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WORCESTER FOUNDATION f o r BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

Annual Report 2001

OurTime to Lead

Supporting Basic Biomedical Research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

THE WORCESTER FOUNDATION

FOR

BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit

organization internationally recognized for its revolutionary contributions to biology and medicine. Among its best known contributions are the discovery and development of the birth control pill, the pioneering work that made in vitro fertilization possible, and the first systematic study of the anti-tumor actions of tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen drug that has subsequently revolutionized treatment of breast cancer.

Initially an independent research institute, the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research merged with the University of Massachusetts Medical School in 1997. Today, the Worcester Foundation is devoted to the support of basic biomedical research of the combined research enterprise, and to the education and training of tomorrow's scientists.

Pictured here and on front cover: the central staircase in the new research laboratory building

WORCESTER FOUNDATION f o r BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

Annual Report 2001

OurTime to Lead

Supporting Basic Biomedical Research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

M E S S A G E

OurTime to Lead

F R O M T H E recruitment of the best of the best investigators to further the research enterprise-- with more to come; the opening of the research laboratory building, truly a "grand" opening; and the incredible success of the Campaign for Research, marked by the generosity of Jack and Shelley Blais and all of the exceptional donors who have made a commitment to furthering research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Together, we are helping to prove that UMMS can lead the way to biomedical discoveries that will shape the future of health in the 21st century. The excitement derived from this incredible growth is felt by all those who serve on the Worcester Foundation Board of Trustees, and we were pleased to welcome four new trustees in 2001: John W. Bassick, Matthew F. Erskine, Leonard M. DeFino and Celia D. Rumsey. Jack is executive vice president of David Clark Company of Worcester. Matt is managing partner of the Worcester law firm Erskine & Erskine and chairman of the H.Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation, which has established three endowed chairs at UMMS through the Worcester Foundation. Leonard and Celia have become involved through their deep interest and support of the Medical School's stellar diabetes research program. Leonard is president of AJD Holding Company of Cleveland. Celia is a contemporary artist and sculptor in Santa Fe.We look forward to their service. On behalf of the board, I would like to thank those trustees whose dedication to the Worcester Foundation cannot be overstated.As Irwin B. Levitan, PhD, Robert M. Quinlan, MD, and Louise C. Reimer, step down from the board, we are grateful for their keen guidance and fidelity to the mission of the Worcester Foundation during their tenures, and wish them well. In 2001, we were greatly saddened by the passing of Jacob "Jack" Hiatt, once referred to by the Boston Globe as

C H A I R M A N

W

e have much to celebrate as we reflect on the past year: the ongoing

"Worcester's Dream Maker." He served as a trustee of the Worcester Foundation from 1969-87, and then as an honorary trustee until his death in February. Mr. Hiatt's lifelong commitment to the city of Worcester was legendary and was reflected in his overwhelming dedication to the improvement of education and the celebration of the arts.With his passing, Worcester has lost a great philanthropist, and the Worcester Foundation and UMMS a great friend. Another former trustee, Dr. Jim Ebert, and his wife,Alma, were tragically killed in May in a car accident north of their Baltimore home. A leader in the biomedical research community, Jim served with distinction as a trustee from 1986-95. He was a professor of biology at Johns Hopkins University, vice president of the National Academy of Sciences, and previously served as president of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dr. Eliahu Caspi, a principal scientist emeritus of the Worcester Foundation, and well known by many in the Foundation and Worcester communities, died in May. Dr. Caspi made important discoveries in understanding the mechanisms of synthesis of steroid hormones and related biochemical substances. We are honored that his family is establishing a lectureship in his memory, with the first lecture scheduled for May 9, 2002. Dr. Caspi is sorely missed by his friends and colleagues. In November, we lost another esteemed scientist retired from the Worcester Foundation--Dr. Elijah Romanoff. Each of these impressive individuals will be remembered for their foresight in advancing support of biomedical research. In closing, I want to acknowledge my predecessor, Morton H. Sigel, who stepped down after five years as chairman of the Worcester Foundation. It was Mort who led the Foundation's negotiations to merge with UMMS in 1997, resulting in a highly successful collaboration that holds even greater promise for the future. His shoes are certainly large ones to fill, but I look forward to the challenge. With grateful thanks and best wishes,

Christopher W. Bramley

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M E S S A G E

F R O M

T H E

P R E S I D E N T

of biomedical research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. In just 30 years, UMMS has risen to achieve national prominence with our ambitious research enterprise; funding is projected to reach $123 million this year. Ranked second out of 10 Northeast public medical schools in funding from the National Institutes of Health--265 individual awards with 14 program, project and center grants--and an impressive fourth among 30 medical schools founded since 1965, UMMS is on the rise, providing the momentum for the institution to become one of the outstanding research medical schools in the country. In October, a dream was realized on campus with the dedication and opening of the new research laboratory building. In just over two years, the structure was designed and constructed to facilitate the latest in cutting-edge biomedical research. Made possible by the unwavering support of the Worcester Foundation and the UMMS community, the building stands as a symbol of the successful collaboration that has defined the relationship of the two since their merger in 1997. Recognizing that the key to furthering growth is in the recruitment of outstanding scientists, the 360,000-squarefoot facility will house 100 new investigators, of which 30 have already been recruited from some of the most prestigious universities and institutes in the country. These scientists, along with our current accomplished faculty, will undertake research to discover the causes of and cures for the most devastating diseases of our time. They will explore the genetic basis of disease, leading to further understanding of how genes work, and develop gene therapy techniques for the insertion of new genes into cells. They will tackle diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, and embark on new frontiers in immunology. Research programs in neuroscience will be launched, with implications for disorders ranging from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome to Alzheimer's disease and the understanding of the genetics of mental illness. This exciting year also encompassed a series of events and accomplishments celebrating superior science.With the support of a four-year, multi-million dollar grant from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, we implemented the

T

he year 2001 was marked by excitement and anticipation as we ushered in a new era

Program in Chemical Biology and appointed Tariq Rana, PhD, as its first director, who will guide the program in applying the power of chemistry to the molecular basis of disease.We welcomed nationally recognized dermatologist and virologist Elliot Androphy, MD, to the Department of Medicine as the Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research and the Department of Medicine's vice chair for research. Among our ranks, we count two of the most highly cited scientists in the world and three Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators. Our scientists are publishing in the most prestigious journals, including Cell, New England Journal of Medicine, Science and Nature and presenting their research at distinguished conferences around the world. And to bring 2001 to a close, we welcomed four of the country's pre-eminent researchers to this fall's Scientific Symposium, reflecting our highest aspirations for scientific achievement. In the coming year, our priority will be the recruitment of a director for our Cancer Center. I am looking forward to an incredible 2002 for the UMMS research enterprise.

John L. Sullivan, MD Director, Office of Research UMMS Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Medicine

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OurTime to Lead

T H E W O R C E S T E R F O U N D A T I O N B O A R D O F T R U S T E E S

Pictured at the board's Fall 2001 meeting are (seated, left to right, front row): Martin Pollak, Guy Nichols, Diane Dalton, Joan Bok, Christopher Bramley, Dr. H. Brownell Wheeler, Mort Sigel, Rayna Keenan and Mel Cutler. Back row, standing, left to right: Dr. John Sullivan, Dr. Alison Taunton-Rigby, Leonard DeFino, Penelope Rockwell, Warner Fletcher, Dr. Maurice Martel, Matthew Erskine, Robert Schultz, James Harrington, Dr. Edward Bresnick, John Bassick, John Herron Jr., M Howard Jacobson, Grant Winthrop, Dr. Thoru Pederson, UMMS Chancellor and Dean Aaron Lazare, Barbara Greenberg and Robert Freelander.

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he Trustees of the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research,

an organization support-

ing basic biomedical research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, also serve as the lay advisory council for the Medical School's research enterprise. In this role, the trustees act as

counselors to the chancellor/dean and to the director of the Office of Research. Principal responsibilities include providing counsel and advice on matters such as: strategic planning, research affiliations, finance and philanthropy, commercial ventures and intellectual property, and physical plant and special equipment. At the behest of the chancellor/dean, the trustees act to facilitate research programs at the Medical School in light of its mission, goals and objectives.

Officers

Christopher W. Bramley Chairman Martin M. Pollak Vice Chairman John L. Sullivan, MD President Melvin S. Cutler Treasurer Diane G. Dalton Secretary

Matthew F. Erskine, Esq. Managing Partner Erskine & Erskine Worcester, Massachusetts Jack Fishman, PhD Director of Scientific Research Professor of Biochemistry Strang/Cornell University Medical Center New York, New York Warner S. Fletcher, Esq. Director Fletcher, Tilton & Whipple, PC Worcester, Massachusetts I. Robert Freelander Worcester, Massachusetts Susan E. Gotz Worcester, Massachusetts Barbara R. Greenberg Worcester, Massachusetts James H. Harrington Chairman and CEO Dolphin Resource Group, Inc. Worcester, Massachusetts John Herron Jr. New York, New York Prentiss C. Higgins Wellesley, Massachusetts M Howard Jacobson Senior Advisor Bankers Trust Private Advisory Services Westborough, Massachusetts V. Craig Jordan, PhD, DSc Diana, Princess of Wales Professor of Cancer Research Robert H. Lurie Cancer Center Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, Illinois Rayna Keenan Worcester, Massachusetts Nina Joukowsky Köprülü Director Joukowsky Family Foundation New York, New York Maurice H. Martel, DDS Holden, Massachusetts Joseph E. Murray, MD* Emeritus Chief of Surgery Harvard Medical School Emeritus Chief of Plastic Surgery Brigham & Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston, Massachusetts

Guy W. Nichols Newton, Massachusetts O. Nsidinanya Okike, MD Professor of Surgery Vice Chair, Division of Thoracic and Cardiac Surgery University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts Thoru Pederson, PhD Vitold Arnett Professor of Cell Biology Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts Riccardo Pigliucci CEO Discovery Partners International San Diego, California Martin M. Pollak Consultant GP Strategies Corporation New York, New York Penelope B. Rockwell Worcester, Massachusetts Celia D. Rumsey Santa Fe, New Mexico Paul S. Russell, MD John Homans Distinguished Professor of Surgery Harvard Medical School Massachusetts General Hospital Boston, Massachusetts Robert Schultz President Schultz Lubricants, Inc. West Boylston, Massachusetts Morton H. Sigel Chairman of the Board and President Tekscan, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts John L. Sullivan, MD Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Medicine Director, Office of Research University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts Alison Taunton-Rigby, PhD President and CEO Forester Biotech Lincoln, Massachusetts

H. Brownell Wheeler, MD Harry M. Haidak Distinguished Professor of Surgery Emeritus University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts Grant F. Winthrop Partner Milbank Winthrop and Company New York, New York

Honorary Trustees

Étienne-Émile Baulieu, PhD, MD Paris, France Robert A. Bernhard New York, New York Nancy L. R. Bucher, MD Lexington, Massachusetts Jane D. Claflin Boston, Massachusetts Robert Cushman Naples, Florida George R. Dunlop, MD Worcester, Massachusetts Orrie M. Friedman, PhD Brookline, Massachusetts Mahlon Hoagland, MD Thetford, Vermont Thomas R. Mountain, Esq. Worcester, Massachusetts *Nobel laureate

Trustees

John W. Bassick Executive Vice President David Clark Company, Inc. Worcester, Massachusetts Helen H. Beekman New York, New York Robert D. Blute Jr., MD Assistant Professor of Surgery and Interim Chief of Urology University of Massachusetts Medical School Worcester, Massachusetts Joan T. Bok Boston, Massachusetts Christopher W. Bramley President and CEO Banknorth Massachusetts Worcester, Massachusetts Edward Bresnick, PhD Bow, New Hampshire James M. Clark President of the Corporation Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts Melvin S. Cutler Chairman Cutler Associates, Inc. Worcester, Massachusetts Founder and Chairman Madison Bank Palm Harbor, Florida Diane G. Dalton Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts Leonard M. DeFino President AJD Holding Company Cleveland, Ohio

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Campaign

The

· the recruitment of 100 new research faculty; · the construction and outfitting of the new 360,000-square-foot research laboratory building on the Medical School campus; · the enhancement of existing research programs through increased support; · the development of major new research programs in genetics and neurobiology; and · the growth of the endowment to provide a stable base of support for the future of the research enterprise. The following are highlights of the Campaign through 2001:

Campaign is Launched by the Massachusetts AFL-CIO

for Research

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n its role of supporting the research enterprise of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research is helping to lead the Campaign for Research.

The Campaign is the Medical School's first major capital fund-raising effort, with its goal of $38 million aimed to accelerate advances in biomedical research through:

The Campaign began in 1999 with a $5 million pledge by the Massachusetts AFL-CIO to establish the Massachusetts AFL-CIO Cancer Research Center.The center's research programs occupy the fourth floor in the new research laboratory building. The Massachusetts AFL-CIO is completing its pledge through an annual fund-raising walk held each Labor Day; the Walk to Cure Cancer has so far raised $1.5 million toward the goal.

New Research Laboratory Building Opens

Just 30 months from architectural design conception, the new research laboratory building opened in late August 2001. Its 360,000 square feet of space will house the research activities of the Department of Medicine, the Massachusetts AFL-CIO Cancer Research Center, the Program in Gene Function & Expression, the Department of Neurobiology and the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology. The building was dedicated during grand opening events in October 2001, which were capped by a major scientific symposium held on campus.

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The University of Massachusetts received an awe-inspiring gift-- the largest philanthropic donation from an individual in its history-- when Jack and Shelley Blais increased their commitment to the Campaign for Research by $15 million, to total $21 million.

Jack and Shelley Blais' gift of $21 million to the Medical School is the largest gift to the University of Massachusetts in its history. The Blaises are pictured here celebrating the new research building's dedication in October 2001.

Largest Gift in the University's History: $21 million from Jack and Shelley Blais

The University of Massachusetts received an awe-inspiring gift--the largest philanthropic donation from an individual in its history--when Jack and Shelley Blais increased their commitment to the Campaign for Research by $15 million, to total $21 million. Their latest magnificent gift was made during a surprise announcement at the October dinner celebrating the dedication of the research building. The Blaises have directed their gift to name the research building after Chancellor and Dean Aaron Lazare. Mr. Blais remarked at the October dinner: "We have been so impressed with the accomplishments at UMass Medical School under the leadership of Chancellor and Dean Aaron Lazare, that the only thing `wrong' with this beautiful new building is that it doesn't have a name. We want this building to have a name: the Aaron Lazare Medical Research Building." A portion of the Blaises' gift, $5 million, has been directed to name the John H. Pierce Pediatric Research Laboratories, while another portion of their gift, $1 million, is to be used by the chancellor at his discretion. The entrance pavilion in the research building has been named for the Blaises in recognition of their inspiring generosity.

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Newly Named Facilities

Newly Named Endowed Professorships

In appreciation of the generosity of the many leadership and major gifts made thus far to the Campaign for Research, facilities within the research building have been named as follows: Naming of the New Research Laboratory Building in Honor of Chancellor/Dean Aaron Lazare The John H. Pierce Pediatric Cancer Research Laboratories/Peter E. Newburger, MD Suite The Blais Pavilion Jack and Shelley Blais Massachusetts AFL-CIO Cancer Research Center Massachusetts AFL-CIO The DeFeudis Atrium, Levels 1-3 Gene J. and Mary C. DeFeudis The Bruce Pollak Atrium, Levels 4-6 In loving memory by Martin and Ellen Pollak The David L. and Goldie C. Michelson Conference Room Mrs. David L. Michelson Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Board Room Dr. Aaron Lazare in recognition of the WFBR Board of Trustees The Joyce Conference Room Ms. Leni Joyce The Svenson Family Conference Room In loving memory of Polly J. Epstein John and Elinor Svenson The Tara Katherine Bean Conference Room Karen and Robert Bean The Bruce Mannooch Conference Room Anonymous The Booth-Rockwell Conference Room Barbara Allen Booth Penelope B. and Sherburne B. Rockwell Jr. The Housen Research Support Facility Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Housen

Seven positions have been endowed by generous individuals through the Campaign for Research thus far. Endowed positions, awarded to leading scientists in their fields, carry high prestige and visibility within the medical research community and provide their recipients with annual income to help accelerate their cutting-edge research. The newly endowed positions and donors are as follows: Lambi and Sarah Adams Chair in Genetics Mrs. Sarah M. Adams Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research Nathan and Barbara Greenberg Charitable Trust Higgins Family Professorship in Neuroscience The Family of Alice C. and Milton P. Higgins

Gene and Mary DeFeudis in the atrium named in their honor in recognition of their leadership gift for cancer research.

Arthur F and Helen P . . Koskinas Chair in Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Arthur F. and Helen P. Koskinas Gladys Smith Martin Chair in Gastrointestinal Cancer H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation David J. and Barbara D. Milliken Professorship in Preventive Cardiology Barbara D. Milliken The Ellison Foundation Donald and Mary Melville Mr. and Mrs. Bruce S. Phillips Barbara Helen Smith Chair in Preventive and Behavioral Medicine H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation

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Major Support for New Scientist Recruitment

The following individuals have made generous gifts or pledges to support new scientist recruitment, a major initiative of the Campaign for Research: Dr. and Mrs. Robert Blute Jr. Coghlin Electrical Contractors Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cushman Warner and Mary Fletcher Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Mr. and Mrs. James Harrington John Herron Jr. and Julia L. Moore Grant and Hope Winthrop

oratory focuses on three principal areas of cell biology: the mechanism by which viruses infect cells, how certain proteins on the surface of the body's cells stimulate cell growth, and the mechanisms involved in the development of protective immunity. Edward I. Ginns, MD, PhD Professor of Psychiatry Director, Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute Dr. Ginns came to UMMS from the National Institute of Mental Health. His research is focused on inherited disorders affecting the nervous system, with an emphasis on understanding the role of genetic factors in susceptibility to and protection from mental illness. C. Robert Matthews, PhD Chair, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Recruited to UMMS from Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Matthews' research studies the mechanisms by which biological proteins fold into unique shapes--an area of great potential for drug discovery and drug design. Steven M. Reppert, MD Chair, Department of Neurobiology Higgins Family Professor of Neuroscience Dr. Reppert came to UMMS from Harvard Medical School. Disorders of the circadian system include jet lag and chronic conditions such as sleep disorders. Dr. Reppert's research focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock and holds great promise for the development of treatments for a range of disorders.

Research Faculty

Newly Named Endowment Funds

Three newly named endowment funds have thus far been established through the Campaign for Research. The investment income from these endowment funds provides annual support, critically important funding in perpetuity for the purposes designated by the donor(s). The newly endowed funds and their donors are as follows: Elise and Monroe England Endowed Fund for Biomedical Research Elise V and Monroe B. England . Robert M. and Nancy Edman Feldman Fund for Biomedical Research Robert M. and Nancy Edman Feldman Ina R. and Haskell R. Gordon Fund for Biomedical Research Ina R. Gordon in loving memory of Haskell R. Gordon

Newly Recruited Research Faculty

The University of Massachusetts Medical School welcomes the following new members to its research faculty, recruited since January 1, 2000. They are exemplary leaders and scientists destined to help further the Medical School's reputation as one of the leading biomedical research institutions in the country.

Faculty Chairs and Directors

Robert W. Finberg, MD Chair, Department of Medicine Interim Director, Massachusetts AFL-CIO Cancer Research Center Richard M. Haidack Professor of Medicine Recruited to UMMS from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Finberg's research links the mechanisms of infectious disease with the causes of and cures for cancer. His lab-

Elliot J. Androphy, MD Professor and Vice Chair of Research, Department of Medicine Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research From Tufts University School of Medicine, Dr.Androphy is a nationally recognized dermatologist and virologist, dedicated to two areas of research: the viral implications of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the underlying molecular causes of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). Zheng-zheng Bao, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine Recruited to UMMS from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Bao is particularly interested in studying the genetic

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pathways involved in the establishment of neuronal connections and formation of organs such as the heart and brain. Lucio H. Castilla, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology/ Program in Gene Function & Expression From the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Castilla, a Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Scholar, focuses his studies on cancer genetics to develop a better understanding of the genes (and pathways) associated with the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia. Wim E. Crusio, PhD Professor, Department of Psychiatry/Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute Recruited to UMMS from the University René Descartes in Paris, Dr. Crusio investigates the hippocampus area of the brain, which plays an important role in behaviors such as learning and memory, exploration, anxiety and aggression.This brain area has also been implicated in debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's and depression. Patrick Emery, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology Dr. Emery came to UMMS from Brandeis University. Particularly interested in researching circadian and addictive behaviors in the common fruit fly, Dr. Emery and colleagues are working on the premise that discoveries made in this organism may play a crucial role in understanding the human biological clock. Paul D. Gardner, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry/Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute From the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Dr. Gardner's research is focused on gene receptors that have been implicated in a variety of brain processes and pathologies, including learning and memory, aging, nicotine addiction, anxiety, schizophrenia and dementia. Roger D. Johnson, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Cell Biology/ Massachusetts AFL-CIO Cancer Research Center Dr. Johnson was recruited to UMMS from the SloanKettering Institute of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. His lab studies the consequences of genomic instability in the aberrant increase of cancer cells.

William R. Kobertz, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Recruited from Brandeis University, Dr. Kobertz studies the function and modulation of ion channels, the proteins that create electricity within the body that drive the rhythm of the heart, maintenance of arterial tone and insulin release by beta cells in the pancreas. Theodore J. Koh, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine Dr. Koh came to UMMS from Harvard Medical School. His lab is primarily interested in the role of gastrin-- a hormone secreted by the mucosal lining of the stomach and intestines of mammals that is vital to the regular growth and development of the gastrointestinal tract--and its role in the development of stomach and colon cancers. Hong-sheng Li, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology Recruited to UMMS from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Li is seeking to identify novel mechanisms by which calcium regulates neuronal function. An influx of calcium can influence cell proliferation and differentiation in the developing nervous system, while abnormalities in receptor-operated calcium influx can lead to defects in brain development. Haley Melikian, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry/Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute Dr. Melikian came to UMMS from Harvard Medical School. She studies neurotransmitter transporters, an important group of proteins in the brain that soak up the signaling chemicals by which nerve cells communicate. Since a number of psychoactive drugs bind to transporters and block neurotransmitters, findings from Dr. Melikian's studies are likely to shed light on the mechanisms underlying depression and addiction to stimulant drugs. Mary Munson, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Recruited from Princeton University, Dr. Munson's research is focused on structural and biochemical studies of yeast proteins that mediate exocytosis, the process by which vesicles in the cell cytoplasm fuse with the plasma membrane, opening the contents of the vesicles to the outside. Exocytosis is used to release substances, such as hormones or neurotransmitters, from the cell--a process crucial for maintenance of cellular integrity and normal cell growth.

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Tariq Rana, PhD Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Director, Program in Chemical Biology Dr. Rana came to UMMS from the University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. His lab is focused on learning more about the molecular mechanism of Tat function (one of the novel proteins expressed by HIV-1) and developing small molecules to control this replication. He and his colleagues have also pioneered a new field to regulate biological functions through small molecule RNA interactions, research that has broad implications for the design of new therapeutic agents and antibiotics.

Heidi A. Tissenbaum, PhD Assistant Professor, Program in Molecular Medicine/ Program in Gene Function & Expression Recruited from MIT, Dr.Tissenbaum is ultimately concerned with discovering the underlying causes of aging, using the model organism nematode worm, C. elegans, to investigate molecular mechanisms of aging. Scott Waddell, PhD Assistant Professor, Department of Neurobiology Also from MIT, Dr.Waddell researches learning behaviors in the fruit fly and their subsequent relevance to learning behaviors in humans.

Nancy Feldman, Jack and Shelley Blais and Massachusetts AFL-CIO President Robert Haynes are flanked by Chancellor and Dean Aaron Lazare and UMass President William Bulger as they dedicate the new research building.

Thomas Jessell, PhD, lectures at the October 2001 Scientific Symposium.

Nancy Feldman joins hosts Peter Mehegan and Lisa Ling at the Gala kicking off the Campaign for Research.

Nicholas R. Rhind, PhD Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Recruited from the Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Rhind focuses his research on the checkpoints during the regulation of the cell cycle. Checkpoints are mechanisms that cells use to deal with problems such as DNA damage or replication errors--problems that can lead to the development of cancer. Siu Ing The, PhD Assistant Professor, Program in Molecular Medicine/ Program in Gene Function & Expression Dr.The, a Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Scholar, came to UMMS from Harvard Medical School. Using Drosophila (the common fruit fly) as her model organism, she is studying the signaling and distribution mechanisms of specific molecules called "Hedgehog" or Hh proteins, and their impact on normal development and tumorigenesis.

Timothy C. Wang, MD Professor, Department of Medicine Chief, Gastroenterology Division, UMass Memorial Health Care Gladys Smith Martin Chair in Gastrointestinal Cancer Recruited from Harvard Medical School, Dr.Wang's research focuses on the hormone gastrin and its role in the development of stomach and colon cancer. His laboratory has shown that longer, less processed forms of gastrin are important growth factors that contribute to the progression of colon cancer in animal studies. Scot Wolfe, PhD Assistant Professor, Program in Molecular Medicine/ Program in Gene Function & Expression Dr.Wolfe came to UMMS from MIT. His lab is attempting to create proteins that can regulate a single gene of interest inside a cell, ultimately establishing a highly adaptable gene-targeting system. Such proteins are critical as they could be used as tools to study the function of any desired gene.

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Donors to the Campaign for Research

We are deeply grateful to the many donors who have provided generous philanthropic support for medical research through the Campaign for Research (1999-2004). Gifts, pledges and eligible planned gift intentions of $1,000 or more to the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research and the UMass Memorial Foundation for the Campaign for Research through December 15, 2001, are listed below:

DIAMOND

Jack and Shelley Blais Elise V. and Monroe B. England J. Irving and Jane L. England Charitable Trust Elizabeth Taylor Fessenden Foundation Fleet Bank Mr. and Mrs. Warner S. Fletcher Mr. and Mrs. Norton Foxman Mr. and Mrs. I. Robert Freelander Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman New York Foundation for Medical Research Edith C. Gauch Trust Allan S. Goff Foundation Mrs. Ina R. Gordon In loving memory of Haskell R. Gordon Stephen R. Gorfine, MD '78 William P. Haas Trust Francis A. and Jacquelyn H. Harrington Foundation Robert D. Harrington Unitrust The Salah M. Hassanein Foundation John Herron Jr. and Julia Moore Mr. and Mrs. Prentiss C. Higgins Hold Brothers On-Line Investment Services Mr.* and Mrs. Louis C. Iandoli Lionel and Lucile* Laramee Estate of Seville M. Malone Dr. and Mrs. Maurice H. Martel Mrs. Mary McKee Mr. Guy W. Nichols Estate of Ruby Philbrook Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association Polar Beverages Mrs. Joseph H. Quick Raytheon Company Louise C. Riemer Penelope B. and Sherburne B. Rockwell Jr. Blair O. Rogers, MD Lester and Joan Sadowsky The Sea Breeze Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Morton H. Sigel H. Arthur Smith Fund Greater Worcester Community Foundation Estate of Mrs. Robert W. Stoddard John and Lynn Sullivan Estate of Helen Swartz Estate of Julius J. Tegelberg Mr. and Mrs. Steven M. Testa Elliot,* Trish and Daniel Tonna Estate of Helen A. Toombs Mary M. Tse, MD '77 Verizon Grant and Hope Winthrop Worcester Foundation Auxiliary Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Yamin Banknorth Massachusetts Dr. and Mrs. Edward I. Ginns Dr. and Mrs. H. Maurice Goodman Hart Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Allan S. Jacobson James Annenberg Levee Charitable Trust Estate of Anne A. Levine Marois Brothers, Inc. Drs. C. Robert Matthews and Paula-Ann Pricken Dr. Thoru Pederson In honor of Robert Cushman Olive Higgins Prouty Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Rock Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Schechter Dr. Cheryl R. and Mr. Richard A. Scheid Drs. Gary S. and Janet L. Stein Estate of Elizabeth K. Smith

PLATINUM

Anonymous (1) Mrs. Sarah M. Adams Gene J. and Mary C. DeFeudis Nathan and Barbara Greenberg Charitable Trust Arthur F. and Helen P. Koskinas Massachusetts AFL-CIO Dr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Pappas H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation

GOLD

Estate of Kenneth C. Cotton Estate of Alice C. Higgins The Iacocca Foundation Martin M. and Ellen Pollak

SUPPORTERS

Anonymous (1) The Behrakis Foundation Ms. Joan T. Bok The Boston Edison Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Bouley Jr. Louis P. and Linda D. Bregou Christos and Mary Cocaine Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Dix F. Davis Dr. Marianne Felice and Mr. John M. Giles III Dr. and Mrs. Edward G. Fey Drs. Robert W. Finberg and Joyce Fingeroth Mr. and Mrs. Albert Fins Estate of Richard E. Goodwin H & S Bakery, Inc. Aldus C. Higgins Foundation Hyman and Shirley Hill Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Krakoff Mr. and Mrs. Paul LaCamera Mr. and Mrs. John H. Mannen Mr. and Mrs. Tom McPhee Bruce D. Minsky, MD '82 Mary and Richard Myers Robert and Charlene Nemeth Neonatology Associates NSTAR Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Charles Pappas Parthenon Capital Foundation Mr. and Mrs. George Place Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Previte The Rachel Foundation Schwan's Sales Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Mark Logan Shelton Margaret E. Sherman Trust Mr. and Mrs. A. Ledyard Smith Jr. Mr. William Yeager Mr. and Mrs. Armand Yelle * Deceased

SILVER

Anonymous (1) Dr. Vitold Arnett Karen and Robert W. Bean Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Nancy Edman Feldman Simeon J. Fortin Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Housen Ms. Leni Joyce Dr. and Mrs. Aaron Lazare Mrs. David L. Michelson Our Danny Cancer Fund The Rose Family: Ralph and Shirley Rose Sidney and Rosalie Rose Mr. Jon R. Shakour John R. and Elinor Svenson & Family In loving memory of Polly J. Epstein

BRONZE

Anonymous (4) Evelyn Silver Acaso and Eduardo Acaso Mrs. Mary P. Benedict Tina and Seth Bilazarian Dr. and Mrs. Robert D. Blute Jr. Mrs. Howard M. Booth Christopher W. and Charlotte Bramley Bushrod H. Campbell and Adah F. Hall Charity Fund Coghlin Electrical Contractors Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cushman Cutler Associates, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Anthony J. DeFino Mary M. Doyle Mr. Spiro J. Efstathiou In loving memory of John Efstathiou

FRIENDS

Trevor O. and Patricia Kelleher Bartram Estate of Zylpha B. Brown Drs. Michael P. Czech and Silvia Corvera

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Donor Supports

`Remarkable Research'

G

oldie Michelson has devoted much of her life to the theater. In fact, she proudly states that--in addition

to turning 100 on her next birthday--she has "directed plays in virtually every church and school throughout the city, including pageants at the Worcester Art Museum."Yet despite her love of the stage, it was the biomedical research undertaken at UMass Medical School that "directed" Mrs. Michelson as she planned her estate. "My daughter Renee inspired me to make these plans now," explained Mrs. Michelson. "And I thought of research first because if there is anything anybody can do to rid the world of diabetes or heart disease, I think it's wonderful." So, in the summer of 2000, as the structural steel of the new research laboratory building was "topped off," Mrs. Michelson began her relationship with UMass Medical School and the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research--a relationship that would eventually lead to the naming of The David L. and Goldie C. Michelson Conference Room in honor of her planned gift for research."The new building is awesome,"commented Mrs. Michelson."If you stop to think about the 100 or more scientists who will inhabit it, something good will definitely come from their work." Besides her daughter and son-in-law, Renee and Leonard Minsky of Bangor, Maine, Mrs. Michelson counts many muses throughout her life who have inspired her philanthropy. She describes her father, a Russian immigrant and dry goods merchant who initially came to the U.S. to study medicine, as someone who believed that those with means should help others. "He always said that this country had been so good to him; that those of us who are lucky should look out for those who have less." Her father's example shines through not only in Mrs. Michelson's philanthropic support, but also in her advocacy for the newest immigrants to this country. Currently, she teaches English to two international students attending Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is hosting a Vietnamese doctor studying for her board certification to practice in the U.S. She has also helped with the placement of numerous newly arrived scientists and engineers in jobs over the last 20 years. Mrs. Michelson credits friend Rae Budnitz, wife of the late Edward Budnitz, MD, one of the East Coast's first cardiologists and longtime UMass Medical School faculty member, with familiarizing her with the Worcester Foundation's Hudson Hoagland Society. And, she fondly remembers how her engineer husband David introduced her to many of Worcester's top physicians, including Dr. Budnitz, while creating the first non-hospitalaffiliated medical offices throughout the city, the model for today's community-based practices. "A friend of mine told me recently that her little granddaughter, a girl of 12, had gone to see her doctor for a routine physical and found that she had diabetes," noted Mrs. Michelson."If you're blessed with health yourself, it really affects you to hear things like this. The sooner a cure is found, the better. And to think about the remarkable things being done in research; I'm glad to be a part of it." To learn more about how to remember the Worcester Foundation in your will or other estate plans, please contact Mary Flynn Myers at 508-856-1411.

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The in Review

UMMS SCIENTISTS ARE BURROUGHS WELLCOME RECIPIENTS

Year

The Burroughs Wellcome Fund's Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences is one of the field's most competitive and prestigious honors: it provides career development assistance and $500,000 over five years in recognition of outstanding graduate and postgraduate research. In 2001, UMass Medical School recruited two of the year's 23 recipients of the award.William R. Kobertz, PhD, assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology, came to UMMS from Brandeis University, where he studied the structure, function and modulation of ion channels, the proteins that create electricity Heidi Tissenbaum, PhD within the body. Assistant Professor of Molecular Medicine Heidi A. William Kobertz, PhD Tissenbaum, PhD, formerly of MIT and now a member of the Program in Gene Function and Expression, is working to identify molecular mechanisms of aging.

NIH GRANT SUPPORTS GENE FUNCTION AND EXPRESSION RESEARCH

The Program in Gene Function and Expression was the beneficiary in 2001 of a $2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, through the National Center for Research Resources, to construct laboratory space in the new research building that was planned to be "shelled," or initially left unfinished. Directed by Michael R. Green, MD, PhD, professor of molecular medicine and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, the Program in Gene Function and Expression currently consists of five faculty who specialize in diverse areas of genetics, including aging and cancer.

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BRUDNICK INSTITUTE ADVANCES THROUGH RECRUITMENT AND EQUIPMENT

At the Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, led by Director Dr. Edward I. Ginns, investigations into the biological origins of mental illness are advancing through the recruitment of exceptional scientists and the acquisition of state-of-the-art equipment.Wim E. Crusio, PhD, professor of psychiatry and an expert in the hippocampus area of the brain, Paul Gardner, PhD, Haley Melikian, PhD, and Wim E. Crusio, PhD, of the Brudnick Institute was director of research at the University René Descartes before leaving Paris for Worcester. Associate Professor of Psychiatry Paul D. Gardner, PhD, came to UMMS from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where he established a research program on the regulation of receptor genes within the nervous system. After a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, Haley Melikian, PhD, was appointed assistant professor of psychiatry at UMMS; she studies a group of proteins in the brain called neurotransmitter transporters.The Brudnick Institute's purchase of San Diego-based SEQUENOM's MassARRAY system also gives UMMS investigators cutting-edge technology to examine DNA variations in the human genetic code that not only contribute to psychiatric illness, but also to a wide range of additional medical disorders.

UMMS SCIENTISTS PUBLISH IN PRESTIGIOUS JOURNALS

During the summer of 2001, UMMS researchers published significant work in major scientific journals: Craig C. Mello, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and associate professor of molecular medicine, published a paper titled "Genes and Mechanisms Related to RNA Interference Regulate Expression of the Small Temporal RNAs that Control C. elegans Developmental Timing" in the July issue of Cell. Also in Cell, Professor of Molecular Medicine William E.Theurkauf, PhD, published "In Vivo Analysis of Drosophila bicoid mRNA Localization Reveals a Novel Microtubule-Dependent Axis Specification Pathway." Michael R. Green, MD, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and professor of molecular medicine, in an August issue of Science, published "Induction of Apoptosis by a Secreted Lipocalin That is Transcriptionally Regulated by IL-3 Deprivation." And Assistant Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Phillip D. Zamore, PhD, published "A Cellular Function for the RNA-Interference Enzyme Dicer in the Maturation of the let-7 Small Temporal" in an August Science.

Pictured from left: Craig Mello, PhD, William Theurkauf, PhD, Michael Green, MD, PhD, and Phillip Zamore, PhD

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INVESTITURE CELEBRATES NEW ENDOWMENTS THROUGH WFBR

Three endowed professorships and an endowed chair were established at UMass Medical School through the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research in 2001.The Gladys Smith Martin Chair in Gastrointestinal Cancer, established by the H.Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation in honor of Mr. Smith's late sister, was awarded to Professor of Medicine Timothy C.Wang, MD, who is internationally recognized for his study of the hormone gastrin and its role in the development of Gregg McCarty Wang (left) and Timothy Wang with members of the H. Arthur Smith stomach and colon cancer.The Smith Charitable Foundation, trustees Janice and Pamela Martin and Chairman Matthew Erskine, at June 2001 Investiture ceremonies. The Gladys Smith Martin Chair in Charitable Foundation also funded the Gastrointestinal Cancer, held by Dr. Wang, is named in memory of Janice's and Barbara Helen Smith Chair in Preventive Pamela's mother. and Behavioral Medicine, which honors Mr. Smith's cousin; Judith K. Ockene, PhD, professor of medicine, director of the Division of Preventive and Behavioral Medicine and principal investigator of the National Institutes of Health Women's Health Initiative, was invested into the chair.The Higgins Family Professorship in Neuroscience was funded by both the Higgins Charitable Remainder Unitrust, established by Alice C. and Milton P. Higgins II, and the Higgins Family Fund, a permanent endowment fund established by the Higgins family. The professorship, the first endowment for the new Department of Neurobiology, was awarded to Steven M. Reppert, MD, professor and Vivian Sigel (left) and husband Mort Sigel (second from right), immediate past chairman of the Worcester Foundation, at Investiture ceremonies with Nathan and Barbara chair of the department and a leading Greenberg, who established the Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research at UMMS. expert on biological rhythms. Barbara and Nathan Greenberg of Worcester were recognized at the Investiture ceremony for their establishment of the Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research. Elliot J. Androphy, MD, a nationally recognized dermatologist and virologist, has been named the inaugural chair, and will be invested during ceremonies in 2002.

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$6.7M NIH GRANT SUPPORTS CANCER RESEARCH COLLABORATION

A five-year, $6.7 million program grant from the National Institutes of Health in 2001 to the UMass Cancer Center is supporting the efforts of a team of 50 faculty and staff to study the method by which genes are redistributed in the nucleus of a tumor cell. A direct result of successful collaboration among UMMS departments over the past several years, the grant incorporates molecular, cellular and genetic approaches and involves junior and senior investigators with laboratories in every research facility on the Worcester campus.

WFBR TRUSTEE JORDAN RECEIVES HONORARY DEGREE

In recognition of his significant contributions to cancer research,Worcester Foundation Trustee V. Craig Jordan, PhD, DSc, was awarded an honorary degree at UMass Medical School's 2001 Commencement. Thirty years ago, as a visiting research fellow at the former Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Jordan completed his early investigations into the anti-estrogen effects of tamoxifen, the line of research for which he is now renowned. Jordan is the Diana, Princess of Wales Professor of Cancer Research, director of the Lynn Sage Breast Cancer Research Program at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, and professor of cancer pharmacology and biological chemistry at Northwestern University.

Chancellor and Dean Aaron Lazare and Commencement speaker Christine Cassel, MD '76, applaud WFBR trustee and honorary degree recipient V. Craig Jordan, PhD, DSc.

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Each year, nearly 1,000 donors contribute unrestricted support, which is used to assist research investigators

Annual Research

G

Since 1998, a total of 40 investigators have received $1.2 million in ARF funding.The philanthropy provided by the ARF has not only led to some significant discoveries, but has also proven catalytic in obtaining millions of dollars of subsequent extramural funding. The following investigators are recipients of 2000-2001 grants:

Edward I. Ginns, MD, PhD,

The

at the University of Massachusetts Medical School as they pursue promising leads to uncover the causes of devastating illnesses.

Fund

ifts of all sizes are made to the Worcester Foundation through the Annual Research Fund,

which includes a growing leadership donor club, the Hudson Hoagland Society. Each year, nearly 1,000 donors contribute unrestricted support, which funds research scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School as they pursue promising leads to uncover the causes of devastating illnesses.

professor of psychiatry and director, Irving S. and Betty Brudnick Neuropsychiatric Research Institute: Mental Health Wellness Genes: Protection From Manic Depressive Illness. Employing cutting-edge technology to examine DNA from normal individuals versus people suffering from, or genetically predisposed to, manic depressive illness, Dr. Ginns is hoping to identify the genes implicated in this disorder. Once identified, these newly discovered genes can be precisely studied as to their function and dysfunction.

Lawrence J. Hayward, MD, PhD, assistant professor of neurology: Mechanisms of Motor Neuron Degeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Dr. Hayward is examining the process of nerve cell degeneration that typifies diseases like ALS. While such degeneration is the defining attribute of these conditions, it is not completely understood.

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Jean A. King, PhD,

associate professor of psychiatry: Predicting Early Risk For Depression with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Dr. King is using the sophisticated FMRI technology, which can measure the actual biochemical status of cells, particularly their metabolic level and state of intercellular signaling, to develop a database of brain images in a prospective study of the onset of depression. By linking the image database with the subsequent onset of disease, it is hoped that early signposts will be identified that will be highly reliable for anticipating depressive illness.

Kendall L. Knight, PhD,

associate professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology: Defining the Role of the Rad52 Protein in Maintaining the Functional Integrity of the Human Genome. The cells of the body have a remarkable capacity for repairing damage to their DNA. Dr. Knight has been working on a component of the DNA repair equipment of cells, a protein called Rad52 (HsRad52), to determine how this protein collaborates with the rest of the DNA repair machinery, with the goal of developing a deeper understanding of this crucial process.

James F. Paskavitz, MD, assistant professor of neurology: Functional MRI of Executive Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis. Dr. Paskavitz is applying the powerful method of FMRI to develop a database of patient images, through which it will be possible to identify both the most prevalent sites of brain alterations associated with MS, as well as the degree of patient-to-patient variation. The results of this project may offer the managing physician a deeper base of information on the patient, as well as help the family understand and cope with behavioral changes.

Thoru Pederson, PhD,

professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology and the Vitold Arnett Professor of Cell Biology: Hormone Regulation of a Gene Implicated in Human Aging and of Relevance to Stem Cell Therapeutics.This research is aimed at finding better ways to control the production in cells of an enzyme called telomerase, which builds and maintains special protective structures at the two ends of each chromosome (DNA). The project is designed to test a novel idea for inducing cells to make higher levels of telomerase in certain biological situations, potentially including stem cell therapeutics.

German A. Pihan, MD,

assistant professor of pathology: Biology and Genetics of the Reed-Sternberg Cell in Hodgkin's Disease. Dr. Pihan's research focuses on discovering the molecular basis of the genesis of the Reed-Sternberg (RS) cell, the malignant cell in Hodgkin's lymphoma. Using a combination of in vivo microscopy and complementation cloning techniques, he is investigating the mechanism that determines how these cells become multinucleated, which will ultimately lead to more effective and selective drugs against the disease.

professor of neurology and surgery: A Feasibility Test of Stem Cell Therapies. As it has been very difficult to compare the potential of stem cells to incorporate into tissues and repair defects, Dr. Recht has developed a novel assay system in which such cells, harvested from various tissues and ages, can be incorporated into blastocysts, early embryos that have not yet begun to differentiate.With this system, he anticipates the ability to accurately assess these cell types for their potential use in clinical therapeutics.

Lawrence D. Recht, MD,

Maria L. Zapp, PhD, assistant

professor of molecular genetics & microbiology: Development of Novel Assay Systems to Study HCV Replication. With an interest in cellular and viral gene expression, Dr. Zapp is investigating the mechanism of hepatitis C virus replication. Despite the availability of HCV cDNAs, there is no efficient, reproducible in vitro system for studying HCV replication. Dr. Zapp's project is aimed at developing such a system.

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The Hudson Hoagland Society

meeting of the Hudson Hoagland Society, held in June. Before a rapt audience, Buck enthusiastically discussed the ancient art of reed ship construction and his amazing journey from The reed ship, "Viracocha" the coast of Chile to Easter Island, the initial leg of the expedition completed in the spring of 2000. Buck's is the first known reed ship expedition to circumnavigate the globe, supporting the theory that civilizations of antiquity could have crossed ocean expanses in primitive boats. Each spring, the Hudson Hoagland Society convenes to hear from a speaker who embodies the spirit of exploration, the same spirit that drives basic research.The Society, established in 1985, is open to individuals who make annual gifts of $1,000 or more to the Worcester Foundation's Annual Research Fund. Since its inception, the Society has raised over $3 million for scientists pursuing new avenues of inquiry. This spring, the Society will feature oceanographer Robert D. Ballard, PhD, as its speaker at its 17th annual meeting. Renowned for undersea discoveries of shipwrecks, including the Titanic, Bismarck and Lusitania, Dr. Ballard most recently combed the floor of the Black Sea in search of artifacts that would support the theory that a cataclysmic flood struck the region some 7,000 years ago, a possible basis of the biblical story of Noah and his Ark. The Society's membership, which grew by 24 over the last year under the leadership of Dr. Maurice H. Martel of Holden, is guided by executive committee members: John W. Bassick,Tina Bilazarian, Spiro Efstathiou,Warner S. Fletcher, Laura Glazier, Dr. Abraham W. Haddad, Dr. Ralph S. McCracken Jr., Patricia A. Moynihan, Penelope B. Rockwell, Joan Sadowsky, Morton Sigel and Deborah Sloane.

THE HUDSON HOAGLAND SOCIETY

(JULY 1, 2000 TO NOVEMBER 30, 2001) Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Bafaro Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bassick Trevor O. and Patricia Kelleher Bartram Helen and William Beekman Mrs. Rosamond E. Bennett Allen D. and Sarah G. Berry Windsor and Jacquelyn Bigelow Tina and Seth Bilazarian Mr. and Mrs. George S. Bissell Mr. and Mrs. Kyver M. Blumstein Dr. and Mrs. Robert D. Blute Jr. Ms. Joan T. Bok Mr. George F. Booth II Mr. Robert W. Booth Ms. Bari Boyer and Dr. Marshall Katzen Christopher W. and Charlotte Bramley Dr. and Mrs. Edward Bresnick Dr. Jerry R. Brooks Neal C. and Agneta Brown Dr. Edward* and Rebecca Budnitz Dr. Gerald J. Carroll Zelda and Samuel Chafetz Henry J. and Elaine Ciborowski Christos and Mary T. Cocaine P. Kevin and Clare K. Condron Rebecca B. Crocker Jeanne Y. Curtis Robert and Mary S. Cushman Dr. and Mrs. Mark Cutler Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Cutler Drs. Michael P. Czech and Silvia Corvera Mr. and Mrs. David F. Dalton Mr. and Mrs. Bruce G. Daniels Theodore* and Marjorie Deitz Maureen and John C. DeMarco Louise I. Doyle Mary M. Doyle Dr.* and Mrs.* James D. Ebert Mr. Spiro J. Efstathiou In memory of John Efstathiou Elise V. and Monroe B. England Mr. Elisha W. Erb Matthew F. and Carolyn W. Erskine Mr. Allan Farber Mrs. Merrill Farber Barbara Elliott Fargo Mrs. Beatrice A. Feingold Nancy Edman Feldman Drs. Robert W. Finberg and Joyce Fingeroth Kathryn M. Fisk John and Virginia Flagg Warner S. and Mary Fletcher Edward and Joyce Flynn Dr. and Mrs. Judah Folkman Domenic and Patricia Fratantonio

E

xplorer Phil Buck shared the details of his planned 10-year expedition to traverse the world's oceans at the 16th annual

DONORS OF $10,000 OR MORE

Dr. Thomas J. and Adelaide S. Vander Salm

DONORS OF $5,000 TO $9,999

Anonymous James M. and Ruth Clark Ms. Leni Joyce Drs. O. Nsidinanya Okike and Kreszentia M. Strobel Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prouty Mrs. Louise C. Riemer

DONORS OF $2,500 TO $4,999

Dr. and Mrs. Michael Bernhard Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bernhard Mrs. Howard M. Booth Mr. Guy W. Nichols Mr. and Mrs. Martin M. Pollak

DONORS OF $1,000 TO $2,499

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Evelyn Silver Acaso and Eduardo Acaso Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Angelini Dr. Vitold Arnett

Joan and Richard Freedman I. Robert and Aviva Freelander Esther and Howard G. Freeman Liz and Bob Frem Mr. Paul H. Gallagher and Ms. Sandra Mayrand Lisa and Peter Gibbs Leo and Lucy Gilson Dr. Wayne and Laura Glazier Mr. Allen M. Glick Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Glick William and Diana Glimm Timothy J. Gollan Drs. Joel M. Gore and Deborah M. DeMarco Mrs. Haskell R. Gordon Richard C. and Susan Gotz Drs. Ivan R. and Noreen M. Green Drs. Michael R. Green and Maria L. Zapp Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Dr. and Mrs. John P. Gusha Mr.* and Mrs. William P. Haas Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Haddad Joy Wetzel Hall Dr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Halpin Mr. and Mrs. James H. Harrington Evelyn S. Heller In memory of Dr. Hyman Heller John Herron Jr. and Julia L. Moore Prentiss C. and Polly Higgins Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hill Drs. Shuk-Mei Ho and Tom Chung Mahlon and Olley Hoagland Nancy and Don Hodes Marjorie and Charles B. Housen Charles F. and Louise Hugo Louis C.* and Ann D. Iandoli Dr. Richard S. and Diane Irwin Dr. Frederick H. and Eleanor Jackson M Howard and Frances Jacobson John and Georgia S. Jacobson Robert E. and Joanne Jenal Mr. and Mrs. John Jeppson Drs. V. Craig Jordan and Monica Morrow Shirley and Benson Kane John F. and Rayna Keenan Mr. and Mrs. William D. Kelleher Jr. Mr. Thomas L. Kempner Mr. and Mrs. B. A. King Nina Joukowsky Köprülü and Murat Köprülü Mr. and Mrs. Edward Krintzman Jean Krintzman In memory of Abraham Krintzman Pauline F. Krull Ms. Susan Landis Dr. and Mrs. Aaron Lazare Mrs. T. Charles Lee David A. Lemoine and Mary Cotter-Lemoine Mr.* and Mrs. George Levine Stephen B. and Valerie Loring

William D. Maney and Jane Stark Maney Mr. Thomas D. Manning Dr. Maurice H. and Rita Martel Merrill and Steve Marx Dr. and Mrs. David M. Matson Drs. C. Robert Matthews and Paula-Ann Pricken Dr. Ralph S. McCracken Jr. Myles and C. Jean McDonough Dr. and Mrs. Glenn Adair Meltzer Drs. W. Peter Metz and Phyllis Pollack Mrs. Goldie C. Michelson In memory of David L. Michelson Laurence K. and Shirley S. Miller Vivian B. Morales Dr. and Mrs. John M. Moran Mr. Thomas R. Mountain James J. and Patricia Moynihan Frederic and Victoria Mulligan Mary and Richard Myers Michael and Mary Beth Noonan Miss Evelyn M. Norsten Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. O'Connell Drs. Judith K. and Ira S. Ockene Jonathan and Natalie Palley Mrs. Marion S. Palm George K. Parker III and Larri Tonelli Parker Drs. Thoru and Judith Pederson Deborah A. Penta Marlene and David Persky Mr. and Mrs. William O. Pettit Jr. Riccardo and Carole Pigliucci Cynthia and Stephen M. Pitcher Roger P. and Gloria Plourde The Pollak Family In memory of Bruce Pollak Mrs. Joseph H. Quick E. Paul and Joyce L. Robsham Dr. Kenneth L. and Carol Rock Penelope B. and Sherburne B. Rockwell Jr. Ralph and Shirley Rose Sidney and Rosalie Rose Drs. Alonzo H. Ross and Elizabeth J. Luna Dr. Aldo A. and Ann Rossini Beverly and Oscar Rudnick Dr. and Mrs. Paul S. Russell James P. and Barbara Sadowsky Joan and Lester Sadowsky Christina and Robert Schultz Mr. Norman L. Sharfman Dr. and Mrs. Stanley A. Shustak Jr. Robert M. and Dr. Shirley S. Siff Morton H. and Vivian Sigel Robert and Susan Sigel Mrs. Willard S. Simpkins Jonathan and Deborah Sloane Barbara H. Smith Mr. Richard J. Stanton Drs. Gary and Janet Stein

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Stowe John and Lynn Sullivan Dr. Daniel G. and Madeleine K. Tear Mr. and Mrs. Sumner B. Tilton Jr. E. Paul Tinsley Mr. and Mrs. Herbert M. Varnum Randi von Steinwehr and Charles Whipple Mark and Barbara Wetzel Todd and Charlotte Wetzel Dr. H. Brownell and Betty Wheeler Ervin and Marie Wilkof Grant and Hope Winthrop Dr. George and Rita Witman Dr. Rosalie Wolf* Susan and David K. Woodbury William A. and Judith S. Yoffie *Deceased

ADDITIONAL DONORS

(JULY 1, 2000 - JUNE 30, 2001)

DONORS OF $500 TO $999

Mr. and Mrs. Kyver Blumstein Mrs. Phoebe Ann Freeman Mr. and Mrs. John B. Hench Mrs. Adelaide D. Bagley Ms. Meg Lansing Mr. and Mrs. Howard R. Lurier Mrs. Mary McKee Mrs. John D. Stubbs Mr. and Mrs. Theodore A. Underwood

DONORS OF $100 TO $499

Dr. and Mrs. Eero A. Aijala Howard J. Alfred, MD Mrs. Lillian Rice Anderson Drs. M. Sawkat and Ursula Anwer Mr. Norman H. Arter Mr. and Mrs. Randall S. Barko Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Barton Mr. and Mrs. George L. Bayrouty Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Beaney Mr. William L. Bernhard Rabbi and Mrs. Seth Bernstein Mrs. Mary D. Blake Mrs. Harry E. Boorky Mr. David D. Borland Mr. and Mrs. John M. Bradley Mr. Arthur F. Braman Mr. and Mrs. George L. Brownell II Mr. and Mrs. James R. Buonomo Mr. Douglas P. Butler Dr. William T. Carleton Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Carter Mrs. William G. Chafee

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DONORS OF $100 TO $499, con't

Mr. George A. Clark Mrs. Irene Clason Dr. and Mrs. Martin A. Compton Mr. and Mrs. Fairman C. Cowan Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Cox Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Bigelow Crocker Jr. Mrs. Elizabeth M. Davis Mr. and Mrs. David L. Dean Mrs. Gardner G. DeMallie Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Donoghue Mr. Robert A. Eddy Mr. and Mrs. Ralph L. Ellis Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Ellis Mrs. Theodore English Mr. Irvin E. Erb Miss Louise T. Erskine Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. and Mrs. Alan L. Feingold and Mrs. Eugene A. Fischer Justin L. Fletcher and Mrs. Bernard I. Friedlander

Mrs. Sidney Medlinsky Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Q. Meystre Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Midwood Mr. and Mrs. David S. Morgan Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Morgan Mr. and Mrs. Edward Morris Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Moser Mrs. Henrietta N. Paine Ms. Leona A. Paslaski Mr. and Mrs. Stephen P. Pollak Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Powers Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. and and and and and and and Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Saul I. Reck Clyde S. Reynolds Clesson A. Robbins Ernest Rosenfeld Larry Rowe Allen Rubin Sanford H. Russell

Dr. Bernard J. Gersh Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Giles Jr. Mrs. Joseph Goldberg Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Greenberg Cdr. and Mrs. Howard P. Handleman, Ret. Mr. Timothy J. Haynes Mrs. Mary Bullard Hennessy Ms. Susan J. Hessel Mr. Harold Hindman Dr. and Mrs. Edwin L. Hubbard Mr. and Mrs. Oliver V. Inge Mr. Barry Jaffe Ms. Mildred E. Johnson Ms. Margaret N. Kalenian Mr. and Mrs. Harry Kaplowitz Mr. and Mrs. Zarvin J. Kasparian Drs. I. Charles and Janice Kaufman Dr. and Mrs. Harry Kavoogian Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Charles Stephen Kelly Mr. and Mrs. Harry P. Kotseas Mrs. Marjorie P. Lee Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel R. Lerner Dr. Donald W. Light Dr. A. Brian Little Mrs. Erma M. Lougee Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Lovelace Mrs. Pauline M. Lundgren Mr. and Mrs. Alan V. Malkasian Mrs. John L. Malone Ms. Janet E. Malser Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. McCray Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop H. McGown Mr. and Mrs. John L. McKie Mr. Robert L. McLeod

Mr. Michael J. Selissen Mr. Walter H. Sharawara Mrs. Abraham Sherman Mrs. Jean H. Simonds Wilfred T. Small, MD Mrs. Arthur K. Smith Dr. and Mrs. Mark E. Stoker Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Stone Alison Taunton-Rigby, PhD Mrs. John R. Townsend Dr. and Mrs. Horatio J. Turner Mr. Gordon M. Tuttle Mr. Brian F. Vigneaux Mr. and Mrs. W. David Warner Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Webster Mrs. Constance V. R. White Mr. and Mrs. Irvine F. Williamson Mr. Ralph O. Winger Mrs. R. Mildred Zuckerman

CORPORATE AND FOUNDATION DONORS

(JULY 1, 2000 TO JUNE 30, 2001) Anonymous (2) Hollis E. and Gwendolyn D. Alden Foundation BioHybrid Technologies, Inc. Tillie and William Blumstein Family Foundation Robert W. Booth Fund In memory of George F. Booth at the Greater Worcester Community Foundation Briarwood Resident Association Central/Goulet Supply Ciborowski Insurance Agency J. Irving and Jane L. England Charitable Trust

Elizabeth Taylor Fessenden Foundation First Massachusetts Bank FleetBoston Financial Foundation Fletcher, Tilton & Whipple, PC Freelander Family Charitable Trust Jewish Community Endowment Foundation In loving memory of David J. Freelander Friedman, Hurwitz & Aliber Greater Worcester Community Foundation Nathan and Barbara Greenberg Charitable Trust Marilyn and Mike Grossman Foundation Bushrod H. Campbell and Adah F. Hall Charity Fund Harlyn Foundation, Inc. Francis A. and Jacquelyn H. Harrington Foundation Hart Foundation Aldus C. Higgins Foundation Iacocca Foundation Jewish Community Endowment Foundation Joukowsky Family Foundation The Kingsley Foundation The Kirby Foundation Krintzman Charitable Foundation LUTCO Ball Bearings Madden Communication, Inc. Frances F. Mansfield Fund Greater Worcester Community Foundation McLaughry Associates, Inc. Merck & Company Foundation Morgan-Worcester, Inc. National Grid Norton Company Foundation Parthenon Capital Foundation David A. Persky Trust Phillips, Silver, Talman, Aframe & Sinrich, PC Bruce Pollak Foundation Olive Higgins Prouty Foundation The Rachel Foundation Rawling Insurance Agency RMF Group, Inc. The Rockwell Foundation Rose Family Charitable Fund Margaret E. Sherman Trust Siff Charitable Foundation H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation H. Arthur Smith Fund Greater Worcester Community Foundation Westboro Toyota, Inc. Worcester Foundation Auxiliary Worcester Sand & Gravel Co., Inc. Wyman-Gordon Foundation The Zeitz Foundation

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Named Endowment Funds

T

he Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research is grateful to the following donors and families who have established permanent endowed positions or funds to provide ongoing support for biomedical research and education programs. For information on establishing a named fund, please contact Mary Flynn Myers, Director of Major Gifts, at 508-856-1411.

Named Funds Providing Support for Endowed Positions

Vitold Arnett Endowed Professorship Fund

Established in 1998 through a generous gift from Vitold Arnett, MD, PhD, to endow the Vitold Arnett Professorship in Cell Biology. Dr. Arnett established the fund to honor the memory of the Worcester Foundation's co-founder, Dr. Hudson Hoagland, in thanks for providing Dr. Arnett with early career direction.

Robert W. Booth Endowed Fund in Memory of George F. Booth

Established in 1992 as an endowment fund through a gift from Mr. Robert W. Booth's fund in memory of his father, George F. Booth, at the Greater Worcester Community Foundation to provide support for research. In 1998, the Booth Fund made an additional generous gift to establish the first endowed chair in basic science research, the George F. Booth Chair in the Basic Sciences.

David J. Freelander Memorial Endowment Fund

Established in 1987 in loving memory of their son David by I. Robert and Aviva Freelander, their family and friends. In 1998, this fund was combined with an additional generous gift from the Freelanders to the University of Massachusetts Medical School to create the David J. Freelander Professorship in AIDS Research.

Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Endowed Chair Fund

Established in 2000 through a generous pledge from the Nathan and Barbara Greenberg Charitable Trust to endow the Barbara and Nathan Greenberg Chair in Biomedical Research. Barbara Greenberg, a trustee of the Worcester Foundation, and her husband, Nathan Greenberg, a former trustee, have been longtime friends of the Foundation and donors to medical research.

Higgins Family Endowed Professorship Fund

Established in 2000 with a generous distribution from the Higgins Charitable Remainder Unitrust, made upon the death of Alice Coonley Higgins, combined with the assets of the Higgins Family Endowment Fund established at the Worcester Foundation in 1991. The fund endows the Higgins Family Professorship in Neuroscience.

Gladys Smith Martin Endowed Chair Fund

Established in 2000 by a leadership pledge of the H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation to endow the Gladys Smith Martin Chair in Gastrointestinal Cancer. The endowment honors the memory of the late Gladys Smith Martin, beloved sister of the late H. Arthur Smith.

Barbara Helen Smith Endowed Chair Fund

Established in 2000 by a leadership pledge of the H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation to endow the Barbara Helen Smith Chair in Preventive and Behavioral Medicine. The endowment honors Barbara Helen Smith, a favorite cousin of the late H. Arthur Smith.

H. Arthur Smith Endowed Chair Fund

Established in 1998 through a generous gift from the H. Arthur Smith Charitable Foundation to endow the H. Arthur Smith Chair in Cancer Research. Mr. Smith was a longtime, generous donor to cancer research at the Worcester Foundation during his lifetime.

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Named Funds Providing Support for Graduate and Postdoctoral Education

Dr. Mark Steven Albion Fellowship Fund

Established in 1998 by Worcester Foundation Auxiliary member Ms. Leni Joyce to create a graduate fellowship in honor of her son Mark's birthday.

George I. Alden Education Fund

Established in 1991 through a major challenge grant from the George I. Alden Trust to attract new support for the Foundation's educational programs.

Anonymous Fund

Established in 1979 by a generous anonymous donor to benefit postdoctoral training and education.

Ina R. and Haskell R. Gordon Fund for Biomedical Research

Established in 2001 by longtime friend and donor Ina R. Gordon, in loving memory of her husband Haskell who served as trustee of the Worcester Foundation from 1972-87 and then as an honorary trustee from 1987 until his death in 1991. Income from the fund will be used to support postdoctoral education.

Charles B. and Abigail B. Knight Memorial Fund

Established in 1994 through a generous bequest by Mr. Kenneth H. Knight in memory of his grandparents, Charles and Abigail, in support of educational activities.

Patricia M. O'Connell Summer Student Fund

Established in 1994 in loving memory of Mrs. Patricia M. O'Connell by her husband,Worcester Foundation scientist Dr. Robert O'Connell, friends and family to benefit the summer student education program.

Mark M. Weisberg Memorial Fund

Established in 1980 by the family of Mr. Mark M.Weisberg to benefit graduate or postdoctoral student research in cancer-related studies.

Grant Winthrop Fellowship Fund

Established in 1996 through a gift from the Joukowsky Family Foundation to honor Worcester Foundation Trustee Grant Winthrop and his steadfast commitment to research excellence. Income benefits graduate or postdoctoral education.

OurTime to Lead

24

Named Funds Providing Support for Research

Chester Baylis Jr. Memorial Fund

Established in 1998 through a generous bequest from longtime Worcester Foundation trustee Mr. Chester Baylis to support promising basic biomedical research.

Barbara G. Brown Fund

Established in 1998 through a generous bequest from longtime Worcester Foundation friend Barbara Gifford Brown to support biomedical research.

Fred Harris Daniels Fund in Memory of F. Harold Daniels

Created in 1992 through a generous endowment gift from the Fred Harris Daniels Foundation for the benefit of biomedical research.

Warren A. and Ruth H. Ellsworth Fund

Established in 1989 by the trustees of the Ruth H. and Warren A. Ellsworth Foundation for the benefit of biomedical research.

Elise and Monroe England Endowed Fund for Biomedical Research

Established in 1999 by generous friends Elise V. and Monroe B. England for the benefit of biomedical research, preferably in the field of diabetes.

Samuel Frank Fund

Established in 1993 by a generous bequest of Mr. Samuel Frank for the benefit of biomedical research.

General Endowment Fund

A permanent fund of the Worcester Foundation for general gifts to the endowment for the benefit of biomedical research and education.

Lydia Gifford Fund

Established in 1998 by a generous bequest from Lydia Gifford for the benefit of biomedical research.

Mimi Aaron Greenberg Cancer Research Institute

Created in 1976 as a living memorial to Mimi Aaron Greenberg, widely admired and loved for her vibrant warmth and humanity. The Institute provides support for cancer research.

Olga R. Haas and William P. Haas Fund for Biomedical Research

Established by the William P. Haas Trust in 2001 upon the death of WFBR donor William P. Haas, for general uses and purposes of the WFBR.

Chester D. Heywood Memorial Fund

Established in 1979 by generous bequests from Rachel W and Chester D. Heywood for the benefit of biomedical research. .

Evelyn S. and Judith M. Isaacson Memorial Biomedical Research Fund

Created in 1983 by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Isaacson in loving memory of their daughter Judith, and amended in 1992 to include Mrs. Evelyn Isaacson upon her passing, the fund benefits biomedical research.

Myles Morgan Memorial Fund

Established in 1979 by family, friends and business associates to honor the memory of Mr. Myles Morgan, incorporator and founding trustee of the Worcester Foundation, for the benefit of biomedical research.

Joseph Persky Biomedical Research Fund

Established in 1980 to honor the memory of Mr. Joseph Persky,Worcester industrialist, philanthropist and longtime friend of the Worcester Foundation, for the benefit of biomedical research.

25

Martin M. Pollak Fund

Established in 1990 in honor of Worcester Foundation Trustee Mr. Martin M. Pollak for the benefit of biomedical research.

Harold R. and Helen G. Rafton Fund

Established in 1982 through the generous bequests of Mr. Harold R. Rafton and Mrs. Helen G. Rafton to provide support for general purposes.

Morton and Vivian Sigel Fund for Biomedical Research

Established in 1998 by the Sigels' children in honor of their parents and to celebrate former Board Chairman Mr. Morton H. Sigel's receipt of the 1998 Hudson Hoagland Award, given in recognition of distinguished service to the Worcester Foundation.

Helen W. Stoddard Fund

Established in 1999 through a generous bequest from Worcester philanthropist Mrs. Robert W. Stoddard. Mrs. Stoddard was a longtime friend of the Worcester Foundation and, at her direction, her fund supports biomedical research.

Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Scholars Fund

Established in 1999 by a vote of the Worcester Foundation Board of Trustees to consolidate three major, unrestricted endowment funds: the Anna P. Hoagland Memorial Fund (1971), the Einar W. and Gertrude Sundberg Fund (1988) and an endowed fund established by a generous anonymous donor (1993). The income from these funds is awarded to promising, newly recruited scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Recipients hold the title of Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Scholar.

Wyman-Gordon Fund

Established in 1988 through a generous gift from the Wyman-Gordon Company for the benefit of biomedical research.

Named Funds Providing Support for Scientific Lectures

M. C. Chang Memorial Fund

Created in 1995 by family, friends and colleagues to honor Dr. M. C. Chang's pioneering contributions to the study of reproductive biology and early development. The income from this fund is used to sponsor the M. C. Chang Distinguished Lecture in the field of reproductive biology.

Gregory Pincus Memorial Fund

Established in 1967 in memory of Dr. Gregory G. Pincus, renowned reproductive biologist and co-founder of the Worcester Foundation. The fund benefits the Gregory Pincus Memorial Lecture.

26

Planned Gifts and Bequests

E

ach year, the Worcester Foundation receives a number of bequests

from individuals who have demonstrated their commitment to the Worcester Foundation and biomedical research through a bequest intention, gift annuity, trust or other planned gift.

The Gregory Pincus Circle recognizes those individuals who have included the Worcester Foundation in their estate plans. The Pincus Circle is named to honor the memory of Worcester Foundation co-founder Dr. Gregory Goodwin Pincus, a renowned reproductive physiologist who developed the birth control pill. Members share what was Dr. Pincus' belief, that basic research offers the best hope for understanding and curing disease. Through their planned gifts, Pincus Circle members help to extend that spirit of hope to future generations by providing financial resources to fuel tomorrow's research breakthroughs. The Pincus Circle invites inquiries from other friends of the Worcester Foundation who wish to make a planned gift in support of research that will benefit generations to come.

GREGORY PINCUS CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP

Michael P. Angelini, Esq. Anonymous (5) Dr. Vitold Arnett Mr. Norman H. Arter Dr. Étienne E. Baulieu Mrs. Rosamond Bennett Ms. Susan Marie Boutiette Dr. Jerry R. Brooks Mrs. Edward C. Budnitz Mrs. Cheney E. Cook Mr. Robert Cushman Mary M. Doyle Mr. and Mrs. Albert V. Ferguson Jack Fishman, PhD Mrs. Phoebe Ann Freeman Dr. Orrie M. Friedman Mrs. Edwin K. Golrick Mr. and Mrs. James H. Harrington Richard Horton, MD Ms. Dorothy M. Hunt Ms. Leni Joyce Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel R. Lerner Dr. John A. McCracken Mrs. David L. Michelson Dr. Josephine L. Murray Mrs. Mary Flynn Myers Mr. and Mrs. John M. Nelson Mr. Guy W. Nichols Mrs. Marion S. Palm Mr. and Mrs. Richard Prouty WFBR co-founders Drs. Gregory Pincus (left) and Hudson Hoagland are pictured in this circa 1960 photo. Members of the Gregory Pincus Circle share Dr. Pincus' belief that basic research offers the best hope for curing disease. Mr. and Mrs. Clesson A. Robbins Penelope B. and Sherburne B. Rockwell Jr. Christina and Robert Schultz Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Senter Morton and Vivian Sigel Mrs. Walter E. Werber Mr. William A. Wheeler III

BEQUESTS RECEIVED THIS YEAR

Estate of Zylpha B. Brown Edith C. Gauch Trust William P. Haas Trust Robert D. Harrington Unitrust Estate of Seville M. Malone Estate of Helen Swartz Estate of Julius J. Tegelberg

27

Our Genomic Era

Project was only the first step toward the broader goal of discovering how the precisely coordinated expression of sets of genes can help us understand the lives of cells, as well as ultimately the higher level properties of the human organism, so-called emergent properties such as mood and memory, for example. In the past year the science of genomics has revealed that most cells in the body share a large set of commonly expressed genes, with each type of cell also expressing a set of genes whose operation is unique to that specialized cell. Although this sounds like a new insight, it was explicitly predicted by the embryologist and geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan in 1934, who presciently stated that "...different batteries of genes come into action as development proceeds." Thus, the decoding of the complete human DNA sequence is more an analytical advance than an intellectual breakthrough. Yet, conceptual advances are indeed being made. For example, we now know that some genes can undergo a "cut and paste" mode of rearrangement in the body's cells. This is the mechanism by which antibodies are made, custom-fit to latch onto the reciprocal shape of a protein on an invading virus or other foreign substance entering the body. I strongly suspect this phenomenon of gene rearrangements is also at play in the construction of the brain (though this has not yet been discovered). Rearrangements, at the RNA message level, are also involved in producing the complex protein molecules that glue cells to one another in the body. The total complexity of our body's proteins is thus likely to considerably exceed that predicted from our sperm and egg-inherited set of genes. This is but one example of how the field of genomics is providing exciting new insights. It also argues that we should be cautious in asserting that we are already in the "post-genomics" era--a point emphatically made by Dr. Francis S. Collins, Director of the National Center for Human Genome Research at NIH in his address at UMass Medical School in October 2001. Many laypersons ask me, "How many genes do we have?" The number was first announced as 30,000 or so, yet I deliberately gave a figure of 70,000 in my report on this page a year ago. Now, a study published this past summer in the journal Genome Biology indeed puts the human gene number at 65,000-75,000. The correct statement is that we really aren't sure yet. Before closing, I cannot fail to mention the likely possibility that the science of genomics, directed at the DNA of infectious micro-organisms, will be important in the quest of peace-loving peoples of the world to mount regrettably necessary defenses against bioterrorism. The joyful dedication of our new research building shortly after the attacks of September 11 caused me to recall a passionate statement made 130 years ago by the French biologist Louis Pasteur: "Take interest, I beseech you, in those sacred institutions, which we designate under the expressive name of laboratories. Demand that they be adorned; they are the temples of wealth and of the future. There it is that humanity grows, becomes stronger and better. There it learns to read in the works of nature, symbols of progress and of universal harmony, whereas the works of mankind are too often those of fanaticism and destruction."

W

riting on this page in the Worcester Foundation's 2000 Annual Report, I commented that the "completion" of the Human Genome

Thoru Pederson, PhD Vitold Arnett Professor of Cell Biology UMMS Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology Director,Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research

28

Making a Gift

The Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research welcomes inquiries about making a gift in support of basic research. For additional information about any of the Foundation's gift programs and their impact on lifesaving research, please contact: Patricia Kelleher Bartram Director of Development or Mary Flynn Myers Director of Major Gifts

Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research

Four Biotech · 377 Plantation Street · Worcester, MA 01605 · 508-856-1994

Chancellor and Dean University of Massachusetts Medical School Aaron Lazare, MD Chairman of the Board Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Christopher W. Bramley President Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research John L. Sullivan, MD Director, Office of Research Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Medicine University of Massachusetts Medical School Director Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Thoru Pederson, PhD,Vitold Arnett Professor of Cell Biology Professor of Biochemistry & Molecular Pharmacology University of Massachusetts Medical School Associate Vice Chancellor for Development University of Massachusetts Medical School Kevin G. Courtney Assistant Vice Chancellor for Development University of Massachusetts Medical School Director of Development Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research Patricia Kelleher Bartram Director of Major Gifts for Biomedical Research Mary Flynn Myers Assistant Director of Major Gifts for Biomedical Research Margaret K. Lansing Major Gifts Officer Julie Rowe-Collins

This annual report is produced on behalf of the Worcester Foundation for Biomedical Research by the Office of Public Affairs & Publications, University of Massachusetts Medical School. Associate Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Managing Editor Mark L. Shelton Associate Director of Publications and Editor Andrea L. Badrigian Staff Writers Kelly Bishop Lynn C. Borella Mary Beth Dziewietin Design Ermini Marketing & Design Printing Atlantic Graphic Services, Inc. Photography Christopher Navin Larry Stein UMMS Biomedical Media Readers are invited to comment on the contents of this annual report. Please address correspondence to: Editor, 2001 Worcester Foundation Annual Report Office of Public Affairs & Publications UMass Medical School 55 Lake Avenue North Worcester, MA 01655-0002 E-mail: [email protected] www.umassmed.edu

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID WORCESTER, MA PERMIT NO. 176

WORCESTER FOUNDATION for BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH Four Biotech · 377 Plantation Street · Worcester, MA 01605

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