Read Microsoft PowerPoint - Expanding ExpressionTM 2nd edition 08- handouts- tx.pptx text version

The Session at a Glance

Literature Review Introduction of the Expanding Expression Tool General Descriptions Group Activity I Using the EET for Therapy and Whole Group Lessons Group Activity II and Discussion Using the EET for Describing People Activity IV Tying into the Curriculum Summary/Questions and Answers

Expanding ExpressionTM

A multisensory tool for oral and written language Sara Smith Friday 4:00-6:00

Before we begin:

Describe/define the following:

Objective:

· To be introduced to and trained on a program that facilitates improvement in your students' oral and written expression · This program...

­ is multisensory ­ targets the way students organize language elements ­ helps students give more detailed descriptions and definitions of items

Outcome of today's presentation

· Learn about a tool that will let you target multiple language areas all at once with your students . · Leave knowing how this program can be used for general descriptions, writing from prior knowledge, and biographies. · Learn how to introduce the program in your therapy sessions, in whole class language lessons, and in your school/district.

Literature Review: Learning

What we've learned about learning...

Learning

· Three basic styles: auditive, visual, and kinesthetic · Taking learning styles into account = multisensory learning experiences to reach more students effectively · `Most students DON'T use strategies that could help them achieve meaningful learning' (Muria, 1994). · "Perhaps more important than any other curriculum content is that which teaches learning strategies." (Robles & Uglem, 2003) WHY?

Robles, Teresita del Rosario Caballero & Uglem, Craig Thomas Chase. 2003. Multisensory Instruction in Foreign Language Education.

· "necessary for educational institutions to provide well-organized learning experiences and simultaneously for the learners to implement a variety of cognitive strategies." (p. 8)

`covers the greatest number of individual preferences'

Robles, Teresita del Rosario Caballero & Uglem, Craig Thomas Chase. 2003. Multisensory Instruction in Foreign Language Education.

Literature Review: The BRAIN

Information enters the brain via the senses

Adapted from David Sousa's Information Processing Model (see bibliography attached)

Central Control Phonological Loop Audio-Visual Sketchpad

comes in as electrical impulses

The thalamus decides whether the information is important based on past experiences

Info enters via the senses

Sensory Filter

Immediat e Memory

Working Memory

Long Term Memory

The Brain and Learning

stimulus starts the process processing of stimulus memory potential arises

Robles, Teresita del Rosario Caballero & Uglem, Craig Thomas Chase. 2003. Multisensory Instruction in Foreign Language Education.

The Brain and Learning

· According to Robles et al.,

­ Teacher talks, student listens = get to only 20% of students (auditive) ­ 80% of students learn under a visual or kinesthetic style (Tileston, op.cit). ­ Learning STRATEGIES is highly transferable and independent of content ­ `For effective learning, we must arouse as many sensations as possible. This not only stimulates the brain, but also assures retrieval of information'.

Literature Review: Defining

Defining Words

· The ability to define words is important for "effective spoken and written communication in literate contexts...[such as] technical reports, informative articles, and persuasive essays. Skill in word definition is important also because it is closely associated with measures of academic achievement, verbal ability and intellectual performance in school age children and adolescents" (pp. ) · Exposure to word definitions: discussions with teachers, reading textbooks, consulting dictionaries, etc.

Nippold, Mariyn A; Hegel, Susan L. Sohlberg, McKay Moore Schwarz, Lisa E. (1999). Defining abstract entities: Development in pre-adolescents, adolescents, and young adults. Journal of Speech, Langauge, & Hearing Research, V42n2, 473-481.

What we've learned about defining words...

Defining Words

· Common type of definition:

­ Aristotelian style

Our Assessments vs. Our Studies

· Adapted from:

X is a Y that Z

word defined superordinate category term 1 or more characteristics

Nippold, M (1995). School-Age Children and Adolescents: Norms for Word Definition, Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 26, 320-325.

Both show improvement with increasing age Differences in types of words Differences in scoring procedures

Nippold, Mariyn A; Hegel, Susan L. Sohlberg, McKay Moore Schwarz, Lisa E. (1999). Defining abstract entities: Development in pre-adolescents, adolescents, and young adults. Journal of Speech, Language, & Hearing Research, V42n2, 473-481.

Main considerations from the literature:

· Multisensory learning experiences are important for reaching all of our students. · Teaching strategies makes learning highly transferable. · Aristotelian style for defining entities is preferred.

EET and Defining Words

· The EET is a multisensory approach for defining and describing entities. · Students learn to provide Aristotelian definitions including a superordinate category term plus 5-6 other characteristics. · When students use the EET, they will automatically include all language elements: group, function, appearance, composition, parts, and location. · It is used for both oral and written expression. · The program can be used with students of any age and a variety of ability levels. · This technique will come quickly and effortlessly to most students.

Bill Tithof- Age 5

BASELINE

USING THE EET First Session: 45 min.

USING THE EET First Session: 45 min.

Here is how Diane Brown, Art Teacher at Kolb Elementary, applies the EET to studying artwork:

Here is how Lori France, a content coach, applies the EET to studying math:

Let's use Eetchy to see if we can dig a little deeper into a vertex. · Geometry Group · a point in common to two or more sides · two rays that come together to form the vertex · it comes from the intersection of two or more sides · points and sides · you would find it at the intersection of two or more sides such as the spine of a book, compass, or a stapler · I know that (students will give a variety of answers.)

· Art Appreciation-D.E.W.

· Green-group: what kind of art is it (painting, pottery) · Blue-do: what are the people doing or what do you do with the object? · What does it look like: How does the art make you feel and why (colors, actions of people) · What is it made of: paint, clay, rock, marble? · Pink-parts: the items or parts in the picture. · White-where: Where does it take place or where would you use it? · Anything else you can say?

Time to reflect...

· Look back at initial

descriptions. Did you remember to include the category, function, appearance, composition, parts, and location?

CONTENTS OF KIT:

Group Activity 1/Analyze Student Samples

· Practice general descriptions using the items on your table. (Take baseline, practice with objects, take data) · The person describing should use the strand while he or she is describing. · Other members of your group can add information that the describing person may not have thought of. · Note: If you are describing an animal, we often skip "what is it made of?"

How to begin using the EET in therapy and/or for whole class language lessons: · Take a baseline. (see student data sheet) · Introduce the EET using a common item or object. · Students practice reciting the symbols · Have the students use the EET to describe an object or item. · Take data after using the EET and compare your data with the baseline information.

How to continue to support the strategy...

· Model, model, model! · If a student is having difficulty with a particular language element, complete practice worksheets or other related language activities.

How to continue to support the strategy...

· Games and activities to reinforce their skills...

­ secret object guessing game ­ dice game ­ show and tell

How to continue to support the strategy...

· For written expression:

­ Students use stickers to complete writing assignments. This allows them to make sure they are including each language element. It facilitates expanding expression from the sentence to paragraph to multi-paragraph level. ­ Students complete pre-writing organizers. This provides structure and also discourages plagiarism.

1. 2. 3. 4.

Complete writing using stickers Cut apart Re-arrange their sentences Write their paragraph

Group Activity 2

· Complete a written description of the item in the bag. · Complete this task as a group. · SHHHH....You will be reading your descriptions for other groups to guess your object. · Have fun! Be creative!

Similarities & Differences

· You can also use the EET for similarities and differences (compare and contrast) · How to organize · Use notes to discuss or write separate paragraphs on similarities and then differences

WRITING FROM PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

DO NOT PROCEED UNTIL STUDENTS BECOME VERY FAMILIAR WITH COMPLETING GENERAL DESCRIPTIONS USING THE EET.

See page 131 in your EET kit manual for prompts.

Writing from Prior Knowledge K-8

Domain/Grade

Writing Process K-8 Writing Process K-8 Writing Process K-8 Speaking K-4 and 6-8

Grade Level Content Expectation

Group Do

Students will set a purpose, consider audience...when writing a narrative or informational piece. Students will apply a variety of pre-writing strategies for both narrative and informational writing. Students will revise drafts based on constructive and specific oral and written responses to writing... Students will plan and deliver presentations using effective informational organizational pattern Secondary GLCE to target during lessons Students will proofread and edit writing... Students will exhibit personal style and voice to enhance the written message... Students will write neat and legibly... Students will be enthusiastic about writing and learning to write.

Domain/Grade

Writing Process K-8 Writing Process K-8 Handwriting K-8 Writing Attitude K-8

Maximum modeling moving toward independent note taking and writing Day

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 and 6

Materials

EET Stickers, lined paper for each student, pencils, Writing from Prior Knowledge Prompt Students' notes, EET Steppers, pencils One of your Students' notes (write them on board), dry erase/Elmo/chalkboard

Made of

Students' notes, lined paper, pencils, thesaurus or word choice notebooks (explained below) Page 141 from the EET manual printed and laminated for each student, editing pen, suggestion sheet, paper, pencils

See attached sheets for parts/procedures for each day

W.GN.(00-08).01, W.PR.(00-08).01, W.PR.(00-08).02, W.PR.(00-08).07, W.PS.(00-08).01, W.HW.(00-08).01, W.AT.(00-08).01 Where

Parts Where

Students will be assessed using the MEAP rubric or rubric in the EET manual

?

Part 1

Part 2

EET stickers, writing from prior knowledge prompt card, prompt to write about, paper, pencils

EET Steppers, writing from prior knowledge prompt card, notes, pencils

Part 3

Part 4

writing from prior knowledge prompt card, notes, pencils, other resources (dictionary, thesaurus, etc.)

Page 141 from the EET manual printed and laminated for each student, editing pen, rough drafts, suggestion sheet

Part 4

Final Drafts, praise for outstanding pieces or pieces that show improvement

Activity

DESCRIBING PEOPLE

· Become familiar with the Biography/Autobiography prompt by completing card sort activity.

See page 133 in your EET kit manual for prompts.

This sample came from a teacher who was using the EET to describe a character the class was reading about. Here is one student's organizer.

Instructional Points

· Once the EET is learned, there are still important areas that need to be taught. A few of the instructional points follow.

TRANSITIONS

ORGANIZATION

Initially, students will produce oral or written descriptions that follow the EET icons one by one (i.e., green-group followed by blue-do). Eventually, you discuss which order the information should be presented. (Having

students take notes on sticky notes and then re-arranging those notes has been suggested as one way of teaching this).

Once students become comfortable using the EET to describe items or situations, it is time to teach them to develop smooth transitions between topics.

Expanding the Program

Carry-over/Internalization

· From therapy to school to district, across grade levels

­ In-service/PD ­ 1 hour sessions with teachers from different grade levels ­ In class language lessons

Repetition and use across many different assignments and learning situations will facilitate carry-over.

Progression- Kindergarten/First

Grade Tasks Mode of Communication Grade

Progression- Second

Tasks Mode of Communication

Kdg

Learn the EET symbols Whole group descriptions that are teacher lead

Oral Oral or written by teacher Oral

2nd

Review the EET symbols

Oral

Whole group descriptions that are teacher lead Oral or written by teacher Review individual descriptions Oral Written, sentence level Written, paragraph level Written by teacher, students dictate orally

1st

Review the EET symbols Whole group descriptions that are teacher lead

Written by teacher, students dictate Oral Written at the word to sentence level

Review individual descriptions Teach individual descriptions, higher level Whole group introduction of writing from prior knowledge

Individual descriptions (show and tell, etc.) Individual descriptions

Progression- Third

Grade Tasks Mode of Communication Grade

Progression- Fourth

Tasks Mode of Communication

3rd

Review the EET symbols Review general descriptions in a whole group Students complete descriptions (games, written assignments, etc.) Complete writing from prior knowledge examples in whole group Students complete writing from prior knowledge (multiple trials) Complete biography example in whole group Students complete biographies/autobiographies

Oral

4th

Oral and written Oral and written

Review the EET symbols

Oral

Review general descriptions in a whole group Oral and written Students complete descriptions (games, written assignments, etc.) Written by teacher as students dictate orally Oral and written Written by teacher as students dictate orally Written, then share orally Students complete writing from prior knowledge (multiple trials) Complete biography example in whole group Students complete biographies/autobiographies Oral and written Written by teacher as students dictate orally Written, then share orally Complete writing from prior knowledge examples in whole group Oral and written Written by teacher as students dictate orally

Progression- Fifth

Grade Tasks Mode of Communication

5th12th

Review the EET symbols Review general descriptions in a whole group

Oral Oral and written

Students complete descriptions (games, written Oral and written assignments, etc.) Complete writing from prior knowledge examples in whole group Students complete writing from prior knowledge (multiple trials) Complete biography example in whole group Students complete biographies/autobiographies Written by teacher as students dictate orally Oral and written Written by teacher as students dictate orally Written, then share orally

Literature Review: 3 styles of learning Multisensory = reach more students Teach strategies- not content specific/transferable Aristotelian definitions are preferred Expanding Expression: General descriptions, writing from prior knowledge, biographies/autobiographies Categorization, functions, appearance, composition, location, associated parts Introducing, baseline, supporting, hierarchical

Reflect: Curriculum relevant practices Targeting written expression Service delivery models Ways targeting semantic language skills Where to begin with EET for tx Language in the classrooms Conclusion: Summary of today's presentation Final Reflection Questions Questions and Answers Evaluation

Bibliography

For more information or seminar related materials, find us at

www.expandingexpression.com or [email protected]

Ehren, B. J. (2000), Maintaining a therapeutic focus and sharing responsibility for student success: keys to in classroom speech-language services. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 31, 219-229. Levine, M. (2002). A Mind at a Time. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster. Nippold, Mariyn A; Hegel, Susan L. Sohlberg, McKay Moore Schwarz, Lisa E. (1999). Defining abstract entities: Development in pre-adolescents, adolescents, and young adults. Journal of Speech, Language, & Hearing Research, V42n2, 473-481. Nippold, M (1995). School-Age Children and Adolescents: Norms for and Hearing Services in Schools, 26, 320-325. Word Definition, Language, Speech,

Robles, Teresita del Rosario Caballero & Uglem, Craig Thomas Chase. 2003. Multisensory Instruction in Foreign Language Education. Sousa, D. (1995). How your brain learns. Reston, VA: NASSP. Tomlinson, C. (1999). The Differentiated Classroom. Alexandria, VA. ASCD.

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