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U P S T A T E

A publication for the SUNY Upstate Medical University Community

APRIL 21 THROUGH MAY 5, 2004

In the Calendar

Radiology Student Society Open House. 4/9. 5:30 to 7 p.m. 3430 University Hospital. See Update Calendar inside.

Carol Baldwin and Brian J. Druker, MD, to speak at SUNY Upstate Commencement May 16

SUNY Upstate participates in osteoporosis study

SUNY Upstate Medical University researchers are seeking individuals aged 18 to 80 years to participate in study to test a pulsing electromagnetic field (PEMF) as a noninvasive, nonpharmaceutical way to reduce or reverse regional bone loss that occurs after fracture or surgery. If successful, PEMF may prove an effective intervention for reducing osteoporotic fractures in susceptible individuals, particularly the elderly. The three-year $750,000 study, "Feasibility and Dosing Study of Bone Density Changes with and Without PEMF Following Immobilization of the Forearm (e-BONE)," is sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). It is being conducted by members of the Orthopedic Research Laboratory at the Institute for Human Performance at SUNY Upstate. The principal investigator is Joseph A. Spadaro, PhD, orthopedic research professor at

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Take Note

Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon is April 27 · April 18 through 24 is National Volunteer Week. To recognize our volunteers, University Hospital's Department of Volunteer Services will sponsor an appreciation luncheon for volunteers Tuesday, April 27, beginning at 11:30 a.m. at the Country Club of Syracuse (formerly LaFayette Country Club), 4480 LaFayette Road, Jamesville. All SUNY Upstate volunteers and employees are invited to attend. Volunteers receive a complimentary meal. Guests' meals are $18 per person. For more information, call 464-5180. (See page 11 for Heart Volunteers article.)

Carol Baldwin

Brian J. Druker, MD

Carol Baldwin, an activist for breast cancer research and Brian J. Druker, MD, a hematologist/oncologist whose research led to the development of FDAapproved Gleevac, a drug that revolutionized cancer treatment, will address graduates and receive honorary degrees at SUNY Upstate Medical University's 2004 Commencement Ceremony, to be held Sunday, May 16 at 1 p.m. in the John H. Mulroy Civic Center Crouse Hinds Theater. Carol Baldwin will receive the Honorary Degree, Doctor of Humane Letters by the State

University of New York Board of Trustees. Diagnosed with breast cancer in 1990 and treated at SUNY Upstate's University Hospital, Baldwin turned her personal medical challenge into a powerful and widespread crusade to accelerate the search for a cure for breast cancer. She played a key role in bringing the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation to Syracuse. In 1996, she founded the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Cancer Research Fund, Inc. which exclusively funds research at SUNY Upstate Medical University and SUNY Stony

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For health information, physician referral, and Upstate Medical University services, call Health Connections at 464-8668

calendar

Wednesday, April 21

Health Careers Shadowing Day. Call 464-4608 for details. Anesthesiology Grand Rounds. 7 to 8 a.m. Wsk. Hall Auditorium. Otolaryngology Grand Rounds. William Azeredo, MD. 7 to 8 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Orthopedic Grand Rounds. "Acute Colonic Pseudoobstruction: Pharmacotherapeutic Strategies for Prevention." David Lehmann, MD, PharmD, Upstate Medical University. 8 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Surgical Grand Rounds. The Lawrence Pickett, MD, Endowed Lecture in Pediatric Surgery: "Thoracoscopy: Where Have We Come From and Where Are We Going?" Bradley M. Rogers, MD, University of Virginia Health System. 8 to 9 a.m. 2231 Wsk. Hall. Pediatric Platform Presentations. 6500 University Hospital. Department of Pediatric Research Poster Session. 5342 University Hospital. Health Sciences Library Tour. Meet at New Book area. Call 464-7193 for information. NIH Director's Lecture. James R. Lupski, MD, PhD, Baylor College of Medicine. 3 p.m. 318 Wsk. Hall. Call 464-5476 for more information. Neurology/Neurosurgery Grand Rounds. "Neurology." Gene Latorre, MD. 4 p.m. 6500 University Hospital. Spiritual Care Grand Rounds. "Practice of Medicine Spirituality Initiative: ChaplainMentors and Medical Students." Rev. Terry Culbertson, Upstate Medical University. 4 to 5:15 p.m. 5299 Wsk. Hall. Free Health Seminar. "MRIs, CAT Scans, PET Scans and Sonograms: What's the Difference?" Gary Litvin, University Hospital. 6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall. Call 464-8668 to register. 7:30 p.m. Wsk. Hall, Medical Alumni Auditorium. Admission: $2. training and click "register for training classes online." Combined Infectious Diseases Conference. 4 p.m. 118 University Hospital.

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Thursday, April 29

Ethics Forum. "The Difficult Patient." 8 to 9 a.m. 1328B University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/hr/ training and click "register for training classes online." Medical Grand Rounds. "CPCMaking a Rash Decision." Anastasia Rowland-Seymour. 8:30 a.m. Wsk. Hall, Medical Alumni Aud. Psychiatry Grand Rounds. "Annual Trainee Grand Rounds." 12:30 to 2 p.m. PBS Bldg., 713 Harrison St. Radiology Student Society Open House. 5:30 to 7 p.m. 3430 University Hospital. R.S.V.P. to Anne Jones, 4647434. CNY Children's Hospital Fundraiser. "Comedy Performance by Joe DeLion and Richie Byrne." Reception. 6 p.m. Performance: 8 p.m. Viva Debris Comedy Club, Hotel Syracuse (Harrison Street entrance.) Tickets: $10 Call 464-8929 for tickets or more information. Health Seminar. "Sexual Predators and Your Teen: Essential Info!" Ann Botash, MD, Upstate Medical University. 6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall. Free. Call 464-8668 to register. Workshop. "QBQ Book and Discussion for PSLs." 7 to 8:30 p.m. E6408 University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/hr/training and click "register for training classes online."

Friday, April 30

Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand Rounds. "Domestic Violence Update." Randi Bregman, Vera House, Inc. 7:30 a.m. Marley Education Center. Workshop. "Medline on the Web." 11 a.m. to noon. Health Sciences Library, meet at reference desk. Call 4644581 to register.

Health Sciences Library Tour. See 4/21 Calendar listing. NIH Director's Lecture. Rafael Yuste, MD, PhD, Columbia University. 3 p.m. 318 Wsk. Hall. Call 464-5476 for more information. Burn Survivors Support Group. 5 to 7 p.m. 6408 University Hospital. Call 464-3600 for more information. Health Seminar. "I Can Cope." See 4/28 Calendar listing.

Saturday, April 24

CNY Children's Hospital Fundraiser. "No Tap Bowling." 1 p.m. Erie Boulevard Bowling Center, 2312 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse. $75 entry fee for team of five. Call 464-9115 or 464-9704 for information. Film. See 4/23 Calendar listing.

Students." Anne Barash, MD, Upstate Medical University. 8 to 10 a.m. Suite 216 Madison Irving Medical Center. AAFP CME available. Call 4647027 for more information. SUNY Nursing Services Orientation. 1 to 3 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge.

Wednesday, April 28

Anesthesiology Grand Rounds. 7 to 8 a.m. Wsk. Hall Auditorium. Otolaryngology Grand Rounds. Bryan Wilcox, MD. 7 to 8 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Ethics Forum. "The Difficult Patient." 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. 1328B University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/hr/ training and click "register for training classes online." Orthopedic Grand Rounds. "Ergogenic Aides." Michael Anvari, MD. 8 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Surgical Grand Rounds. "Principles and Practice of Surgery for Cancer of the Rectum." Margaret Plocek, MD, Upstate Medical University. 8 to 9 a.m. 2231 Wsk. Hall. Pediatric Grand Rounds. "Improving Adolescent Preventive Services." Jonathan D. Klein, MD, University of Rochester School of Medicine. 9:15 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Health Sciences Library Tour. See 4/21 Calendar listing. NIH Director's Lecture. Stuart L. Schreiber, PhD, Harvard University. 3 p.m. 318 Wsk. Hall. Call 464-5476 for more information. Susan Bastable, EdD, RN, Reception. 3:30 to 5 p.m. Wsk. Hall, ninth floor cafeteria. Health Seminar. "I Can Cope." 5:30 to 8 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall. Free. Call 464-8668 to register.

Thursday, April 22

SUNY Upstate New Employee Orientation. 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge. Medical Grand Rounds. "The Cardiologist's Favorite Hypertension." Rose Giammarco, MD, Upstate Medical University. 8:30 a.m. Wsk. Hall, Medical Alumni Aud. Conference. "Current Diagnostic and Treatment Challenges in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry."8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. LeMoyne Manor Inn, 629 Old Liverpool Road, Liverpool. Seminar. "How to Become an Inventor." M. Guven Yalcintas, PhD, SUNY Technology Transfer Office. "Contracts/Subcontracts." Christopher Hanifin, Robert Mason, Srt. And Tom VanAlstyne, Research Foundation. Lunch: 11:45 a.m. Lecture: Noon to 1:30 p.m. 2231 Weiskotten Hall. Call 464-5476 to R.S.V.P.

Saturday, May 8

Race for the Cure. Beginning 8:30 a.m. NYS Fairgrounds, Cole Muffler Court. CNY Children's Hospital Fundraiser. Booksigning. Local author Ellen Yeomans will sign copies of her new children's book, Jubilee. 1 to 4 p.m. Barnes & Noble in the Great Northern Mall.

Saturday, May 1

Kidney Walk. Registration: 9 a.m. Walk: 10 a.m. Onondaga Lake Park. Call 464-5413 for information.

Monday, April 26

SUNY Nursing Services Orientation. 12:45 to 3:30 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge. AA Open Meeting. Noon. 4137 University Hospital. Call 4635011 for more information. Free Health Seminar. "Got Stress?" Kimberlee Garver, University Hospital. 6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall. Call 464-8668 to register.

Thursday, May 6

SUNY Upstate New Employee Orientation. 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge. Workshop. Getting the Red Out: Powerful Listening, Fearless Speaking." 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Healthlink at ShoppingTown Mall. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/ hr/training and click "register for training classes online." Medical Grand Rounds. 8:30 a.m. Wsk. Hall, Medical Alumni Aud. Psychiatry Grand Rounds. 12:30 to 2 p.m. PBS Bldg., 713 Harrison St. Workshop. "Computer Skills for PSLs." 3 to 4 p.m. 1541 University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/ hr/training and click "register for training classes online."

Monday, May 3

AA Open Meeting. See 4/26 Calendar listing.

Tuesday, May 4

Workshop. "Computer Skills for PSLs." Noon to 1 p.m. 1541 University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/ hr/training and click "register for training classes online." Workshop. "Getting Started with Medical Terminology Part I. See 4/27 Calendar listing. Combined Infectious Diseases Conference. 4 p.m. 118 University Hospital. Nursing Forum. "Advancing Cancer Treatment: Clinical Trials." 6 to 8 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall. Free. Call 464-8668 to register.

Upstate Update Production Schedule

Issue May 19 to June 2 June 2 to 16 June 16 to 30 June 30 to July 14 July 14 to 28 Deadline May 3 May 17 May 31 June 14 June 28

Tuesday, April 27

Workshop. "All About Payroll and Employee Time and Attendance." 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge. Email "STATEPR" to register. Volunteer Recognition Luncheon. 11:30 a.m. Country Club of Syracuse, 4480 LaFayette Road, Jamesville. Call 4645180 for information. Family Medicine Faculty Development Program. "Learning to Learn Part 1." Lynn Beth Satterly, MD, Upstate Medical University. Noon to 1 p.m. 3111 Weiskotten Hall. (Part 11 offered 5/25 - attendance of both sessions is encouraged.) R.S.V.P. [email protected] Workshop. "Getting Started with Medical Terminology Part I." 2 to 4 p.m. E6408 University Hospital. To register, visit www.upstate.edu/hr/

Friday, April 23

Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand Rounds. "Update on Contraception (Mostly Oral). Howard Zacur, MD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital. 7:30 a.m. Marley Education Center. SUNY Upstate New Employee Orientation. 8 a.m. to noon. C.A.B., East Lounge. SUNY Nursing Services Orientation. 1 to 3 p.m. C.A.B., East Lounge. Film. "Mystic River." Rated R.

Friday, May 7

Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand Rounds. 7:30 a.m. Marley Education Center. SUNY Upstate New Employee Orientation. 8 a.m. to noon. C.A.B., East Lounge. Family Medicine Faculty Development Program. Teaching Cultural Competency to Medical

The SUNY Health Sciences Library

Wednesday, May 5

Anesthesiology Grand Rounds. 7 to 8 a.m. Wsk. Hall Auditorium. Orthopedic Grand Rounds. 8 a.m. 6500 University Hospital. Surgical Grand Rounds. 8 to 9 a.m. 2231 Wsk. Hall.

Art Show

Through April 30

On My Own Time Art Show

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Visit Upstate Update on the web at: www.upstate.edu:80/hr/update/

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SUNY Upstate Commencement-continued from page 1

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C H I L D R E N ' S Gifford Foundation awards $250,000 to children's hospital

The Rosamond Gifford Foundation has awarded a $250,000 grant to the capital campaign for the Central New York Children's Hospital at University Hospital. The grant puts the level of funding for the children's hospital project at $7.5 million toward the campaign goal of $15 million. "We greatly appreciate the generous support of the Gifford Foundation and we hope its endorsement of this project will inspire other individuals and organizations to support this vital community project," said Eileen Pezzi, vice president for development at SUNY Upstate Medical University. The Gifford Foundation, founded in 1955, offers more than $1 million in grants annually to various human service and cultural agencies and programs serving Central New Yorkers. The Central New York Children's Hospital at University Hospital will consolidate pediatric services at University Hospital to two floors and feature 50 private patient rooms, family sleep and dining area as well as playrooms and a family resource center among other amenities. The children's hospital will have its own entrance. The addition will increase the amount of space dedicated to pediatric medicine at University Hospital from 18,000 square feet to 87,000 square feet. The children's hospital will comprise the top two floors of a proposed $99 million, six-story addition to be built above the existing Emergency Room. While a break ground date has not been set, the children's hospital is set to open in December 2007. For more information on the children's hospital or to make a contribution to the campaign, call 464KIDS.

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Nearly 500 attend Little Gifts for Life Auction

Nearly 500 Central New Yorkers attended the Eighth annual Little Gifts for Life auction, raising $165,000 to benefit University Hospital's Center for Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders (7H). A highlight of the March 26 event was the presentation of the Scott Carter Nursing Awards to 7H nurses Brooke Frasier and Maria White. Twenty-two year old cancer survivor Katie Flynn, who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 4 and treated at University Hospital, offered remarks. Presenting sponsor for Little Gifts for Life was CDMC&S (Camp Dresser & McKee/ C & S Engineers Inc.) Chairs for the event were Jim and Angela Albanese, who have served as event chairs for the past four years. More than 40 area businesses and industries supported the event, including sponsors Environmental Engineering Associates and Niagara Mohawk, a National Grid Company.

Brook. Since 1996 her organizations has awarded a combined $2.5 million for breast cancer research to these two SUNY campuses. Dr. Druker will receive an Honorary Degree, Doctor of Science from the State University of New York Board of Trustees. He is recognized for leading the molecular research that inspired the development of Gleevec and for his efforts to convince the pharmaceutical industry to invest in molecularly targeted drugs like Gleevec, the first of a new breed of drug compounds that are reverse-engineered to disrupt

abnormal molecular processes. Dr. Druker is the director of the Cancer Institute Leukemia Center at the Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) in Portland, professor of medicine in OHSU's division of hematology and medical oncology, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and program leader in hematologic malignancies at the OHSU Cancer Institute. He holds a joint appointment in OHSU's Department of Cell and Developmental Biology.

University Hospital nurses participate in smallpox vaccination seminar

United States currently has suffiMore than 90 University cient quantities of the vaccine to Hospital nurses participated in a vaccinate every single person in smallpox/smallpox vaccine the country in an emergency and seminar recently sponsored by the University Hospital nurses the Onondaga County Health stand among those who can Department, the New York State vaccinate the public. Health Department and SUNY Upstate Medical University. Since the smallpox vaccine has not been routinely administered in the United States since 1972, many health care professionals are not knowledgeable about the vaccine. The nurses learned the technique for giving smallpox vaccine by practicing on each other, using sterile saline and a special biforcated needle. The attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 have heightened K. Bruce Simmons, MD, and Dianne Smith-Bickerton, RN, (seated, right) of Employee/Student Health, with concern of the smallpox an Onondaga County Health Department nurse virus being used as a bioterrorism weapon. The

SUNY Upstate. Annie Pennella, clinical research associate, is the study coordinator. According to Pennella, the PEMF device induces a small electrical current signal in a specific skeletal region to stimulate bone formation. PEMF has been used successfully for years to promote fracture healing and enhance spine fusion. PEMF has also improved bone density in animal models of osteoporosis. "Our primary goal is to determine if PEMF reverses or reduces bone loss that normally occurs with disuse of the forearm after fracture or surgery, and to determine the effect of daily treatment duration on efficacy," said Pennella. Eighty volunteers who have recently had their arm in a cast or external fixator due to hand surgery or forearm fracture are being recruited. Each qualifying volunteer will receive free bone density measurements before and after the treatment. They will be expected to make four visits to the Institute for Human Performance. Each eligible volunteer will be randomized to one of the active treatment groups or a control group. PEMF is administered through an electronically controlled transducer placed over the forearm for 1, 2 or 4 hours each day for eight weeks, beginning six weeks or so after the initial injury or surgery. The selfcontained, battery-powered PEMF unit is already FDA approved for fracture healing in the forearm but is not currently approved for improving bone density. Volunteers in the control group will receive inactive but otherwise identical units and treatment times. The researchers will use DXA and other scans to compare each participant's baseline bone density values to those taken after their course of treatment. Spadaro adds that if PEMF does reduce or reverse bone loss in the forearm, it may be eventually tested for treating regional osteoporosis. "Such a noninvasive intervention applied to the hip or spine, which are especially associated with high morbidity and mortality in aging individuals, could have a significant national health care impact," said Spadaro. To learn more about study criteria or about the study, contact Pennella at 315-4642663 (464-BONE) or [email protected]

7H nurses: front row: Sharon Bauer, Fran Parthemore, Aubrey McDonald, Maria White, Louiza Singh, Sandy Demaline, Joyce Baker. Second row: Detria Watson, Jen Vann, Sharon Tonkin, Peggy Oxnard, Cheryl Cook, Brian Langdon, Brooke Fraser

Above: cancer survivor Katie Flynn offered remarks at the event

Little Gifts for Life co-chairs Jim and Angela Albanese

Right: W. Scott Carter award recipients Maria White, RN, (left) and Brooke Fraser, RN, (right) pose with 7H's Sharon Bauer, RN, and Ronald Dubowy, MD, director of the center.

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LECTURES, SEMINARS, WORKSHOPS

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Alcohol Awareness

As a public service, Upstate Update will run a series of educational articles about alcohol, alcohol abuse and where to get help to overcome alcohol dependency. The first article is titled "What is Your Alcohol I.Q." Did you know that all types of alcoholic beverages have the same potential intoxicating effect? One standard drink contains about 14 grams (about .6 fluid ounces) of pure alcohol. Therefore the equivalent of one drink is: 12 oz. beer or wine cooler 5 oz. glass of wine (port or sherry) 1 @ oz. of 80 proof distilled spirits 2-3 oz. cordial, liqueur or aperitif 8-9 oz. of malt liquor 3-4 oz. of fortified wine 1.5 oz. of brandy

April 26, 6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall, DeWitt.

"Got Stress?" health seminar. Social worker Kimberlee Garver of University Hospital offers suggestions on how to balance the daily stress of children, extended, work and other life obligations. Includes a presentation by the Mental Health Connection drama group. Free. Call 464-8668 to register.

May 4, 6 to 8 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall, DeWitt

Nursing Forum. "Advancing Cancer Treatment: Clinical Trials." Katherine Leonard, RN, Cynthia Carr, RN, Daisy Allmann, RN, of University Hospital discuss how clinical trials work, how they can benefit patients and how patients can access information on available clinical trials. Free. To register, call 464-8668.

Now through April 30, Health Sciences Library, Weiskotten Hall. On My Own Time Art Show.

Showcases the artistic talents of SUNY Upstate individuals. Free. Celebrating its 30th anniversary.

Saturday, April 24, 1 p.m. at Erie Boulevard Bowling Center, 2312 Erie Blvd E., Syracuse. "NoTap Bowling" fundraising event for the CNY Children's Hospital at University Hospital and University Hospital's Inpatient Medicine Services Retention and Recognition efforts. Features trophies, raffles and door prizes. Entry fee is $75 for a team of five. Contact Sheila Ruff at 4649115 or Sue Gigon at 464-9704 for details. Preregistration is required. Sponsored by University Hospital's Inpatient Medicine Services.

April 28, May 5, 12, and 19. 5:30 to 8 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall, DeWitt.

"I Can Cope" health seminar. Sign up for one session or for all four. Series helps patients with self-care and promotes physical and emotional well-being. Free. Call 464-8668 to register.

May 13-15, Craftsman Inn, 7300 E. Genesee Street

"Preparing Bright Futures: Experiential Workshop in Basic Pediatric Hypnosis." Workshop includes lectures, demonstrations and experiential training. Intermediate and advance workshops available for those who already have basic training. Cost $450. Maximum of 18.50 category 1 credits designated toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award. Call 464-7525 for more information.

Compliance Charge Posting

SUNY Upstate's Compliance Office reminds SUNY Upstate individuals that it is important that charges are posted within four days of the service date. Posting charges later can significantly increase the potential for error, resulting in noncompliance with regulations and contracts. In many cases, late charges result in missed opportunities for reimbursement and cause a great deal of rework. University Hospital has contracts that have specific timeframes in which charges can be submitted for payment. Also, be sure to post the charge to the proper account number and to enter the correct date the service was given. Charges should only be posted when there is documentation in the medical record to support them. Call Fiscal Services at 464-8086 for more information.

Thursday, April 29, beginning at 6 p.m. Viva Debris Comedy Club, Hotel Syracuse (Harrison Street entrance.) Evening of comedy to benefit

CNY Children's Hospital at University Hospital. Doors open at 6 p.m. to a pre-performance reception featuring free munchies and raffles for prizes. Entertainment begins at 8 p.m. featuring Joe DeLion and Richie Byrne. Tickets are $10 each ($6 of each ticket will be donated to the children's hospital). For tickets or more information, call Karen Capogreco at 464-8929. Sponsored by SUNY Upstate's Hospital Information Systems Department and the Viva Debris Comedy Club.

April 29, 6 to 7 p.m. HealthLink at ShoppingTown Mall, DeWitt.

"Sexual Predators and Your Teens: Essential Info" health seminar. University Hospital pediatrician Ann Botash, MD, heightens parents awareness of this problem and increases their ability to provide information to their children to keep them safe and aware. Free. Call 464-8668 to register.

June 2, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oncenter, Syracuse.

Pediatric Teaching Day: "Health Promotion in the Office: An Approach to the Overweight Child." Topics include childhood and adolescent obesity, Type 2 diabetes in youth, management of childhood obesity, hypnosis and management of obesity, obesity and co-morbid lipid problems, how to help the overweight child, among others. Call 464-5451 or e-mail [email protected] for more information.

Saturday, May 1. Registration at 9 a.m. Walk begins at 10 a.m. Onondaga Lake Park (meet at the Willow Bay pavilion.) Kidney Walk. Join the

University Hospital team in this walk to benefit Team CNY (comprised of members of University Hospital's Transplant Services, transplant recipients, living donors and donor families) and the National Kidney Foundation. Pledges in any denomination are welcome. T shirts given to those who raise a minimum of $50 in pledges. To register or for more information, contact Ellen Havens at 464-5413.

April 29, 5:30 to 7 p.m. 3430 University Hospital

Radiology Student Society (RADSS) Open House for MSIIV medical students. Includes hors d'oeuvres and beverages. RSVP to Ann Jones at 464-7434.

Moderate drinking is defined as one or two drinks per day for men or one drink per day for women or those over the age of 65. Women and the elderly have lower levels of body water, so smaller amounts of alcohol achieve higher alcohol concentrations than in younger men. In other words, when ingesting the same amount of alcohol as a man, a woman will have a higher alcohol concentration. Alcohol is absorbed quickly by the small intestine. Absorption rates depend on the type of food in the stomach. High carbohydrate foods and fatty foods decrease absorption rates. A carbonated or effervescent alcoholic beverage will be absorbed faster. The effects of alcohol may appear within 10 minutes after consumption and peak 40 to 60 minutes later. The alcohol concentration continues to rise if consumption is faster than the rate it is broken down by the liver. It takes about three hours to eliminate the alcohol content of two drinks. Nothing will speed up the process, not even coffee or a cold shower. Your blood alcohol content (BAC) depends on the quantity of the beverage consumed, the alcohol percentage in each drink, your weight and gender and the time spent consuming the drink. There are a number of other factors such as age, physical condition, foods consumed and medications taken. More than 150 different medications should not be taken with alcohol. Antihistamines and cold medications are good examples. How much alcohol is enough? By the time your blood alcohol content (BAC) reaches 0.05, you will likely feel less inhibited and more at ease in social situations. Therefore, if that is the goal, there is no reason to ingest more since your BAC will likely continue to rise for up to an hour after ingesting your last drink. Another consideration is to alternate alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. At what point can you safely drive a motor vehicle? Impairment of driving skills can occur with any amount of alcohol in the blood stream. There is no safe amount of alcohol for anyone driving a motor vehicle, boat, airplane, or operating heavy equipment. Alcohol impairs your ability to judge how impaired you have become. Additionally, the last drink will continue to elevate your blood alcohol content for up to an hour after ingestion. The best policy is to avoid drinking and driving. Appoint a designated driver before your evening or social event begins. The next Upstate Update will include information on alcohol abuse and dependence and where to get help. Direct any comments or inquires to K. Bruce Simmons, MD, medical director, Employee Student Health, 464-4260.

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A message from the co-chairs of the CNY Children's Hospital Employee Fund Drive

As co-chairs of the CNY Children's Hospital Employee Fund Drive, we want to thank all of you who have already pledged your support. We also want to encourage everyone who hasn't yet made his or her pledge, to fill out a pledge card today. SUNY Upstate employees now have a second opportunity to support the CNY Children's Hospital by using payroll deduction through the Upstate Medical University Foundation and having 100 percent of their gift directly deposited into the Children's Hospital Fund. Payroll deductions will begin with the first paycheck in June, and employees still have the option of spreading their gift over the next three years. Our vision is to have the employees of Upstate demonstrate a position of leadership and commitment to the project by raising a significant gift in support of the children's hospital. We're close to reaching our Employee Fund Drive goal of $500,000, with more than $400,000 raised to date. Reaching this goal will clearly demonstrate our employees' commitment to the children of our community -- but we need your help! For as little as $3.85 per pay period for the next three years, you can have your name listed on a permanent "star" located on our employee "Wall of Honor" within the new children's hospital. These stars will serve as a reminder for generations to come that our employees helped to bring a children's hospital to Central New York. We ask that you consider the importance of the children's hospital to this community and region, and think about the giving options in the materials you received. Your contribution will make a remarkable difference in the lives of thousands of children and their families. For questions about the children's hospital, or additional information, call Upstate Medical University Foundation at 464-KIDS.

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Paige'sButterflyRun

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Palmer Elementary School Hicks Rd., Baldwinsville 5K Certified & Timed Race 9 a.m. start time 3K Fun Run/Walk 10 a.m. start time

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On-Site Registration University Hospital 2nd Floor Lobby Tuesday, May 18 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Book Fair and book signing to benefit CNY Children's Hospital

On Saturday, May 8 at 1 p.m., author Ellen Yeomans will autograph copies of Jubilee, her new children's book about heaven. The book signing, to be held at the Barnes & Noble in Clay, will be part of a day long book fair, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., to benefit the CNY Children's Hospital. Coupons must be used for the benefit and will be available on the SUNY Upstate website (www.upstate.edu/events) and through the Children's Miracle Network office, 464-4416. Photocopies may be used and can be distributed to schools, community groups, friends, colleagues, etc. Coupons will not be available on May 8. Barnes & Noble is located at 3956 Route 31, Liverpool (across from Walmart Plaza in Clay). Yeoman's daughter, Paige Arnold, was a patient at University Hospital's Center for Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders. See above for information about Paige's Butterfly Run and refer to page 6 under "Events" for more children's hospital fundraising events.

In Jubilee, Yeomans shares her vision of heaven as a joyful picnic and reunion where family and friends all gather to celebrate. Illustrated by Tim Ladwig, Jubilee vividly shows the sights, sounds, and tastes of that celebration where all joy is to be.

Leola Rodgers and Linda Robson Employee Fund Drive Co-Chairs CNY Children's Hospital Campaign

The article "Integration of ChemicalGenetic and Genetic Interaction Data Links Bioactive Compounds to Cellular Target Pathways," by Patricia Kane-Popp, PhD, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, was published in Nature Biotechnology, (Vol. 22; No. 1, January 2004). Maryann Fields, RN, BNS, trauma nurse coordinator for University Hospital, has been elected as president of the New York Division of the American Trauma Society (ATS). ATS members are supporters and often members of a trauma team who are committed to caring for the trauma patient and the patient's family and to making trauma care and injury prevention a national health care priority. Jeffrey Bogart, MD, SUNY Upstate class of 1989, was appointed vice chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology. Dr. Bogart joined the department as assistant professor at the completion of his residency at SUNY Upstate in 1993. He was named residency program director and educational coordinator in 1997 and was promoted to associate professor in 2000. Valerie Beecher, has joined SUNY Upstate's Employee/Student Health as ergonomics specialist, responsible for developing an ergonomics program for University Hospital, including worksite evaluation, training and education, and product and equipment selection. Ergonomics is the science of fitting jobs to the worker and equipment and tools to the user. Prior to SUNY Upstate, Beecher was an ergonomist at Duke University and Health System where she conducted ergonomic worksite evaluations and provided training for over 200 clinical and non-clinical work areas. Beecher is an associate ergonomics professional who earned a master's degree in industrial engineering, human factors and ergonomics from SUNY Buffalo. She is reachable at 464-4567 or by e-mailing [email protected] Ronald Seymour, PT, PhD, vice chair of the Physical Therapy Education Department at the College of Health Professions, was appointed chair of the Education Committee of the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy for 2004. The Federation is the umbrella agency consisting of 53 jurisdictions governing

licensing of physical therapists. The Education Committee serves as editors of the four annual Federation Forum magazines and plans the annual conference. Brenda Engbretson, PhD, associate professor of health sciences and human studies in the College of Health Professions, will present "Can the Borg RPE Scale Be Used to Prescribe Resistance Exercise Intensity?" at the annual American College of Sports Medicine meetings, held June 2 to 5 in Indianapolis. College of Health Professions physical therapy students Mike Fillinger, Chris Genson, Jason Shewchuck, Matt Lynch and Michelle Redington co-authored the paper. David Boyland, PT, assistant professor of physical therapy education in the College of Health Professions, presented at the following conferences in March: Finger Lakes Sports Medicine Symposium in Canandaigua ("The Throwing Elbow"); Spring Sports Medicine Symposium in Syracuse ("Management of Acute and Chronic AC Joint Injuries" and "Running Injuries"); and Orthopedics East Annual Spring Meeting in Syracuse ("Management of the Arthritic Knee"). Carol Recker-Hughes, PT, assistant professor and academic coordinator of clinical education in the College of Health Professions, participated on a panel regarding subacute care and the changing practice of physical therapy at the Combined Sections Meeting Symposium in Nashville. The abstract "Ubiquitous Computing: A Case Study of Physical Therapy Program's Experience" by Dale Avers, PT, has been accepted at the SUNY Stony Brook CIT conference to be held in June. Avers is assistant professor in the College of Health Professions' Physical Therapy Education Department and director of the Department's doctoral program in physical therapy. Avers also presented a continuing education course in Houston, TX and Charlotte, NC on the evidence-based approach to functional assessment and exercise as an Intervention for older adults. She will also address the first graduating class of the Sacred Heart College's master's in gerontology class in Fairfield CT in April.

The SUNY Upstate Office of Public and Media Relations arranges interviews among Upstate staff and members of the local and national media. Here are a few examples: A study by Ran Anbar, Pediatrics, on curing habit cough with hypnosis has appeared in the February issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, on Reuters newswire and on WebMD. Dr. Anbar was interviewed on the subject by The Australian Radio Network. Patricia Mondore, Pediatrics, was interviewed on WFBL radio regarding the sale of her the CD to benefit the CNY Children's Hospital at University Hospital. University Hospital physical therapist Sarah Meyers discussed the health benefits of walking in a live interview during a noon newscast on WSTM-TV 3. Denise Woodall-Ruff, MD, Children's Center for Nutrition and Exercise: Healthy Lifestyle Family Program, and nutritionist Maryann Russo appeared on WIXT- NewsChannel 9's public affairs program, "With Steve on Sunday," to discuss the epidemic of childhood obesity and outline steps families can take to combat obesity in their children. Joe Spadaro, PhD, and Annie Pennella, Orthopedic Research Laboratory, appeared on WIXTNewsChannel 9 and in the Post-Standard, respectively, about SUNY Upstate's participation in an osteoporosis study.

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Community Giving Campaign receives Governor's Award

Each member of SUNY Upstate's Community Giving Campaign committee has received a State of New York - Executive Chamber Governor's Award in recognition of outstanding support of the 2003 SEFA campaign. Each citation was signed by New York Gov. George E. Pataki. The committee was commended for its efforts which resulted this year in a 19 percent participation increase by SUNY Upstate employees and a 31 percent increase in dollars raised for the campaign. SUNY Upstate's team, led by Zanette Howe of Marketing and University Communications, used a variety of communications vehicles to promote the campaign, including a website; print and electronic communications, that included posters and a video featuring SUNY Upstate employees; and databases that improved the efficiency of information gathering. Presentations were made at University Hospital's Management Forums. In addition, the committee recruited 182 representatives from each SUNY Upstate department who were responsible for encouraging staff participation in the campaign. Congratulations to the members of the 2003 Community Giving Campaign committee for receiving the Governor's Award: Zanette Howe Sharon Putney Rebecca Cerio Judy Runfola Melanie Rich Virginia Westmiller Margaret Bourke Stephanie DeJoseph Trymeter Carter Donna Joyner Carol Ceraldi Susan Keeter Diane Conklin Daniel Hurley June Edwards Sharon Zalatan Klaiber

University Hospital heart volunteers give hope to heart patients

Upstate Update presents this spotlight on the Heart Volunteer program in recognition of National Volunteer Week, April 18-24. The article was written by LeMoyne College senior Amanda Hromalik who is completing an internship in SUNY Upstate's Department of Public and Media Relations. Two years ago, Marcia Hannett and Mary Andriello would never have envisioned themselves participating in University Hospital's heart volunteer program. Marcia's first symptom of heart disease presented as a minor pain in her shoulder whenever she walked up a slight incline. Initially, she dismissed the pain as just being "out of shape," but on a return trip from England, her plane had to make an emergency landing because she was having a heart attack. She had a stent placed in her right coronary artery to prevent future blockage, but six months later she needed triple bypass surgery after she continued to have pressure in her chest. Like most women, Hannett did not realize that she was at risk for heart disease, having no family history, blood pressure or cholesterol problems. Nor, did she recognize the subtle pain as a symptom of heart disease. Mary Andriello was diagnosed with heart disease in Oct. 2002. The nurse caring for her husband arrived at the house to find her sitting in a chair, sweating and with a shaky heartbeat. She was sent to a cardiologist who prescribed open heart surgery. Marcia and Mary are using their personal experiences as a way to help others who are preparing for open heart surgery by volunteering with University Hospital's Heart Volunteer Program. The program enlists people who have had open heart surgery to help patients and their families prepare for the surgery. Heart Volunteer Virginia Haynes has had heart surgery four times between 1969 and 1994 and has been with University Hospital's program since its inception in 1982. She remembers what a frightening experience it was to prepare for open heart surgery, especially having little information about the procedure at the time. She dedicates her time to help other patients to face the surgery. "It gives patients hope when they see me active and walking around," Haynes said. "It helps for the patients to see that these volunteers have survived open heart surgery and have a normal lifestyle." According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one cause of death for American women. Warning signs of heart disease include pain or pressure in the chest, arms, neck, or jaw, shortness of breath, dizziness, breaking out in a cold sweat and nausea. Knowing the symptoms and getting them checked out can be a lifesaving measure. For more information on the heart volunteer program, contact Andrea Kennedy-Tull in Volunteer Services at University Hospital at 464-5180.

The Race for the Cure to benefit the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation will be held Saturday, May 8, beginning at 8:30 a.m. at the New York State Fairgrounds. Among those participating will be Robin Tetrault of the Department of Surgery. In the article below, Robin explains in her own words why it is important for her and others to support the race and breast cancer research: In 1980 I began taking belly dancing lessons because I needed to exercise to keep my scoliosis under control and keep myself pain free. Belly dancing has brought me many friends and helped me through several of life's ups and downs. Little did I know what an important role it would play following surgery to remove a small breast cyst that was refusing to be aspirated. Over the past thirteen years I have had several breast cysts aspirated and it had become a "ho hum" sort of occurrence for me, so I was totally unprepared to find out that I had breast cancer. Valentine's Day has never been one of my favorite holidays, probably due to the fact that it has never lived up to my expectations. Feb. 14, 2003, was definitely the most awful Valentine's Day that I have ever had ­ it was the day I heard the worst four words of my life - "you have breast cancer." Four words that have the power to turn your life upside down. My surgeon believes in balance and he immediately followed those awful words with five wonderful words - "you're not going to die." Shocked and numb, I listened to a description of the type of cancer I had and what was to happen next. God, family and friends and dance got me through the next 2 1/2 months. After six and a half weeks of radiation, I was told that the biggest side effect would be fatigue. I had planned to perform at Katina's CNY Bellydance Festival, but decided not to since my last treatment was scheduled just five days before the event. During the second week of treatment, I felt God suggesting that I dance cancer out of my life and I decided to perform at the festival. My radiation therapist told me that I should forget about performing because I might not have the energy. Due to fatigue, I almost agreed, but then I would feel Him nudge me off the couch and into my dance studio. I figured that this may not be my best performance, but it would definitely be my most meaningful one. My mom, my friends and even my surgeon and his nurse came to the festival. I began my performance wearing a pink survivor's t-shirt over my costume. As I removed the t-shirt and tossed it aside I knew that I had thrown breast cancer from my life. All in all, I had an easy cancer experience; many women do not. Last year another dancer/survivor, two dance friends and I donned shimmy belts and walked the course of the Race for the Cure. We were a sight to see and hear. We will be there again this year; so, if you hear jingling ­ it will be bellydancers from Syracuse walking to help eliminate breast cancer. 10

Heart Volunteers, front row, from left: E. Jane Lanzendorf, Belva Vlassopulos, Mary Andriello, and Ginny Haynes. Back row, from left: John Henderson, Marcia Harnett, Tim Sturick, Carmen Spadaro and Herb Isaacs. Not all Heart Volunteers are photographed.

Nominations Due April 26 for Outstanding Hospital and Campus Employees

If you know someone who makes a difference to SUNY Upstate, the deadline to submit a nomination for the President's Employee Recognition awards is April 26. The awards acknowledge outstanding non-faculty employees and teams and encompass the

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Front row, from left: Sharon Zalatan Klaiber, Zanette Howe, Diane Conklin. Back row, from left: Carol Ceraldi, Margaret Bourke, Becky Cerio, Melanie Rich, Tree Carter, Stephanie DeJoseph, Judy Runfola, and Sharon Putney

existing annual Hospital Awards for University Hospital employees, as well as new awards for employees of the four colleges and those in shared service departments. Categories for the President's Employee Recognition awards include: Employee of the Year;

Supervisor of the Year; Team of the Year; and Outstanding Contribution of the Year. For downloadable nomination forms, visit www.upstate.edu/admin/president/awards.shtml or call Nancy Prott at 464-7860. 11

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Gift Shop closes

After a 41 year run, the University Hospital Gift Shop, operated by Advocates for SUNY Upstate Medical University, has closed due to the hospital lobby renovation project. Gift items are available at the Eckerd's hospital location and may also be carried by the coffee bar when it relocates in May. Other food and snack items are available in the hospital cafeteria located on the second floor and in vending machines near the cafeteria.

Putting the HIPAA Privacy Rule to the test

University Hospital recently implemented its incident command plan in response to a school bus accident that resulted in children being assessed and treated in University Hospital's Emergency Department. According to SUNY Upstate Privacy Officer Cindy Nappa, this incident offered an opportunity to review the information that hospital personnel are permitted to share with school representatives and parents of the children who call the hospital for updates on their child's condition. Nappa offers the following guidelines provided by the Department of Health and Human Services. Q. May a doctor or hospital disclose protected health information to a person or entity that can assist in notifying a patient's family member of the patient's location and condition? A. Yes. The HIPAA Privacy Rule permits a doctor or hospital to disclose protected health information to a person or entity that will assist in notifying a patient's family member of the patient's location, general condition or death. The patient's written authorization is not required to notify, identify, or locate the patient's family members, his or her personal representative, or to the person responsible for the patient's care. Certain conditions must be met before disclosure of information, such as providing the patient the opportunity to agree or object or making an inference based on professional judgment that the patient does not object to and the disclosure is in the patient's best interest. Nappa adds that University Hospital's overall response to the schoolbus incident was a reflection of a common-sense balance between protecting patients' privacy rights and ensuring information was provided to the school and to the children's parents in a timely and coordinated manner. "This was truly a team effort that was given very positive recognition by those involved in terms of our response to the information issues presented," said Nappa.

Susan Bastable reception is April 28

SUNY Upstate individuals are invited to a reception for Susan Bastable, EdD, RN, Wednesday, April 28, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. in Weiskotten Hall's ninth floor cafeteria. Dr. Bastable is leaving SUNY Upstate to become the director of LeMoyne College's upper division nursing program. She has been on faculty at SUNY Upstate's College of Nursing since 1990 and participated in all the accreditation processes throughout the program.

Note: Contact the Human Resources Department for address corrections. Upstate Update is published by the Public and Media Relations Department at SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY. To submit news or calendar items, contact editor Doretta Royer, Fourth Floor, 250 Harrison Street, 464-4836; e-mail: royerd. Printed by Upstate Medical University Duplicating and Printing Services.

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