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N AT U R A L H I STO R Y N O T E

Yarrow's Spiny Lizards (Sceloporus jarrovii) on Lizard Rock, Santa Catalina Mountains, Pima County, Arizona: Adventures of a DiaperBag-Toting Herpetologist

Kevin E. Bonine Tucson Herpetological Society, Tucson, Arizona, USA.

Figure 1. The author and family on Lizard Rock, Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona. Photo by Kevin E. Bonine.

The2006) inattention paidHerpetologist was fresh in recent Sceloporus jarrovii (Archie et al. the Sonoran

my mind as we took our family's newest herpetologist, Molly, on her first hike (Fig. 1). The destination was Lizard Rock (Fig. 2), a prominent landmark on the Mt. Lemmon highway (near mile marker 16). Upon reaching the summit on 21 May 2006, ca. 1015h, I noticed one adult S. jarrovii in species-typical pose on the lip of a crevice in the exfoliating granite boulders that comprise much of the Santa Catalina mountains. I briefly retreated from the summit to secure the safety of my fellow hikers, shed my diaper bag, and returned to the summit armed with camera. While settling in to wait for a voucher-photo opportunity, two other S. jarrovii emerged from the same crevice. I did not handle the animals, but they appeared to be one male and two females (Fig. 3).

Lizard Rock is atop the ridge that separates Bear Canyon from Willow Canyon and, according to the USGS, is a bit more than a kilometer straight-line map distance from the General Hitchcock picnic area where S. jarrovii was first documented in the Santa Catalinas in 1996 (Archie et al. 2006). The presence of multiple individuals, and of both sexes, so far from the likely origination point of S. jarrovii into this sky island suggest that the population is spreading. As Archie et al. (2006) point out, documenting the range expansion of S. jarrovii will indeed be interesting from the perspectives of ecology and conservation. Also of interest are the concomitant genetic changes in a population rapidly expanding from perhaps just a few (or even one) pioneering individuals (see discussion in Edwards et al. 2005).

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SONORAN HERPETOLOGIST 19 (7) 2006

Figure 2. View of northwest face of Lizard Rock from Willow Canyon. Photo by Angela Urbon-Bonine.

I plan to take camera, diaper bag, and my young apprentice into the Willow Canyon environs on future S. jarrovii missions. Feel free to accompany us, but please bring your own burp cloth. Acknowledgements Thanks to my wife Angela for her knowledge of, and interest in, the natural world, and for her willingness to shepherd a newborn and a dog while her husband leans off into space seeking photos of invasive lizards. Thanks to Don Swann for discussion and insight regarding this species and many others.

Literature Cited Archie, J. W., R. L. Bezy, and E. F. Enderson. 2006. Yarrow's Spiny Lizard (Sceloporus jarrovii Cope 1875): Lowe's line revisited. Sonoran Herpetologist 19:50-53. Edwards, T., K. E. Bonine, C. Ivanyi, and R. Prescott. 2005. The molecular origins of spiny-tailed iguanas (Ctenosaura) on the grounds of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. Sonoran Herpetologist 18:122-125.

The presence of multiple individuals, and of both sexes, so far from the likely origination point of S. jarrovii into this sky island suggest that the population is spreading.

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Figure 3. Sceloporus jarrovii at the summit of Lizard Rock, Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, 21 May 2006. Photo by Kevin E. Bonine.

SONORAN HERPETOLOGIST 19(7) 2006

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