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INDEX As in the past, the Summer issue of the TDR brings you the latest version of the annual index, a guide to the contents of the magazine's past four quarterly issues, 61­64, listing all significant topics arranged alphabetically; and providing for each entry a summary (or "abstract") of its contents, more than a thousand summaries in all. This is a resource that should be of considerable help in finding the information you seek; but you will also find a good deal more here than you've found in past Indexes. In spite of the past year's national turmoil and economic uncertainty, in these four issues TDR has systematically amplified coverage and delivery of information valuable to its members. This is a fact clearly demonstrated in this index: although in comparison to previous year's magazines, the total page count in Issues 61 through 64 was reduced by about five percent--at the same time

ABS. See Anti-Lock Brake System Accelerator pedal position sensor (APPS), troubleshooting Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains signs of a malfunctioning APPS, and suggests tests. 24 Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Four readers tackle a mix of problems, including intermittent throttle response, dead pedal, erratic speedometer, and Trouble Code P2127, all of which suggest problematic APPS. 30 Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly evaluates thirty accessories he has installed inside and out, on his `04 Turbo Diesel, and gives his reasons for judging them worthwhile. 83­84 Accessories, added by Scott Dalgleish, evaluation update Issue 63 (Back In The Saddle) After 14,000 miles of informal testing, Scott Dalgleish updates his assessment of his compound turbochargers made by Turbo Resource, and declares that they prove "you can have your cake and eat it too." 86 Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Issue 63 (TDReview) On a scale of one-to-five stars, the editor rates 25 accessories he has added to his '07.5, 3500 6.7-liter, Mega Cab, Long Box Turbo Diesel, in an update to the launch of the evaluation project in TDR Issue 59. 48­49 Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) In the first article in a series, John Holmes describes revisions in a `99 Quad Cab, adopted as a TDR Project Truck, beginning with Triple Full Pillar gauge mount, Six-Bay Fuse Panel and other accessories. 85­89 Issue 63 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes describes additions to his Project Truck: step gate, gate glide, block heater, differential covers & transmission pans, steering box stabilizer, muffler elimination kit, cold air kit, and FASS system, with critiques. 66­70 Accessories, those which are ill-considered or of dubious merit Issue 61 (Member2Member) Responding to queries concerning advertisers of accessory devices/techniques of dubious merit, the editor reprises reviews and commentary from TDR archives. 12­13 Additives, to fuel and oil. See also Fuel additives; See also Oil additives Issue 64 (Technical Topics) In an informal resume, supported by opinion of Kevin Cameron, Scott Dalgleish, and Bosch specialist Gerald Tobey, the editor concludes that, with a few exceptions, as noted, diesel fuel and lube additives should not be used. 52­55 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Responding to a reader seeking his opinion on using Lucas Products additives, Jim Anderson says that personal opinions vary but that he avoids any additives other than an anti-gelling fuel treatment in cold weather operation. 69 Aerodynamics design principles affecting fuel economy Issue 63 (Member2Member) From an interview with General Motors Design VP in Automotive News, the TDR excerpts explanation of aerodynamic design constraints and modifications which affect fuel economy positively and negatively. 8 Air conditioner, inefficient. See Battery, intermittent failure, troubleshooting Air conditioner evaporator, accessing to remove Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) A reader seeking instruction for removing the dash to access the air conditioner evaporator is referred by Joe Donnelly to his article in Issue 59, p. 90. 27 Air dam, plastic deflector valance, repair of Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson notes that the fasteners securing the plastic air dam valance below the front bumper are subject to failure; and he gives three suggestions for dealing with the problem. 83

the number of informative entries is more than five percent greater. Without noticeably sacrificing its famous good humor, the magazine is "leaner and meaner": it is taking its subject and its readers more to heart in these challenging times, when helping us get the most out of our favorite truck is not just a luxury anymore. As an example of this increased depth and breadth, take a look at the greatly increased number of entries on methods of improving fuel efficiency and economy. Begin by looking under the topic head "Fuel Efficiency...." But that is just a start in using this tool for greater satisfaction and value from your Turbo Diesel. Wishing you a satisfactory and productive year, from the compilers, Bob and Jeannette Vallier TDR Writers/Editors

Air horn. See also Exhaust brake, in-line, aftermarket Issue 61 (Back In The Saddle) Scott Dalgleish advocates installation of the Pacbrake air horn, particularly to anyone adding the air compressor required with the Pacbrake PRXB exhaust brake. 96­97 Air intake heater grid relay, testing of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) For troubleshooting cold-weather startup problems, a reader provides instructions, with graphic illustration, for testing the intake manifold air heater grid relays. 34 Air intake system, 6.7-liter engine, aftermarket Issue 62 (TDRelease) Performance Systems Manufacturing announces a version of its "Proven Combination" air intake system built for the 6.7-liter engine. 133 Air intake system, in the SRT-10 Hood Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking if cold air can be inducted through the SRT-10 hood, Joe Donnelly cites descriptions of his homemade duct in TDR Issues 52 and 58. 31 Air intake system: advice on selecting Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) To a reader seeking advice on the best air filter/air box for a 24-valve engine with a Smarty and 275hp injector upgrade, Joe Donnellyadises and references articles on the subject in TDR Issue 59, pp. 35, 130­134. 31 Air intake system: aFe brand and BD brand. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Air intake system: Cold Air kit. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Air intake system: Pete Tomka. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Alternator bracket, replacement with cast unit Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) A reader asking about replacing his weld-repaired stamped OEM alternator bracket with a later issue cast unit is advised by fellow readers and directed by the editor to TBS bulletins and reports in earlier issues of TDR. 32 Alternator bracket, tendency to crack, corrected Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly says that earlier upper alternator mount brackets were liable to crack, a weakness corrected by the manufacturer switching from stamped steel to cast iron. 32 Alternator brushes, replacing Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) Readers discover and describe the steps in do-it-yourself replacement of alternator brushes in a truck with a 12-valve engine. 19 Anti-Lock Brake System warning light, intermittent, troubleshooting Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Readers troubleshoot intermittent ABS warning light, testing and replacing wires from the rear-wheel speed sensor. 28 Anti-sway bar, with camper configuration, evaluating Issue 63 (TDRV) Readers discuss the possible merits of replacing stock with Hellwig anti-sway bar to improve suspension on a Turbo Diesel mounted with a slide-in camper. 101 Antifreeze. See Coolant, specs for all models Arm rest in door panel, source Issue 63 (First Generation) One member informs another of a source for a replacement arm rest in the driver's side door panel of a First Generation Turbo Diesel. 14 Automatic transmission fluid ATF+4, less expensive alternative to Mopar Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Walmart markets an automatic transmission fluid meeting ATF+4 standards and licensed by Mopar. 28 Automotive industry, critique of top management Issue 63 (Four Whaling) Greg Whale evaluates the top management in the Big Three auto manufacturers: Mulally at Ford, Lutz and Wagoner at GM; Nardelli at Chrysler. 59­60

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Automotive industry, in crisis, analysis Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson notes severe economic crisis in the American automotive industry, with particular attention to impact on unit production at Cummins and Chrysler; marketing by Dodge; sales volume at dealerships and vendors. 82 Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes reports calamitous declines in sales of automotive vehicles in the face of the financial crisis and worldwide recession: layoffs, plant closings, discontinued models, threatening insolvency. 84­85 Issue 63 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor points out that the current crisis in the automotive industry has parallels in previous economic downturns, citing news stories in Consumer Guide and Automotive News from the `50s and the `80s. 47 Issue 63 (Four Whaling) Greg Whale reports and interprets the crisis in the automotive industry: shifts in consumer demands and marketing problems, management mistakes, role of government; he names names and surveys the grim outlook. 58­60 Issue 63 (Four Whaling) Greg Whale singles out what he calls "Seven Letters" as bearing large responsibility in the current crisis facing the automotive industry: UAW, the unions; and CAFE, arbitrary fuel/mileage requirements. 60 Issue 63 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes does a roundup of media rumors and press reports on root causes of the crisis in the industry, including incorrigible management misdirection, government CAFE standards, and unions. 66 Autonet, mobile internet connection Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes describes a product she saw at 2008 SEMA, the Autonet option from Chrysler which effectively makes your pickup a mobile WiFi hotspot anywhere accessible to satellite connection. 72 Auto shows. See Los Angeles Auto Show 2008; See Chicago Auto Show 2009 Axle, maintenance and service Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reminds readers of the prescribed change intervals and weights of rear-axle lubricants, specific to the Dana in the `94­'02, and the American Axles on later model trucks. 82 Axle ratio, choice of Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reports that to address fuel-mileage issues Dodge will be coming out with a new gear ratio, 3.42:1, available on `09 2500 and 3500 Turbo Diesels, both manual and automatic. 82 Back-up camera: Rear View Camera V3P. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Back-up camera: Swift Hitch brand Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes describes the "Swift Hitch" brand portable wireless fullcolor back-up camera system she found displayed at 2008 SEMA. 73 Back-up camera: VR3 wireless Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) In an addendum to Polly Holmes' review of the Swift Hitch back-up camera, the editor references reviews of the alternative VR3, an "unbeatable" back-up camera at less than a hundred dollars, appearing in TDR Issues 58 & 59. 73 Back-up light: Blazer. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Back-up sensor: Parking Partner. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Ball joint and hub bearing inspection and replacement Issue 63 (From The Shop Floor) Andy Redmond provides instructions for inspecting and replacing ball joints and hub bearings on Turbo Diesels, with illustrative photos, parts numbers, and charts of relevant torque and alignment specs. 104­107 Banks, Gale, Engineering: observes 50th anniversary in the industry Issue 63 (Back In The Saddle) Scott Dalgleish observes the 50th anniversary of Gale Banks Engineering, paying tribute to its contribution to what he calls "our hobby." 87 Barrett-Jackson auction Issue 64 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes reports on this year's Barrett-Jackson auction, notes the effects of economic downturn, marvels at its lineup of Mopars, Cudas, Challengers and Hemis. 78­79 Batteries: Optima. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Battery, charge drain from, troubleshooting Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson rehearses procedures for checking circuits to locate source of an occult power drain that kills the battery overnight, prescribing serial meter testing of fuses, solenoids, and lines not switched by the ignition. 70 Battery, intermittent failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) In diagnosing a problem with batteries constantly going dead and an incompetent air conditioner, Jim Anderson helps a reader use trouble codes to identify and fix a loose crankcase position sensor (CPS). 83 Battery acid leak, damage to cruise control vacuum actuator Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Failure in the cruise control is traced to a vacuum actuator damaged by acid leaking from the driver's side battery. 16 Battery post cables, correcting loose clamps Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) By trimming the ends of the jaws of a loose battery-cable clamp with a hacksaw to lessen its effective circumference, a clamp worn loose through long use may be restored to a snug fit on the post. 28 Battery top post connectors, aftermarket Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes describes his adding what he calls "the little 3 Circuit Top Tap Connectors" to his battery, which provide him an extra nut to the positive terminal for easy hookup of another electrical do-hickey. 73 "Become a TDR Writer" contest Issue 64 (Turbo Tips) The editor promotes his "Become a TDR Writer" contest, in which readers submitting helpful do-it-yourself instructions receive $100 and publication in the Turbo Tips column of the magazine. 10 Bed Cover: Agri-Cover Lite Rider. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Bed Liner: Spray-in, Line-X brand. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update; See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Bed Step: AMP Research. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Biodiesel, fuel filter kit. See Fuel filter, auxiliary, severe duty and biodiesel Biodiesel fuel, product and status report Issue 62 (Blowin' In The Wind) Although tests of biodiesel by engine manufacturers suggest that B20 formulations are theoretically acceptable, neither Cummins nor Chrysler approve more than B5. 48 "Block 53" problem. See Lock-N-Stitch, repair kit for "Block 53" engine Block heater plug: WigiDigit. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Blow-by, excessive, diagnosing Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly analyzes symptoms of excessive blow-by, rough engine and excess blue smoke, noting that bad injectors would cause white but not blue smoke, and that bad rings would account for the problem, indicating a rebuild. 33 Brake caliper kit, upgrade for `94­'99 trucks Issue 63 (TDRelease) EGR Performance Brakes offers its Tri-Power three-piston aluminum caliper kit for `94­'99 2500 and 3500 trucks, providing 16% more brake torque than stock units. 123 Brake light switch, replacing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) A member provides instructions for removing the brake light switch from the foot pedal assembly, in the process of correcting erratic cruise control and torque converter. 16 Brake lines, breached from corrosion and abrasion Issue 63 (Letter Exchange) Brake power can fail because of breaks in lines caused by corrosion from road salts or friction, a possibility that calls for periodic inspection. 6 Brake pad-to-rotor contact surfaces, wear pattern Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader is told that it is normal to have a half-inch unused rotor surface on the outside, detected after replacing new brake pads on his First Generation truck. 22 Brake pads, advice on choosing Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader seeking advice on choosing front brake pads for a `05 Turbo Diesel, Joe Donnelly says that some brands squeal and others wear the rotors fast, but that Mopar brand performs well for him. 37 Brakes, front, rotors, replacing Issue 63 (First Generation) A reader is assured that in the front brakes on the First Generation Turbo Diesel, rotors are separate from the hubs and may be purchased and replaced separately. 14 Brakes, rear, adjusting Issue 61 (First Generation) Readers exchange information gleaned from experience in adjusting emergency brakes and recommend tools for the job on First Generation trucks. 16 Issue 61 (From The Shop Floor) Andy Redmond provides instructions for servicing rear brakes in Third Generation Turbo Diesels, in steps much the same as for other year models, enumerating tools, parts, and specs; and advising on brake fluid. 122­123 Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC), as index of fuel efficiency Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson points out that both the 5.9-liter and 6.7-liter engines operate most efficiently in the 1900­2100rpm range, providing the driver a guide for achieving maximum fuel efficiency. 62 Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC), explained. See also Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Issue 61 (Tech Topics) Brake Specific Fuel Consumption is a technical measure of engine efficiency reckoned according to a simple mathematical formula explained by the editor. 41 Issue 61 (Tech Topics) Mark Chapple, of TST Products, explains the role of calculating BSFC in tests to measure fuel efficiency of the Turbo Diesel engine with various accessories and with timing advance. 46­47 Braking, uneven or lateral pulling Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly references the text of TSB 05-04-99, page 50 of this issue, describing repair technique for correcting brake and steering pull problems. 31 Brite Box accessory Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) As a convenience accessory to the TDR Project Truck John Holmes adds the Brite Box, which provides for simultaneous high and low headlight beams. 74 Brite Box and Fogzilla combination. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Bumper, front, adding new springs for the extra weight Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Responding to a reader's query on how to compensate for extra weight of a heavy aftermarket front bumper, Joe Donnelly describes his own addition of a KORE Chase suspension system. 28 Bumper and rocker panel textured finish: U-POL. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Bumpers, upgrade, aftermarket. See also Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) To a reader seeking evaluation of Reunel bumpers, Joe Donnelly enumerates their merits, saying they "may be stronger than the frame" and "they tie the rails together," adding that they have saved his truck from being totaled. 35 Cab air filtration system: Cab Fresh brand. See also Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) In his program to upgrade not just the performance but also the comfort of the TDR Project Truck, John Holmes installs the Cab Fresh Filter Kit. 74 Cab cowl, crack under windshield, repair Issue 63 (First Generation) Instructions are provided for identifying and repairing a cracked body seam in the cowl under the windshield of a First Generation truck, requiring a welded patch. 16 Calendar. See TDR annual wall calendar Camper, truck suspension, reducing sway Issue 63 (TDRV) Bill Stockard advises that the best way to minimize sway in a Turbo Diesel mounted with a slide-in camper is to add a spacer in the overload springs, and recommends vendors. 101 Camshaft, procedure in replacing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly describes replacement of the camshaft in the Turbo Diesel engine, with a reference to illustrative photos in TDR Issue 33, pp. 46­48. 17 Camshaft drive gear, removal of, instructions Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Although it is work to pull the camshaft drive gear from the engine to replace the gear case, it is necessary, says Joe Donnelly, who provides painstaking instructions for the job. 27 Cargo rack, at hitch receiver: Carpod brand Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes describes the Carpod cargo rack which fits into a pickup's hitch receiver to carry up to 450 lbs of extra stuff, but weighs only 50 lbs and folds when not in use. 73

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Catalytic converter, fouled, from extended idling. See Idling, prolonged, damage from CCV filter. See Closed Crankcase Ventilation (CCV) filter, servicing Chicago Auto Show 2009 Issue 64 (TDReview) Steve St. Laurent visits the Chicago Auto Show to preview Dodge pickup products. 60­62 Chrysler, proposed integration with Fiat Issue 64 (Four Whaling) G.R. Whale speculates on benefits in a union of Chrysler and Fiat: advantages of scale and in niche markets, and Chrysler's being free from Cerberus management: on balance, he sees reasons to "be positive." 66­67 Chrysler/Nissan alliance Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) Nissan and Chrysler have entered into strategic cooperative agreements to share technical expertise and to better apportion market niches, i.e., Nissan in small-engined vehicles, Chrysler in big-engined vehicles. 52 Chrysler: survey of current status Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes surveys media's coverage of Chrysler in crisis, a storied auto maker with a reputation for innovation but weakened by recent years of indecisive management. 72 Chrysler Group, survival strategies in a tough market Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes reports the departure of Mike Donoughe from management in Chrysler Group; the sales slump; spectacular sales incentives; and eliminating clones to produce fewer models, focusing on those remaining. 86 Chrysler manufacturing and marketing, multinational alliances Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes reviews news of cooperative projects envisioned by Chrysler with Nissan of Japan; with Chery of China; with Tata of India; and for a Volkswagen vehicle in Canada--for economy of scale and allocating market niches. 84 Chrysler operations improvements Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes pays tribute to Chrysler management under Cerberus for being named North America's most efficient vehicle manufacturer. 84 Clampload. See Clutches, overview of and commentary on Closed Crankcase Ventilation (CCV) filter, servicing Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Readers provide cautionary advice and brief instructions for changing the CCV (Closed Crankcase Ventilation) filter, which, if not serviced on schedule or when signaled, may result in clogged intercooler. 39 Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Robert Patton defines CCV as an acronym for "closed crankcase ventilation," explains its filter in the 6.7-liter engine, describes steps for periodic changing, and provides both Fleetguard and Mopar part numbers and prices. 40 Clutch, bearings, replacing of. See Transmission, manual, clutch bearings, servicing and replacing Clutch disc: factors affecting life expectancy of Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly summarizes factors determining performance and life expectancy of transmission clutch disks, including their intended application, construction, servicing, and operator's patterns of use or abuse. 31 Clutches, overview of and commentary on Issue 63 (Tech Topics) Gary Croyle explains clutches: how they work, their parts, how they are installed, and how to keep them in good working condition. 40­44 Clutch master cylinder, failure, troubleshooting Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) A reader discovers that his transmission's refusal to shift from first was caused by a failure in the clutch master cylinder, replacement of which solved the problem. 25 Clutch pedal vibration, troubleshooting Issue 61 (6.7 HPCR) To troubleshoot vibration in the clutch pedal of a '07.5 Turbo Diesel, three correspondents prescribe road tests and specific points for attention in teardown inspection. 39 Clutch pilot bearing, removal of Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly provides instructions for removing the clutch pilot bearing from the flywheel. 20 Compressor and air horns: Pacbrake. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Computers, on-board, malfunction, troubleshooting Issue 64 (From The Shop Floor) Not only do on-board computers signal vehicle malfunction, they themselves sometimes malfunction; Andy Redmond provides a guide to troubleshooting computers in all year models: location, typical problems and fixes. 106­111 Condenser Guard: Lanier Metal. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Constant Velocity joint, lubricating Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) The lube fitting in the Constant Velocity joint of the drive shaft is difficult to find, especially with manual transmissions, but readers provide ready instructions for proper lubrication. 31 Constant Velocity joint, rebuilding Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) The best fix for a worn-out Constant Velocity joint is to have it rebuilt and rebalanced at a driveshaft shop. 14 Coolant, specs for all models Issue 62 (Technical Topics) The editor surveys coolants for Dodge-Cummins Turbo Diesel vehicles by models, for product type, system capacity, fill quantity, and specs; with service instructions. 42­44 Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) To a query on coolant for the 24-valve engine and thermostat's temperature rating, the editor provides particulars and refers readers to a comprehensive roundup of specs for all models, Issue 62, pp. 42-44. 24 Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) An owner of a 5.9 HPCR with questions about coolants and possible alternatives is provided instructions for servicing and directed to TDR Issue 62, pp. 42­44, for a comprehensive roundup. 29 Coolant leak at block heater Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) A leak from the block heater on a `94 Turbo Diesel is traced to a failed O-ring seal. 20 Coolant leak at head gasket Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) A coolant leak at the head gasket requires replacing the gasket, according to Joe Donnelly, who would opt for the Cummins version, which is superior to the original. 20 Cooling system maintenance and servicing. See Engine cooling system, maintenance and servicing "Cover of the TDR" artwork program Issue 64 (Tailgating) The editor promotes the "Cover of the TDR" artwork program, begun with this issue, in which artists Kelly Snyder and Bob Pierce accept commissions to portray members' trucks to grace the successive quarterly issues of the TDR. 5 Cover of the TDR magazine. See TDR magazine cover art Crank cycle, overly prolonged, troubleshooting Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) A reader reporting prolonged crank cycle is advised by one member to replace overflow check valve, and by another member to replace a failed CPS (crankshaft position sensor), a fix that corrected the problem. 28 Crankshaft, front seal and wear rings, removing Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) A reader is advised on ways to remove a new wear ring at the crankshaft front seal of his 12-valve Turbo Diesel, including cutting with a Dremel, nudging with PVC pipe, heating with a torch, striking with a hammer. 24 Crankshaft, specs for dowel pin and tone ring Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly explains the relation of dowel pin at end of crankshaft to tone ring, and defines the bolt pattern and spacing for serpentine belt in 12-valve and HPCR engines. 30 Crankshaft dowel pin, broken. See Crankshaft, specs for dowel pin and tone ring Crankshaft position sensor (CPS), replacing Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) For a reader who intends to replace the crankshaft position sensor on his `99 Turbo Diesel, Jim Anderson provides general information on location and procedure. 70 Cruise control, intermittent failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) A reader discovers that damage to the vacuum actuator from leaking battery acid explains intermittent failure of cruise control on his Second Generation truck. 16 Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Readers report cruise controls disengaging on rough roads when towing with Second Generation Turbo Diesels, and solve the problem by replacing the brake light switch. 16 CTF ("cheap-to-free"), applying the test for real value Issue 63 (Tailgating) Whether a "cheap-to-free" deal is a genuine bargain or an el-cheapo ripoff depends on value realized, the editor says, maintaining that the quality of TDR's magazine and website demonstrates a "real deal." 4 Cummins' Column Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Introducing a column providing direct input from Cummins, the editor reports answers to the most pressing problems customers have had with early production 6.7-liter Turbo Diesels. 70­74 Cummins, Clessie: account of, by Lyle Cummins Issue 63 (Your Story) Lyle Cummins, son of Clessie, the eponym and guiding genius of Cummins Diesel manufactory, pens a brief account of his father's role in the early history of diesel application in America. 56­57 Cummins, Lyle, his books for sale Issue 63 (Your Story) Lyle Cummins offers for sale individual titles of books he has authored on his illustrious father, Clessie, and his personal library of research material. 56­57 Cummins-powered 1931 Duesenberg racer Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A reader attending an auto show spots a Cummins-powered 1931 Duesenberg race car, a vehicle that evokes reminiscences by author Lyle Cummins, to which the editor provides background drawn from Cummins' book. 6­7 Cummins 6.7-liter engine, extent of difference from the 5.9-liter Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins explains that the 6.7-liter engine does not break with the past but builds on the design of the legendary 5.9-liter, while it provides more advanced system integration and improves aftertreatment technology. 70­71 Cummins 6.7-liter engine, pros and cons Issue 62 (Cummins' Column) In a simulated dialog with a first-time buyer seeking justification for purchasing a 6.7-liter HPCR Turbo Diesel, the editor concedes initial teething problems and then enumerates all its merits in design, function, and value. 74­79 Issue 62 (Four Whaling) G.R. Whale reasons that the problems besetting the 6.7-liter HPCR are of a sort inevitable in any new and innovative product, and argues that they are far outweighed by its demonstrated superiority over any competing engines. 80­81 Cummins 6.7-liter engine, what's new in the `09 model Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) After a visit to the Cummins plant, the editor reports two notable changes in the 2009 engine: a dual fuel filter with greater filter area and finer rating; and revised coolant hoses and O-ring fittings. 34 Cummins 6.7-liter engine, wins 2008 PACE award Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) Cummins received the Automotive News PACE (Premier Automotive Suppliers' Contribution to Excellence) Award for 2008 in recognition of the 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel, the most advanced heavy-duty pickup engine in the market. 48 Cummins Turbo Diesel engine, changes in `04.5 Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly itemizes and explains the new and/or upgraded specs for the engine and its attached components introduced midyear in the 2004.5 Turbo Diesel. 32 Cup holder: Don's Thermoplastics. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update DDP service facility, change in location Issue 63 (Back In The Saddle) Following his practice of keeping readers up to date on news items both big and small, Scott Dalgleish notes a new location of DDP in Monroe, WA. 87 DDRP (Direct Dodge Replacement Pump), installing Issue 63 (From The Shop Floor) Andy Redmond explains the merits of the FASS DDRP as a replacement for the inadequate stock transfer pump in '98.5­'02 trucks, and provides illustrated instructions for installation. 108­109 DDRP (Direct Dodge Replacment Pump), remedy for a weak lift pump Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) The editor emphasizes importance of full pressure to the VP-44 injection pump in 24-valve engines and recommends replacement of stock with the mid-priced "Dodge Direct Replacement Pump" by makers of FASS. 24

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"Dead pedal problem," troubleshooting. See also Accelerator Petal Position Sensor (APPS), faulty, multiple problems, diagnosing Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) A logically inferable cause of "dead pedal" (failure of engine fueling to respond to the pedal) is a bad injection pump: Joe Donnelly recommends a reader consider a new one or rebuild. 25 Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) To a query from a reader with a 5.9 HPCR reporting intermittent dead pedal with bucking and fading, Joe Donnelly suggests checking fuel pressure between the filter and the CP3, and checking the APPS, as well as accessing codes. 30 Dealerships and service facilities, recommended Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A member with 500,000 miles on his `97 Turbo Diesel recommends service of Goerend Transmission. 8 Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes selects a dealership to take care of his Turbo Diesel when he is sojourning in Texas; and puts in a plug for his old employer Carson Dodge, back home in Nevada. 86 Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson recommends Don's Truck & Tractor Repair, Surgoinsville, TN, praises his well-equipped shop, and reports his reputation for fixing trucks others can't. 64 Delivery valves. See Fuel injection pump, delivery valves, #191 vs. #181 Diagnostic Trouble Code of doubtful accuracy, troubleshooting Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) A reader with a recurring diagnostic code, but seemingly with no attendant equipment problem, checks connections at the PCM and cleans accumulated corrosion, but concludes cause is an electronic "bug." 24 Diagnostic Trouble Code P0401 Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Engine hesitation and stutter accompanied by DTC P0401 results from fouled EGR coolers, requiring cleaning, parts replacement and adjusting. 39 Diagnostic Trouble Code P042e Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The Check Engine light triggered by Diagnostic Trouble Code P042e indicates that the Exhaust Gas Recirculation control is stuck open, requiring cleaning of fouling soot by a service tech. 39 Diagnostic Trouble Code P2000. See Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) oxygen sensors, troubleshooting Diagnostic Trouble Code P2262. See Turbocharger, soot contamination and P2262 Code Diagnostic Trouble Codes, displaying via key cycling Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Contrary to some misinformed reports, Diagnostic Trouble Codes can indeed be accessed by cycling the ignition key in the `07.5 and later trucks, just as in previous models. 38 Diagnostic Trouble Codes, familiarization with, admonished Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) With a couple of anecdotal examples, Jim Anderson emphasizes the importance of heeding Control-Module "trouble codes," which can localize and identify the cause of problems in the engine and drive train. 83 Diagnostic Trouble Codes, guide to use of Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Citing technical upgrades in the ECM system and consequent increase in the number and complexity of Diagnostic Trouble Codes, the editor provides a comprehensive analysis and explanation, with practical guidance for their use. 46­49 Diagnostic Trouble Codes for the 6.7-liter engine, comprehensive list of Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Observing that the number of diagnostic trouble codes is increasing rapidly and will continue to escalate, the editor lists them and identifies each one's meaning, complete at the time it was compiled. 47­48 Diesel-powered race car. See Cummins-powered 1931 Duesenberg racer Diesel-powered vehicle industry and the competitive market. See the following topic heads: Chrysler/Nissan alliance; Chrysler Group, survival strategies in a tough market; Cummins 6.7-liter engine, wins 2008 PACE award; Diesel-powered vehicles, disadvantage in the market; Diesel-powered vehicles, smaller engines promise competitiveness; Ford diesels, new 4.4-liter V-8 diesel, slated for five truck models; GM Duramax diesel, uncertain changes to meet 2010 emissions standards; Nissan Titan, discontinued in Nissan-Chrysler coöp marketing Diesel-powered vehicles, disadvantage in the market Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor opines that diesel passenger cars and light-to-medium duty pickups will continue to be at a competitive market disadvantage because of fuelprice differential and government emissions bias. 51 Diesel-powered vehicles, smaller engines promise competitiveness Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor cites news media for evidence that new smaller diesel engines for lighter-duty vehicles will enhance competitiveness and perhaps usher in the long-awaited "Diesel Renaissance." 52 Diesel automotive industry, news of. See Automotive industry, in crisis, analysis Diesel engine, efficiency, superiority to gasoline Issue 63 (Member2Member) Reprising a classic TDR analysis, the editor explains the superiority of diesel over gasoline engines and calculates the former's greater fuel efficiency but its economic disadvantage at today's premium for diesel fuel. 10­11 Diesel engines slated for light-duty applications Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor quotes at length from reports in Automotive News on new light-duty trucks in the works at Chrysler Group emerging from its alliance with Nissan. 52 Diesel fuel, accidental use of "low sulfur" in place of required ULSD Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) One fueling with the dis-allowed "Low Sulfur" diesel instead of ULSD will not cause harm, but continued use will damage the equipment, says Cummins. 74 Diesel fuel, adding used engine oil, ill-advised Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly declares that adding used lube oil to diesel fuel is likely to cause catastrophic damage to injectors and wreak general havoc on the engine. 34 Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson notes reader queries about adding used motor oil to diesel fuel for economy, and recommends against it, saying that it was not designed to be burned in a combustion chamber. 82 Issue 62 (TDRV) Joe Donnelly explains why he strongly advises against any fuel concoction such as that proposed by a reader to thin used motor oil with 30% gasoline as a substitute for diesel, inevitably leading to serious engine damage. 121 Diesel fuel, adding vegetable oil, ill-advised Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson says that vegetable oil congeals at higher temperatures than diesel fuel and clogs the system, damages the engine, and is destructive of catalytic converters. 82 Diesel fuel, liability in using untaxed "off-road diesel" Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson cautions against using un-taxed, off-road diesel fuel for in-town or on-highway travel, a violation of law with a heavy penalty. 68 Diesel fuel, mis-measurement, cheating at the pump Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reports on the failure by regulators to correct what amounts to cheating at the pump, resulting from disparity between fuel volume in storage at a nominal 60 degrees and the actual, hotter temperature at the pump. 82­83 Diesel fuel, questionable availability of ULSD in Mexico Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins techs warn that availability of ULSD is not assured in Mexico or Canada and that non-ULSD will compromise emissions compliance in late model Turbo Diesels. 74 Diesel fuel, rising prices, explanation of Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) In extended quotation from the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, Robert Patton identifies the constraints in supply, refining, and marketing which account for disproportionately high diesel fuel prices. 50­51 Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson sees merit in the theory that rising fuel prices are an inevitable consequence of the worldwide population explosion and competition from emerging national economies vying for limited supply. 82 Issue 62 (Backfire) A reader opines that high diesel fuel prices result from conspiracy in the oil industry, and mildly reproves the TDR for failing to give more editorial attention to the question of industry-wide collusion. 110 Diesel fuel prices, oscillation in Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes comments on recent oscillations in cost of diesel fuel and says that although at the moment the national average price is in a lower range, she still plans her trips for economy. 72 Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), information and advisory on servicing Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins techs tell how to monitor the DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) and interpret and deal with trouble codes, with references to relevant bulletins. 73­74 Differential covers: Mag-Hytec. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update; See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Differential fluid: LE-607. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Differential gear ratio, 3.42:1. See Axle ratio, choice of Differential oil, synthetic vs. non-synthetic Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly reports his experience with synthetic vs. non-synthetic differential lubes, and offers guidelines for regular maintenance. 32 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson recommends synthetic differential oil and says that a 75W-90 or 75W-140 will work well in all rear axles used in Dodge trucks from 1989 to present. 69 Direct Dodge Replacment Pump (by FASS). See DDRP Dodge Challenger SRT-8 muscle car Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes is enthusiastic about the new Challenger SRT-8 sedan muscle car, declaring it is even better than the 1970 Hemi Challenger. 84 Dodge Ram 1500, 2009 model, review of. See also "UConnect" internet access system, option in Dodge Ram 1500 Issue 62 (TDReview) Andy Redmond describes the 2009 gasoline-powered Dodge Ram; compares its drivability to that of the Ford 150, Chevrolet 1500, and Toyota Tundra; and anticipates carry-over of features to Turbo Diesel models. 50­53 Issue 62 (TDReview) The 2009 Dodge Ram pickup has "broken out of the pack" of competitors, says the editor, who evaluates its new features, many of which, particularly advances in cabin features, he expects will show up in coming Turbo Diesels. 54­55 Issue 62 (Four Whaling) Highlighting in particular its coil/link rear suspension, G.R. Whale says that the Dodge 2009 Ram 1500 pickup is a "heck of a good truck," a "game changer" which may keep Chrysler afloat till its new products come on line. 81 Dodge Ram Turbo Diesel 2010, 2500/3500, review Issue 64 (TDReview) Steve St. Laurent reviews the 2010 Dodge Ram 2500/3500 Heavy Duty pickup, identifies the several configurations available, describes new features. 60­62 Dodge Ram Turbo Diesel 2010 Chassis Cab Issue 64 (TDReview) The Dodge 2010 Chassis Cab, introduced this year at the Chicago Auto show, in Regular and Crew Cab but not Mega Cab, with best-in-class fuel economy, is notable for Selective Catalyst Reduction technology utilizing urea injection. 62 Doors, cab, adjusting of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Members provide detailed instructions, complete with illustrative photos, for correcting the fit of cab doors by adjusting hinges and strikers, to eliminate air leaks. 33­34 Door sill protector: Step Shields Kit Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) In his project to refurbish the TDR Project Truck, John Holmes includes among many minor embellishments the Step Shields Kit, designed to prevent scuffing of the the cab's door sills and give a more secure foothold. 73 DPF. See Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF), information and advisory on servicing Drag racing. See Racing, Dodge Cummins Diesel pickups Drive shaft, one-piece vs. two-piece Issue 62 (TDRV) Joe Donnelly explains the rationale for a two-piece driveshaft, and references Mark Williams' website for technical discussion of ways to increase diameter to raise the threshold of critical speed at which a driveshaft becomes unstable. 121 DTC. See Diagnostic Trouble Codes Dually (dual rear wheel) conversion in a 3500 shortbed Issue 64 (Your Story) George Doughtie converts an'06 3500 Mega Cab to a dually, using adapters from Arrowcraft and full-size dually fenders for Mega Cabs on a short box from T.A.W., modified to pull a gooseneck. 64 Dumb car names Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor notes the nomenclatural extravagance in names invented for vehicle models, some silly, some bizarre, some suggestive. 50

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Dump station, setting up an RV sewer facility. See RV dump setup at home Dying, vehicle engine, at road speed. See Engine operation, prolonged cranking and dying at road speed Earn Your Stripes, license tag Issue 61 (Earn Your Stripes) TDR offers its popular color-lithographed license tag bearing the Super-B character for owners to proclaim power upgrades, in increments of 100 hp, and lists names of recipients in the current quarter. 118 Issue 62 (Earn Your Stripes) TDR members who achieve high horsepower are awarded "Earn Your Stripes" license-tags, each one a full-color insignia emblazoned with the level achieved, inscribed in increments of 100 hp. 108 Issue 63 (Earn Your Stripes) The TDR continues its offer of color-lithographed license tag bearing the Super B cartoon character for Turbo Diesel owners to proclaim their power achievements, in increments of 100hp, at cost of $4. 96 Issue 64 (Earn Your Stripes) Ornamented with a cartoon image of the Super B character, and displaying from 4 to 8 stripes to proclaim levels of horsepower achievement, the TDR's "Earn Your Stripes" license tag is offered to qualifying members. 98 ECM. See Engine Control Module Economic quandary: a critical American dilemma Issue 63 (Exhaust Note) Kevin Cameron says he still hopes that Americans will be designing and building efficient products, but observes ruefully that the free market imperative works to undermine the integrity of domestic American productive capacity. 128­129 Editorial policy, TDR re-commits the magazine to Turbo Diesel basics Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) Facing a society roiled by unprecedented change and beset by hard times, the editor pledges to re-focus the TDR on the basics of Turbo Diesel problem solving, performance enhancement, and efficient operation. 7 EGR. See Exhaust Gas Recirculation EGT, 6.7-liter engine, safe thresholds for operation and shutdown Issue 64 (Cummins' Column) To a reader worried about prematurely shutting down a hot engine when directed to do so in midst of a regeneration mode, a Cummins engineer provides a time table and says, "following that table is all that is needed." 57 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) The 6.7-liter engine is designed to operate briefly at 1450 degrees; and it will tolerate shutdown temperatures above the traditional threshold of 300 degrees without damage to the turbocharger, if Cummins guidelines are observed. 69­70 Electrical noise, interference in control circuits Issue 61 (From The Shop Floor) Andy Redmond offers a kit to attenuate electrical noise interference in control circuitry. 120 Issue 61 (From The Shop Floor) Andy Redmond traces the cause of torque-converter lock/unlock problems in the 47RE transmission to electrical noise in bad control circuits between the accelerator pedal position sensor (APPS) and the PCM. 120 Electrical noise, interference with transmission operation. See Torque converter lock/unlock problem, troubleshooting Electrical systems, multiple power failures. See Front Control Module (FCM), defective Emissions particulate trap, removal of Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) While it is technically possible to remove the diesel particulate trap on 6.7liter trucks, and kits can be bought on the web, the vehicle would not pass inspection and warranty is jeopardized. 64 Emissions pollution, engine maker's dilemma balancing efficiency with EPA compliance Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins spokesmen explain the engine maker's dilemma in complying with government mandate to reduce nitrogen oxides and particulate matter while trying to maintain power efficiency, and the consequent compromises. 72­73 Emissions Recall G30 Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) The editor explains and updates info on Emissions Recall G30 for all `07.5 and `08 2500 and 3500 series trucks built prior to October `07, which reprograms the ECM and replaces the oxygen sensor module. 70­74 Emissions regulations, continuing increase in restrictions Issue 63 (Blowin' In The Wind) An ex-EPA official is optimistic that there will be no new restrictions on diesel emissions, but the editor reviews pending deadlines and proposals already in the works which clearly indicate otherwise. 46 Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Issue 61 (Exhaust Note) Kevin Cameron ponders alternatives to meet 2020 CAFE standards: seek the best BSFC, as Chevy's Volt; settle for Parallel hybrids, as the Prius; follow the lure of HCCI; somehow clean up gas or diesel engines: all compromises. 135­137 Energy cost, long-term effects of scarcity and politics Issue 61 (Four Whaling) In a free-wheeling assessment of politics at home and abroad, supply constraints, and consumer prejudices, G.R. Whale speculates that in the long-term drivers and operators will adjust to higher prices and smaller vehicles. 76­78 Engine, intermittent missing in 5.9-liter engines Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson notes an increase in reports of intermittent engine missing in `98.5­'02 models, indicating poor electrical contacts in plugs between sensors and electronic control modules, a result of corrosion buildup. 63 Engine, intermittent throttle response. See Accelerator pedal position sensor (APPS), troubleshooting Engine, prolonged cranking and dying at road speed Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) A reader reporting protracted cranking at engine startup with dying at road speeds, is advised by Joe Donnelly to check lift pump delivery pressure and volume and inspect fuel filter for restriction and fuel tank for contamination. 31 Engine, sluggish in 6.7-liter vehicles, toubleshooting Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) To a reader reporting sluggish engine operation in his late-model Turbo Diesel, Jim Anderson suggests periodic operation at full highway speed to keep the ERG system well blown out. 69 Engine-operation gauge and trip computer, aftermarket Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes describes and recommends an easy-to-use portable digital trip computer and multifunction vehicle computer, the ScanGauge II. 88 Engine block heater, failed, troubleshooting Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Failed circuit continuity is identified as cause of engine block heater failure, a problem corrected by replacing the cord and plug. 28 Engine block heater plug disconnect, automatic Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) A specialty product is made to automatically eject the plug from the engine block heater, but Jim Anderson recommends a personal memory aid, such as looping the cord around the door handle, for a forgetful driver. 69 Engine Control Module (ECM): reprogramming with Smarty tuner Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Assisted by Marco Casano, developer of Smarty, Joe Donnelly delves into the mysteries of the ECM to disclose the parameters of, constraints in, and techniques for reprogramming for increased performance. 79­82 Engine cooling system, maintenance and servicing Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reviews the basics in maintaining and servicing the engine cooling system: coolant, hoses, and radiator. 82 Engine cooling system temperature gauge, erratic readings Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson says that erratic behavior of a cooling system temperature gauge "almost always means that something is not right," and proceeds to itemize things to check out before an expensive teardown to inspect the head gasket. 70 Engine hesitation/stutter in 4th gear. See Diagnostic Trouble Code P0401 Engine ignition, failure to maintain Issue 62 (First Generation) Readers with problems in maintaining ignition in a First Generation truck diagnose the cause as a failed lift pump and rehearse the variables in making a repair. 12­13 Engine oil, additives to. See Additives, to fuel and oil Engine oil, change interval in the 6.7-liter engine Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins technicians address customer complaints about premature EVIC messages to change oil, advising compliance with the G30 Recall and the latest reflash, emphasizing the importance of heeding the change alert system. 71 Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The editor and John Martin continue from Issue 61 their interpretation of test data on change interval of engine oil in a 6.7 HPCR engine, to conclude that a 10,000 mile interval is dangerous. 42­43 Engine oil: CI-4 vs CJ-4 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) For trucks before the 6.7-liter engine, the additive formula in the older CI-4 engine oil is better than CJ-4, formulated for new engines; but to standardize, oil companies have made a product roughly "backward compatible." 71 Engine oil: limited availability of CI-4 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Increasing scarcity of API CI-4 lube oil is the result of refiners switching to CJ-4, with assurances that the new product is backward compatible for earlier diesel engines as well as those made after 1/1/07 which require it. 68 Engine oil drain valve: Fumoto. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Engine oil filter, dual bypass, aftermarket Issue 64 (Product Showcase) Gary Wescott reviews the dual bypass oil filter technology and describes construction and installation of Amsoil's BMK25 kit, which the maker says could extend oil changes to 60,000 miles. 112­113 Engine oil level, overflow reading Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Overfilling engine oil should be avoided; and particularly in the new engines with closed crankcase ventilation, care should be taken to allow sufficient time for the oil to drain to the pan in the process of an oil change. 71 Engine oil life, comparative lab analysis Issue 61 (6.7 HPCR) The editor reports further on his analysis of engine oil performance and uselife (see Issues 54 through 59) with an eye to figuring proper change interval. 34­35 Engine oil pressure sending unit, replacing Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) TDR readers submit information on source and installation of a Cummins direct-replacement engine oil-pressure sending-unit, which requires no reflashing and works perfectly, at a cost less than the Mopar unit. 29 Engine operation problem, dead pedal. See "Dead pedal problem" Engine power deficiency, intermittent drop and surge. See Soot buildup in 6.7-liter model trucks, problems with Engine rattle and rough acceleration at 2000 rpm Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) For troubleshooting timing rattle and rough acceleration at 2000 rpm, Joe Donnelly suggests first checking the fuel control actuator (FCA), the least expensive fix among possible causes, which include a bad injector. 35 Engine rattle and stumble at idle Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) A reader corrects a problem with engine stumble and rattle when idling at a stop light by replacing a failed fuel control actuator (FCA). 34 Engine rough, troubleshooting. See also Fuel injection pump shaft, fouled with oil, instructions for cleaning Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly analyzes a report of multiple symptoms of bumpy idle, rough engine operation when cold, and excessive blue smoke in a 5.9 HPCR engine; and conjectures likely need for a rebuild. 33 Engines, internal combustion: alternatives to diesel Issue 64 (Exhaust Note) Besides the alternatives of gasoline vs. diesel, there are other choices now in development, with sophisticated advantage over both, but very expensive to develop in an economic environment demanding quick, cheap solutions. 119 Engine sensors, locations of Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Members provide graphic drawings with labels indicating the location of sensors on the engine of 24-valve Cummins Turbo Diesels. 26 Engine stalling and irregular performance. See Fuel Control Actuator (FCA), malfunctioning, troubleshooting Engine stalling and low idle. See also Engine ignition, failure to maintain Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly troubleshoots problems with engine stalling and low idle speed when operating the air conditioner in a 12-valve Turbo Diesel. 20 Engine stumble, drag, and dying Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Readers trace engine stalling, dying, and stumbling to a sticking FCA (fuel control actuator) valve and decide on its replacement. 30 Engine temperature sensor, failure. See Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting

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Events 2008. See also May Madness 2008 recap Issue 61 (Chapter News) The 4th Annual Central Texas Diesel Spring Dyno Event took place with more than 70 trucks registered, in April. 112 Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Forty TDR Snowbirds flocked together in central Florida twice in early 2008 and will meet again twice in early 2009, according to Jim Anderson, sponsor of the events, who invites attendance at future meetings. 83 Issue 62 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes reports on a Cummins Customer Appreciation get-together at Carson Dodge, Carson City, NV. 90 Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson spotlights the annual "TDR Dodgers" rally in East Tennessee hosted by Don's Truck & Tractor Repair, Surgoinsville, TN. 64 Events 2009 Issue 63 (Out Standing In The Field) The 15th Annual May Madness is scheduled for May 4­9, `09, in Pahrump, Nevada, and impressario Joe Donnelly provides details and a form for advance registration. 90­91 Issue 64 (Chapter News) Ontario TDR club held its organizing meeting in a blizzard, established camaraderie, and made plans for quarterly events and projected a possible Canadian National event. 93 Exhaust brake, aftermarket Issue 62 (TDRelease) Pacbrake introduces its new Max Flow PRXB Exhaust Brake designed for `94­'02 trucks to provide advanced performance, in a kit including air compressor and tank. 132 Exhaust brake, Banks, installed on a `04 with automatic transmission. See also Warranty, jeopardized by engine modifications, warning Issue 63 (Life's A Beach) Jerry Nielsen describes installation of a turbo-mounted exhaust brake "designed by Banks ... for use on the `03­'07 Turbo Diesel trucks ... with an automatic transmission," and judges it superior to other brakes. 74­77 Exhaust brake, integral to the 6.7 HPCR engine, idiocyncracies Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) To a reader who mistakenly suspects he has a problem, fellow members explain the characteristics of the exhaust brake equipped in the 6.7 HPCR Turbo Diesel. 36 Exhaust brake, PacBrake PRXB, installation Issue 61 (Back In The Saddle) Pacbrake PRXB in-line 4-inch exhaust brake: Scott Dalgleish describes the product and its installation suitable for Third Generation HPCR Cummins engines. 96­97 Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) To the TDR Project Truck, a `99 Turbo Diesel, John Holmes adds the Pacbrake PRXB, describes installation, and pronounces it the best of the exhaust brakes installed on his four trucks. 76­77 Exhaust brake, VGT compared to aftermarket. See Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT), comparative braking effectiveness Exhaust brake, whether continuous engagement causes problems Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) Readers are assured that the exhaust brake integral to the 6.7 HPCR engine is designed to be engaged continuously and its regular use will cause no problems. 37 Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), history of use in Cummins engine Issue 64 (Cummins' Column) Although EGR is not found in the 5.9-liter Dodge Turbo Diesel B-series pickup, according to Cummins sources, it has been used in several other of its truck engines since 2002, and since 2007 in the 6.7-liter engine. 56 Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) oxygen sensors, troubleshooting Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) Readers troubleshoot problems with the EGR oxygen sensors, clogged with soot or missing insulation wrap, which trip a Code P2000, addressed in TSB 18-035-08, calling for replacement and/or cleaning and rewrapping, under warranty. 37 Exhaust manifold, botched threading in hole drilled for thermocouple, repair of Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) For a reader who stripped the threading in the hole he drilled in the exhaust manifold for a pyrometer thermocouple, members provide instructions for retapping a size larger and then installing a reducer. 36 Exhaust manifold, replacing with aftermarket three-piece assembly Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) A reader reporting a cracked manifold of a `00 Turbo Diesel is directed to an aftermarket replacement. 22 Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader intent on renovating his 12-valve Turbo Diesel with 400,000 miles, Joe Donnelly advises replacing the exhaust manifold with a 3-piece unit. 18 Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Readers share information on procedure in replacing a cracked stock one-piece exhaust manifold, a not uncommon failing, with an aftermarket threepiece manifold. 25 Exhaust manifold: ATS and BD brands. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Exhaust system, aftermarket, adapted to DPF Issue 62 (TDRelease) Banks offers a new product, the CoolCuff, to temper extreme heat generated by the DPF, to complement its Monster Exhaust assembly. 132 Exhaust system regeneration in 6.7-liter engine: explanation of and advisory Issue 62 (Cummins' Column) The editor explains the design principle, construction, and function of the exhaust aftertreatment system in the 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel and in a sidebar provides practical tips for the vehicle operator. 78­79 Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The TDR explains the exhaust system regeneration standard in the 6.7liter Turbo Diesel; runs through a guide to interpreting EVIC messages in the overhead console; and identifies necessary actions by the vehicle's operator. 49 Exhaust upgrade, critera for deciding on Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) On whether to go for a larger, 5-inch exhaust with a near-stock pickup, Joe Donnelly says that increasing flow after the turbo offers only minimal gains, while some restriction in the stock turbo is desirable and even necessary. 36 Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking if the spoolup is slower and boost harder to reach with a larger downpipe, Joe Donnelly says that in his own experience the 5-inch helped once the engine was over 570hp, and explains why. 36 Fan clutch, replacing Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Readers note signs of failure in the fan clutch and emphasize importance of quality in aftermarket replacements. 18 FASS Fuel Pump and Filtration Kit. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update; See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck FCA. See Fuel Control Actuator FCM. See Front Control Module Fifth-gear nut problem Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) In the NV4500 transmission, the nut holding fifth gear may loosen, resulting in loss of fifth gear, the proper fix for which is a fully splined aftermarket shaft and nut, says Joe Donnelly. 20 Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) A manufacture deficiency in the NV4500 can cause the fifth-gear nut to unfasten from the drive shaft, resulting in loss of fifth gear, calling for replacement with a new aftermarket fully-splined main shaft and new nut. 27 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Loss of fifth gear in the NV4500 transmission in Second Generation trucks can result from the overdrive gear working loose, a failure best fixed by installing a new fully splined mainshaft and new crush washer and nut. 69 Fifth-wheel plus truck: method for weighing Issue 64 (TDRV) In amplification of a reader's suggestion of how to weigh a fifth wheel and truck combination appearing in a previous edition of TDR, Jim Anderson offers a refinement which facilitates calculating hitch-pin weight. 103 Fifth-wheel trailer hitch, no-drill bolt-on, installation Issue 64 (TDRV) Three readers share their experience, advice, and instructions for installing PullRite and Draw-Tite no-drill bolt-on fifth-wheel type trailer hitches. 104 Filter media, in new Fleetguard and Mopar oil and fuel filters Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The editor explains the filter medium, known as StrataPore, made of polymeric fibers providing 5-micron filtration, used in the new FS2 in all 6.7-liter engines made since 12/15/08. 51 Flatbed, relocating the fuel-tank fill-port Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) For his 4500 Chassis Cab, a reader relocates the fuel-fill port in a CM flatbed to a site vertically above the tank in the floor of the deck for convenience and to shorten flow travel in the filler neck. 35 "FlexFuel" vehicle. See Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Floor Mats: Husky and Mopar. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Fog lights: Fogster brand switch. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Fog lights: Mopar. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Ford, termination of contract with Navistar Issue 64 (Blowin' In The Wind) The editor reports termination of Ford's contract with Navistar for diesel engines in Ford's pickups, leaving the automaker without an announced source for model year 2010. 58 Ford diesels, new 4.4-liter V-8 diesel, slated for five truck models Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) Ford reveals plans for diesel vehicles powered by its 4.4-liter V-8, including the F150 and various SUVs and vans. 48 Four-wheel drive, replacement of stock hubs with Dynatrac Free Spin kit Issue 62 (Product Showcase) Doug Leno describes replacement of OEM 4WD hubs with the Dynatrac Free Spin kit with Warn manual lockout hubs, to demonstrate significant fuel economy, along with improved reliability, serviceability, and drivability. 128­131 Four-wheel drive, suspicious flashing indicator light Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) A reader suspecting a faulty flashing 4x4 mode in the indicator light of his '03 Turbo Diesel is counseled by members on how to evaluate and use this in operating the vehicle. 29 Fratzog, historic Dodge Division logo Issue 64 (Tailgating) The editor identifies the emblem artist Pierce superimposed upon the truck image appearing on the cover for TDR Issue 63, as the "Fratzog," an abstract design which served as the Dodge Division's logo from 1962 through 1976. 5 Front Control Module (FCM), defective, cause of multiple power failure in electrical systems Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) A reader lists electrical problems which readers agree are consistent with failure of the FCM, replaced by the dealer, though no explanation for its failure was found. 30­31 Front wheel bearings, servicing Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Front wheel bearings on trucks earlier than 2001 have grease fittings and should be repacked at least every 5 years/100,000 miles; but on later models cartridge type "lubed for life" fittings must be replaced as a unit. 70 Fuel, mixing diesel and gasoline, forbidden Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) To questions readers ask about gimmicks to cut fuel costs, Jim Anderson advises against adding vegetable oil or used engine oil to the tank or resorting to techniques of disabling one or more injectors. 82 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson enjoins against deliberately adding diesel to gasoline or gas to diesel in either diesel or gas engines, as damaging and dangerous. 69 Fuel/water separator, replacing in First Generation trucks Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader with a `92 Turbo Diesel is advised that it is easier to replace the fuel/water separator working from above, and is provided instructions for the procedure. 20 Fuel additives. See also Additives, to fuel and oil Fuel additives, information on Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson remarks members' interest in fuel additives to increase lubricity in ULSD, notes the editor's recommendations in Issue 52, and reminds readers that currently none is approved, but one is under Cummins development. 80­81 Fuel additives in the 6.7-liter engine, Cummins' stance on use of Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins does not recommend any current aftermarket fuel additives with the 6.7-liter engine. 74 Fuel Control Actuator (FCA), malfunctioning, troubleshooting Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Readers trace engine stalling and irregular performance to a sticking fuel control actuator (FCA) valve and describe ways to correct it. 30 Fuel control actuator (FCA), removal of, tool for Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Removal and replacement of the FCA (fuel control actuator) calls for a T25 Torx bit. 32 Fuel door: Bully brand. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Fuel economy, strategies to improve. See also entries under the following topic heads: Fuel efficiency, methods for increasing; Water-methanol injection, to improve fuel economy; Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) To increase fuel economy in his Turbo Diesel tow truck on his summer travels, Jim Anderson buys a new, smaller, much more basic trailer. 84

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Fuel efficiency, methods for increasing. See also entries under the following topic heads: Aerodynamics design principles affecting fuel economy; Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC); Axle ratio, choice of; Fuel economy, strategies to improve; Fuel injection pump, P7100, adjusting timing to improve mileage; Fuel injection timing, adjusting, general advice; Fuel injection timing, changes in, effect on fuel efficiency; Fuel mileage, methods for increasing; Power boxes, to reset timing of injection pumps; Pressure/timing combination enhancement Issue 61 (Member2Member) Beyond the usual advice on driving efficiency, the editor recommends consideration of refinement in fuel injection timing, with a reference to article on p. 40. 13 Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly tells a reader that buying a small car for daily commutes to increase fuel economy may not make as much fiscal sense as simply improving mileage on your Turbo Diesel, some methods for which he lists. 32 Issue 61 (Technical Topics) Today the leading concern of TDR drivers is maximizing fuel efficiency, methods for which the editor reviews, summarizes, interprets, and updates, drawing on TDR archives, web resources, and current industry information. 40­43 Issue 61 (Technical Topics) In concluding his comprehensive review and evaluation of possible methods of increasing diesel fuel efficiency, the editor presents the bottom line: drive slow (approximating BFSC) and change engine timing. 43 Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson notes that use of synthetic engine and driveline lubes improves fuel mileage. 82 Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly reviews the standard ways of increasing fuel efficiency, before a full exposition in the remainder of his article on improving fuel mileage by advancing injection timing, procedures for which he describes. 100­107 Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader seeking advice on improving fuel mileage in his `03 Turbo Diesel with 6-speed transmission and 3.73 gears, Joe Donnelly advises DDP Stage 1 injectors and prudential driving practices. 33 Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking how he might improve fuel mileage without generating excessive smoke in his `05 truck, Joe Donnelly advises more timing and DDP Stage 1 injectors, the TST PowerMax-CR, and the Smarty. 34 Issue 62 (Polly's Pickup) Addressing the topical concern over high costs of diesel, Polly Holmes identifies a dozen tried-and-true things a driver can do to help save fuel. 90 Issue 62 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly evaluates available ways to improve fuel economy and gives particular emphasis to methods of advancing injection timing. 94­95 Issue 63 (Member2Member) John Martin explains that fuel economy is a function of aerodynamics, rolling resistance, and efficiency in driveline and engine; and enumerates modifications, large and small, which can have a measureable effect. 9­10 Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson explains that engine efficiency governs rate of fuel consumption and reports on his road tests, which once again demonstrated to him that slower driving speeds consistently yield better mileage. 62­63 Issue 63 (Product Showcase) Gary Wescott describes the Edge Mileage Max, a performance module which he says provides better fuel atomization and measurably improves fuel economy. 110 Issue 63 (TDRelease) Banks Engineering announces introduction of the EconMind tuner, designed to address rising fuel costs, said to deliver fuel mileage gains as high as 20%. 122 Fuel filter & canister, new to 6.7-liter engines. See also Filter media, in new Fleetguard and Mopar oil and fuel filters Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The editor explains the new FS2 dual-element fuel filter and containing canister equipped on 6.7-liter engines made after 12/15/08, a unit owners of HPCRs made before that date must purchase and install to make the changeover. 50 Fuel filter, auxiliary, severe duty and biodiesel Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Reportedly Cummins is working on a new factory-authorized fuel filter kit for biodiesel or severe duty cycles, available in late `08. 74 Fuel filter, changing Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader's request for information on how to replace the fuel filter, members respond with step-by-step instructions, and the editor refers to coverage in earlier issues of the TDR. 30 Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) Robert Patton provides detailed instructions for servicing and changing the all-important fuel filter on the Turbo Diesel engine, `07.5 and newer, with references to past issues of the TDR for earlier models. 38­40 Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) Harvey Barlow describes a shortcut, endorsed by TDR editor Patton, for changing the fuel filter on '07.5-and-later engines, from below, with a 1/2" ratchet and a 1/2" extension inserted in the slot at the bottom of the filter. 40­41 Fuel filter, drainless Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) A reader seeks a drainless fuel filter as an emergency spare. 19 Fuel filter, in pre-heater module, servicing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly recommends removal and cleaning of the fine-mesh filter in the bottom bowl of the fuel pre-heater module annually, and provides parts numbers for the item on the 12-valve Turbo Diesel engines. 20 Fuel filter canister, in 6.7-liter engine, easy removal of Issue 64 (Turbo Tips) The newest version of the fuel filter canister featured in this issue, p. 50, retains the indentation on the earlier version described in Issue 62, p. 40, which accepts a 1/2" drive socket head, facilitating easy removal. 10 Fuel filter cover, Geno's. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Fuel filter overflow valve, instructions for removing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly describes the steps in removing the fuel filter overflow valve in the Turbo Diesel engine. 20 Fuel filter replacement, Mopar kit, steep discount price, one-time only Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) Due to a lucky fluke in wholesale pricing, Geno's offers Mopar-box fuel filter kits for late model Turbo Diesels at a steeply discounted price, five hundred in stock, one-time only, first come, first served. 41 Fuel filters, micron ratings, evaluation of Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking which micron rating he should choose in a fuel filter, Joe Donnelly explains the reasons for exact filtration and options available in the market, and advises extreme cleanliness when installing extra-fine filters. 33 Fuel injection lines, leaking, troubleshooting Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) A reader provides tips for tracing the origin of leaks in injector lines, with suggestion for tightening procedures. 27 Fuel injection lines, replacing, instructions for Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly acknowledges that injection lines occasionally fail, especially for cylinders #4 and #6, and gives instructions and lists tools for replacing. 34 Fuel injection pump, CP3, Stage 3 upgrade Issue 62 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly notes that the stock Bosch CP3 pump is limited to about 600 hp regardless of modifications, and describes Floor-It-Diesel's Stage 3which will support 700-800hp. 99 Fuel injection pump, CP3, principle of operation explained Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Unlike the injection pump in the 12-valve engine, the Bosch CP3 on the 5.9 HPCR maintains a constant high pressure fuel supply controlled by the ECM and injected upon its electronic signal. 29 Fuel injection pump, CP3, ticking sound, explained and addressed Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Readers report an audible ticking from the Bosch CP3 fuel pump on their 5.9 HPCR engines, the origin of which is explained and possible adjustments to dampen or eliminate it are described. 29 Fuel injection pump, CP3 upgrades, cautionary advice Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly warns of sloppy workmanship in some modified Fuel Control Actuators in CP3 upgrades and reports favorably on a Floor-It Diesel Stage 3 CP3 pump installed on his vehicle. 32 Fuel injection pump, delivery valves, #191 vs. #181 Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) In response to a query on the relative merits of the #191 over the stock #181 delivery valves with the 215hp injection pump and possible advantage of cutting them, Joe Donnelly advises staying with the stock #181, uncut. 22 Fuel injection pump, failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (First Generation) Readers with First Generation trucks consider the variables in repairing a failed fuel pump to correct a problem in maintaining ignition. 12­13 Fuel injection pump, P7100, "rocker," explained Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains how the "rocker" or level works in the P7100 fuel injection pump. 21 Fuel injection pump, P7100, adjusting timing to improve mileage Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly gives advice on timing adjustment in the P7100 for improved mileage at highway speeds. Fuel injection pump, P7100, delivery valve O-ring seal part number Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly provides the Bosch part number for the green O-ring delivery valve seal in the P7100 injection pump. 26 Fuel injection pump, P7100, differences between 180hp and 215hp Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader's query, Joe Donnelly identifies differences in component parts in the Bosch P7100 180hp and the 215hp, and concludes that the main distinction between the two is that the latter makes more power. 22 Fuel injection pump, P7100, installing plungers and barrels, advice on Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Installing plungers and barrels in the P7100 injection pump is not a job you can do at home, says Joe Donnelly, who explains why and advises going to a good Bosch shop. 25 Fuel injection pump, P7100, timing specifications Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly gives timing specs for the P7100 injection pump, and refers to more detailed instructions for the job, on pp. 100ff, Issue 61. 21 Fuel injection pump, VP44, gear puller tool Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Readers identify Snap-On as source of a gear-puller tool to remove the VP44 injection pump, and also offer the suggestion that a steering wheel puller does the job. 25 Fuel Injection Pump, VP44, re-setting timing. See Power boxes, to reset timing of injection pumps Fuel injection pump, VP44, 9-pin connector fused to plug Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Readers discover that the VP44 9-pin connector may become fused into its plug by sprayed sealant or corrosive degreasing compound, freed up by tapping with a hammer or scoring the junction with an X-Acto knife. 25 Fuel injection pump: Floor-It Stage 3 CP3. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Fuel injection pump conversion in 5.9-liter engine, evaluation of practicality Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) It is a big, expensive job to replace the VP44 with pumps from the 8.3-liter engine, which is not a reasonable fit for the 5.9-liter Turbo Diesel, says Joe Donnelly. 26 Fuel injection pump leak, troubleshooting Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader who suspects a leak at the injection pump is advised by Joe Donnelly to check for leaks of engine oil, fuel, steering fluid before taking his unit to a Bosch pump shop to replace seals or for a rebuild. 22 Fuel injection pump shaft, CP3, adjusting rotation of Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) In addressing a ticking sound issuing from the Bosch CP3 fuel pump, two readers provide instructions for rotating the CP3 gear on the shaft. 29 Fuel injection pump shaft, fouled with oil, instructions for cleaning Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) To address problems with an engine that runs rough and won't go over 800 rpm, Joe Donnelly gives instructions for cleaning the shaft of the injection pump to eliminate oil contamination. 18 Fuel injection timing, adjusting, general advice Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly details methods for changing engine timing in all Turbo Diesel models: the Bosch VE injection pump; the P7100 pump; the VP44 injection pump; and the HPCR engine. 100­107 Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader reporting excessive fuel usage, slow throttle response and lots of smoke in three salvaged diesel engines, Joe Donnelly refers him to instructions on injection pump timing in TDR Issue 61, p. 102. 21 Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Concluding his resume on reprogramming the ECM in this issue, Joe Donnelly explains the extreme difficulty in balancing complex functions, referring to findings of Mark Chapple of TST and Marco Castano of MADS. 82 Fuel injection timing, adjusting electronically with "boxes". See Power boxes, to reset timing of injection pumps

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Fuel injection timing, changes in, effect on fuel efficiency Issue 61 (Technical Topics) Industry engineers share their expert understanding of the complex interrelation between time retardation or advance and decreased or increased fuel efficiency. 44­47 Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) As the most effective approach to increasing diesel engine fuel efficiency, Joe Donnelly expounds on ways to advance the timing in fuel injection pumps in all models of Turbo Diesel pickups. 100 Fuel injection timing, shadetree instructions for the P7100 pump Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly spells out a procedure for setting P7100 timing on a 1998 truck within 1/2 degree of stock timing, "a good enough approximation...until you can get it timed just where you want it with the proper tools." 26 Fuel injector, "hot rod" VP44, question of durability Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains the construction of performance versions of the VP44 injector pump to a reader with a query about their durability. 24 Fuel injector, an upgrade for `01 HO Turbo Diesel engine Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) To a query on which would be a better aftermarket injector for a `01 HO Turbo Diesel, Joe Donnelly suggests working with DDP for better balance, power, and durability. 26 Fuel injector, choosing aftermarket replacement Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) For a `03 Turbo Diesel with 144,000 miles and an SPS 66 turbocharger, Joe Donnelly recommends the new stainless steel Bosch bodies, available at approx. $3000. 33 Fuel injector, for the P7100 pump, part numbers Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains the interchangeability of, and difference between, Bosch injectors for use with the P7100 pump. 18 Fuel injector, reconditioning of Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly concedes that to pop-test and shim worn injectors, if all set uniformly for pressure, may enhance performance of injectors with long mileage, but he recommends a new set. 18 Fuel injector, replacing, instructions Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) A reader provides instructions for removing and replacing injectors in the process of changing connector tubes and O-rings. 28 Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader seeking information about changing the injectors on a `95 Turbo Diesel, Joe Donnelly references instructions in TDR Issue 51, p. 94. 21 Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly refers a reader to Issue 51, p. 95, for information on injector removal and installation. 30 Fuel injector, Stage 1, analysis of Issue 62 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly explains considerations for choosing the DDP's Stage 1 injector, describes its specs, synopsizes its installation, and evaluates its performance, with an eye to fuel economy as well as all-around function. 96­98 Fuel injector, testing and cleaning. See Fuel injector, reconditioning of Fuel injector, troubleshooting. See also Blow-by, excessive, diagnosing Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Common injector problems include cracked bodies, leakage, bad solenoids and bad nozzles, all of which can be isolated to individual injectors by qualified technicians in shops prepared to provide high-quality upgrades. 34 Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly describes the routine in checking for bad injectors, either a pair at a time or individually; or, more sure-fire, sending the lot to a Bosch shop like Dynomite Diesel for testing and, where necessary, replacing. 35 Fuel injector failures, traced to low lubricity in ULSD modified post-refinery Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson traces a rash of injector failures in `00­'07 trucks in cold climates to the practice among some distributors of adding kerosene or other "dry" fuel as anti-gelling agent, lowering lubricity unacceptably. 80­81 Fuel injector nozzles, DDP brand Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly expresses his satisfaction with a new set of DDP Stage 1 (50hp) fuel injector nozzles, and the handy injector tool included in the package. 78 Fuel injector nozzles from 8.3-liter ISC engine, unsuitable in 24-valve engine Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly responds to a query on the advisability of replacing injector nozzles in the 24-valve Turbo Diesel engine with those from the 8.3-liter ISC engine, declaring that it is not suitable in our applications. 26 Fuel injectors, anticipating replacement of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) A `04 Turbo Diesel with 198,000 miles and without added power may very well get many more miles before injectors are replaced, but more severe service and personal prudential considerations would justify a new set. 35 Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking about installing better aftermarket injectors in his `04 Turbo Diesel with 100,000 miles, Joe Donnelly said that he himself did just that, a new set of Stage I with stainless steel bodies from Dynomite Diesel. 35 Fuel injectors, replacing with Bosch parts Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Rather than buying rebuilt or stock replacements, Joe Donnelly recommends Bosch Stage 1 injectors from Dynomite Diesel; and refers readers to TDR Issue 51, p. 97, for do-it-yourself instructions and a list of tools. 35 Fuel injectors, wiring schema Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) For a reader who pulled the wiring harness from his injectors and forgot which wire and plug goes where, Joe Donnelly describes the color code and exact connections. 35 Fuel injectors: Diesel Dynamics. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Fuel injectors: Dynomite Diesel Performance (DDP). See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Fuel injector tubes, leaks at connectors Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) Special tools are not necessary, says Joe Donnelly, who provides instructions and specs for fixing and avoiding leaks at connectors in the fuel injector lines. 32 Fuel leak at filter canister, inexpensive alternative repair Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) A reader with a fuel leak at his `98 Turbo Diesel's filter canister, a direct replacement for which is no longer available, solves the problem without expensive retrofits or upgrades, at a cost of $6.00. 29 Fuel leak at fuel filter housing, corrective replacment of O-ring Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader is provided the part number for the square-cut gasket (functioning like an O-ring) for replacement in a leaking fuel filter housing of a First Generation Turbo Diesel. 20 Fuel lift pump: BD Flow-MaX Issue 63 (TDRelease) BD Diesel Performance offers its new Flow-MaX lift pump, billed as an ideal replacement of the inadequate OEM pump in `98.5­'02 trucks, which mounts on the frame, in a kit with all hoses and hardware. 123 Fuel lift pump, ECM reflashing when upgraded Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) When the lift pump is upgraded to an in-tank unit, the ECM is reflashed but not replaced. 28 Fuel lift pump, in-tank replacement, wiring of Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) One reader explains to another the intricacies of wiring in the intank lift pump replacement. 22 Fuel lift pump, instructions for replacing Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) A reader cites a webpage for instructions on installing the lift pump on a 5.9 HPCR engine, and the editor refers to the article in a previous issue of the TDR, of which the webpage cited is the original text. 28 Fuel lift pump, run time after turning the ignition on Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) The ECM is programmed to engage the fuel pump for 30 seconds after the ignition is turned on before shutting off in `03 to `04.5 trucks. 28 Fuel lift pump: FASS system. See entries under the heads: Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update; Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Fuel mileage, methods for increasing. See also Fuel efficiency, methods for increasing Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) In answer to the Big Question of how to increase fuel mileage, Jim Anderson reviews the tried-and-true advice, and speculates that some of the rise in diesel prices is artificial and will correct in time with lower consumption. 81­82 Fuel price, cause of rise in Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) In TDR's tradition of "political incorrectness," Jim Anderson speculates that worldwide population over-growth is cause of rising energy costs, but then in his even-handed way concedes that his theory may have a hole or two. 82 Fuel return-line check-valve leak, cause of startup problem Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Readers correctly trace problems of prolonged cranking at startup to leaks in the fuel return line check valve. 25 Fuel shutoff solenoid, troubleshooting Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Erratic function of the fuel shutoff solenoid in a 12-valve engine is traced to deterioration of the boot and resulting fouling of the route of the plunger, addressed by clearing, cleaning, lubing, and reassembling. 14 Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) A member traces a malfunctioning fuel shutoff solenoid to a wire loose at the battery terminal. 16 Fuel system, HPCR engine, technical resumé Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) In response to a reader's request for information on the HPCR fuel system, Joe Donnelly references TDR Issue 42, p. 26. 34 Fuel system fittings, sealant Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Readers nominate their preferred products for sealing the fittings in the fuel system of diesel engines. 18 Fuel tank, aftermarket: Transfer Flow. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Fuel tank, auxiliary, aftermarket Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes describes and praises a 40-gal. in-bed auxiliary fuel tank and tool box combo, with two optional high-tech automatic transfer systems, made by Transfer Flow. 90 Issue 62 (Product Showcase) Gary Wescott reviews the Transfer Flow auxiliary fuel tank equipped with a fill kit that extends through the side of the camper shell, describes its installation, and estimates its merit. 124­125 Issue 63 (TDRelease) Transfer Flow, Inc., promotes the merits of its 50-gallon, auxiliary tank with its patented transfer operating system in either black powder-coated steel or diamond plate aluminum. 122 Fuel tank, auxiliary, rust problem Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Joe Donnelly recalls a big problem with rust in an unlined aftermarket auxiliary fuel tank, suggesting the advantage of an aluminized steel fabrication. 71 Fuel tank, pickup tube, alternative location of Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) To a reader's query about installing a pickup tube with a filter in his fuel tank, Joe Donnelly recalls his own installation of a pickup tube in a Transfer Flow tank, and references TDR Issue 56, p. 102. 31 Fuel tank fill tube. See Flatbed, relocating the fuel-tank fill-port Fuel tank gauge, below-empty cushion of 8% Issue 62 (Member2Member) Readers discover that the vehicle manufacturer intentionally provides a cushion of approximately 8% of fuel reserve below the gauge reading of empty. 8 Fuel tank strap stud, replacement of Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly recounts his experience with a stripped stud in the cross member holding the fuel tank strap in his 1997 Turbo Diesel and provides instructions for knocking it out and welding a replacement. 27 Fuel transfer pump. See entries under Fuel lift pump Fuel transfer pump, aftermarket Issue 62 (TDRelease) Diesel Performance Products announces its innovative DDRP transfer pump, a discrete component separate from the full FASS system, to replace the OEM Dodge `98.5­'02 unit. 133 Fuel transfer pump, cautionary advice on frailty of stock in 24-valve engine Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) The stock transfer pump with the VP-44 injection pump in 24-valve engines "has been known to fail," says the editor, who emphasizes need to maintain pressure, advisability of gauges, and merit of the DDRP replacement. 24 Fuel transfer pump, in-tank unit in `05 and newer trucks, report on Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Responding to a query about performance of the in-tank transfer pump in `05 and newer trucks, Cummins says, "To date, it has been a major improvement over the engine mounted lift pump of the past." 74 Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Although the stock in-tank transfer pump in trucks since 2005 --and which may be retrofitted in earlier models--seems trouble-free, its pressure is a bit low for supplying the VP-44, and may be replaced with a FASS. 63 Fuel transfer pump, replacement for the now-discontinued original equipment Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) One reader tips off another that a replacement for original stock fuel transfer pump in models `03­'04.5, one not mounted inside the fuel tank, is available inexpensively from Geno's Garage. 28

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Fuse panel, auxiliary, Six Bay, aftermarket. See TDR Project Truck, upgrading a `99 2-wheel, automatic quad cab, narrative account Gasoline, accidentally fueled in the 6.7-liter engine Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins techs advise immediate removal of gasoline accidentally fueled to the tank of a Turbo Diesel, advising that using it is dangerous and can damage the engine. 74 Gauge, fuel pressure: Westach. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Gauge, rail pressure: DiPricol. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Gauge installation in `07.5-up Turbo Diesels Issue 61 (6.7 HPCR) Members tell how they installed gauge systems on their '07.5­up Turbo Diesels; and the editor writes comprehensive how-to instructions for this issue and for Geno's Garage to provide henceforth with products. 36­38 Gauges, multifunction, aftermarket Issue 62 (TDRelease) ISSPRO publicizes its new Performax gauge system designed to monitor up to 17 vehicle systems simultaneously. 133 Gauges: Autometer. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Gauges: Isspro. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) After replacing his cylinder head, a reader's transmission won't shift to overdrive, and his gauges, tach, speedometer, heater fan motor, and engine temperature sensor are inoperative, solved by replacing a 10-amp fuse. 25 Global warming, a reader challenges the evidence for Issue 62 (Backfire) In a letter to the editor, a reader argues that the case for calamitous global warming caused by human activity is a concoction of alarmist elitists, which has paralyzed America's initiative, making us a nation of sissies. 110­111 GM Duramax diesel, uncertain changes to meet 2010 emissions standards Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) GM has not fully revealed how it will change the Duramax diesel engine to conform to 2010 emissions standards and meet the competition of Cummins' fully compliant 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel. 48 Gooseneck hitch, interference with Ride-Rite air bags, adjustments for Issue 64 (TDRV) Slightly modifying the air bag brackets, adding a washer, and making a small bend in the release handles will correct interference between Ride-Rite mounting brackets and the side braces of the B&W Turnover Ball gooseneck hitch. 104 GPS (Global Position Sensor), aftermarket Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes buys, field tests, and reviews the Magellan Maestro 4250 GPS, finds it suitable for in-town use, but deficient for scoping the route an hour ahead or threading backroads. 73 Grease fittings, scouting their locations Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson provides a general guide to locating the lube grease fittings on the suspension of Dodge Cummins Turbo Diesel trucks, noting that their number, type, and location vary from year to year and even within year models. 70 Head gasket, blown, troubleshooting Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly advises a reader who blew two head gaskets with a turbo wastegated at 40 pounds that the likely cause is surfaces warped, rough, or improperly cleaned; explains diagnostics; and recommends his present gasket. 30 Head gasket, proper procedure in replacing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly responds to a reader seeking information on proper procedures in replacing the head gasket when modifying the engine for increased horsepower; and provides specs for thickness and seals. 17 Headlight brights, adjusting beam level Issue 64 (TDRV) The headlight bright beam may be lowered to compensate for a pickup's tilt when towing a heavy trailer by inserting blocks in the springs under the bump stop or re-adjusting the lamps manually whenever hitched, or installing air bags. 104 Headlight switch, repair Issue 61 (First Generation) To replace a melted headlight switch in First Generation trucks, readers discover that parts for the `94 truck will fit. 16 Heater control panel light, troubleshooting Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Readers troubleshoot problems in HVAC control panel lights, both those failed and those inconstant, leading finally to the solution of unsoldering the old bulb and re-soldering a replacement. 28 Heater core, replacing Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly refers a reader requesting instructions for replacing the heater core to an article in TDR Issue 59, p. 90. 31 Heater core/air conditioner evaporator assembly, servicing and replacement of parts Issue 62 (First Generation) Readers pool instructions on removing and replacing parts in servicing the heater core/air conditioner evaporator assembly in the First Generation Turbo Diesel. 12 Heater fan motor, failure. See Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting Heater valve, proper setting of coolant level control Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader is apprised on the proper setting of the arrow on the coolant control valve of the heater in the First Generation pickup. 20 Holset H2E turbocharger, modified, evaluation of Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly summarizes predictable performance of a Holset H2E with alternative powertrain modifications. 22 Holset HX55 turbocharger, criteria for identifying Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) A reader reports coming across a turbocharger he thinks may be a Holset HX55; Joe Donnelly describes it and how it differs from an HX40, providing a photo and assessment of its suitability in Dodge pickup applications. 22 Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), explained. See Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Honors and recognition awards Issue 61 (TDR/R/R) TDR adds to its roster of honorees for enlisting new members, high mileage, and other distinctions in the Turbo Diesel world. 114­117 Issue 62 (TDR/R/R) TDR adds to its roster of honorees for enlisting new members, high mileage, and other distinctions in the Turbo Diesel world. 104­107 Issue 63 (TDR/R/R) TDR adds to its roster of honorees for enlisting new members, high mileage, and other distinctions in the Turbo Diesel world. 92­95 Issue 64 (TDR/R/R) TDR adds to its roster of honorees for enlisting new members, high mileage, and other distinctions in the Turbo Diesel world. 94­97 Hood scoop, SRT-10. See Air intake system, in the SRT-10 Hood Hoses, silicone upgrade Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly expounds on the advantages of Mr. Bob's silicone boost hoses and provides installation tips. 98 "Hot fuel," update. See also Diesel fuel, mis-measurement, cheating at the pump Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson updates his investigative reporting on the national scandal of "hot fuel," a deception in which the buyer is shorted because fuel is pumped at a temperature and volume higher than its legal rated energy coefficient. 82 Hubodometer for trailers Issue 62 (TDRV) Robert Patton highlights the "hubodometer," an automatic counting device attaching directly on the hub of axles to track trailer mileage, handy for anticipating service; provides a web source; and gives tips for easy installation. 116 Issue 62 (TDRV) Stemco and other companies make a device called a hubodometer, which attaches to the hub of a trailer axle to record miles or kilometers traveled, useful in anticipating maintenance and service intervals. 122 Hubs, locking, tools and instructions for removing Issue 63 (First Generation) Members provide instructions and list of tools for removing the front locking hubs on a First Generation truck. 14 Hydrogen generator, to augment fueling Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) To a reader asking if installing a hydrogen generator to augment fueling is a good idea, Joe Donnelly says if he wants extended driving range, he'd be better off installing an auxiliary tank. 71 Idle speed, low, troubleshooting. See Engine stalling and low idle Idle speed, programmed increase at low ambient temperatures Issue 63 (The Way We Were) TSB 18-31-01 involves reprogramming the ECM to ramp up idle speed from 800rpm to 1200rpm at low ambient temperatures. 52 Idling, prolonged, damage from Issue 63 (The Way We Were) The editor updates information on extended engine idle, explaining that it lowers combustion temperature, increases ring wear, hastens oil degradation, and contributes to soot accumulation in the after-exhaust treatment system. 52­53 Idling, prolonged, legal restrictions on Issue 63 (The Way We Were) The editor identifies websites providing law and government policies regulating and prohibiting extended diesel engine operation at idle. 54 Issue 63 (The Way We Were) The editor reports that all 4500/5500 Chassis Cab models of the Dodge Cummins Turbo Diesel are exempted from government regulations prohibiting prolonged operation of the engine at idle because they have low enough emissions. 54 Issue 63 (The Way We Were) While 4500/5500 Chassis Cab models are free from regulation limiting prolonged engine idle, 2500 and 3500 pickups do not appear to meet that exemption, so extended engine idling is ill-advised, according to the editor. 54 Ignition timing. See Fuel injection timing Index, TDR Issues 57­60 Issue 61 (TDReSource) This index to Issues 57­60 accesses technical information arranged alphabetically by topic with brief informative annotations. 54­68 Injection pump. See entries under Fuel injection pump Injector. See entries under Fuel injector Intake manifold, aftermarket Issue 63 (TDRelease) Wilson presents its "Thrasher" intake manifold, which it says provides a more even air distribution and offers gains in torque and fuel economy. 123 Intercooler, aftermarket Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly reports on his satisfaction with the BD intercooler, strong and not prone to leakage. 32 Issue 64 (TDRelease) Advanced Flow Engineering (aFe) announces its new BladeRunner Intercooler for the `03-'07 Turbo Diesel, an upgrade that offers significantly advanced performance, with a price of $2,057.65, available now. 117 Intercooler hose, oil leak from, intervention in the event of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) An oil leak from the downstream intercooler hose, a sign of a defective turbocharger, would call for removing and cleaning the intercooler, followed by carefully flushing out any hydrocarbon cleaner. 32 Intercooler hoses, aftermarket Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) To a reader concerned about going over the limit of pressure in intercooler hoses, Joe Donnelly recommends Mr. Bob's brand. 26 Intercoolers, safe pressure limits Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly says the stock intercooler in the 24-valve engine can handle boosts spiking above 50 psi, but the BD can handle more yet, with greater cooling efficiency; and references comparison figures in Issue 60, p. 92. 26 Killer dowel pin, precautions during procedures to secure Issue 64 (First Generation) When removing the gear cover to deal with the "killer dowel pin" in models prior to 1996, gear case mounting bolts should also be carefully secured because more serious engine damage would result from errant washer heads. 22 Killer dowel pin, TST kit with stepped tab Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly informs a reader that his Second Generation may have a restrictor ring to secure the dowel pin, but that TST makes a kit with stepped tab if his case does not have the restrictor ring. 31 Killer dowel pin, visual verification of the fix Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) According to Joe Donnelly, there is no visual evidence to indicate conclusively that a KDP kit has been installed to contain the killer dowel pin. 26 KORE Chase suspension. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Leaks, various. See entries under the following topic heads: Battery acid leak, damage to cruise control vacuum actuator; Coolant leak at block heater; Coolant leak at head gasket; Crankshaft, front seal and wear rings, removing; Doors, cab, adjusting of; Fuel injection lines, leaking, troubleshooting; Fuel injection pump leak, troubleshooting; Fuel injector, troubleshooting; Fuel injector tubes, leaks at connectors; Fuelleakatfuelfilterhousing,correctivereplacementofO-ring;

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Fuelreturn-linecheck-valveleak,causeofstartupproblem; Intercooler hose, oil leak from, intervention in the event of; Power steering reservoir, leak from; Rearend,leakingfluid,diagnosing; Rocker box gasket, `03 Turbo Diesel, replacing, instructions for; Trailerbrake,electric-over-hydraulicsystem,troubleshooting; Transmission,automatic,fluidleak,troubleshooting; Transmission, automatic, reverse gear, failure at startup LED (Light Emitting Diode) lamps, in RV applications Issue 61 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reviews advances in LED lamp technology and surveys what is available for applications inside and outside the RV. 126­127 Light bulbs in cab, replacing Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader is instructed in changing light bulbs in the cab of his First Generation Turbo Diesel and advised that it is probably not necessary to replace the gaskets. 20 Limited-slip additive, not required in models `03-up Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly confirms that because the American Axle differentials used in `03-up Turbo Diesels do not use clutches, "limited-slip" additive should not be used. 33 Lock-N-Stitch, repair kit for "Block 53" engine Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) To avoid buying a new engine block, Scott Sinkinson resorts to the Lock-N-Stitch bolt-on kit to repair a cracked "Block 53" in his 24-valve Turbo Diesel, and provides detailed instructions for doing the job. 22­24 Los Angeles Auto Show 2008 Issue 63 (Four Whaling) G.R. Whale describes and comments upon the 2008 Los Angeles Auto Show: the cars, the electric vehicles, the news conferences and speeches. 58­59 Lubricants, greases Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes identifies and defines the specs of the many lubricating greases specific to components in the Turbo Diesel truck. 87 Manual lock-out hubs, advantages over OEM hubs on `03 and later Turbo Diesels. See Fourwheel drive, replacement of stock hubs with Dynatrac Free Spin Kit May Madness 2008 recap Issue 61 (Chapter News) Polly Holmes and Joe Donnelly tell what happened at May Madness 2008, complete with reports on socials, seminars, Show-n-Shine, Rodeo, and Dyno competitions, results and observations. 109­111 Mega Cab, to be available in `09 2500 and 3500 truck frames Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) To clear up uncertainty about availability of the Mega Cab in `09 models, the editor cites a report in Automotive News that it can be had in the heavy-duty 2500 and 3500 truck frames. 52 Mega Cab Long Box truck, update evaluation of Issue 63 (TDReview) One year after acquiring his vaunted '07.5 Mega Cab long-box Turbo Diesel, the editor evaluates components, build, and performance, detailing likes and dislikes of engine and of the truck in which it is mounted. 50­51 Mirrors, factory, field of view, in towing Issue 61 (TDRV) Readers evaluate visibility in factory mirrors while towing trailers 102-inches wide, and in general find them satisfactory, while recognizing inevitable limitations. 128 Mirrors, slip-over CIPA, add-ons. See TDR Project Truck, upgrading a `99 2-wheel, automatic quad cab, narrative account Muffler elimination kit: Geno's. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Multifunction switch (headlights, turn signals, etc.), replacing Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) A reader provides instructions for accessing and replacing the multifunction switch without disassembling the steering column. 31 Names of vehicle models--modish, silly, bizarre. See Dumb car names Nissan Titan, discontinued in Nissan-Chrysler coöp marketing Issue 61 (Blowin' In The Wind) Media reports say that the impending Chrysler/Nissan alliance will result in a Chrysler full-sized pickup to displace the Titan in 2011 model year. 52 Noises, various. See entries under the following topic heads: Engine rattle and rough acceleration at 2000 rpm; Engine rattle and stumble at idle Fuel injection pump, CP3, ticking sound, explained and addressed; Fuel injection pump shaft, CP3, adjusting rotation of; Turbocharger, wheezing, diagnosed Oil-pressure sending unit, O-ring part number Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly specifies the Cummins O-ring part number needed by a reader installing an oil pressure sending unit in the `98­up engine block. 24 Oil filter, Fram brand, caution and advice Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) The editor notes problems identified in a recall of the Fram oil filter in 5.9-liter Turbo Diesel applications and suggests substitution with the Fleetguard StrataPore, a product made by Cummins. 8 Oil pressure, abnormally low in rebuilt engine, troubleshooting Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Abnormally low oil pressure in a newly rebuilt engine may be explained either by an incorrect gasket between sump and pump, or by an oil-passage plug overlooked in reassembly. 22 Oil pressure gauge, failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (First Generation) Readers diagnose impending failure of OEM oil pressure gauge in First Generation trucks and decide on replacement with a Cummins unit. 12 Oil pressure warning light sender, installing Issue 61 (First Generation) A reader provides instructions for installing the sender of the oilpressure warning light in a First Generation truck. 17 Overdrive on/off switch, relocating Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) To vacate the dash slot of the overdrive on/off switch in the Second Generation truck preparatory to installing a gauge, an alternative is to install the `99 model's shift lever which has the switch button in its end. 18 Overdrive unit, GearVendors brand, service reminder Issue 63 (Back In The Saddle) Scott Dalgleish admits that he delayed a scheduled fluid change in his GearVendors overdrive unit, and, although dodging the bullet this time, he reminds owners of required regular service. 87 Parallel hybrid, explained. See Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Performance chips or programmers, Cummins' stance on their use Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) "Leave the engine and aftertreatment system alone," says Cummins; the new engine is not as tolerant of performance chips, and while using such a device does not theoretically void warranty, it puts it "in serious jeopardy." 74 Performance in `06 configuration, improving through modification Issue 63 (Letter Exchange) A reader who judges the `06 Turbo Diesel as most suited to upgrading for improved performance, recounts acquiring three such trucks and modifications he made according to procedures presented in pages of the TDR. 7 Pierce, Bob, artist-illustrator Issue 62 (Tailgating) The editor gives us a short bio of Bob Pierce, motor-vehicle artist-illustrator, describes his work appearing in TDR over the years, and highlights his color drawing on the cover of the current issue. 4­5 Pilgrim Industries (RV manufacturer), closure Issue 62 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reports that Pilgrim Industries, which in Issue 61 he commended for inaugurating a better warranty on a superior floor, has closed its doors, another victim of the crisis facing makers of RVs. 121 Pistons, melting: preventing the problem Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) For a reader looking to replace pistons, Joe Donnelly counsels on how to prevent melting pistons, including the admonition to provide a bigger turbo in applications with enhanced power and to "drive by the gauges." 26 Pistons, replacement with less expensive brand Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) The Mahle moderately priced piston makes a fully acceptable replacement for the Cummins-made stock in 24-valve engines, according to Joe Donnelly. 26 Power, low performance, troubleshooting Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) In diagnosing low power in a 12-valve engine, Joe Donnelly identifies a likelihood of low fueling, and prescribes gauging pressure to the P7100 pump, inspecting the shutoff solenoid, and checking for broken or kinked lines. 17 Power box. See also entries under Power module Power box: Edge Juice/Attitude; Smarty; TST PowerMax-CR. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Power boxes, to reset timing of injection pumps Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly explains computer-controlled injection pumps in Turbo Diesel engines, and precises the functions and effectiveness of several power enhancement "boxes" to increase fuel efficiency. 105­107 Power enhancement, strategy to achieve 600hp Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) How do I make 600hp while preserving reliability in a 12-valve Turbo Diesel? To this query Joe Donnelly describes how he achieved that goal back in March 2001. 26 Power enhancement, with alternative injectors and torque plates Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader seeking 300hp in his '95 Turbo Diesel, Joe Donnelly spells out the constraints governing stock engines combined with several configurations of upgrade injectors and torque plates. 20 Power enhancement aftermarket product. See also Power module Power module. See also entries under Power box Power module ("power adder"), alternatives Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader seeking advice on a suitable power module, Joe Donnelly suggests the Smarty and the TST PowerMax-CR, both of which are able to change settings on the fly and can change speedometer calibration for oversize tires. 37 Power module: TST PowerMax-CR, upgrade, description of Issue 64 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly describes and evaluates an upgraded TST PowerMax-CR power box, its functions, settings, and readouts, ideally accessible via a Palm computer instead of the R49 control, for `03­'07 engines. 82­84 Power modules: distinguishing those which add pressure from those that add timing Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly tells how to visually distinguish those external power boxes which add pressure from those which work by adding timing, and remarks that unlike external boxes, the Smarty works inside the ECM and does both. 37 Power steering reservoir, leak from Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) The seal between vacuum pump and power steering pump may fail and leak oil into the steering fluid reservoir, causing overfill and leak. 19 Power upgrade in an engine with 400,000 miles Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader seeking more power in a 12-Valve Turbo Diesel with 400,000 miles, Joe Donnelly says that its ring seals are not as good as new and identifies engine components vulnerable to failure under the added stress. 18 Pressure/timing combination enhancement Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) In a rider to Joe Donnelly's roundup on fueling enhancements in computer-controlled injection pumps (this issue, pp. 105­107), Doug Leno opts for combination pressure and timing advance to increase fuel efficiency. 107 Preventive maintenance and overhaul, 5.9 HPCR engine, at 200,000 miles Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly enumerates items in preventive maintenance and component overhaul advisable for a `03 Turbo Diesel with 200,000 miles, particularly emphasizing a likely need to replace the injectors. 34 Preventive maintenance of a 2006 Turbo Diesel, recommendations Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly lists four high-priority procedures in preventive maintenance of a 5.9 HPCR truck: keep EGT low; change oil regularly; keep rpms below 3000 and don't lug below 1800rpm; improve fuel filtration if you raise rail pressure. 36 Race car, diesel. See Cummins-powered 1931 Duesenberg racer Racing, Dodge Cummins Diesel pickups Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly reports increasingly favorable reception of Turbo Diesels by NHRA (National Hot Rod Association) in competitive drag racing. 78 Radiator, engine cooling system, draining of Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Readers describe how to open a stubborn radiator drain petcock. 28 Radiator, in 24-valve Turbo Diesels, instructions for replacing Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Readers provide instructions, cautions, and advice for replacing the radiator in 24-valve Turbo Diesels, a procedure not requiring removal of shroud or fan, but calling for care in removing plastic reservoir bottles. 30

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Radiator drain, removing the stopcock Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly gives instruction for careful removal of the plastic stopcock at the radiator drain, with advice to replace the O-ring likely to be damaged in the process. 19 Radiator hose, lower: question of rigidity Issue 64 (First Generation) The wire coil which maintained rigidity of lower radiator hoses in First Generation trucks is deemed unnecessary in later hoses, of silicone manufacture, which are not prone to collapse. 20 Rail pressure, erratic, troubleshooting Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Erratic rail pressure readings may result from a faulty gauge as well as from weak pressure, says Joe Donnelly, who advises checking the gauge, some brands of which are more reliable than others, as well as checking the lift pump. 37 Rail pressure, hazards from increasing of Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader who blew a rail poppet after modifying his 5.9 HPCR engine to increase fuel pressure, Joe Donnelly cites a Smarty guru who advises that in the quest for added power, increasing rail pressure should be only the last resort. 30 Rail pressure, high readings, interpretation of and coping with Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly explains operational ranges in rail pressure readings with stock and optional equipment, at selected settings in programs such as Smarty, with cautions on damage to components, including the injectors. 31 Rail pressure, increased, effect on mpg Issue 64 (Backfire) To clarify seemingly conflicting stories in TDR about effect of increasing rail pressure on fuel consumption, Joe Donnelly reports the opinion of experts that changing timing, not rail pressure, is key to increasing miles per gallon. 100 Ram Challenge event 2009, report on Issue 62 (TDReview) Andy Redmond reports on the 2009 Ram Challenge event in Dallas, held to showcase the 2009 Dodge Ram 1500 pickup and demonstrate its merits in comparison to competing vehicles marketed by Ford, GM, and Toyota. 50­53 Rear-end axle differential, fluid change interval Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reminds readers to change fluid in the rear-end axle differential, and limited-slip additive where required, according to service schedule. 82 Rear end, leaking fluid, diagnosing Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) Diagnosing a leak near the driveshaft at the rear differential after four-wheeling in mud, Joe Donnelly says it is probably a bad pinion seal, but suggests checking for over-filled fluid spilled from the vent. 26 Recalls Issue 62 (TDReSource) Dodge issues two Safety Recalls, one Emissions Recall, and four Customer Satisfaction Notifications, which apply to some but not all models. 71­72 Regenerative braking, explained. See Emissions standards: the technological challenge of the 2020 CAFE Release load and plate lift. See Clutches, overview of and commentary on Reunel bumpers, evaluation of. See Bumpers, upgrade, aftermarket Rocker box gasket, `03 Turbo Diesel, replacing, instructions for Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) A member with a leak at the rocker box gasket of his `03 Turbo Diesel provides list of tools, parts, and supplies necessary for replacement, with full instructions for removal and installation, estimating 2.5 hours for job. 32­33 Running Boards: AMP Research. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update RV axle and wheel maintenance, anticipating interval. See Hubodometer for trailers RV checklist when removing from storage Issue 63 (TDRV) Jim Anderson recounts in detail equipment to check and procedures to follow when readying an RV for the road after a season of storage. 100­101 RV dump setup at home Issue 62 (TDRV) Readers weigh procedures and the need for a trap in building a dump station. 122 Issue 64 (TDRV) In amplification of information on installing an RV sewer dump at home, Jim Anderson advises against use of holding tank chemicals for odor control because they mess up both domestic septic tanks and municipal systems. 103 RV exteriors, waxing Issue 64 (TDRV) Jim Anderson provides instructions for cleaning, waxing, and maintaining the exteriors of RVs, distinguishing between what works best for fiberglass and for corrugated metal. 102 RV flooring, product quality Issue 61 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reports that Pilgrim, a maker of RVs, has introduced a five-year warranty on floors, henceforth made of a composite called Cosmo Lite, instead of the plywood in general use in the industry. 126 RV manufacturers, shake-up in the line-up Issue 61 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reports failures, buyouts, and realignments in brands and makers of RVs, involving Travel Supreme, Jayco, Alpenlite and Alpine, and National RV. 126 RV trailer hitch, heavy duty Issue 62 (TDRV) Joe Donnelly advises that because Class 5 ratings are not standardized, operators of Turbo Diesels seeking a heavy duty trailer hitch should check specs before making a choice. 121 RV trailer suspension components, coping with poor quality Issue 62 (TDRV) A reader laments the poor quality common in the component parts in the suspension of travel trailers, citing in particular nylon bushings which he repaired with new bronze rebushed trunnions, in some degree coping with this deficiency. 116 Seat belt reminder chime, instructions for disabling of Issue 62 (Member2Member) Technical instructions are provided for silencing seatbelt reminder chimes programmed in Third Generation Turbo Diesel pickups. 9 Seat belts, liable to deterioration over time Issue 62 (First Generation) Joe Donnelly explains that nylon seat belts, although over-engineered, deteriorate significantly over time, and should be inspected periodically. 13 Seat covers: Covercraft. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Seat heater: Rostra. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Seat hinge at attachment to floor, passenger side, replacing of Issue 62 (First Generation) A reader identifies a rusted-out and broken hinge attaching the passenger seat to the floor in his First Generation truck and reports the replacement part number and easy replacement. 13 SEMA 2008 (Specialty Equipment Marketing Association), annual show Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes reports on the 2008 SEMA, recites her favorite new products on exhibit, and revels in the excitement of her companion, Melissa Forbus. 72 Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly briefly describes the concept behind the SEMA show, its venue, types of product, magnitude in terms of floor space and number of exhibitors and attendees. 78 Sensors, engine, locations of. See Engine sensors, locations of Serpentine belt, routing sequence and diagram Issue 63 (24-Valve Engines) A reader gives a handy rule for routing the engine serpentine belt: "place the grooved side of the belt over the grooved pulleys and the smooth side over the smooth pulleys"; and the TDR provides a diagram. 24 Serpentine belt, tool for changing Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Joe Donnelly describes a tool made by Lisle Corporation which makes changing the serpentine belt much easier. 71 Shifter handle of NV5600, broken, repair of Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Easy to repair with a weld, the shifter handle of the six-speed NV5600 is made of tubing, not solid rod as in the past, and therefore is amenable to custom bending to put the knob closer to the driver. 31 Shock absorbers, "frequency selective damper" aftermarket Issue 63 (Product Showcase) Koni North America announces the Frequency Selective Damper (FSD) shock absorber, a unique product that senses and adjusts to road condition, available for the '99 through '08 2500 and 3500 four-wheel drive Turbo Diesels. 120 Slipping the clutch, at higher Smarty settings Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly explains some of the penalties incurred with power adders such as the Smarty: settings of increased rail pressure are hard on injectors over time, and settings with stronger torque will slip the clutch. 31 Smarty, maximizing power levels Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) In response to a reader seeking advice on the best Smarty settings for economy while towing with his 5.9 HPCR, Joe Donnelly enumerates his preferences and results with different injectors at specific settings. 30 Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly explains that some versions of Smarty with some truck modifications yield greater power at lower settings, and that replacing stock lift pump with a FASS to fuel the CP3 will give higher power levels. 31 Smarty, use of in reprogramming the ECM Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly shares information and understanding gained in thoroughly researching the function of the ECM and techniques of effective reprogramming by the Smarty power tuner. 79­82 Smoke, blue, excessive, troubleshooting. See Blow-by, excessive, diagnosing "Snowbirds," TDR winter nomads in Florida, invitation to meet Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson invites Snowbirds winter-vacationing in Florida to gather twice a year at places and times he will arrange. 83 Soot buildup in 6.7-liter model trucks Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) In explaining the problem with soot fouling the turbocharger, the cause of the P2262 code alarm, Cummins techs suggest putting the pedal-to-the-metal to help reduce accumulation of soot. 72 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) A member explains two kinds of soot buildup in turbochargers of HPCR trucks, the resulting boost problems, and diagnostics for solving them; and notes Chrysler's large effort to correct them. 36 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) A reader explains that the EGR is efficient only at high speed and load ranges; analyzes how design demand governs efficiency of system components; and advises the owner how to minimize soot build-up. 36 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) A reader expresses concern at finding soot on the turbocharger silencer and provides a photo as evidence, to which another reader offers reassurance that some soot from the EGR is inevitable and in this instance is negligible. 37 Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reports that most problems with the 6.7-liter engine are linked to soot buildup in turbocharger and particulate trap, which requires periodic driving loaded at highway speeds to burn off accumulated deposits. 64 Issue 64 (Cummins' Column) According to Cummins, the effect of soot contamination in the intake tract of engines with EGR "is no more detrimental [to the integrity of the combustion seal] than the exhaust gas created by the combustion event." 56 South Bend con-Fe clutch. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Spare tire, occluded by slide-in camper, accessing Issue 64 (TDRV) Slide-in campers mounted in Turbo Diesel pickups may overhang the rear bumper and make access to the spare tire hoist difficult, a problem corrected by rotating the lift assembly or by using a socket extender, as described by readers. 104 Spare tire, provision against theft Issue 62 (Letter Exchange) Members provide against theft of the spare tire and wheel in the Turbo Diesel by installing a cable and lock. 7 Speedometer, erratic swings. See Accelerator Petal Position Sensor (APPS), faulty, multiple problems, diagnosing Speedometer, failure. See Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting Splash guards, aftermarket Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) Continuing the saga of re-doing the 1999 Turbo Diesel Project Truck, John Holmes reports adding some minor refinements including Dodge/Cummins splash guards to all four wheels. 73 Spring hanger bracket and bushings Issue 64 (First Generation) Readers inform a fellow member of the Dodge Part Number of bushings for the rear spring hanger on the front springs of a First Generation truck, and offer advice for replacing. 21 Springs, suspension, unequal lift between. See Suspension, springs, fatigue SRT10 hood. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Starter solenoid, failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Intermittent failure of the engine to start is corrected by rebuilding or replacing worn-out solenoid contacts. 25

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Startup problem, troubleshooting. See also entries under the following topic heads: Engine, prolonged cranking and dying at road speed; Fuel return-line check-valve, leak, cause of startup problem; Starter solenoid, failure, troubleshooting Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson interprets the low-voltage trouble code in diagnosing an engine's refusal to start, caused by fouled battery terminals, corrected by cleaning posts and cable clamps. 83 Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) A reader with startup problems in a 12-valve, suspecting a failed transfer pump, but also checking all lines and junctions, and with help from other readers, traces the problem to a failed O-ring in the top of the pre-filter. 18­19 Startup problems, in cold weather. See also Air intake heater grid relay, testing of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) A reader with irregular ignition and excessive black smoke at initial startup in cold weather consults the TDR online forum, to discover that a failing fuel control actuator (FCA) was the source of his problem. 34 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) To a reader who reports hard starting in cold weather, followed by rough running and smoke, Jim Anderson suggests checking for a leak in the fuel system after checking the intake-manifold heater-grid starting-assist system. 69 Startup problems: failure of ignition Issue 64 (Turbo Tips) Bill Thomas submits a winning "Turbo Tip" suggesting use of a homemade double-male-sided jumper wire to test integrity of connections in the power distribution center. 10 Steering box stabilizer, BD. See also Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Issue 63 (Product Showcase) To address a problem of excessive wandering after increasing tire size, Doug Leno tries a BD steering box stabilizer (SBS), describes its installation (with photos), and evaluates effect on steering. 112­115 Steering problems: loose, excessive play Issue 64 (First Generation) Readers troubleshoot loose steering, identifying possible culprit: kingpin bushings, tie rod ends, dragline, flexible joint on steering shaft just above the gearbox, and the driveshaft itself. 21 Steering problems: uneven or lateral pulling. See also Braking, uneven or lateral pulling Issue 64 (Member2Member) Doug Leno identifies axle rotation as the cause of right-hand pull in steering a vehicle with aftermarket suspension upgrades, which he addresses by adjusting control arms and installing a Kore steering damper. 14­17 Stereo Unit: JVC. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update StrataPore polymeric filter media. See Filter media, in new Fleetguard and Mopar oil and fuel filters Suspension, front, spring hanger bracket bushings. See Spring hanger bracket and bushings Suspension, front coil springs, for heavier bumper loads Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) To a reader planning to increase front bumper load, Joe Donnelly suggests the KORE variable-rate front springs which he himself uses with a Reunel bumper and winch. 24 Suspension, rear air, aftermarket, evaluation of Issue 63 (Life's A Beach) Jerry Nielsen replaced his rear leaf package with a trailing arm air suspension system, which gives an excellent ride, but which he would not recommend because a leak can disable the rig and leave the driver stranded. 74 Suspension, springs, fatigue Issue 61 (First Generation) Spring steel is subject to fatigue; and because weight of engine, transmission, and load are always unequally distributed, lift may become unequal from left to right and front to rear, perhaps requiring shims or replacement. 17 Suspension, variable-rate coil springs, advantages Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains the advantages of variable rate springs, in that unlike stacked springs they protect against instant shock and provide optimum performance as the weight of the load varies. 24 Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking about the quality of ride with the KORE VR coils, Joe Donnelly responds by saying it is smoother than stock and never stiff. 28 Suspension: KORE system. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Suspension upgrade for a heavier front bumper. See Bumper, front, adding new springs for the extra weight Sway bar end links, rear, aftermarket Issue 64 (Product Showcase) Suspension Maxx, Inc., publicizes its rear sway bar end link for `94 and newer trucks, which eliminates the play in the ball-in-socket joints. 116 Tachometer, failure. See Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting Tachometer, Isspro, models available Issue 64 (First Generation) A reader seeking a particular model of Isspro tachometer is directed by a fellow member to Geno's Garage, which stocks every model produced by the maker. 21 Tailgate drop support, aftermarket Issue 64 (Product Showcase) Geno's Garage offers the "EZ Down," a device that uses a mini gas-charged strut that effectively dampens the drop of the tailgate of the Turbo Diesel pickup. 116 Tailgate lift assist: WigiDigit GateGlide. See entries under these topic heads: Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update; Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Tailgate lock kit, aftermarket Issue 63 (TDRelease) WigiDigit introduces the Gate-Lock, wired to lock the tailgate at the same time as the doors are locked, available at Geno's Garage for `94­'09 Turbo Diesels. 123 Tailgate Protector: Mopar. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Tailgate step kit: Step Gate. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Tampa RV Show Issue 64 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reports on the Tampa RV Show, billed as the nation's largest such event, notes the impact of the economic downturn, describes Airstream's first toyhauler and an RV with an automatically-lowered patio. 102­103 TDR: meeting the economic challenge Issue 64 (Tailgating) The editor calls upon members to lend a hand in promoting the magazine's circulation by handing out the TDR brochure, copies of which were distributed to subscribers within this issue's cover wrap. 4 TDR annual wall calendar Issue 61 (Tailgating) The editor asks members for "pin up" photos of their Turbo Diesel pickups for the annual TDR wall calendar, with rules for submission and hints from the judges. 5 Issue 62 (Tailgating) The editor thanks the sponsoring advertisers and commends members for the high-quality photos submitted in competition for inclusion in the 2008 edition of the full-color TDR wall calendar. 4 TDR clubs and chapters Issue 61 (Chapter News) The roster of TDR chapters is brought up to date. 108 Issue 62 (Chapter News) The roster of TDR chapters is brought up to date. 100 Issue 63 (Chapter News) The roster of TDR chapters is brought up to date. 88 Issue 64 (Chapter News) The roster of TDR chapters is brought up to date. 92 TDR magazine, editorial policy on reporting economic calamity Issue 63 (Tailgating) In the current environment of economic uncertainty the TDR will continue its main focus on ownership, operation, and upgrading of the Turbo Diesel; and limit reports on the crisis to measured background articles. 5 TDR magazine, its growth and progress Issue 62 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly surveys improvements in the TDR magazine over the past ten years, particularly in its level of technical precision, comprehensiveness of information, reader accessibility, and layout and design. 94 TDR magazine, premium placed on editorial content Issue 63 (Tailgating) Quality editorial content "ain't cheap," and increasingly is being tossed out the window by other special-interest and trade journals bent on cost-cutting, a false economy the TDR will not resort to, pledges the editor. 4 TDR magazine cover art Issue 61 (Your Story) Jeannette Vallier tells the story of Kelly Snyder, the artist who did the portrait of the Second Generation Turbo Diesel appearing on TDR's cover this issue, with info on the truck, the artist, and her work available on commission 130­131 Issue 62 (Tailgating) The editor expounds on the original art portrayals of Turbo Diesel trucks which have appeared on past issues of TDR magazine and on the current issue. 4­5 Issue 63 (Tailgating) The editor sets forth the TDR practice of featuring artists' renditions of members' Turbo Diesel pickups on the magazine's cover. 4­5 TDR magazine spine design: mystery montage image Issue 61 (Tailgating) The edtior reveals completion of a composite montage image of a Turbo Diesel pickup, serially imprinted on the cover spines of TDR issues 41 through 61. 5 TDR Project Truck, upgrading a `99 2-wheel, automatic quad cab, narrative account Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes acquires a '99 two-wheel drive, Quad Cab, automatic Turbo Diesel; and in Issue 62 begins a series of articles to recount the extended buildout, with description of accessories added, and parts replaced or changed. 85­89 TDR readers' testimonials about the magazine Issue 62 (TDRV) A subscriber who pulls a travel trailer expresses his appreciation of the RV topics in the TDR, a coverage almost unique among diesel magazines, he declares. 116 Issue 63 (Letter Exchange) During all the years since its initial publication TDR has served him well, according to a reader who regrets leaving the fold after buying a Mercedes turbo diesel and turning over his back issues to his Dodge dealer. 6 Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A new subscriber with years of experience in diesel maintenance commends the TDR for the quality of news coverage in Issue 63. 6 Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A reader with a liftetime interest in all things mechanical and periodicals devoted to them, testifies that "the TDR is right up there with the best of them." 7 Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) In spite of his frustration over "meager" news coverage from inside privately-held Cerberus, a worried reader casts his vote of confidence in the TDR and renews his subscription. 8 TDR readers' yarns about their trucks Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A reader recounts adventures and misadventures on the road to and from camping in the Moab, UT, area, with photos of pop-up camper and towed Jeep, in and out of snow. 7 Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A reader recounts towing a 1925 model AX 3-ton Moreland to an antique auto show. 8 Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A Coast Guard Auxiliarist certified to tow CG boats on public highways recounts his work at the height of the navigation season in Alaska. 8 Issue 61 (Letter Exchange) A highly satisfied member towing a fifth-wheel behind a `96 Turbo Diesel provides a photo of his rig atop Hoover Dam. 10 Issue 62 (Letter Exchange) A member provides photos of his First Generation Turbo Diesel with a toterhome coversion modification. 7 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) After a series of Turbo Diesels, none of which totally satisfied him, a subscriber says Dodge finally got it right in the `08 4500 Chassis Cab, and praises his truck's build, brakes, transmission, and integral exhaust brake. 35 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) A member who pulls a 40' gooseneck with a '07 Turbo Diesel 3500 Chassis Cab in his oil-field hotshot-service, vouches for its power, fuel economy, and comfort. 35 Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A reader proclaiming "My heart is 100% Dodge," tells about his `97 and `04 Turbo Diesels, boasting he has hauled 33,450 pounds behind the latter. 7 Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A reader complains about the paucity of news on Cerberus; reprehensible dealer discount policies; his temptations to buy another brand of truck; and a final decision to service his '01 Turbo Diesel. 8 TDRV column: Holmes' critique and advice Issue 63 (Backfire) John Holmes critiques the magazine's TDRV column, faults "its direction, technical content, and completeness of answers," and suggests adding outside professional help to oversee the column. 98 Issue 63 (Backfire) The editor responds to Holmes' critique of TDR's RV column; concedes his personal inexperience in RV towing; pledges the magazine to continued improvement; and announces the addition of a new columnist from Trailer Life. 98 TechAuthority Online (replaces old-style TSB notifications) Issue 62 (TDReSource) The Dodge TSB (technical service bulletin) has been superseded by an online, interactive information source, with bulletins keyed to individual VIN numbers, a service highly recommended by the editor. 72 Technical queries, how to contact Jim Anderson for help Issue 62 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson advises readers he can no longer be reached directly on his personal phone, and provides updated instructions for contacting him via email for answers to truck technical questions. 82

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Technical Service Bulletins (TSBs), TDR review of Issue 62 (TDReSource) In its annual review of Technical Service Bulletins, the TDR summarizes the problems and fixes announced by Dodge relevant to Turbo Diesel trucks for the years 2006­2008, to date (8/2008). 56­70 Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) As an addendum to the regular yearly summary of Dodge TSBs, which appeared in TDR Issue 62, the editor abstracts two recent bulletins that apply particularly to his own `07.5 truck model, with a referral to full web documentation. 37­39 Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) Updating its annual log of Dodge technical service bulletins, the TDR reprints summaries of interest to owners of the 6.7-liter engine, concerning changes in fuel filter and enhancements in the exhaust aftertreatment system. 44­45 Ten Back, review of the TDR issue ten years prior Issue 61 (10 Back) Robert Patton introduces the first installment of a "new" column in TDR titled "10 Back" which in each issue will return to the pages of TDR ten years in the past, to provide a new perspective on the present. 14 Issue 62 (10 Back) In the second regular installment of a new column titled "10 Back," the editor reprises Issue #22, and advises readers that a reprint of the referenced text is now posted in archives on the TDR website. 10­11 Issue 62 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly harks back to the TDR world ten years past, recalling yesteryear's less complex technical challenges, and recounting modifications in his truck, meetings he attended, and his first article in the TDR. 92 Issue 63 (10 Back) The editor looks back at Issue 23, when he first introduced an assigned "Theme" for each issue; identifies articles still timely for maintaining in-depth information on the Turbo Diesel; and provides reprints on the web. 12 Issue 63 (10 Back) Sam Memmolo remembers his article on "Midnight" ten years ago; revels in the success of his TV show since then; and reflects on road adventures in the intervening decade, with new resolve to make every day count henceforth. 13 Issue 64 (10 Back) The editor looks back at TDR Issue 24. summer `99, to recall the news topical then, and to marvel at how much of its technical information is still relevant today. 18­19 Theme for Issue 61. See also Editorial policy, TDR re-commits the magazine to Turbo Diesel basics Issue 61 (Tailgating) The editor notes the sensationalism and superficiality of many competing periodicals, and re-dedicates the TDR to presenting information genuinely useful to Turbo Diesel pickup owners. 4 Theme for Issue 63: "Pause to Reflect" [on change and continuity] Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson ponders how much more complex have become the challenges in diesel monkey-wrenching since his '94 pickup when he penned his first essay for TDR Issue 14, but asserts that TDR has maintained its usefulness. 62 Issue 63 (Polly's Pickup) Polly Holmes recounts her "Pause to Reflect" while attending SEMA on how America retains its freedoms and values even at the moment of a presidential election, in a peaceful transfer of power. 72 Issue 63 (Back In The Saddle) Scott Dalgleish admits he jumped the gun last issue in reflecting on change and continuity, but comes up with reflections on a NASCAR event he attended (the past) and enduring TDR friends (the continuity). 86 Theme for Issue 64: "Turn off the TV and go outside and play." Issue 64 (Tailgating) As theme for issue 64, in a time of economic uncertainty, the editor proposes we not obsess over bad news, but maintain a positive attitude, do our best, and follow his mother's dictum, "Turn off the TV and go outside and play." 4 Issue 64 (Four Whaling) A skeptical G.R. Whale tries to act on this issue's theme, goes out in the snow to assist a buddy in distress, gets stuck, ruminates on why he likes old-time trucks best, goes back home, resolves to be positive ... after a beer. 66 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson reflects on this issue's theme, good advice in a climate of defeatism and the commercial media's drumbeat of pessimism; in fact, he says, good things are stirring in America and folks are still buying trucks. 68 Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes doesn't recall his mother's telling him to turn off the TV and go outside, but he remembers her urging him to never look back and focus on doing things better tomorrow, a philosophy for our times, says he. 72 Issue 64 (Polly's Pickup) In line with this issue's theme, Polly Holmes waxes philosophical and even inspirational, recommending we all live for today but plan for tomorrow, go with our feelings, forget the past, expect a miracle. 79­80 Issue 64 (Motor-Minded) As his variation on the editor's motto for Issue 64 on how we should meet the current economic crisis, Mark Barnes offers two slogans: "Is the glass half full or half empty?" and "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade." 90­91 Timing, distinguishing between camshaft and injection pump timing Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains camshaft and injection pump timing to a reader confusing the two; and, judging by the malfunction reported, he references instructions for the latter procedure in TDR Issue 61, p. 102. 21 Timing pin, extraction and replacing Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly gives instructions for extracting a broken timing pin and securing a replacement. 21 Timing pin, in engine gear case, removal of Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly provides instructions for removing a stuck timing pin in the engine gear case, for a reader working on his fuel injection pump. 21 Timing pin, specs in making valve lash adjustment Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) A reader making a valve-lash adjustment finds free travel of the timing pin in its bore, is advised that some free play is normal, and is provided criteria for troubleshooting by fellow members to determine if it is intact. 14 Tire air pressure, dash warning light Issue 61 (6.7 HPCR) A reader explains the operation of the low tire-pressure warning light in the new model trucks and gives instructions for interpreting it and for resetting it. 39 Tire chains, use of in towing trailers Issue 64 (TDRV) To a reader planning an Alaska trailer-hauling trip and asking advice on using tire chains, Jim Anderson admonishes that only the chained tires' traction is increased, while all other wheels may lock up, resulting in jackknifing. 103 Tires, RV. See entries under Trailer tires Tool Tray, fuel filter cover: Geno's. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Tool Tray: Lanier Metal Fabricators. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Top dead Center timing pin. See Timing pin, extraction and replacing Torque converter, ATS, 68RFE Issue 64 (TDRelease) A press release from ATS Diesel Performance describes and promotes its new 68RFE torque converter, for which it claims significant advantages over stock. 117 Torque converter, ATS Five Star Issue 61 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes describes the design, construction, and installation of the ATS Five Star torque converter incorporating the Viskus Clutch (viscous clutch) Drive with Valve Body Assistant (VBA). 88­89 Torque converter lock/unlock problem, troubleshooting. See also Electrical noise, interference in control circuits Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Readers whose torque converter spontaneously unlocks when towing on rough road surfaces solve the problem by servicing and/or replacing the brake light switch located under the brake pedal. 16 Issue 62 (24-Valve Engines) Electrical noise is detected as source of a torque converter lock/ unlock problem by several readers who prescribe and describe modifications in wiring to effectively eliminate the erratic performance. 25 Issue 63 (12-Valve Engines) With assistance of another member, a reader traces source of a problem with irregular unlocking of the torque converter in his 12-valve truck to a faulty brake-light switch. 19 Torque plate, modification of rack travel Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) On the question of modifying rack travel of the torque plate, either by the latter's elimination or substitution, Joe Donnelly reviews the range of possible alterations and their effects, with suggestions on re-contouring. 17 Torque plate, TST brand, matched to specific engines Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) In response to a reader's query about whether the TST #10 and #100 torque plates are suitable for his 175hp fuel pump, Joe Donnelly says that they are primarily for the 215hp pump, while the TST #4 is ideal for a 1995 engine. 26 Torsion dampers. See Clutches, overview of and commentary on Toterhome, conversion modification of a First-Generation Turbo Diesel Issue 62 (Letter Exchange) A TDR member submits photos of his First Generation Turbo Diesel pickup converted to include a "toterhome" living-unit truckbed modification. 7 Tow/Haul overdrive lockout: questions Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) The tow/haul mode locks out 6th gear in the Chassis Cab truck, but not in the 3500 vehicle equipped with the 68RFE. 39 Issue 64 (Idle Clatter) On the 2005 truck Dodge added a tow/haul feature but deleted the overdrive lockout, a limitation which can be corrected by a reflash, described in TSB #21-006-07. 68 Towing mirrors, factory, evaluating. See Mirrors, factory, field of view, in towing Trailer, new fifth-wheel, modifying Issue 62 (TDRV) Jim Anderson reports work-in-progress in modifying his toy-hauler fifthwheel, smaller and less opulent than his previous rigs, describing his upgrades in weatherproofing, maximizing storage bays, suiting the interior to his style. 120 Trailer brake, electric-over-hydraulic system, troubleshooting Issue 63 (TDRV) Readers troubleshoot problems with electric-over-hydraulic trailer brakes, including failure resulting from leaking fluid and failed pumps, emphasizing a need to operate within specifications and manufacturers' operating instructions. 102­103 Trailer brake controllers, comparison of types and brands Issue 62 (TDRV) A reader reviews the MaxBrake which, like the BrakeSmart, senses hydraulic pressure of the truck's brake application to send braking voltage to the trailer brakes instead of relying on the inertial pendulum; and describes installation. 118 Issue 63 (TDRV) Correspondents compare inertial trailer brake controllers, such as the Prodigy, to those tied into the truck's master cylinder and synchronized with the brake pedal, such as the MaxBrake, agreeing on the latter's superiority. 102 Trailer brake controllers, with hydraulic disk brakes Issue 64 (TDRV) Jim Anderson notes availability of brake controllers made specifically for use on trailers equipped with hydraulic disk brakes. 103 Trailer hitch jack, electric Issue 62 (TDRV) The editor cites the advantages of an Ultra Fab electric hitch jack to replace the primitive manual trailer tongue crank, and describes its easy installation. 116 Trailer stabilizer jacks, scissor design, recommended Issue 63 (TDRV) An enthusiastic reader provides photos and recommendation of Ultra-Fab brand stabilizers to prevent rocking in his fifth-wheel trailer while it's parked. 103 Trailer tires, maintenance Issue 61 (TDRV) RV tires are subject to usage quite different from tires on pickups, and require particular care in maintenance and monitoring for such signs as flat spots, bulges, and de-lamination, with frequent over-the-road checks for overheating. 127 Issue 62 (TDRV) Joe Donnelly notes that while in this application bias ply performs somewhat better than radials, trailer tires are problematic and liable to separation and failure, and therefore require frequent inspection for bulging tread. 121 Trailer tires: evaluating loads on individual tires Issue 64 (TDRV) While it would be better to weigh each trailer wheel individually when calculating trailer tire load, facilities for doing that are not generally available, making it important to monitor each tire's temperature regularly. 103 Trailer towing, weight limits and guidelines Issue 64 (TDRV) Jim Anderson shares the advice he has given to two members on matching a trailer's weight to their particular Turbo Diesel pickups, and vice versa. 103 Trailer towing with 3.73 axle ratio Issue 61 (TDRV) Several members evaluate their towing of heavy trailers with 3.73 axle ratio in the 68RFE automatic, reporting generally good performance. 128 Trailer wheel bearings, evaluating options Issue 62 (TDRV) Readers compare alternatives in trailer wheel bearings, choosing among Dexter Nev-R-Lube, Dexter EZ Lube, and the old-fashioned standard bearings requiring annual cleaning and repacking. 122 Trailer wiring receptacle, instructions for installing Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) A reader discovers that there is no factory-installed trailer wiring receptacle on his '08 Turbo Diesel Chassis Cab, and is provided instructions for mounting one and websites for the necessary wiring diagrams. 38

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Transfer case NP205, adapting a replacement of Issue 62 (First Generation) In response to a reader seeking advice on adapting a different case to his First Generation truck with the stock NP205 transfer case, Joe Donnelly spells out the constraints and suggests contacting a specialist shop for parts. 13 Transmission, 47RE, BD modifications for Issue 64 (Ranch Dressing) After adding an exhaust brake to his '99 project truck, John Holmes installs several BD modifications to the 47RE transmission, including a transmission pan, torque converter, PressureLoc and valve body. 74­75 Transmission, 47RE, cooler-line check valve Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) A reader replacing the 47RE transmission but uncertain whether there is a check valve in the cooler line, is assured that indeed there is such, and is told where to find it. 18 Transmission, 47RE, front band/2nd gear anchor Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) A reader with problems shifting lst and 2nd gears in the 47RE transmission discovers a broken front band/2nd gear anchor in his oil pan, and is instructed in procedures and parts in replacing it. 22­23 Transmission, 47RE, shifting problems. See Transmission, 47RE, front band/2nd gear anchor Transmission, 48RE: delay before shifting into Drive, explanation of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) A delay before engaging in Drive mode is normal in the 48RE automatic transmission because it takes some time for the transmission to build pressure, a "problem" fixed by an initial interval of idling when first starting up. 32 Transmission, 68RFE, temperature sensor, installation of Issue 61 (6.7 HPCR) The sensor for a temperature gauge on the 68RFE automatic transmission should be installed on the top cooler line on the passenger side, according to information from a reader. 39 Transmission, 68RFE, torque converter, analysis of Issue 64 (Product Showcase) Although the new 68RFE torque converter built by ZF Sachs looks similar to the 47-48RE converter, it offers significantly improved construction and function, according to a press release by ATS Diesel Performance. 114­115 Transmission, automatic, erratic shifting, troubleshooting Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) A reader is presented with a "laundry list" of possible causes of erratic downshifting out of overdrive in cold weather, to finally trace the cause to a corroded connection at the transmission temperature sensor. 25 Transmission, automatic, failure to shift into overdrive. See Gauges and accessories inoperative, troubleshooting Transmission, automatic, fluid leak, troubleshooting Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) With advice from fellow members, a reader traces a mysterious leak of automatic transmission fluid to a minute abrasion in cooler lines which leaked only when the truck was operating. 28 Transmission, automatic, optimal maintenance procedures Issue 64 (Turbo Tips) Reprising information from Issue 42 and drawing on tips from readers, the editor describes ideal maintenance of automatic transmissions, including drain-plug installation, methods of fluid change, and temperature monitoring. 11­12 Transmission, automatic, reverse gear, failure at startup Issue 62 (6.7 HPCR) Failure to engage reverse gear at startup in a late model automatic transmission may indicate a leak in the torque converter drain-back valve or it may simply result from a normal lag in drain-back refill, according to a TDR reader. 36 Transmission, automatic, switching from 48RE to the larger 68RFE Issue 63 (Idle Clatter) To a reader's query whether in the 5.9-liter truck the stock 48RE transmission can be replaced with the 68RFE from the 6.7-liter engine, Jim Anderson explains differences in control modules which prohibit it. 64 Transmission, automatic, technique for maximum fluid drain. See Transmission, automatic, optimal maintenance procedures Transmission, automatic, valve body, aftermarket Issue 64 (TDRelease) SunCoast Diesel Transmission offers its new valve body for `96­'07 automatic transmissions, the E618-VB, providing electronic pressure control with 17 different controlled shift points for each upshift and downshift. 118 Transmission, choice of in buying a used truck for towing, advice Issue 63 (TDRV) For the best transmission in a used Turbo Diesel intended for towing, Jim Anderson gives advice on choices between manual and automatic, in successive truck models, with comments on gear ratio and longevity. 101 Transmission, manual, clutch bearings, servicing and replacing Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly advises a reader with 280,000 miles on a Turbo Diesel pickup that in servicing the clutch he should change the pilot and throw-out bearings and replace the rear main bearing seal if it is leaking. 18 Transmission, manual, fluid: Torco RTF. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Transmission, manual, lube cooler, aftermarket Issue 61 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly describes the construction, function, and effectiveness of the Trans-Cool cast aluminum lube cooler for manual transmissions, available at Geno's. 99 Transmission, manual, refusal to shift up from first. See Clutch master cylinder, failure, troubleshooting Transmission, manual, South Bend clutch, Con-OFe versus Con-Fe Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly explains his preference of the South Bend Con-Fe clutch to the Con-OFe in applications suitable to his truck's operation. 32 Transmission, NV4500, loss of fifth gear. See Fifth-gear nut problem Transmission, NV4500, lube tests and recommendations Issue 62 (First Generation) In response to a reader's query about choosing a lube for the NV4500 five-speed transmission, Joe Donnelly identifies his personal choice of Torco RTF, a selection he first discussed in Issue 33, p. 17. 13 Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly tests five lubricants in the NV4500, provides numerical results, notes that none out-performs the Dodge-recommended Castrol Syntorq, and recommends temperature testing in any trial use of alternatives. 21 Transmission, NV5600, flywheel: resurfacing of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly notes the injunction that "heavy stock" not be removed from thickness in resurfacing the flywheel in NV5600 five-speed and six-speed transmissions, observing that in his experience grinding to 1.490" is acceptable. 36 Transmission, NV5600, rebuild, process described Issue 64 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Noting that there are now many vehicles on the road equipped with the NV5600 manual 6-speed, Joe Donnelly provides a timely description of a rebuild of this transmission by Standard Transmission and Gear in Ft. Worth. 85­89 Transmission, NV5600, vent: location and function Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) A reader describes the location of the vent on the NV5600 transmission and explains its function. 30 Transmission clutch: South Bend con-Fe. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Transmission cooler lines, replacing Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Transmission cooler lines in 12-valve engines have been known to fail because of plastic fittings, which suggests replacing these couplings with new lines. 19 Transmission pan: Mag-Hytec. See Accessories, added to the Holmes TDR Project Truck Travel Companion Issue 62 (Tailgating) Beginning in 2008, "Travel Companion" guide and registry of participating members will be published electronically on the TDR's website, but a print copy will be available upon special request. 4 Issue 62 (TDR/R/R) The editor promotes the TcDR program, a band of members committed to mutual aid on the road, and publicizes rescues performed in the past quarter. 105 Travels, by TDR staff Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson recounts his tour of the Florida Railroad Museum, his trailering northward to Tennessee in the spring, his delight over the Chattanooga Choo Choo in the tourist mecca at the foot of Lookout Mountain, TN. 84 Trivia Quiz, answers Issue 61 (The Way We Were) Answers are revealed to questions in the Quiz printed in Issue 60, pp. 116-118, testing readers' recall of both trivia and signal events in fifteen years of the TDR, with names of contest winners. 124­125 Truck industry and the competitive market, sales figures Issue 64 (TDReview) Steve St. Laurent attends the Chicago Auto Show this year and learns there that the Dodge Ram truck is doing comparatively well, particularly in the 3/4 and 1 ton market. 60 TST Power Kit, calibrating for full power gain Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader with weak power gains from the TST kit, Joe Donnelly counsels installing a fuel pressure gauge and checking for boost leaks, position of the torque plate, full play of the shutoff solenoid, fuel pump efficiency. 25 TST Power Kit, estimating maximum hp with stock engine Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) To a question of whether the TST Power Kit would provide 300hp with a 1997 stock 215hp engine, Joe Donnelly says yes, but it would be too much for a stock clutch and turbo housing; explains why; and offers options. 26 Turbo Air Guide/TAG3, failure alert Issue 64 (Member2Member) John Holmes alerts readers that one early version of TAG3 (not including TAG1 and TAG2 models) may fail and damage the turbocharger; he provides information for getting an exchange. 17 Turbocharger, advantages of a larger housing Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) To a reader asking what to expect from a larger turbo housing configured in a 1997 215hp with a TST #11 Power Kit, Joe Donnelly estimates figures for a lower EGT, increased power, and improved fuel efficiency. 26 Turbocharger, aftermarket, good for up to 600hp Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly says that there are problems with the HX40 turbo in applications up to 550­600hp, that he has blown four and would not use it in a performance application, opting for the High Tech 66/71 with 14 cm2 exhaust housing. 36 Turbocharger, aftermarket, good for up to 800hp Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader asking for a recommendation of a big single turbo for making 800hp, Joe Donnelly says he might try the big 71/73 High Tech, but his best bet would be a set of BD twins, more street-able and durable. 36 Turbocharger, compound (twin), BD, description Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) In response to a reader request for information, Joe Donnelly provides a thumbnail description of the BD Twin Turbo kit, with references to detailed treatment in earlier issues of TDR. 20 Issue 61 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly describes the configuration and installation of the BD compound ("twin") turbos and gives high marks to their performance on his truck. 24 Turbocharger, compound (twin), BD, performance update Issue 63 (Have Ram, Will Travel) Joe Donnelly updates his assessment of the BD twin turbo setups, both higher and less high horsepower, comparing and outlining the advantages of each. 85 Turbocharger, compound (twin), Garrett Issue 61 (Back In The Saddle) Following an explanation of how compound ("twin") turbos work, Scott Dalgleish describes the configuration of Garrett dual ball bearing twins installed by Turbo Re-Source to support 750hp and develop 550hp in towing. 92­94 Turbocharger, compound (twin), instructions for installation of Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) For a reader seeking information on properly installing a set of BD twin (compound) turbochargers, Joe Donnelly provides detailed instructions. 37 Turbocharger, compound (twin), matching injectors and Smarty settings Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) Although Joe Donnelly prefers Dynomite Diesel's Stage 1 or 2 injectors with big twins such as the BD R700, stock injectors are adequate; and a higher Smarty torque is enough for decent spoolup on the 5.9 HPCR. 31 Turbocharger, compound (twin), pairing of units, explained Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) To a reader seeking advice on compound turbos built around the stock HX40, Joe Donnelly explains his preference for the BD twin-turbo kit, designed as a unit and cost effective. 33 Turbocharger, compound (twin): BD. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Turbocharger, Holset. See Holset H2E turbocharger, modified, evaluation of; See Holset HX55 turbocharger, criteria for identifying Turbocharger, Schwitzer S300, reportedly slow spool-up Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly explains that there are a lot of different size Schwitzer S300 turbos and the larger ones are slow to spool, as a reader reports, but that a smaller exhaust housing or bigger injectors may help spool the turbo. 27

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Turbocharger, soot contamination and P2262 Code. See also Soot buildup in 6.7-liter model trucks Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins technicians cite progress in the company's diligent efforts to solve the problem of turbo failures caused by soot contamination in late-model trucks which triggers the infamous code P2262. 72 Turbocharger, stock, identifying the model from its ID plate number Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly instructs a member in how to read the ID plate on his stock turbocharger to determine its model and specs. 20 Turbocharger, upgrade, considerations in selection of Issue 64 (24-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly describes the constraints and parameters in selecting a turbo upgrade for a 235hp `02 Turbo Diesel used for heavy towing and slated for DDP 75hp injectors, a Smarty, stronger clutch, and aftermarket lift pump. 30 Issue 64 (5.9 HPCR) Joe Donnelly offers advice in choosing a turbocharger upgrade for a 5.9 HPCR Turbo Diesel with a moderately upgraded engine, some models biased toward drivability at lower power, some more suitable for the configuration's full power. 37 Turbocharger, wheezing, diagnosed Issue 63 (6.7 HPCR) A reader complaining of a wheeze in his `08 Turbo Diesel 5500 takes his vehicle to the dealer, who traces the problem to an EGR valve loose on its gasket. 35 Turbocharger: High Tech. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Turbocharger housing, judging the right size for the HX35 Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly recites the constraints and considerations in selecting size of a turbocharger housing for the HX35. 20 Turbo Diesel, 6.7-liter truck, customer complaints addressed by Cummins spokesmen Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) In response to complaints and concerns among owners of `07.5 and `08 6.7-liter Turbo Diesels, the editor's contacts at Cummins explain the reasons for turbo failures and related problems and what is being done to correct them. 70­74 Turbo Diesel, 6.7-liter truck: consumers' pros and cons for purchasing Issue 64 (6.7 HPCR) To those considering replacing a Dodge Cummins 5.9-liter Turbo Diesel truck with today's 6.7-liter model, a couple of members tick off the many advantages of the truck, balanced by noting disadvantages in some uses. 38 Turbo Diesel, Second Generation, 12-Valve: "the ideal truck" Issue 62 (10 Back) In looking back ten years, Scott Dalgleish reflects on the all-around merits of the 12-valve Second Generation Turbo Diesel manual with the P7100 mechanical injection pump, as a nearly ideal truck. 10 Turbo Diesels, maintenance during extended periods of low use Issue 61 (Idle Clatter) Jim Anderson says that if your Turbo Diesel is sitting idle for extended periods because of high fuel prices, you should take it out on the road and drive it for at least 20 miles each week. 81 "UConnect" internet access system, option in Dodge Ram 1500 Issue 62 (Ranch Dressing) John Holmes praises the new 2009 Ram, with emphasis upon the optional accessory "UConnect" internet access system, enabling worldwide communication from vehicle via cell phone link. 84 Universal joint cups, loose, troubleshooting and repair Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly advises a reader against welding loose cups on the universal joint, explains why, and suggests a possible expedient of using #609 Loctite to retain them to the axle. 18 Urea-based aftertreatment introduced in 2010 model Issue 64 (Cummins' Column) According to Cummins sources a new urea-based emissions aftertreatment (using SCR technology) will be introduced in the 2010 Dodge Chassis Cab, a change which will not be made in 6.7-liter pickup models. 56 Used Second Generation Turbo Diesel: advice for improving Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly suggests ways to improve a newly purchased used 1997 Turbo Diesel, including containing the killer dowel pin; replacing the original exhaust manifold; and, most cost effective power adder, the TST Power Kit. 25 Used truck, dedicated to towing, choosing a transmission in. See Transmission, choice of in buying a used truck for towing, advice Vacuum actuator in cruise control unit, troubleshooting Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) A reader discovers that intermittent failure of cruise control was caused by damage to the vacuum actuator from leaking battery acid. 16 Valve Body Assistant (VBA). See Torque converter, ATS Five Star Valve covers, plastic components, questionable quality? Issue 63 (5.9 HPCR) To a query on whether valve covers on Turbo Diesel engines are plastic, Joe Donnelly says that those in models `03­'06 are aluminum with plastic trim, while those in later engines are one-piece plastic between aluminum plates. 31 Valve lash adjustment, a reader's test of operating tolerances Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A reader reports an extended test of valve lash adjustment in his 2004 Cummins Turbo Diesel engine, still within tolerable range after 140,000 miles in severe duty. 6­7 Valve lifters, removal, how-to instructions Issue 62 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly provides instructions for an improvised procedure for extracting valve lifters in a 12-valve engine, with reference to photos in TDR Issue 33, pp. 46­48. 17 Valve spring, heavy duty: typical applications Issue 64 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly says the most popular application for heavy-duty valve springs, besides the obvious one of use with exhaust brakes, is for higher rpm engines where the hp curve gets ragged over 3200 rpm. 26 Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT), comparative braking effectiveness Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) According to Cummins techs, the integrated VGT brake on 6.7-liter engines has over 30% more braking capacity than typical aftermarket exhaust brakes on 5.9 model trucks. 74 Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT), operation explained Issue 61 (Cummins' Column) Cummins tech guys provide a cutaway drawing of the Holset Variable Geometry Turbocharger to illustrate its operation when vane is closed to function like an exhaust brake. 72 Vehicle speed sensor (VSS), replacement Issue 61 (First Generation) A TDR member informs another of the proper vehicle speed sensor (VSS) for First Generation models, both two-wheel and four-wheel. 17 Viscous clutch drive. See Torque converter, ATS Five Star Volkswagen Jetta TDI diesel Issue 62 (Four Whaling) G.R. Whale ponders the popularity of diesel in Germany and compares the fuel economy of the Volkswagen Jetta TDI diesel passenger car, one of the most popular vehicles in Europe, to that of the Cummins 6.7-liter Turbo Diesel. 80 Warranty, jeopardized by engine modifications, warning Issue 63 (Life's A Beach) Jerry Nielsen warns Turbo Diesel owners that significant modifications to the engine, including the turbo, eliminating components required by law, or adding unauthorized accessories or upgrades, will likely annul the warranty. 74 Issue 63 (Life's A Beach) The editor explains in detail why it is a violation of manufacturer's warranty to install any exhaust brake other than the Jacobs brake (and this only since 2006 model) on any Dodge Cummins with automatic transmission. 74­75 Water-methanol injection, background and history Issue 62 (Exhaust Note) Kevin Cameron reviews the history of augmenting diesel fueling with water-methanol to control detonation and to dampen temperature to increase power in racing vehicles, a process with application in today's Turbo Diesels. 136­137 Water-methanol injection, in 1930s John Deere tractors Issue 64 (Letter Exchange) A WWII veteran reminisces about his experiences operating 1930s John Deere Model D tractors equipped with water-methanol injection. 7 Water-methanol injection, increase in fuel economy Issue 62 (Product Showcase) Used in competition to increase horsepower and lower EGT, watermethanol injection may also increase fuel economy at lower power levels, demonstrated by results of experiments on a Turbo Diesel with a Snow system. 126­127 Water-methanol injection, review, Part II: practicality, fuel costs, engine-durability Issue 63 (Product Showcase) Continuing research into water-methanol fuel injection, Doug Leno analyzes issues of practicality, effect on engine integrity, and cost/benefit ratio, with an overview of the Snow system used in his study. 115­116 Water-methanol injection: Snow Stage 3 MPG-MAX unit, installation Issue 63 (Product Showcase) Doug Leno describes the installation of the Snow Stage 3 MPGMAX water-methanol injection system, operation of the system controller, provision for storing fuel; and reports on initial performance results. 117­119 Water pump, instructions for replacing Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) A member provides instructions for replacing the water pump on the 5.9 HPCR engine. 28 Water pump, warranty coverage Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) A respondent to a question from a member says that the water pump on the 5.9 HPCR engine is covered by the Cummins portion of the 100,000-mile newvehicle warranty. 28 Website, instructions for logging on. See also Technical queries, how to contact Jim Anderson for help Issue 62 (Tailgating) For first-time users, the editor provides instruction for logging onto the Turbo Diesel Register website, a vast resource of useful information. 4 Weigh scales, public, how to use Issue 62 (TDRV) Readers share information on how to position a truck and/or trailer on public weigh scales to determine axle weights. 122 Wheels and tires, stock size on `00 not compatible with `08 truck Issue 61 (5.9 HPCR) The 16" wheels and tires from a `00 3500 will not clear the larger brake calipers requiring 17" on the `03­newer Turbo Diesel. 30 Winch: Warn 16.5ti and XD9000. See Accessories, added by Joe Donnelly, evaluation update Windows, power, gears, replacing Issue 63 (First Generation) Readers provide instructions for sourcing and replacing the gears in the power window of a First Generation Turbo Diesel in which the glass will lower but not raise, with suggestions on servicing the motor slider. 14 Windshield wipers, intermittent setting, malfunction Issue 62 (5.9 HPCR) Readers trace problems with the windshield wiper intermittent switch to a failing multifunction switch, and give instructions for replacement. 31 Wiring fuse panel: Six-Bay brand. See Accessories, added to the editor's truck, evaluation update Wiring the 7-pin trailer receptacle, instructions for. See Trailer wiring receptacle, instructions for installing Wrench sizes, metric/American equivalents Issue 61 (12-Valve Engines) Joe Donnelly provides the formula for converting between metric and American wrench sizes, and a table of equivalents. 21

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