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Curriculum and Assessment Guide (CAG) Elementary 2010-2011 Houghton Mifflin Fifth Grade

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CORE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 2010-2011

Grade 5 English Language Arts Houghton-Mifflin Reading - 2002

Anthology, Expeditions 5 Practice Book 5

Open Court Reading - 2002

Anthology Comprehension & Language Arts Skills Workbook Spelling & Vocabulary Skills Workbook

Mathematics Pearson enVision Math ­ Pupil Edition Pearson enVision Math ­ Teacher Edition Science

Scott Foresman ­ Student Edition (former Rio Linda and North Sacramento Schools) MacMillan-McGraw Hill, 2007 Student Edition

History/Social Studies

Scott Foresman/Prentice Hall ­ Our Nation ­ Pupil Edition (consumable) (Is North Sac consumable???) (Is Del Paso consumable??)

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Base Program Description: Reading/Language Arts

I. Content and Coverage: The Language Arts Program is based on the state adopted English/Language Arts Content Standards and the Reading/Language Arts Framework for California Public Schools. The English/Language Arts Content Standards include the following strands at each grade level: Reading; Writing; Written and Oral English Language Conventions; and Listening and Speaking. II. Materials: A. Houghton Mifflin Reading (HMR) or Open Court Reading (OCR) were selected from the approved textbook matrix adopted by the California State Board of Education and by the district Board of Trustees. HMR or OCR program materials will be provided for teachers and students in grades K-6. These materials will be used for Language Arts instruction including: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

III.

Content Scheduling: A. The Language Arts program in TRUSD is made up of two essential elements: The first element is "Houghton Mifflin Reading/Writing" and "Open Court Reading" which is whole-class instruction using the HMR or OCR gradelevel materials focusing on the content standards in reading and writing. The second element is "Differentiated Instruction" small, homogenouslygrouped, using materials at the students' instructional level. This provides practice with readable text and skill/concept instruction based on the needs of students. B. It is recommended that the Language Arts instruction be scheduled for at least two and one-half hours per day time including a minimum of 30 minutes of differentiated instruction. Every attempt should be made to integrate other areas of the curriculum into language arts. One-half day kindergarten instructional time will need to be adjusted accordingly. An instructional pacing schedule can be found in the Curriculum and Assessment Guide for each grade level.

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IV.

Teaching Strategies: A. Differentiated instruction provides the opportunity for flexible, fluid grouping within a classroom. Student groups will change throughout the year based on student assessments. The ELD portion of the day provides the opportunity to differentiate for English Learners. A minimum of 30 minutes of ELD instruction is required based on students' CELDT levels. Assigned homework will vary based on the instructional level of the students. The assignments will reinforce previously taught skills and give parents/guardians an opportunity to be involved in student learning.

B.

C.

V.

Pupil Evaluation: Assessment should be ongoing and regular. A. Screening/Entry Level assessments are used to: o Find out more about what students know and need to learn. o Plan extra support to help students catch up to grade level. o Assist the teachers in organizing classroom and grade level instruction to target specific needs while continuing to teach the core program to all students. B. Monitoring assessments are used to: o Check on the progress of the class in learning the content and skills contained in the comprehensive instructional program. o Help the teacher emphasize areas of the core instructional program to meet the needs of students. o Develop a database to be shared with the grade level and the school to evaluate progress on the reading language arts standards by groups of students. C. Outcome/Summative assessments are used to: o Assess student progress in meeting the standards in reading and language arts across the class, grade level and school. o Provide student learning data on the long-term outcomes of the instructional program. o Uncover issues related to the needs of school populations and the alignment of the instructional program to the state standards in reading and language arts.

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Twin Rivers Unified School District Language Arts Program

Houghton Mifflin Reading or Open Court Reading Grade Level Core instruction

plus

Differentiated Instruction

Flexible grouping based on student instructional level

Program Management

Planning/Pacing/ Instructional grouping

Universal Access/ Flexible Grouping

EL, RSP, GATE, Other

Cross-Curricular Integration

Assessment

for placement and to inform instruction

Standards-Based Reading Instruction Decoding/ Structural Analysis Spelling

Standards-Based Writing Instruction Listening & Speaking

Vocabulary

Writing Strategies/ Application s

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Research & Technology Grammar & EnglishLanguage

Library/Media Center Connection

Comprehension

READING INSTRUCTION IN TWIN RIVERS UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

Houghton Mifflin Reading Or Open Court Reading · Whole class · "Core grade level" material (the same for all students) · exposure to general concepts skills and concepts are standards-based · Differentiated Instruction Flexible small groups

"Differentiated instructional level" material (advanced, proficient, basic, below basic and far below basic) · "practice" with readable text skills and concepts are standards-based

Focus on language arts content standards

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Focus on strengths and needs of students

Twin Rivers Unified School District

Houghton-Mifflin Reading

Fifth Grade 2010/2011 Pacing Guide

Fifth Grade Theme 1

Nature's Fury Aug. 23, 2010

Earthquake Terror

Eye of the Storm: Chasing Storms With Warren Faidley

Implementation

Implementation

Implementation

Implementation

Assessments

Aug 12­ Aug 20 Back to School Unit

CELDT Testing

Measures Theme 1 Data due in Measures Sept. 24, 2010

Volcanoes

District Standards Theme 1 Test District Standards Theme 2 Test

Theme 2

Give It All You've Got Sept. 27, 2010

Michelle Kwan: Heart of a Champion Baseball in April from La Bamba

The Fear Place

Mae Jemison: Space Scientist

Theme 2 Data due in Measures Oct. 29,2010 Theme 3 Data due in Measures Jan. 14, 2011 Theme 4 Data due in Measures Feb. 28, 2011

Theme 5 Data due in Measures April 1, 2011 Theme 6 Data due in Measures May 24, 2011

Theme 3

Voices of the Revolution Nov. 1, 2010

And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?

Katie's Trunk

James Forten from Now is Your Time!

District Standards Theme 3 Test

Theme 4

Person to Person Jan. 10, 2011

Mariah Keeps Cool Mom's Best Friend

Yang the Second and Her Secret Admirers

District Standards Theme 4 Test

Dear Mr. Henshaw

Theme 5

One Land, Many Trails Feb. 28, 2011

A Boy Called Slow Pioneer Girl

Black Cowboy, Wild Horses

District Standards Theme 5 Test

Elena STAR Testing

Theme 6

Animal Encounters April 4, 2011

The Grizzly Bear Family Book The Golden Lion Tamarin Comes Home My Side of the Mountain

District Standards Theme 6 Test

*Running Record due in MEASURES: Tri. 1 October 29, 2010,

Tri. 2 February 28, 2011 7

Tri. 3 May 24, 2011 (Former Rio Linda sites only)

Reading/Language Arts Houghton-Mifflin Reading Writing & Fluency Pacing Schedule 2010 ­ 2011

2nd ­ 6th Grades Writing Prompts:

Tests

Delivered with the Standards Theme

Theme 1 writing prompts ~ Scores due in Measures September 24 Theme 2 writing prompts ~ Scores due in Measures October 29 Theme 3 writing prompts ~ Scores due in Measures January 14 Theme 4 writing prompts ~ Scores due in Measures February 28 Theme 5 writing prompts ~ Scores due in Measures April 1 Theme 6 writing prompts ~ No writing prompt given

2nd ­ 6th Grades Fluency:

Delivered at the beginning of the trimester

Trimester 1 Fluency Assessment ~ Scores due in Measures October 29 Trimester 2 Fluency Assessment ~ Scores due in Measures February 28 Trimester 3 Fluency Assessment ~ Scores due in Measures May 24

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Houghton Mifflin Reading Reading-Writing Workshop (R-WW)

Purpose:

o To guide students through the writing process; o To instruct students in specific writing genres; o To apply foundational writing strategies, applications, and conventions.

Scope and Sequence

Theme 1 Grade 1 Grade 2 Story Grade 3 Personal Narrative Instructions Grade 4 Personal Narrative Description Grade 5 Description Personal Essay Story Personal Narrative Research Report Persuasive Essay Grade 6 Personal Narrative Story

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Description Friendly Letter Research Report Personal Narrative Description Personal Narrative Instructions

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Story Research Report Description Persuasive Essay

Story Persuasive Essay Personal Essay Research Report

Description Research Report Personal Essay Persuasive Essay

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5

6

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Story Research Report Friendly Letter Instructions

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Houghton Mifflin Reading Writing Rubric Scoring Guide for Grades 4 ­ 6 General Criteria

Score

Genre-Specific Criteria

Conventions Grammar, Spelling, Punctuation

-Contains few, if any, errors in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling -These errors do not interfere with the reader's understanding of the writing

Focus/Development Ideas/Organization

-Clearly addresses all parts of writing task -Demonstrates clear understanding of purpose -Maintains consistent point of view, focus and organization, including paragraphs when appropriate.

Style Sentence Fluency Word Choice

-Includes a variety of sentence types -Has a strong sense of audience -Includes word choice that adds interest and exactness

Narrative

Summary

Response to Literature

-Demonstrates a clear understanding of the literary work -Provides effective support for judgments through specific references to text and prior knowledge

Expository Composition: Description

-Description is interesting and meaningful; the beginning attracts the reader's attention and the ending is well crafted; includes many vivid sensory details

Persuasive Composition

The essay is well organized with a strong introduction and conclusion -Persuasive language, facts, opinions, and arguments are used effectively

Research Report

-The first paragraph introduces the topic of the paper, which remains consistent throughout. -Both paragraphs include appropriate, effective topic sentences and supporting details

A

-Provides a thoroughly developed sequence of significant events to relate ideas, observations and/or memories -Includes vivid descriptive language and sensory details that enable the reader to visualize the events or experiences

-Is characterized by the paraphrasing of the main idea(s) and significant details.

B

-Address all parts of writing task -Demonstrates general understanding of purpose -Maintains a mostly consistent point of view, focus, and organization, including paragraphs when appropriate -Presents a central idea with mostly relevant facts, details and/or explanation

-Includes some variety of sentence types -Has some sense of audience -Includes some interesting words.

-Contains some errors in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling -These errors do not interfere with the reader's understanding of the writing

-Provides an adequately developed sequence of significant events to relate ideas, observations and/or memories -Includes some descriptive language and sensory details and enables the reader to visualize the events or experiences.

-Is characterized by some paraphrasing of the main idea(s) and significant details

-Demonstrates an understanding of the literary work -Provides some support for judgments through references to text and prior knowledge

-Includes many details; has a good beginning and ending, but description is not totally clear; sensory language in some places

-the essay includes an introduction, an opinion, and a conclusion, but needs more supporting facts and stronger persuasive language

-The report consists of one very strong paragraph with a good topic sentence and supporting details, or two weaker, more disorganized paragraphs. It may not stick to one topic throughout

C

-Addresses only parts of the writing task -Demonstrates little understanding of purpose -Maintains an inconsistent point of view, focus and/or organization -Suggests a central idea with limited facts, details and/or explanations

-Includes little variety of sentence types -Has no sense of audience -Includes few interesting words

-Contains several errors in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling -These errors may interfere with the reader's understanding of the writing

-Provides a minimally developed sequence of events to relate ideas, observations and/or memories -Includes limited descriptive language and sensory details that enable the reader to visualize the events or experiences

-Is characterized by substantial copying of key phrases and minimal paraphrasing

-Demonstrates a limited understanding of the literary work -Provides weak support for judgments

-Details are confusing or out of order; sentences lack variation; little sensory language

-The essay may have an introduction, conclusion, or opinion, but it is not persuasive -The writer's opinion is generally unsupported

-The report consists of one paragraph that may lack a topic sentence or provide little detailed support for the main idea -A few phrases may be copied directly from the selection

D

-Address only one part of the writing task -Demonstrates no understanding of purpose -Lacks a clear point of view, focus, organization -Lacks a central idea but may contain marginally related facts, details and/or explanations

-Includes no sentence variety -Has no sense of audience -Includes very few, if any, interesting words

-Contains serious errors in grammar, punctuation, capitalization, spelling -These errors interfere with the reader's understanding of the writing

-Lacks descriptive language and sensory details that enable the reader to visualize the events or experiences -Lacks a sequence of events to relate ideas, observations and/or memories

-Is characterized by substantial copying of indiscriminately selected phrases or sentences

-Demonstrates little understanding of the literary work -Fails to provide support for judgments

-Few details; little or no organization; few sentences; no sensory language; many errors interfere with comprehension

-The essay is not organized, developed, or persuasive. -Lacks an introduction, conclusion, and clear opinion

-The essay consists of only one paragraph that is disorganized and fails to support a clear main idea. It may be copied from the selection or include mostly fabricated details

F

-Writing is disorganized - Lacks detail and facts

- Word choice is meager and repetitive

- Lacks basic understanding of English conventions

-Fails to address the prompt

-Fails to address the prompt

-Fails to address the prompt

-Fails to address the prompt

-Fails to address the prompt

-Fails to address the prompt

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English Learner (EL) Program

The primary goal of the EL Program is to support EL students in their acquisition of English for successful academic progress in instructional base program areas. Direct services to students are delivered by teachers who have authorization of the Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC). Primary language support, for the equal access to the core curriculum, is provided by bilingual paraeducators.

English Language Development

I. Content and Coverage: The ELD program is based on the state adopted ELD Standards and the Reading/Language Arts Frameworks for California Public Schools. The ELD Standards include the following strands at each California English Language Development Test (CELDT) proficiency level/grade: Listening, speaking, reading and writing. II. Materials: A. The Houghton Mifflin: Handbook for English Language Learners. B. Rigby: On Our Way to English C. Hampton Brown: Avenues III. Content Scheduling: As a separate curricular area, the TRUSD English Language Development program is made up of: · · · · · IV. Instruction based on the ELD Standards ELD instruction provided for English Learners at all proficiency levels until redesignated Fluent English Proficient (RFEP) Daily ELD instruction provided in a small group setting for a minimum of 30 continuous minutes Academic language instruction addressed in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Various grouping formats as determined by the teacher and/or school site.

Teaching Strategies: A. Teachers differentiate instruction to match the type and complexity of skills and concepts being taught in order to meet the needs, interests, and learning styles of the students.

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B. The essential components of an ELD lesson are: · Address specific ELD standards · Explicitly link concepts to background experiences · Explicitly link past learning with new concepts · Emphasize key vocabulary (i.e. introduce, write, repeat or highlight) · Provide modeling, comprehensible input, guided practice, and independent practice · Pupil Evaluation C. The CELDT assessment is administered yearly to all District English Learners during the period of July through October. D. The Language Dominance test is administered to EL students to determine proficiency in their primary language.

Alternative Bilingual Early Exit Program

An early exit (K-3) Spanish bilingual program at Madison and Harmon Johnson Schools provides students English Language Development and access to the core curriculum through Spanish. Classrooms are staffed by BCLAD teachers or CLAD teachers teamed with bilingual Paraeducators. All students in grades K-3 participating in the Alternate Bilingual Early Exit Program will receive a regular report card reflecting the Spanish/English curriculum

English Learning Students

English Learners (ELs) are identified by means of the Home Language Survey and then tested using the California English Language Development Test (CELDT). Using this information, ELs are placed in the following five categories by level of English language proficiency. · · · · · Beginning Early Intermediate Intermediate Early Advanced Advanced

Notification of the designated proficiency level of a student will be provided to the classroom teacher. . EL/ELD is to be checked on the report card for all EL students except those redesignated (RFEP).

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Levels of English Proficiency

CELDT Level

Beginner (May or may not be in the

silent stage of language production)

Listening/Speaking

Limited comprehension and demonstrates the use of a few basic words.

Writing

May or may not attempt to write about a topic. The response is minimal and may contain some isolated English words as well as the student's primary language.

Reading

Far Below Basic *Recall minimal details from a simple story, grasping sound/symbol correspondence.

Early Intermediate

Some basic social language, demonstrates limited comprehension. Speaks using simple words.

Is able to write at least one complete sentence in response to a prompt. The sentence may contain correct word order, but errors may obscure the meaning.

Far Below Basic *Understands literal comprehension, and can match simple vocabulary to pictures.

Intermediate

Demonstrates comprehension of simple vocabulary, may have gaps in communication in terms of vocabulary.

Is able to write a composition about a topic, but the composition may consist of a disorganized list of events, may include some details.

Below Basic * Understands some comprehension questions, can grasp main idea and sequencing.

Early Advanced

Demonstrates comprehension of social language and some academic language. Uses a fairly extensive vocabulary, with minor errors.

Is able to write a composition that includes relevant details and logical sequence of events or ideas. Sentences may contain few errors in grammar and mechanics.

Basic *Approaching grade level reading. Can grasp main idea and sequencing. Is beginning to draw conclusions, infer and make generalizations.

Advanced

Demonstrates comprehension of social language and most academic language. Uses extensive vocabulary.

Is able to write a well organized composition that contains clear sequencing, precise vocabulary and has minimal errors in grammar and mechanics.

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Proficient or Above *Able to apply higher order thinking skills (inferring, generalizations etc.) and are at or close to grade level.

Houghton Mifflin Language Arts ­ 2010/2011 Print Shop Orders Grades 3, 4, 5, and 6

Standards Tests for Themes--Grades 3, 4, 5, 6 -One per student at each grade level at each school:

Aero Haven, Allison, C.C.A.A., Del Paso, Dry Creek, Fairbanks, Foothill Oaks, Frontier, Garden Valley, Hillsdale, Joyce, Kohler, Larchmont, Madison, North Avenue, Oakdale, Orchard, Pioneer, Regency Park, Ridgepoint, Rio Linda, Sierra View, Village, Westside and Woodridge

-One Direction for Administration per teacher/classroom (one time only)

-One answer key per teacher/classroom (for each assessment)

-Sent three times per year, as follows: Assessments for Theme 1 & 2 delivered by August 16, 2010 Assessments for Theme 3 & 4 delivered by November 1, 2010 Assessments for Theme 5 & 6 delivered by February 21, 2011

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2010-2011 Elementary Report Card Reading/Language Arts Standards Marking

Fluency standards are expressed in words correct per minute (wcpm). Fluency standards change each trimester. See guide below for Fluency standards.

Fluency

Trimester 1

Grade 1

Exceeds Adv Prof B BB FBB

A B C D F

Grade 2 80+ 53 ­ 79 39 ­ 52 25 ­ 38 0 ­ 24

Grade 3 106+ 79 ­ 105 60 ­ 78 41 ­ 59 0 ­ 40

Grade 4 115+ 99 ­ 114 78 ­ 98 56 ­ 77 0 ­ 55

Grade 5 125+ 105 ­ 124 86 ­ 104 66 ­ 85 0 ­ 65

Grade 6 130+ 115 ­ 129 96 ­ 114 76 ­ 95 0 ­ 75

Trimester 2

Exceeds Adv Prof B BB FBB

A B C D F

65+ 35 ­ 64 26 ­ 34 17 ­ 25 0 ­ 16

100+ 70 ­ 99 53 ­ 69 36 ­ 52 0 ­ 35

122+ 92 ­ 121 69 ­ 91 46 ­ 68 0 ­ 45

130+ 108 ­ 129 87 ­ 107 66 ­ 86 0 ­ 65

135+ 114 ­ 134 93 ­ 113 71 ­ 92 0 ­ 70

140+ 125 ­ 139 106 ­ 124 86 ­ 105 0 ­ 85

Trimester 3

Exceeds Adv Prof B BB FBB

A B C D F

83+ 53 ­ 82 40 ­ 52 26 ­ 39 0 ­ 25

120+ 89 ­ 119 68 ­ 88 46 ­ 67 0 ­ 45

137+ 107 ­ 136 81 ­ 106 54 ­ 80 0 ­ 53

140+ 112 ­ 139 94 ­ 111 76 ­ 93 0 ­ 75

145+ 118 ­ 144 97 ­ 117 76 ­ 96 0 ­ 75

150+ 135 ­ 149 113 ­ 134 91 ­ 112 0 ­ 90

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Elementary Grading Philosophy

The Twin Rivers Unified School District believes that communication between home and school is critical to the success of students. The report card is a formal communication between the school and families that reports how a child is progressing towards meeting grade level standards. Grading helps the teacher: Communicate progress towards meeting California Standards to the student and parent Evaluate strengths and needs of each student Set instructional goals and plan teaching strategies and interventions

Grading helps the student: See personal progress towards grade level standards Recognize how work may be improved Set personal goals for future learning

Grading helps the parent/guardian: Be knowledgeable about the child's progress towards grade level standards Guide and assist the student in making academic and social progress Encourage their child to work towards goals

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Elementary Grading Rubric

Consistently demonstrates high use of advanced thinking, skill and understanding of grade-level standards. Test scores consistently indicate a high level of understanding of grade level concepts and skills The student intuitively makes connections and applications to other areas. The student consistently uses appropriate academic language. Student work is complete and well organized- demonstrating a high level of commitment. Consistently meets and understands grade-level standards. Test scores indicate a concrete understanding of grade level concepts and skills The student uses a variety of skills to demonstrate their understanding. The student may need prompting to utilize particular processes/strategies. Student work is complete and organized. Approaching grade-level standards. The student demonstrates some basic foundational levels. The student may have gaps in understanding and test scores may be inconsistent The student relies on familiar strategies and requires scaffolding and prompting to access grade level standards. Student work is generally complete but quality, thoroughness and organization varies. Consistently performing below grade-level standards Test scores indicate little or very weak understanding and acquisition of grade level concepts and skills. Student work varies widely in quality, thoroughness and completion. The student lacks basic foundational skills to access gradelevel standards. Test scores indicate little or no understanding of grade level concepts and skills. Student work demonstrates little or no understanding or may be frequently incomplete.

A

Advanced

B

Proficient

C

Basic

D

Below Basic

F

Far Below Basic

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