request that the principal of the former school send the cumulative card and cumulative folder of said child to the principal of the new school attended. 2. A student transferred from a state-approved school, in or out-of-state, will be allowed credit for work completed in the former school. When a student transfers from one school to another, a properly certified transcript, showing the student's record of attendance, achievement, and the units of credit earned is required. The principal of any approved school receiving a student from an unapproved school, in or out-of-state, should carefully investigate the composition of the unapproved school and its instructional program. The school issuing the high school diploma must account for all credit required for graduation and its record must show when and where this credit was earned. The student may be required to provide further evidence of proficiency in the subject matter for which credit is claimed. 3. The cumulative cards of dropouts should be filed with the principals of the secondary schools for a period of two (2) years after which these records will be transferred to the Terrebonne Parish School Board Office Building where they will become part of the inactive records. 4. The cumulative folder must contain the student's records in accordance with the requirements of Bulletin 1566, Section II D, Bulletin 741, and Terrebonne Parish Policies and Procedures. 5. Records to be included in addition to other local requirements are listed below. Course grades Scores on Louisiana Educational Assessment Program Scores on local testing programs and screening instruments necessary to document the local criteria for promotion Information (or reasons) for student placement (See Appendix A, #32, definition of regular placement) Information on the outcome of student participation in remedial and alternative programs Special education documents as specified in the Individuals with 75

Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) - Part B Application A copy of the letter informing the parent of either the placement of the student in or the removal of the student from either a compensatory or a remedial program - (must be kept on file) A copy of the parent's written consent for either the student to be placed in or removed from an alternative to regular placement (must be kept on file) Written documentation of the SBLC procedures and action regarding qualified handicapped students under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Written documentation of the SBLC procedures and action regarding qualified handicapped students under Act 854 of the Louisiana Legislative Dyslexia Law (Bulletin 1903).

NOTE: When a decision is made to retain a student, a record will be maintained to reflect the parent/guardian has been informed in writing of the decision and of the system's due process procedure relating to placement procedures as defined in the system's Pupil Progression Plan. B. Reports 1. Reports to parents must be issued on the fourth school day following the close of each grading period with the exception that the report cards for the final grading period shall be issued on the last day of school. 2. Mandatory progress-deficiency reports must be sent to the parents or guardians of all students, grades K ­ 8 (non-4X4 schools), in danger of failing a grading period before the half-mark of the grading period has elapsed. Teachers are encouraged to send progress reports from the half-point to the end of the grading period. Teachers in 4 X 4 schools must inform parents if student is in danger of failing a course. 3. Parents must be informed in writing prior to the placement of a student in either a compensatory or remedial program or removal of the student from such a program. 4. Parents will be given all test results of their child or children upon request. C. Health Records 1. The supervisors of Child Welfare and Attendance and the supervisor of School Nurse Programs can check health records of students to see that the immunization statute is being enforced. 2. Survey teams, whose proper function under our state and federal laws is the public health, can see any cumulative folder of a student for medical purposes.

76

3. A copy of medical records can be shared with any agency involved in Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) without a release signed by the parent or guardian. D. Special Education Reporting The reporting procedures for all special education students' follows established Terrebonne Parish Policy. Progress toward reaching IEP goals and objectives are sent to parents of exceptional students at the same time as non-disabled peers receive reports to parents. B. Policies on Due Process 1. Due process procedures for teachers, students, and parents shall be specified in each local Pupil Progression Plan as related to student placement. The local school system must ensure that these procedures do not contradict the due process rights of students with disabilities, as defined in the IDEA-Part B. Describe the LEA's policies on due process procedures for teachers, students and parents as related to student placement for the following: o Regular education students o Students with disabilities o Section 504 students Policies on Due Process P. L. 17:24.4 (ACT 146 SUBSECTION G) SECTION G2 - SECTION 504 The procedure to be followed in resolving a complaint by students, parents, teachers, or other qualified individuals regarding a student's program placement, instructional program and/or process, assigned letter grades, due process rights for Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall be accomplished in accordance with the following: 1. The person or persons making the complaint will first discuss the matter with the student's teacher(s) and principal and/or the Review Committee at the school building level. If deemed necessary, the appropriate principal and complainant will be involved in further discussion with one or more supervisors of instruction. Supervisors of Child Welfare and Attendance may be included in the discussion. (Cases involving a complaint by teachers shall be referred to the principal. The remainder of the following steps will occur as necessary.) 2. If, as a result of the discussion, the matter is not resolved, the complainant may request a meeting, in the attempt to resolve the complaint, with the Assistant Superintendent. The assistant superintendent has the delegated authority to include in this meeting the professional personnel deemed necessary by him/her to resolve the complaint. 77

3. If the matter is not resolved, the complainant may initiate the complaint in writing to the superintendent of the Terrebonne Parish School System within five days of the meeting with the assistant superintendent. Full details of the complaint must be in writing. 4. The superintendent and any professional personnel he may choose to designate shall investigate the complaint and communicate a written response to the complainant within twenty days from the date of the written complaint. 5. The complainant or complainant's representative will be given the opportunity during this twenty day period to present evidence, including the opportunity to question the parties involved in the complaint. 6. If the complaint is still unresolved, the complainant may appeal the final resolution of the superintendent to the Terrebonne Parish School Board following the receipt of the superintendent's decision. 7. If the complaint is still unresolved, the complainant may appeal the final resolution of the Terrebonne Parish School Board to the Louisiana State Department of Education after the receipt of the school board's decision. Information concerning this complaint procedure regarding student placement will be disseminated upon request to interested individuals in Terrebonne Parish. TITLE IX OF THE EDUCATION AMENDMENT OF 1972 Grievance Procedures In compliance with the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, as adopted by resolution of the Terrebonne Parish School Board on December 16, 1975, it shall be the affirmed policy of the Terrebonne Parish School Board to adhere to the provisions of Title IX as affirmed in the Board's resolution. In keeping with the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 the Terrebonne Parish School Board adopts and publishes the following grievance procedures providing for the prompt and equitable resolution of student and employee complaints alleging any action which violates the provisions of the said Title. Any student, professional employee and non-professional employee who lleges that any policy or practice of the Terrebonne Parish School Board is contrary to the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 shall be directed according to the following procedures in registering a complaint. In all cases of alleged non-compliance the principles of due process shall apply. I. Grievance Procedure 78

A. Student personnel 1. Students alleging non-compliance as a result of policy and procedure of the Terrebonne Parish School Board shall first register their complaint with the employee or person to whom they are directly responsible. This complaint shall be submitted in writing beginning with the classroom teacher or department head, and then to the principal of the school, should the allegation not be resolved at the first level of authority. 2. In the event the alleged complaint cannot be resolved between the aggrieved parties and the principal, then the appeal from the principal's decision shall be directed to the appropriate staff member or supervisor, according to the established Table of Organization as printed in the Policies and Procedures Terrebonne Parish School Board.

B. Professional employees 1. The aggrieved party shall register, in writing, the allegation directly to the Department Head, School Principal, or Supervisor, and specifically to that person to whom the employee is immediately responsible. 2. Should the complaint not be resolved at the initial level of authority, the appeal shall be directed to the appropriate staff member or supervisor, according to the established Table of Organization as printed in the Policies and Procedures Terrebonne Parish School Board.

II.

Appeal Procedure A. A written statement of the complaint, including an explanation as to how the provisions of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 were violated, shall be required. B. Should the complaint not be resolved at the initial level of authority, the appeal shall be directed to the appropriate staff member or supervisor, according to the established Table of Organization as printed in the Policies and Procedures - Terrebonne Parish School Board. C. In the event the complaint is not resolved at the school level or according to the Table of Organization as printed in the Policies and Procedures Terrebonne Parish School Board, then the grievance shall be registered with the appropriate Supervisor at the Terrebonne Parish School Board Office, P. O. Box 5097, Houma, Louisiana 70361, Telephone No. 876-7400.

79

D. Should the office of the Supervisor of Title IX not resolve the complaint to the satisfaction of all parties, the aggrieved party may exercise the right of appeal. This appeal shall be directed to the Superintendent and then to the Terrebonne Parish School Board within five days after the Superintendent has rendered a decision, otherwise the decision of the Superintendent shall be final. DUE PROCESS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION Prior Notice Written notice must be given to the parents of a student with an exceptionality at a reasonable time before the LEA proposes or refuses to initiate or change the identification, evaluation, or educational placement of the student or the provision of FAPE to the student. If the notice in the preceding paragraph relates to an action proposed by the LEA that also requires parental consent, the LEA may give notice at the same time it requests parental consent. The prior notice must include the following information: A description of the action proposed or refused by the LEA, an explanation of why the LEA proposes or refuses to take action, and a description of any options considered or rejected by the LEA and the reasons why those options were rejected; A description of each evaluation procedure, test, record, or report used as a basis for the proposed or refused action and any description of any other factors that are relevant to the LEA's proposal or refusal; A statement that the parents of a student with a disability have protection under the procedural safeguards of IDEA; Identification of the employee or employees of the LEA who may be contacted for assistance in understanding the provisions of the procedural safeguards. The notice must be in understandable language. It must be written in language understandable to the general public and provided in the native language of the parent or other mode of communication used by the parent, unless it is clearly not feasible to do so. If the native language or other mode of communication of the parent is not a written language, the LEA shall take steps to ensure that a. b. c. the notice is translated orally or by other means to the parent in his or her native language or other mode of communications; the parent understands the content of the notice; and there is written evidence that these requirements have been met.

Right to Inspect and Review Records 80

The parent of a student with an exceptionality has a right to inspect and review all educational records with respect to the identification, evaluation and placement of the student and the provision of a free appropriate public education. A. The LEA must comply with a request by the parent to review the student's records without unnecessary delay. B. The parent has the right to inspect and review the student's records before any meeting regarding an individualized education program or hearing relating to the identification, evaluation, or educational placement of the student or the provision of FAPE to the student, and in no case more than 45 days after the request has been made. C. The parent has the right to a response to a reasonable request for explanations and interpretations of the records. D. The parent has the right to request that the LEA provide copies of the records containing the information if failure to provide those copies would effectively prevent the parent from exercising the right to inspect and review the records. E. The parent has the right to have a representative (authorized in writing) inspect and review the records. F. The LEA may assume that the parent has authority to inspect and review records relating to his or her child unless the LEA has been advised that the parent does not have the authority under applicable State law governing such matters as guardianship, separation, and divorce. G. Each LEA must keep a record of parties obtaining access to education records (except access by parents and authorized personnel) including the name, the date access was given, and the purpose for which the party is authorized to use the record. H. If any education records include information on more than one child, the parents of those children have the right to inspect and review on the information relating to their child or to be informed of that specific information. I. The parent has a right to be informed of the type and location of the records being collected, maintained, and used by the LEA. J. An LEA may charge a fee for copies of records that are made for parents if the fee does not effectively prevent the parent from exercising his or her right to inspect and review the records. K. The parent has a right to request that the student's records be amended when the parent believes that the information contained in the records is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise is in violation of the student's privacy rights or other rights of the student. L. After receipt of a request by the parent of a student with an exceptionality to amend the student's records, the LEA must decide whether to amend the records or to refuse to amend the records within a reasonable time. M. If the LEA refuses to amend the records requested by the parent, the LEA must inform the parent of the refusal and advise the parent of a right to a hearing under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). 81

N. The LEA shall on request provide an opportunity for a hearing to challenge information in the records to ensure that it is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights or other rights of the student. 1. If as a result of a FERPA hearing, the LEA decides that the information is inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights or any other rights of the student, the LEA shall amend the information accordingly and so inform the parents. 2. If, as a result of a FERPA hearing, the LEA is not required to amend the records because the records are not in violation of the privacy right or any other rights of the student, the LEA must inform the parents of their right to place in the record comments they may have on the records or comments setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decision of the LEA. 3. Any comments by the parents placed in the records as a result of a FERPA hearing must be maintained by the LEA as part of the student's records as long as the records are maintained by the LEA. 4. Any contested records maintained by the LEA and disclosed to any LEA or party who has a legitimate interest in the education of the student, as determined by the LEA, must include the parent's comments contesting the disclosed information or an explanation of the reasons for the objections to the records maintained. O. The parent has a right to be informed when personally identifiable information collected, maintained, or used by the LEA is no longer needed to provide educational services to the student. P. The parent has the right to have the destruction of personally identifiable information no longer needed to provide educational services to the student. However, the LEA must maintain without limitation a permanent record of the student's name, address, telephone number, grades, attendance, classes attended, grave level completed, and the year the student completed school. Q. When the LEA provides access to a student's record to parties other than the parents of the student or to the employees of a participating LEA involved in providing special education and related services to the student, the LEA must maintain a record of the parties review the records, the date access was given and the purpose for which the access was granted. R. When access is granted to records that contain information on more than one student, the LEA must grant access to only that information pertaining to that parent's child or access to the specific information on the student. S. A parent's right to view confidential records relating to the student may be presumed. However, this presumption may be rebutted if the LEA has knowledge that a parent does not have authority to review records under state law governing such matters as guardianship, separation, and divorce. T. Statements regarding any current or previous disciplinary action taken against a student with an exceptionality must be transmitted to the same extent that disciplinary information is included in, and transmitted with, records of students without disabilities. 82

Mediation Mediation is a way to discuss and resolve disagreements between the parent and the school with the help of an impartial third person who has been trained in effective mediation techniques. Mediation is a voluntary process, and both the parent and the school must agree to participate in order for the mediation session to occur. The mediation sessions are scheduled in a timely manner and held in a location that is convenient to the parties of the dispute. A mediator does not make decisions; he or she facilitates discussions and decision-making. The discussions in a mediation session are confidential and may not be used as evidence in subsequent due process hearings or civil court proceedings. If the mediation process results in full or partial agreement, the mediator will prepare a written mediation agreement that must be signed by both the parent and the school's representative. In addition to describing the things you've agreed to, the mediation agreement will state that all discussions that occurred during the mediation are confidential and may not be used as evidence in a due process hearing or other civil court proceeding. The signed agreement is legally binding on both the parent and the school and is enforceable in court. Mediation is available to resolve a disagreement between the school and the parent regarding the identification, evaluation, placement, services, or the provision of a FAPE to the student. The parent may request mediation before, at the same time, or after requesting a due processing hearing. Requesting mediation will not prevent or delay a due process hearing, nor will mediation deny any of the parent's and/or student's rights. The parent or the school may suggest mediation, and it begins when both agree to participate. Participating in mediation is voluntary for both the parent and the school. The parent's right to a due process hearing is not delayed or denied by requesting or declining to participate in mediation. In order to initiate the process, the parent and the school must send the Request for Mediation to the Division. The Division will assign a mediator who will contact both the parent and the school to schedule a timely meeting in a convenient location. The Division maintains a list of mediators who are trained, qualified, and knowledgeable about the laws and regulations relating to the provision of special education and related services. A mediator is assigned based on a rotational basis. No employee of Department of Education (including the Division) a local school corporation or other public agency providing special education services is eligible to be a mediator. Mediators must not have any personal or professional conflict of interest. Mediators are not considered to be employees solely because they are paid to provide this service. The Division bears the cost of the mediation process. The school may establish procedures to offer the parent the responsibility to meet at a convenient time and location to have someone from a parent training 83

center or alternative dispute resolution entity to discuss the benefits of the mediation process when the parent has opted not to participate in mediation with the school. However, the Division must approve any procedures established by the school before they can be implemented, and the procedures cannot be used to delay or deny the parent's right to a due process hearing if the parent declines to participate in such a meeting. The Division pays for the cost of these meetings. Due Process Hearing A due process hearing is a formal proceeding in which evidence is presented to an independent hearing officer to resolve a dispute between the parent and the school regarding the student's disability identification, evaluation, eligibility, placement, services, or reimbursement of services the parent has obtained privately. A request for a due process hearing must be made within one year of the date the parent knew or should have known about the alleged action forming the basis of the dispute with the school. This one-year limit does not apply if the parent was prevented from requesting the hearing due to specific misrepresentations made by the school that it had resolved the problem the parent complained about or if the school withheld pertinent information from the parent. Only a parent, attorney representing a student, the school or the Department of Education may request a due process hearing regarding a student with a disability. To request a due process hearing, the parent needs to send a signed, written request with the following information: Parent's name, address, and telephone number Child's name and address (if different from parent) Name of the school district and the school the child attends A statement of the reason for the hearing request, including a description of the problem and a statement of the facts relating to the problem; and A proposal for resolution of the problem, to the extent known to the parent. This information should be sent to: Louisiana Department of Education Attn: Legal Division 1201 North 3rd Street Baton Rouge, LA 70802 Parents will be not be able to have a due process hearing unless the written request for a hearing contains all of the information listed above. Once a request for hearing is received, an independent hearing officer is appointed, and he or she is provided with a copy of the hearing request. Otherwise, the request remains confidential. The Division will send the parent and the school a letter notifying them of the hearing officer's appointment. In 84

addition, the school must abide by certain requirements within specific time periods after it receives the request for a due process hearing. The school must also inform the parent of the availability of mediation and of any free or low-cost legal and other relevant services in the area. HOME STUDY PROGRAM - COMPLAINT RESOLUTION PROCEDURE The procedure to be followed in resolving a complaint by students, parents, or other qualified individuals regarding a student's placement shall be accomplished in accordance with the following: 1. The person or persons making the complaint will first request in writing a conference with the Supervisors of the Office of Child Welfare and Attendance. If, as a result of the discussion, the matter is not resolved, the complainant may initiate the complaint in writing to the Assistant Superintendent within three (3) days of the meeting with the committee and supervisors. If, as a result of the discussion, the matter is not resolved, the complainant may initiate the complaint in writing to the superintendent of the Terrebonne Parish School System within five (5) days of the meeting with the committee of supervisors of Child Welfare and Attendance. The superintendent and any professional personnel he may choose to designate shall investigate the complaint and communicate a written response to the complainant within twenty (20) days from the date of the written complaint. The complainant or complainant's representative will be given the opportunity during the twenty (20) day period to present evidence, including the opportunity to question the parties involved in the complaint. If the complaint is still unresolved, the complainant may appeal the final resolution of the superintendent to the Terrebonne Parish School Board within fifteen (15) days after the receipt of the superintendent's decision. If the complaint is still unresolved, the complainant may appeal the final resolution of the Terrebonne Parish School Board to the Louisiana State Department of Education within twenty (20) days after the receipt of the school board's decision.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

This complaint procedure will be issued to students, parents, or other individuals prior to or following a home study program. P. L. 95-561 SECTION 128 ­ NCLB TITLE I PROGRAM - TERREBONNE PARISH 85

COMPLAINT RESOLUTION PROCEDURE for the ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION ACT OF 1965 If the Terrebonne Parish Title I Program is not providing services in accordance with state and federal regulations, a parent may file a complaint in accordance with The Louisiana Handbook for School Administrators, Bulletin 741, Section 349, which is available online at the following website address: http://www.doa.louisiana.gov/osr/lac/28v115/28v115.doc. Parents may also request a copy of this bulletin by calling the Department's toll-free number 1877-453-2721. This bulletin contains detailed procedures established for resolving complaints filed against the Department of Education or a local education agency pursuant to provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, 29 U.S.C. §6301, et. seq. (ESEA). Summarized from the above handbook, complaints to the Louisiana Department of Education must (1) be in writing and (2) describe a violation of the law or a violation of federal statutes or regulations. The written complaint must include: A statement of the violation of a requirement of a pertinent federal statute or regulation; The facts on which the statement is based, including the name of the local education agency; A proposed solution for the problem; The parent's signature and contact information; Only violations occurring within the past year. A parent is notified when the Department has received a complaint, and complaints will be resolved within 60 days of receiving the complaint, unless the timeline has been extended. The parent will receive a written decision addressing each violation and will also be informed of the right to request that the Secretary of the United States Department of Education review the decision made by the Louisiana Department of Education. C. Legislative Guidelines 1. Local school systems are encouraged to develop criterion-referenced testing programs for local assessment use (R.S. 17:391.7(G) and R.S. 17:24(H)). 2. Local criteria for K-12 must supplement the content standards approved by the BESE (R.S. 17:24(G)). 3. Local criteria must be coordinated with statewide curricular standards for required subjects, to be developed as part of the competency-based education plan (R.S. 17:24.4(E) and (G)). D. Other Policies and Procedures 86

Each LEA shall have policies and procedures that address, but are not limited to, the following (Bulletin 741 §337): 1. the establishment of the number of school days, length of the school day, and other necessary guidelines for the operation of the schools; 2. provision of special educational and related services to exceptional students, in accordance with the IEP, for no fewer than 177 days or the equivalent during the normal 182-day school cycle; 3. the operation of special departments and special programs in each school; 4. the admittance of students to and the dismissal of students from special educational programs; 5. the exclusion of students with communicable diseases and their readmittance following their recovery (refer to §1131); 6. the control of communicable problems, such as lice and scabies (refer to §1131); 7. the care of sick or injured students, including notification of parents, in cases of emergencies that occur while students are under the jurisdiction of the school; 8. the administration of medication in schools (refer to §1129); 9. the operation of summer schools and extended school year programs for eligible exceptional students (refer to Chapter 25); 10. the disciplining of students with disabilities (refer to §131.); 11. the use of standard universal precautions by personnel when individuals have direct contact with blood or other body fluids and the provision of sanctions, including discipline, if warranted, for failure to use standard universal precautions; 12. the use of school buildings outside of regular school hours; 13. student access to the Internet (refer to §1709); 14. the prohibition against use of tobacco in schools, on school grounds, and on school busses (refer to §1143); 15. the prohibition of teachers from recommending that a student be administered a psychotropic drug and from specifying or identifying any specific mental health diagnosis for a student; 16. the prohibition of teachers from using a parent's refusal to consent to administration of a psychotropic drug or psychiatric evaluation, screening or evaluation as grounds for prohibiting a student from attending class or participating 87

in school-related activities or as the sole basis of accusations of child abuse or neglect against the parent or guardian; 17. the notification of the parent or legal guardian of every student, in writing, of the proper process and procedures to follow in order to make a complaint or request information from the school or the school's governing authority: a. such information shall include, at a minimum, the name, address, phone number, and email address of the appropriate person to contact at each step of the prescribed process or procedure, and shall be updated, at least, on an annual basis; b. such information shall be incorporated into any existing policy or policies, code of conduct, or student handbook of the LEA or of each school under its jurisdiction; 18. the implementation of §2304 Science Education; 19. the school assignment of students in foster care (refer to §1109); 20. the electronic communications by an employee at a school to a student enrolled at that school (refer to §1141); 21. the inspection by qualified persons of all fire safety and prevention equipment, including fire alarm and smoke detection devices (refer to §1501); 22. the physical abuse of public school teachers and other school employees by students (refer to §521); 23. the collection of student biometric information (refer to §1149); 24. pre-service and ongoing grade-appropriate classroom management training for teachers, principals, and other appropriate personnel regarding behavioral supports and reinforcement, conflict resolution, mediation, cultural competence, restorative practices, guidance and discipline, and adolescent development; 25. a schedule for the retention and disposition of records; the schedule shall be approved by State Archives, as required by R.S. 44:411; and 26. appropriate responses to the behavior of students with exceptionalities that may require immediate intervention. (See for reference: Guidelines for the Use of Seclusion Rooms and Restraint of Students with Exceptionalities) Include policies related to these requirements in this document, if the PPP is the appropriate location for the policies and procedures. Other Curricular Program Requirements I. Early Childhood Program The purpose of the Pre-Kindergarten Program is to provide access to universal high quality, developmentally appropriate pre-kindergarten classes (if funds are available) to all four-year-old children who are eligible to enter public school 88

kindergarten the following year. Pre-kindergarten is funded through the collaboration of 8(g), Title I, LA 4 Cecil J. Picard Pre-Kindergarten, and IDEA funds. II. Sex Education Whereas, during the 1979 Legislative Session, Act 480, was passed and permits instruction in Sex Education within existing course of study on a local School Board option basis, and Whereas, the Terrebonne Parish School Board has appointed a Special Parental Review Committee which has studied this matter for several years (and reviews this matter periodically ), Now, Therefore, Be It Resolved that the Terrebonne Parish School Board in regular session duly convened does hereby establish the following policy governing the instruction of Sex Education in the public schools of this parish: SECTION 1 A. "Sex Education" shall mean the dissemination of factual biological or pathological information that is related to the human reproductive system and may include the study of sexually transmitted disease, AIDS, pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, childbirth, puberty, menstruation, menopause, and family planning. SECTION 2 B. Topics dealing with sex education have been identified and designated as "Sex Education" and instruction shall be limited to only the approved criteria as set forth by the Parental Review Committee and the Terrebonne Parish School Board in the following courses: Course/Grade Life Science (Grade 7) Consumer Homemaking I (Grade 9) Consumer Homemaking II (Grade 10) Biology I Biology II/AP (Grade 10-12) Topic Human Reproduction, Puberty, Menstruation, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, AIDS, Family Planning Dating Child Care & Development Human Reproduction, Menstrual Cycle, Family Planning, Prenatal Development, Childbirth, Spontaneous & Therapeutic Termination of Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, AIDS Prenatal and Infant Care Personal Adjustment, Marriage and Family 89

Parenthood Education (Grade 11-12) Adult Responsibilities

(Grade 11-12) Environmental Science (Grade 11-12) Psychology (Grade 11-12) Sociology (Grade 11-12) Introduction to Health Occupations (VocationalGrades 11-12) Health Occupations General Coop. (VocationalGrade 12) Birthrate, Birth Control as it relates to world population Development of interpersonal relationships Love and Marriage Human Reproduction

Human Reproduction, Puberty, Menstruation Conception, Gestation, Birth

SECTION 3 C. No instruction in sex education will be offered in kindergarten through the sixth grade. SECTION 4 D. Those teachers assigned one or more of the subjects listed in Section 2 shall be duly authorized as official instructors of sex education. Also, general school health nurses, and resource personnel such as medical and health professionals, social service personnel, and college faculty members are designated as official sex educators as approved by the Terrebonne Parish School Board. SECTION 5 E. Parents not desiring their child to participate in that segment designated sex education and having a child enrolled in one of the aforementioned courses shall send written notification to the school. Parents may exercise their right to excuse their child from such instruction without penalty or loss of academic credit. School administrators shall determine a worthwhile alternative to sex education appropriate to their own school for students with written parental notification. SECTION 6 F. The Revision Committee for Parental Review is composed of a parent and student representative from each high school, the science and social studies curriculum specialists, a high school principal, one junior high or middle school principal, school nurses, a medical doctor, one clergy member, one each: biology, life science, and consumer science teachers; Ex-officio 90

members include: Superintendent, Asst. Superintendent, Secondary Supervisor, Student Services Supervisor, and Chairman of the Education Committee. SECTION 7 G. Parent permission forms will be distributed to parents of students enrolled in courses containing topics considered sex education. Terrebonne Parish School District will implement Louisiana Science Education Act 473 by informing all science teachers annually that our policy is to encourage student research in controversial issues making sure that teachers not take any position relative to the topic. Copies of the act and state education department policy will be given to teachers making sure that teachers know to separate themselves from the issue, deliver facts for both arguments but not take a side on the issue being discussed. This information will be issued and discussed at the annual safety workshop. III. Grades Nine ­ Twelve: Summer School A. Students attending a state certified summer school will be considered for subject credit and possible promotion. B. Regulations of the State Department of Education outlined in Bulletin No. 741 and the regulations adopted by the Terrebonne Parish School Board will be the governing authorities.

IV. Grades Four and Eight: LEAP Summer School, GEE/EOC Summer School A. Students who fail the LEAP or GEE, or EOC exams are eligible for summer school. Classes of fifteen (15) or less will be established. A certified teacher is required to teach the courses failed in English/Language Arts and Mathematics. GEE failures will also be provided summer classes by a certified teacher in Science and Social Studies, as warranted. B. Courses will be established based on the number of units failed in each subject area. C. Students in grades four or eight and GEE failures who are absent from a class in excess of five (5) days will not receive credit for the course and will not be eligible for override, waiver or appeal. (Extenuating circumstances should be referred to the Child Welfare Office for determination.) D. The length of summer school, the time of each period in the daily schedule, and the teaching load in each class shall be in conformity with the regulations adopted by the State Board of Education. V. Students in the Terrebonne Parish School System shall receive instruction in values, self-esteem, and respect for individuals and property. 91

Individual differences of students shall be provided for within the educational program in each school by accelerating students, grouping students, enriching or adjusting the program, differentiating materials and methods, providing alternate programs, and through establishing special education classes for those children whose needs cannot be adequately met in general education programs. VI. The instructional program of each school shall be characterized by well-defined instructional objectives and systematic planning by teachers based on the Common Core State Standards and GLE's. The instructional program shall give evidence of: A. The selection and use of varied types of learning materials, experiences and activities. B. The adaptation of organizational and instructional procedures to meet student needs. C. The use of varied evaluative instruments and procedures. VII. Technology integration and computer literacy skills will be addressed based on established state K ­ 12 Technology Guidelines. (See "Terrebonne Technology Plan")

92

APPENDIX A

This section should include the following: Definition of Terms

A list of state terms as outlined in the Guidelines. A list of terms used in the local plan. (Terms must be clearly defined; they will be used as the basis for interpretation of the components of the local plan.) Additional information that you wish to add would begin with Appendix B.

DEFINITION OF TERMS

As used in the Terrebonne Parish Pupil Progression Plan the terms shall be defined as follows: 1. Above Grade Level - Those students who qualify in accordance with the Terrebonne Parish School System's procedures for honor class placement (score above State standard on Tests). Academically Able - Those students who score at or above the State required performance level on the Louisiana Criterion-referenced Grade Level Tests and were promoted without conditions the preceding year. Acceleration - Advancement of a student within the grade at a rate faster than the average student. This may include gifted students, identified in Bulletin 1508. Administrative Placement - Grade advancement of those average students not meeting the academic criteria for promotion, but who in the humanistic judgment of the review committee should be advanced. Alternate Assessment - The substitute way of gathering information on the performance and progress of students who do not participate in typical state assessments. (Ambulatory) Para-Professional - Trained aides working with identified students. The para-professional may be assigned to two or more teachers or more than one school. At Grade Level - Those students who meet the requirements in accordance with the grading procedures of the Terrebonne Parish School System and score at the State standard on the Louisiana Criterion-referenced Grade Level Tests.

2.

3. 4.

5.

6. 7.

93

8.

Bulletin 1508 - Pupil Appraisal Handbook published by the State Department of Education listing the criteria for eligibility, screening, and evaluation for each exceptionality recognized by the Louisiana State Department of Special Education. Bulletin 1706 - Regulations for Implementation of the Exceptional Children's Act Louisiana's Law for exceptional children. CCSS (Common Core State Standard) Compensatory Programs - Programs designed to assist students, including handicapped students, to overcome educational deficiencies identified through the State Grade Level Competency Testing and other local criteria. Competency Test - State designed test to evaluate proficiency in reading, writing, and mathematics at selected grade levels. Course Outline - (Grades 7-12) Locally constructed standards for all subjects to assist the teacher in course content for instructional purposes, as well as a suggested timetable for completion. These outlines include the State Grade Level standards that have been identified by the State Department of Education officials. Critique Committee - A committee of selected educators representative of all educational strata formulated to review and provide input for the development of the pupil progression plan. Curriculum Content Standards - (Grades K-12) Locally constructed standards, which incorporate, state standards and local curriculum standards. DIBELS NEXT ­ The Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS NEXT) are a set of standardized, individually administered measures of early literacy development. They are designed to be short (one minute) fluency measures used to regularly monitor the development of pre-reading and early reading skills. DIBELS NEXT is used to assess student development of phonological awareness, alphabetic understanding, and automaticity and fluency. Exceptional Student - A student who is evaluated in accordance with Bulletin 1508 to have an exceptionality which significantly affects educational performance to the extent that special education is needed. This definition also includes an infant or toddler with disabilities from birth to three years of age who is evaluated in accordance with Bulletin 1508. Exceptionality - Any one of the characteristic impairments or conditions, as defined in Bulletin 1508, which significantly affect the student's educational performance to the extent that the student needs special education. Gifted - Demonstrated abilities that give evidence of high performance in academic and intellectual aptitudes. 94

9. 10. 11.

12. 13.

14.

15. 16.

17.

18.

19.

20. 21.

GLE ­ Grade Level Expectations ­ "what a student should know and be able to do in each subject area." Homebound or Hospital Instruction (settings) - Alternative education settings for the provision of special education according to an IEP by a certified teacher in the student's home environment or in a hospital in which both of the following conditions exist: 1) the student must be enrolled in special education, and 2) the student is not able to be moved from the hospital or home environment as a result of physical illness, accident or emotional crisis or the treatment thereof, or as a result of disciplinary action taken consistent with Bulletin 1706, Exceptional Children's Act. Individualized Education Program (IEP) - A written statement for each student with exceptionality developed at a meeting in accordance with requirements set forth in Bulletin 1706, Exceptional Children's Act. Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities - Students between the ages of birth and three years of age who have been determined eligible for early intervention services according to Bulletin 1508. Instruction in Regular Class - An alternative education setting for eligible exceptional students in which instruction is provided in the regular classroom including: 1. Supplemental aides and services to exceptional students, and/or 2. Special education instruction to exceptional students which is provided by a special education teacher certified generically or in the area of exceptionality for which special education is provided. 3. The pupil/teacher ratios established in Bulletin 1706, Exceptional Children's Act are used. Louisiana Educational Assessment Program (LEAP) - "The state's testing program that includes the grades 3, 5, 6, 7, 9 Louisiana Norm-Referenced Testing Program (Iowa Achievement Test); the grades 4 and 8 Criterion-Referenced Testing Program including English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies for grades 4 and 8; and the Graduation Exit Examination (GEE 21)-(Written Composition, English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies)." LEAP 21 SUMMER REMEDIATION PROGRAM - The summer school program offered by the LEA for the specific purpose of preparing students to pass the LEAP 21 test in English language arts or mathematics. Mainstreaming/Inclusion - The process by which special education students are scheduled into regular classes and receive regular program instruction with modifications. Parent Committee - A committee of parents representing geographic segments of the parish from each school site and students in various academic areas. Proficiency - On-grade-level competence with respect to a skill. 95

22.

23.

24.

25.

26.

27.

28. 29.

30.

Promotion - A pupil's placement from a lower to a higher grade based on local and state criteria contained in the Pupil Progression Plan for Terrebonne Parish School System. Pupil Appraisal Team - Consists of two or more appropriate personnel certified by the Louisiana State Department of Education who evaluate a referred student according to guidelines set forth in Bulletin 1508; an appropriate team may be composed of an educational diagnostician, school psychologist, social worker, speech therapist or any related service personnel deemed appropriate. Pupil Progression Plan - "The comprehensive plan developed and adopted by each parish or city school board which shall be based on student performance on the Louisiana Educational Assessment Program with goals and objectives which are compatible with the Louisiana competency-based education program and which supplement standards approved by the State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. A Pupil Progression Plan shall require the student's mastery of grade-appropriate skills before he or she can be recommended for promotion." (Act 408) Regular Placement - The assignment of students to classes, grades, or programs based on a set of criteria established in the Pupil Progression Plan for Terrebonne Parish School System. Placement includes promotion, retention, compensatory program and/or remediation, and acceleration. Remedial Programs - Programs designed to assist students including identified exceptional and Non/Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, to overcome educational deficits identified through the Louisiana Education Assessment Program and other local criteria. Remediation - Programs/Methodology designed to assist students, including students with disabilities, to overcome identified deficiencies. Resource Room - A type of alternative educational setting for special education and related services designed or adapted as a location where exceptional students may receive all or part of the special education required by the IEP, and in which all of the following exist: 1. 2. 3. 4. The pupil/teacher ratios established in Bulletin 1706, Exceptional Children's Act are used. No student who is not an exceptional child is enrolled; Instruction is provided for not more than twelve (12) students for any one hour of certified IEP time units. Special education is provided by a teacher certified generically or in the area of exceptionality for which special education is provided. 96

31.

32.

33.

34.

35. 36.

5. 37.

No student shall be enrolled for more than 216 minutes of certified IEP time units per day.

Retention - Non-promotion of a pupil from a lower to a higher grade based on local and state criteria contained in the Pupil Progression Plan for Terrebonne Parish School System. Review Committee or (SBLRC) - A specified group of educators (principal, assistant principal if available, two selected teachers of the students involved, and if requested by the school's principal, a curriculum specialist and assessment teacher) who serve to review questionable (borderline) promotional situations. School Building Level Committee (SBLC) - A committee of at least three school level staff members which may be identified as SBLC, SAT, or STAT, etc. at the discretion of the parish. The committee must be comprised of at least the principal/designee, a classroom teacher, and the referring teacher. It is suggested that other persons be included, such as the guidance counselor, reading specialist, master teacher, nurse, parents, etc. This committee is a problem solving, decision making group who meet on a scheduled basis to receive referrals from teachers, parents, or other professionals on individual students who are experiencing difficulty in school due to academic and/or behavior problems. In most instances, for enrolled students, it is only through the SBLC that a referral can be made to pupil appraisal for an individual evaluation. School Building Level Review Committee (SBLRC) Self-Contained Special Education Class - A type of alternative education setting in which the same teacher provides special education instruction for an approved group (the size of which must be consistent with the pupil/teacher ratio listed in Bulletin 1706, Exceptional Children's Act): 1. In which instruction is provided for each exceptional student for more than 216 minutes per day when the balance of the school day is in regular class placement; A student may be released during the school day to receive related services, adapted physical education, or speech therapy consistent with the student's IEP; and Special education is provided by a teacher certified generically or in the area of exceptionality served.

38.

39.

40. 41.

2.

3. 42. 43.

Skills - Specific objectives that describe what the student must learn in order to develop proficiency with respect to the standards and local curriculum documents. Special Education - Any program of instruction within the preschool, elementary, and secondary school structure of the state, specifically designed by providing for different learning styles of exceptional students. This instruction shall be in alternative 97

educational settings, which meet the standards of the State Board, are approved by the Department, and implemented according to an Individualized Education Program. 44. 45. State Assessment Test - A state instrument used to assess a student's proficiency of specified skills in reading, writing, and mathematics. State Content Standards - Specific levels of attainment of skills and objectives as established in the State of Louisiana Department of Education English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies Standards documents. Statements of what we expect students to know and be able to do in various content areas. Talented - Possession of measurable abilities that give evidence of unique talent in visual or performing arts, or both. Vocational Education - Organized educational programs directly related to the preparation of individuals for paid or unpaid employment, or for additional preparation for a career requiring other than a baccalaureate or advanced degree. Writing Committee - A group of local educators selected to study and interpret Bulletin 1566, review, and evaluate the present educational program and to revise and/or augment programs and policies in order to formulate a pupil progression plan in compliance with Act 750.

46. 47.

48.

98

APPENDIX B

TERREBONNE PARISH SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS

1. Roosevelt Thomas 212 Cherbourg St. Houma, LA. 70363 Gregory Harding 148 Columbus St. Houma, LA. 70360 Richard "Dicky" Jackson 607 Funderburk Ave. Houma, LA. 70364 Debi Benoit 120 Royce St. Gray, LA. 70364 Brenda Leroux Babin 3202 Sharon St. Houma, LA. 70363 L. P. Bordelon, III 217 Tiger Tail Rd. Houma, LA. 70360 Roger Dale DeHart 1353 Dr. Beatrous Rd. Theriot, LA. 70397 Donald Duplantis 1132 Barrow Street Houma, LA. 70360 Hayes Badeaux, Jr. P. O. Box 127 Bourg, LA. 70343 District 1

2.

District 2

3.

District 3

4.

District 4

5.

District 5

6.

District 6

7.

District 7

8.

District 8

9.

District 9

99

Information

Grading Procedures

99 pages

Find more like this

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

737108


You might also be interested in

BETA
untitled
Application Form