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Sandi Radomski: Overcoming Cravings For Food

Welcome to the Tapping World Summit 2011. This is your host, Jessica Ortner. By listening to this interview, you agree to the terms located at http://www.thetappingworldsummit.com/disclaimer. We hope this interview helps you become a healthier and a happier you. Today we are going to focus on the physical components of overeating and cravings. Most of us have experienced a craving. We try to think of something else, anything else, but all we can focus on is the food that we cannot wait to have. Giving in to cravings often leaves us feeling disappointed and dissatisfied. If you feel like you have struggled around food, then this interview is perfect for you. We will be speaking with Sandi Radomski from http://allergyantidotes.com . Sandi is board certified in social work, a psychotherapist and a naturopathic doctor. Alongside of Patricia Carrington and Carol Look, Sandi is the creator of the online tapalong called Key to Weight Loss & Zap Your Cravings. She is most famously known for her work with allergies. It is a real joy to have her. Welcome, Sandi. Sandi Radomski: Oh hi, Jessica. I'm so happy to be here.

Jessica Ortner: I'm very happy you're with us Sandi, because I know that this topic is something that is very close to your heart. Can you tell us why? Sandi Radomski: Oh definitely. Weight has been my main issue of my whole life. I grew up as the fattest kid in school. My parents and my brother weighed over 300 pounds. When I went to school, in graduate school in psychology, it was all about being able to help people with their weight. And when you had asked me to talk about cravings, I sort of chuckled because I have this story about how I had huge cravings, and I just like to tell this story. One time I was flying back from a trip with a man that I was dating and on the airplane, he asked me to marry him. And it's like ­ and I didn't want to marry him. And then I am stuck on this plane. You can't get up. You can't move away. You're stuck in this little place, and all I could think about was cheesecake. And in my head, I just started thinking, when can I have a piece of cheesecake? Where can I find cheesecake? How can I sneak away to a store and get cheesecake? Is there any cheesecake at the airport? And later I remember laughing at myself and seeing where my head went right to the craving instead of dealing with the issue that was going on. Jessica Ortner: Well, with that, when we're learning about tapping, we're learning about tapping on the physical craving and on the emotions behind it. How do we find that balance between focusing on these two issues that are very similar but still different? Sandi Radomski: Well, I think as therapists, most of us are used to looking at emotions as being the driver for cravings. And even as a culture we look at ­

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people in this culture view eating as an emotional issue and that we're somehow morally weak if we give in to eating. But in reality, a lot of our cravings are physiological. And I think it's real important for people to know that. Twin studies have shown that 50% of being overweight is genetic. Therefore 50% of us are dealing with physiological tendencies that are making it harder for us to overcome cravings. And I guess for me, personally, it's always been easier to not give into a temptation when I realize that a lot of it is that my brain is trying to trick me into eating. Jessica Ortner: Well then can you tell us more about how our biology has an impact on the cravings? Sandi Radomski: Well, first of all, most importantly (really) is that cravings have been hard-wired into our genetic makeup... since the beginning of time. Because when we were cave men and we were in the cave, we had to have a lot of craving for food to get us out of there and willing to go into danger and try to find food and hunt food and gather food. So cravings were part of our existence. We needed it to exist. So that was what drove us to go out and hunt. But sometimes, you know, hunters and gatherers, we weren't always successful, so we were also hard-wired to whenever we found any food that was high-calorie or high energy, we were programmed to eat as much of it as possible because we never knew when we were going to find that food again. So here we are hard-wired to eat high-calorie, high-energy foods and yet now we are exposed to food 100% of the time. I mean look at all the food in the grocery store. Just getting gas, there's all this food in the convenience store. Then just our cupboards and our refrigerator... we are bombarded with food all the time, yet we're having to overcome our genetic, biological imprinting to eat all those foods. So that's the first part. The second part is really that the cravings are very related to how our bodies use neurotransmitters. And what's been discovered is that people who are overeating, they are addicted to food. And it's usually a sugartype thing. The same part of their brain lights up, the same part of their brain is stimulated when they eat that as when the drug addict or alcoholic is using their drug of choice. And it's really important because that's the intensity of this craving. It's affecting that same reward and pleasure place of the brain. So that when we see, smell, taste or even think about our food, our brain sends out a lot of dopamine. And the dopamine needs to get into the cells of the brain, but the problem is that for people who are obese, who have food addiction problems, they have a much fewer amount of d2 dopamine receptors and those are the inhibitory receptors that say, Okay, it's okay to calm down now. It's okay to be peaceful. And they have a lot more of the d1 receptors which are the excitatory receptors that go, I've

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got to have it. I've got to have it. I really have all this urgency and agitation and all that to have this substance. So just by seeing or smelling or even thinking about food, these people who have the addiction problem, their brain goes into agitation and stimulation of having to have it. So the obese people have far fewer of the good dopamine receptors than the normal non-addicted person. And in fact, which is really important, the more obese a person, the less of those receptors they have. So those people who have more of an addiction have less of those receptors which means that they are having much more of a struggle than other people have. So they are physiologically up against a much bigger struggle of not giving in to that have to have it. Jessica Ortner: Someone might be listening to this, Sandi, and feel a little discouraged because it seems like when we're dealing with our biology, even though it has to do with us, it seems like something we don't have a lot of control over. So what do you say to people who just say, Well, I'm just going to give up because I'm obviously unlucky and my body's not functioning the way that other people's body functions. Sandi Radomski: Well, there are things that we can do about it, because a lot of this overstimulation of the brain are caused by very specific substances. You know, you're not getting an overstimulation of the brain by eating protein and most starch vegetables. You're not getting it by eating non-carbohydrate foods. There are lots of foods out there that don't stimulate that part of the brain. It's sort of like knowing that some of foods are almost as problematic as alcohol would be for an alcoholic. Jessica Ortner: So then what are these substances or these foods that people have cravings over that can be dangerous? Sandi Radomski: Well, the main cravings that we have are for carbohydrates and sugars. I mean, you don't see many people, like I said, having cravings for protein or most starch vegetables. It's really the carbohydrates, the cookies, the candies, the chocolate, the ice cream, the pasta, the bread... all of which break down to sugar in your brain. And again, this has to do with another neurotransmitter. All of the sugars are really significant. Sugars are a way that serotonin gets into the brain. So that one way, if you're feeling down or depressed is to eat some sugar so you get a hit of serotonin that goes right into the brain. Jessica Ortner:

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What is serotonin?

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Sandi Radomski: Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is involved with us feeling happy or feeling sad. And a lot of our anti-depressants are serotonin-uptake inhibitors kind of thing so that a lot of our anti-depressants are about dealing with serotonin. Jessica Ortner: Okay.

Sandi Radomski: So what we want is you're going to be wanting to make sure you're eating foods that are not causing problems with the neurotransmitters. Jessica Ortner: Can you tell us about salt?

Sandi Radomski: Sure. Salt ­ which seems like a pretty natural substance is actually an addictive substance. And actually, like sugar, it has a lot of the same characteristics. If you're stopping eating a lot of sugar, you'll actually get withdrawal symptoms. It's hard to control the amount of salt you're eating and a lot of people have a lot of difficulty stopping eating salt, even when they know it's hurting their health. Jessica Ortner: That's interesting. A lot of the foods that are bad for us are formulated to be addicting. For example, Coca Cola has salt in it which makes you thirsty for more Coke. So what power do we have if a lot of these big kind of brands of food are formulated to be addicting? Sandi Radomski: Well, I don't know that you're going to want to hear my answer, but I would say to eat as naturally as possible. Because if you're eating natural foods, you're not eating stuff that they put addictive substances in. The food industry is designed to sell food, and so they're going to put whatever in that's going to make you want to have it more. So if you can eat more naturally, even if it's fun foods that are... taste good, the more natural you can eat, the less likely you're going to have those added cravings. Jessica Ortner: We also get bombarded by advertisements of different foods that are addictive. So what role does that play, and what can we do about it? Sandi Radomski: Well, obviously the ads are designed to sell food and they're really good at it. And what I talk to people about is just being aware... it's just awareness of what's going on. So if you see a commercial and all of a sudden you feel like you have to run out and get a McDonald's burger because it looked so good on television, you really could step back and laugh and say, Look what my brain is making me do right now. And when you see those advertisements, they're a really good time to tap on it. And we'll be doing some tapping a little later on, specifically on some of those pictures.

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So when you see the advertisement, you can use it to your advantage. Jessica Ortner: gets it started? Are there certain things that actually stimulate the craving that

Sandi Radomski: Well, so many things can get it started, unfortunately. The sight of the food can do it. The smell. The taste. But even thinking about the food can get a craving going. And even the environments where you normally have that food can stimulate a craving, because the brain reacts as though you're eating it, even if you're just seeing it or thinking about it. My father used to always have this ­ used to say ­ he was diabetic, and he used to say his blood sugar would go up if he just walked past the bakery. And now I realize he probably was right. I mean, if he smelled it and saw the pastries, his blood sugar probably did. Jessica Ortner: That's so interesting. Sandi, what do you say to someone who knows they should get rid of a craving but they get so much enjoyment from that food that they don't want to let go of it? Sandi Radomski: What I talk to people about is looking at the enjoyment when they're eating it and then how they feel afterwards. Because people can say, Oh, I really want it. I really want it. And they eat it and they may really love it when they're eating it, but then afterwards, are they feeling regret? Are they annoyed with themselves? Are they feeling like a failure? Are they feeling like they didn't stick with their plan of what they set out to do? So we start looking at the consequences of the behavior and see if it's a balance ­ if they really still feel like the pleasure was so much greater. Because usually the consequences last a lot longer. Jessica Ortner: Yeah. That's very true. Can you share with us a story or an example of how someone's relationship with food changed when they tapped on a craving? Sandi Radomski: Sure, sure. Basically what I feel ­ what I'm looking for is for the person to no longer have that I have to have it urgency. Because when you have that I have to have it, it's really hard to use your rational mind. When you're no longer in that state of I have to have it, you can step back and say, No. I really had planned just to eat this. And right now when you ask that question, I'm thinking of a person I'm working with right now, who weighs in at the high 300's, I think. And she has been in inpatient programs. She's been in every diet thing, you know, OA, everything that she... every kind of diet kind of thing. And what's happened right now, and I'm so excited is that she's now able to get her work, which is so unfair to people, but they have baskets of candies and goodies just laying out all the time. She has to walk past them all the time. And she says she

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can now walk past them without giving in to the cravings. And also at their work, they have these parties where they have ­ like they had a breakfast and they brought in every gooey pastry breakfast, you know, pancakes, muffins, cakes, cookies, everything. And she went to the breakfast and brought her own food and ate the breakfast and enjoyed the company and didn't feel pulled to eat those things. So I'm thrilled about that. Jessica Ortner: That is fantastic. Wow! Now, if someone does tapping on a craving, does that mean that they never have the craving, that they never have a piece of chocolate cake? Sandi Radomski: Well, now actually, when we're... because that feels really bad. It feels such deprivation, so a lot of when we're doing the tapping, the phrasing I use is often is, I can pass it by for now. You'll see that when we're tapping later on actual specific things. We're passing it by for now. Because to say to someone they will never, ever, ever have that, it just feels too daunting. And we're just going to almost do a step by ­ you know, sort of like the 12-step program, one day at a time. We're doing a one day at a time here. Jessica Ortner: Mm-hmm. So then when should someone tap on a craving? Do we tap when we actually have the craving or before it even starts? Sandi Radomski: Well, it's always good to do things in prevention. And since your body doesn't know if you're just thinking about it or if you're eating it, you really have the opportunity to tap on it before. Because you can create that image of seeing that food before you're exposed to it. So it always is better to do prevention. For example, if you know you're going to a buffet, you know you're going to a holiday party, you know you're going out to a restaurant that has a beautiful basket of bread sitting on the table... you can do your tapping prior to that in preparation. And then, obviously, if there's a time when you're exposed to a situation where there are things that you're craving or really wanting, you can tap there. I have people ­ you can tap in your imagination or, I always tell people you can always go to the ladies' room or the men's room and do your tapping. Jessica Ortner: That makes sense. Well, I'd love to give people an experience of the tapping. So can we do some tapping, and where's the best place to start? Sandi Radomski: Okay. Well, I just want to start with really general and about the brain, because I think it's important for us to talk about some of the physiological reaction. And really the person I was telling you about that's having such success

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right now, she had the success when we started working with more of this brain agitation and the urgency from the brain directly. So that's why I want to start there. What I want to start, and I'm assuming most people know the tapping sequence and everything. Jessica Ortner: Yeah. They know the tapping sequence, so the listeners and I will both tap along with you. Sandi Radomski: Okay, good. Why don't we just start tapping on the karate chop place. And we're going to do this three times. KARATE CHOP POINT: Even though my brain is over-stimulated By the sight, smell or thought Of my addictive foods I no longer need to act on these impulses. [Good.] Even though my brain is over-stimulated By the sight, smell or thought Of my addictive foods, I no longer need to act on these impulses. Even though my brain is over-stimulated By the sight, smell or thought Of my addictive foods, I no longer need to act on these impulses. [Good. So now I want you to go to the eyebrow.] EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: Sight, smell, thought of that food. Sight, smell, thought of my favorite food. Sight, smell, thought of my addictive food. Sight, smell, thought of my treats. Sight, smell, thought of my problem foods. Sight, smell, thought of my have to have foods. Sight, smell, thought of those foods. Sight, smell, thought of that food. Good. And so now I just want you to take a breath. And we'll do another round of tapping.

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Jessica Ortner: Now Sandi, as we're doing this tapping, should we all be focusing on that one particular food? Sandi Radomski: We certainly can. And then later, we'll actually do it with a concrete food. But whatever food comes to mind, that would be a good thing, yes. Jessica Ortner: Sandi Radomski: EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: Okay. Okay. And then on the eyebrow.

I no longer need to act on these impulses. My thoughts no longer need to control me. I no longer need to act on these impulses. I can stay in control. I no longer need to act on these impulses. My senses no longer need to control me. I no longer need to feel driven to consume them. I no longer need to act on these impulses.

Good. And so just take a breath [Both breathing deeply] See how that feels. Okay. So what I was going to go on to is specifically targeting the agitation that happens when the urge begins, because that agitation is what drives us. Jessica Ortner: Yes.

Sandi Radomski: You know, you're sitting there and you're doing fine and you're just hanging out and all of a sudden, for some reason, the thought flitters through your mind, or you walk past something or the T.V. has an image on it and suddenly you're driven, you're agitated. The thought keeps going ­ cycling ­ over and over again. There's a candy in the cupboard or there's a piece of pie in the refrigerator or Oh, I could go down to the store and get this. And it's that agitation that drives us. So one of the things we can do to help us with our physiology is keeping ourselves calm. Jessica Ortner: Sandi Radomski: Okay. So that's what I was going to tap on now.

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Jessica Ortner:

Okay. Yes please.

Sandi Radomski: Okay. So again, all of these, I guess, would be good to - whatever images of food that you have that drive you, that give you that agitation, you can think about it right now. So, KARATE CHOP POINT: Even though I have thoughts and images of food, I can stay poised and calm. (Good.) Even though I have thoughts and images of food, I can stay poised and calm. Even though I have images and thoughts of food, I can stay poised and calm. (Good. And then at the eyebrow) EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: Thoughts of food. Images of food. Smells of food. Taste of food. Beliefs about food. Memories of food. Thoughts of food. Connections with food. Good. So now let's take a breath and we'll continue tapping. I'm going to go back to the eyebrow. EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: I can stay poised and calm. I can stay peaceful. I can stay relaxed. I can stay in control. I am poised. I am calm. It is possible to stay poised and calm. I choose to stay poised and calm. Good. Just take a breath. Jessica Ortner: (breathing loudly) Fantastic. And that is so true how when the craving comes, it takes over your whole body and you feel so agitated.

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Sandi Radomski: Jessica Ortner:

Right, right. Definitely been there. Yeah.

Sandi Radomski: Right. And that agitation ­ it's almost like ­ I know I've been in a place where I've said, I might as well just give in and have this. I'm going to be like this all night. So if there's a way for you to know that you can calm yourself down, even when that thought has come through, that that would be helpful. Jessica Ortner: Right. When we think about the craving, we often think that that food is going to give us so much pleasure... that it's this huge luxury. And then when we eat it, we usually feel horrible about it. Sandi Radomski: Mm-hmm.

Jessica Ortner: So how can we do tapping on this belief that it's going to give us so much pleasure? Sandi Radomski: Well, I think we can go directly for that because at the time, it really is a false belief that it's going to give us that much pleasure. Because if you weigh the momentary pleasure compared with your feelings about yourself afterward, there's no equivalency. Jessica Ortner: Right.

Sandi Radomski: I could feel bad for a whole work over something that I did where the pleasure was really momentary. Jessica Ortner: That's very true. Yeah. I'd love to do some tapping on this.

Sandi Radomski: Yeah. That would be great. I remember times when I would say, I can't believe I ate that whole thing. I mean, I just ate a whole cake or a bag of cookies or something. And at the time it seemed Oh it's so wonderful. But then the regret and remorse is palpable. Jessica Ortner: Because what's funny is in the moment, you do feel like you're taking care of yourself, like you're rewarding yourself. You're giving yourself something so good. And that's what's really tricky about it. Sandi Radomski: It's very tricky. And the whole thing is that food itself is so much trickier than other addictions, because with other addictions you just say abstinence, I can't have this. But food is always saying, which food and when? Jessica Ortner: Yeah.

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Sandi Radomski: You know? Making a decision. And it's very hard because the same brain that's stimulating you to want to have that food is the brain that has to say, No, this isn't probably a good choice. So this tapping we're going to do next to help with knowing that, really getting it on a body level that, what you're avoiding is the guilt and the remorse and that those emotions are also connected with the food ­ not just the pleasure ­ that the guilt, the remorse, the anger at yourself is connected with the food. So let's make a better choice. Jessica Ortner: Sandi Radomski: Yeah. Okay. So let's go to the karate chop place.

KARATE CHOP POINT: Even though I believe that food will give me Pleasure, joy, peace and enjoyment, I choose to remember That I will instead feel guilty Agitated, ashamed and disgusted. (Good.) Even though I believe that food will give me pleasure, joy and peace, I choose to remember That I will instead Feel guilty, agitated, ashamed and disgusted. (Okay) Even though I believe that food will give me Pleasure, joy, peace, and enjoyment I choose to remember That I will instead feel guilty, agitated, ashamed and disgusted. (Good.) EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: False belief of pleasure from food. False belief of joy from food False belief of peace from food. False belief of enjoyment from food. False belief of grounding from food. False belief of love from food. False belief of connection from food. False belief of happiness from food.

Good. And let's take a breath. And now we'll continue. EB: SE: I choose to avoid the regret. I choose to avoid the guilt.

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UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH:

I choose to avoid the agitation I choose to avoid the shame. I choose to avoid the disgust. I choose to avoid the embarrassment. I choose to avoid the anger at myself. I choose to avoid the heartache.

(Breathing deeply with Jessica.) Jessica Ortner: Oooh. That is fantastic because it's so right on. I feel like we're really getting to the root here. Sandi Radomski: Right. Right. And whenever I say that heartache, I always get such a feeling because I think all of us can remember the times when we had heartache when we gave into things that we didn't really want to. Jessica Ortner: Yeah. That is so true. (deep sigh) So I'd love to stay with this momentum and continue tapping. So where can we move from here? What else can we tap on? Sandi Radomski: Well, I'd like to do a tapping that goes directly to how our brain uses our neurotransmitters. Jessica Ortner: Okay.

Sandi Radomski: And I think it would be helpful. And again, this was really helpful with the person whom I'm working with right now. So we're going to work directly with how the food or the sight of food causes a brain response. So that it no longer needs to be over-stimulated by the food or the environment in which food is eaten. So let's just go directly for that because I think this is not our normal tapping. So I think it would be helpful for everybody. Jessica Ortner: Sandi Radomski: Okay. Okay.

KARATE CHOP POINT: Even though I see, smell or think about food, My body knows how To have a normal release and reaction to dopamine. (Good.) Even though I see, smell, or think about food,

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My body knows how to have a normal release And reaction to dopamine. Even though I see, smell, or think about food, My body knows how To have a normal release and reaction to dopamine. EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: The sight of food. The smell of food. The taste of food. The thought of food. The places with food. The grocery store. The convenience store. Food at a restaurant. Good. And we'll take a breath. Good. And now we'll start at the eyebrow again. EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: I can have a normal release of dopamine. I can have a normal reaction to dopamine. I can have the normal number of dopamine receptors. I now choose to have a normal release of dopamine. I now choose to have a normal reaction to dopamine. I now choose to have the normal number of dopamine receptors. My brain can have a normal response. My brain can have a non-addictive response. Good. And I know some of you are thinking, Well how can I affect this with the tapping? But all of us have been able to affect change in back pain, headaches, physiological things that are going on. I've been able to help people with infections and things that you wouldn't normally think tapping can work with. So I believe that tapping can have a great response. Jessica Ortner: working? And how can we figure out whether this tapping protocol is

Sandi Radomski: Well, it's all in how you're reacting to the world. You know? If you don't have as much of that agitated, I have to have it feeling, it's working. Jessica Ortner: That's fantastic. Well I'd love to move on and do some tapping on targeting the actual craving. Sandi Radomski: Yes. I would love that. So I would like people to pause the tape for a moment...

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Jessica Ortner:

Yeah.

Sandi Radomski: And then be able to go ­ and I'd like you actually get some concrete, some real food... some food that you might be drawn to eat. And if you can't find the food, just find some pictures of food so you can have it right in front of you, so you can see the change when we're tapping for it. So I'd like you to get one or two foods. And you may want to get them, if you can, in the same category. Just so ­ like if there are two kinds of bread things, two kinds of cookie things ­ only because tapping can generalize to more than one item. Jessica Ortner: Okay.

Sandi Radomski Okay. So now that you have the foods in front of you, what I want you to do is now rate your urge to eat that food on a scale of zero to ten. Ten being you just have to have it. Now we're going to tap to reduce this craving. And you'll see that I'm using the phrase, I can pass it by for now. And, like we talked about it earlier, I do this so that it feels more attainable to pass it by at this time. And not feel like you're going to have to avoid it forever. So once again, it's like the One Day at a Time approach. So we've got the food in front of you and we're just going to do the tapping. And this is something that you can do for yourself for the foods that are in your house, the foods that come in pictures in the magazines, the foods that are on television, the foods that are at the buffet... you can use this technique very directly in helping you to be able to avoid these cravings. And what happens is that they do generalize. So that if you do several types of cookies, you're less likely to be drawn to other cookies. And then cookies kind of generalize to cakes, and it sort of broadens so that all of your problem areas can be taken care of. Jessica Ortner: That's great.

Sandi Radomski: So as you're looking at the food... So continue to look at the food while we're doing this. I want you to tap on the karate chop place. KARATE CHOP POINT: Even though I crave this food. I can pass it by for now. Even though I crave this food,

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I can pass it by for now. Even though I crave this food, I can pass it by for now. EB: SE: UE: UN: CP: CB: UA: TH: I can pass it by for now. I choose to pass it by for now. It is possible to pass it by for now. I deserve to pass it by for now. I am willing to pass it by for now. I can pass it by for now. I choose to pass it by for now. I am willing to pass it by for now. Good. So now what I'd like you to do is look at the food as you're continuing to, and now re-rate your cravings for that food. Notice if it's gone up, stayed the same or gone down. And then we can do it again. Jessica Ortner: Now what happens if someone begins to tap and as they're saying, I can pass it by for now, they have that little voice in the back of their head going No! I can't. I don't want to. Sandi Radomski: Okay. Then you can always tap for that:

Even though I have this voice inside me that's saying no,no, no I can't give it up, I can pass it by for now. It's just for this moment. I can pass it by. To make it concrete. Can you do it for this moment? Because while they're tapping, they're already passing it by in that moment. To just know they can extend that. Jessica Ortner: Right.

Sandi Radomski: As we're just doing this, what came to me is to be able to tap on This is just food. Jessica Ortner: Yeah.

Sandi Radomski: You know? This is just food. It's not love. It's not connection. It's not the Savior. It's just food. Jessica Ortner: Oh. So if someone still feels that craving for the food they have in front of them, can they continue to go through the same tapping rounds?

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Sandi Radomski ­ Cravings Continued

Sandi Radomski: They can continue to do it as many times as they want. I would suggest if you're saying, if someone's saying, I don't know if I can do this, one of the things you may want to do is, if it's something you're craving really, really a lot, is when you first start tapping on it, have it a little farther away from you and then tap the cravings down and then bring it closer and closer to you so then you can actually have it really close to you and be able to have no draw to have to have it. Jessica Ortner: Hmmm. That's a great tip. Now as we wrap up here and people move forward with the intention to take control of their cravings, what are some tips you'd like to leave our listeners with? Sandi Radomski: Well, doing this kind of tapping for cravings, for the cravings before they happen is really essential. We're talking about how the brain, just thinking about a food, it thinks you're actually eating it and makes changes, but also we can use that to our advantage. We can use how our brain works to our advantage. Because our bodies don't know if you're really doing something in imagination or if you're really doing it in actuality. For example, every time you tap in, I can pass it by for now, your body believes you've been able to pass it by. It believes that you have now created a habit of not having to have it. So every time you experience sitting in your living room tapping and saying you can pass it by and you're able to look at that picture and say, This no longer is drawing me. Your body believes that in actuality you were able to pass it by when it was in front of you. You're using the brain now to your advantage. So as much tapping as you can do in preparation would really be helpful. And in this way, and also tapping for the things that we were doing about the agitation and also for the dopamine because the dopamine's a lot of what causes that agitation. The more you can do that tapping ahead of the craving, you're going to be in a much better place. And I truly believe that our cravings for food no longer need to rule our lives. Because I know that that's where I was before and that's not where I am now. So I truly believe that the tapping can calm that urgency; can calm that have to have it feeling and help you take back control of your life. Jessica Ortner: Sandi, it's been incredibly insightful. I've enjoyed it so much. Thank you for this interview. Sandi Radomski: Oh. You're very welcome. This was fun.

© 2011 Tapping World Summit

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