Read North_Ga_-_Doctor_of_Nursing_Practice.pdf text version

Letter of Intent New Doctoral Program Proposal

RECEIVED

AUG 25 2009

Institution: North Georgia College & State University Date: 8/24/2009 SchoollDivision: Department of Nursing, School of Science and Health Professions Degree: DNP Major: Nursing CIP Code: Starting Date: Fall 2010

51.169M.MIDDLETON

Description and Objective of the Degree:

North Georgia College & State University (NGCSU) intends to develop a Doctor of Nursing Practice

(DNP) degree as a post-master's degree with 39 to 41 credit hours offered over five semesters including

540 clinical practice hours. Eventually, the plan is to expand the program to a post-baccalaureate degree

for registered nurses. This proposal also meets two goals from the University System ofGeorgia Nursing

Education Plan (6/17/08): # 2. Increase the number ofUSG nursing faculty members and # 4. Increase

the educational level of the Georgia nursing workforce.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) and other visionary professional nursing

groups such as the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) have proposed that

DNP preparation should be the entry level for advanced nursing practice by 2015. Therefore, all nurses

desiring to advance their level of practice as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse

midwives, or registered nurse anesthetists would need to enroll in DNP programs.

DNP curricula build on the current master's level education by expanding the student's knowledge of

evidence-based practice, quality improvement, and systems thinking. The eight essentials ofthe DNP

curriculum include nursing science, organizational and systems leadership, the scholarship of application,

technology, health care policy, collaboration, population health and prevention and the advanced practice

role. There is also a requirement for a final scholarly project that is research-based (AACN, 2006).

Currently, NGCSU has a long-standing FNP program that is nationally accredited and our graduates

enjoy high pass rates on national certification examinations. North Georgia also presently prepares nurse

educators. The proposed curriculum will offer the option of enrolling in nurse educator courses as

electives that will prepare the DNP graduate to assume a faculty role and, thereby, help to relieve the

nursing faculty shortage that is being experienced in Georgia as well as nationally. In summary, the

objectives of the DNP degree are to prepare advanced practice nurses at the highest level of clinical

practice and to provide a pool of doctorally-prepared potential faculty in nursing.

Program Fit to Institutional Mission and Nationally-Accepted Trends in Nursing:

The mission of North Georgia College & State University is to develop and educate leaders through

strong liberal arts, pre-professional, professional, and graduate programs. North Georgia provides an

environment of academic excellence that develops leaders who respect all people, maintain high ethical

standards, continue intellectual and personal growth, and serve the community, state, nation, and the

world (excerpted, NGCSU Mission Statement). The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) will further the

mission ofNorth Georgia by adding a premier professional graduate program to the current strong

offerings in the Nursing Department. This degree will prepare nurse leaders who will serve not only the

North Georgia community but the entire state of Georgia and the nation.

North Georgia has recently completed the strategic planning process for 2008-2013. Under the section on

Institutional Image the document notes, "As we move forward, we will continue to expand our graduate

and professional degree programs to meet the growing needs of our students as they work and serve

throughout the region and the world." The DNP program is consistent with this image of our institution as

it will answer a need for a professional doctorate in nursing in the north Georgia region.

In addition to the movement toward the DNP as the entry level for advanced practice as discussed earlier,

the establishment of another DNP program in the state is consistent with calls from the Institute of

Medicine (2003) and the National Research Council of the National Academies (2005, p.74) for nursing

1

education that prepares individuals for practice with interdisciplinary, information systems, quality improvement, and patient safety expertise. As the requirement for the DNP goes into effect, two possible circumstances will exist if we are unable to expand the number and capacity ofDNP programs in Georgia: Georgia's advanced practice nurses will be under-credentialed and will seek educational mobility outside of the state or potentially leave practice in Georgia. This will relegate Georgia's rural citizens to fewer advanced health care providers at a time when primary care physicians are decreasing in numbers in rural settings.

Response to Demand Data from a needs assessments conducted by North Georgia in August 2008 illustrates the need and potential student base for the program. · The majority of the 150 respondents were masters-prepared nurses (n=123, 82%). Only 60 (40%) were graduates of North Georgia. · Most were nurse practitioners (n=103). Others included clinical nurse specialists (n=8), nurse midwives (n=5), and nurse anesthetists (n=I), nurse administrators (n=12), and nurse educators (n=25). · Interest in the DNP was expressed by 90% (n=136) with 86 desiring to start as soon as 2009. · The majority were interested in either an online program (n=54, 36%) or a mix of online and traditional methods (n=76, 51 %). · Comments stressed the proximity ofNGCSU and flexibility of online classes as attractive factors as well as reputation of North Georgia as a quality nursing program.

The University System of Georgia has 11 MSN-granting institutions. Eight of those educate advanced practice nurses who are eligible for DNP program entry, however, only two DNP programs currently exist in the state. MCG enrolls approximately 15 students Iyear; Georgia Southern University plans to enroll 10. As the DNP becomes the entry level for advanced practice nurses, the numbers of prospective students seeking the practice doctorate for certification will far outnumber the available program enrollments. The proposed program would represent the first DNP program in northern Georgia in a public setting. While the initial student enrollment would likely represent NGCSU MS alumni, the needs assessment indicates a pool of additional students from other MSN programs throughout the state. Once the BSN DNP option would be in effect, graduates of Brenau, Kennesaw, and West Georgia would be in the projected applicant pool. In the steady enrollment state, 10-15 graduates per year are anticipated from North Georgia.

Institutional Resources Resources for the program include budget, facilities, and the development and delivery of the curriculum by the faculty. Budget Initially, NGCSU Department of Nursing will assign 1Yz FTE to the DNP program representing the efforts of several different faculty members who will divide the instructional load according to the courses that are offered and the expertise of the faculty. We expect that the program will also require administrative support equivalent to 1/3 FTE that will be provided from existing administrative staff. The Director of the Library has been asked to investigate the cost of adding to the collection to support the online DNP program. It is the intention to apply for HRSA grant funding to assist in further development of the program and the current plan is that the program will not start until this funding is obtained. Facilities The Department of Nursing is currently located in the Health and Natural Sciences building and has adequate classroom space and technological resources to accommodate this program. Existing student services are adequate to support the program; additional special services will not be needed.

2

Curriculum and Delivery The curriculum for the DNP is being developed based on nationally accepted standards provided by such organizations as AACN and NONPF utilizing the expertise of the combined graduate faculty. With a range of 7-9 credit hours in each of the five terms, the program will provide students with the additional expertise they need to be leaders in the health care field. The culminating scholarly project for this program will be an original translational research project that will move the evidence basis for practice forward in the student's selected area of interest. An additional feature of the curriculum is the ability to produce new doctorally-prepared nursing faculty. Georgia and the nation are experiencing a nursing faculty shortage. Students will have the opportunity to enroll in our current nursing education courses to better prepare them to become accomplished educators as well as clinicians. Clinical experiences are a critical component of any nursing curriculum. Opportunities for varied clinical experiences have been provided across courses and include both public and private agencies, many of which serve those citizens who are underserved and from diverse patient populations. North Georgia's nurse managed center provides outstanding clinical opportunities for the students to not only hone their clinical skills, but examine and improve health system delivery. As a primarily online program, nurses in educationally underserved areas will have access to a clinical doctorate. The program will also be attractive to those professionals that desire the clinical doctorate but must continue to work full time. The service area for North Georgia is also designated as a Health Provider Shortage Area (HPSA) making the need for preparation of primary health care providers a priority. Given the clinical features of the program, the health care needs of underserved populations will be addressed by the addition of this program. The proposed program will be delivered primarily online with two to three intensive, face to face sessions each semester. North Georgia has a strong record in delivering online and face to face programs and is ready with the technology to deliver this program. The program design, strength of the nursing faculty, and opportunities to work with patient populations in a nurse managed center are features that will encourage students to enroll in this program. NGCSU nursing faculty have an extensive history in obtaining HRSA Advanced Education in Nursing Traineeship grants to fund student tuition; this type of funding can be an important factor to students as they choose a program. The school is also experienced in obtaining funding for HRSA Advanced Education in Nursing grants that allow for, not only addition of faculty, but other attractive enhancements to the program that would not otherwise be possible. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2004). MeN Position Statement on the Practice Doctorate in Nursing. Washington, DC: Author. Institute of Medicine (2003). Health Professions Education: A bridge to quality. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. National Research Council of the National Academies (2005). Advancing the nation's health needs: NIH research training programs. Washington, DC: National Academies Press

3

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA

APPLIED DOCTORAL DEGREES

ADDITIONAL CRITERIA

(Submit One Copy with the Letter ofIntent)

Institution: North Georgia College & State University Institutional Contact (President or Vice President for Academic Affairs): Linda Roberts-Betsch Date: 8/24/09 SchoollDivision: School of Science and Health Professions Department: Nursing Name of Proposed Program: Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree: DNP Major: Nursing Degree Inscription: Doctor of Nursing Practice CIP Code:

51.1699

Anticipated Starting Date: Fall 2010

Program Classification: Applied Doctoral Degree

Applied Doctoral Degrees - Points of Clarification Please describe how the institution meets each of the qualifying principles below: 1. Proposals must clearly demonstrate high and sustained market demand for the professional degree. This program will have a high and sustained market demand from multiple points of view. Georgia is currently experiencing nursing shortages in the areas of registered nurses, nurse faculty, and primary care providers. The proposed Doctor of Nursing Practice Program has the potential to affect all of these areas. By preparing clinical faculty, this DNP program can help alleviate the shortage of well-prepared faculty and thus the shortage of registered nurses. With nine hours of electives in curriculum, instruction, and

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

evaluation, the proposed DNP program has the potential to prepare nursing educators who have the additional knowledge and skills of a clinical doctorate that can address this shortage of qualified faculty. There are currently 15 programs in Georgia that offer the Master of Science degree in nursing of which 11 are in the University System. Eight of those educate advanced practice nurses who are eligible for DNP program entry, however, only two DNP programs currently exist in the state. MeG emolls approximately 15 students Iyear; Georgia Southern University plans to emolll0 in its initial class. Georgia is also facing a healthcare provider shortage. The service area for North Georgia is also designated as Health Provider Shortage Area (HPSA) making the need for preparation of health care providers a priority. As the DNP becomes the entry level for advanced practice nurses, the numbers of prospective students seeking the practice doctorate for certification will far outnumber the available program enrollments. If additional programs are not implemented this will relegate Georgia's rural citizens to fewer advance health care providers at a time when primary care physicians are decreasing in numbers in rural settings (Atlanta Journal Constitution, July 7, 2008). Establishing another DNP program in the state is consistent with calls from the Institute of Medicine (2003) and the National Research Council of the National Academies (2005, p.74) for nursing education that prepares individuals for practice with interdisciplinary, information systems, quality improvement, and patient safety expertise. Additionally, data from a needs assessment conducted by North Georgia in August 2008 illustrates the local need and potential student base for the program. · The majority of the 150 respondents were masters-prepared nurses (n=123, 82%). Only 60 (40%) were graduates of North Georgia. · The largest group identified themselves as nurse practitioners (n=1 03) with several clinical nurse specialists (n=8), nurse midwives (n=5), and nurse anesthetists (n=I). There were also several nurse administrators (n=12) and nurse educators (n=25). · Ninety percent (n=136) indicated interest in the DNP program now or in the near future with 86 interested in starting as soon as 2009. · Most respondents were interested in either an online program (n=54, 36%) or a mix of online and traditional methods (n=76, 51 %). · Comments stressed the proximity ofNGCSU and flexibility of online classes as attractive factors as well as reputation of North Georgia as a quality nursing program. · Additionally, since the close of the survey, the institution has received numerous calls and electronic mail correspondence wanting to know when the program might be available indicating a solid pool of applicants for the initial classes. The proposed program would represent the first DNP program in northern Georgia in a public setting and the survey results indicate a robust market for the DNP degree in its initial post-masters classification. While the initial student emollment would likely represent NGCSU MS alumni, the needs assessment indicates a pool of additional students from other MSN programs throughout the state. Once the BSN-DNP option was implemented, graduates of Brenau, Kennesaw, and West Georgia would be in the projected applicant pool. In the steady emollment state, 10-15 graduates per year are anticipated.

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

2. The proposing institution must clearly demonstrate readiness to implement the degree program and be prepared to cover all startup costs. Proposals must clearly demonstrate that the program's infrastructure is sustainable by having available faculty resources and other support attributes. North Georgia is ready to implement this program with existing resources and the funding of a HRSA Advanced Education in Nursing (AEN) grant. North Georgia has a policy to return 80% of the tuition generated by a new program to the department for the first two years. This will allow the department to fund adjunct faculty replacements for the faculty assigned to the DNP program. North Georgia also has a strong track record in receiving HRSA Advanced Nursing Education grants to fund new programs. Grant funding will be critical to the start up for this new program to further defray initial and continuing costs. AEN awards are usually granted for a three year period with the option to renew for an additional three years. With eventual expansion of the program to a post-baccalaureate degree, it is reasonable to expect to extend funding even beyond the six years. The Department of Nursing is currently located in the Health and Natural Sciences building and has adequate classroom space to accommodate this program for the onsite component. The Department of Nursing has successfully offered courses online in all of its programs. The infrastructure to support the curriculum is already in place with the ability to offer both synchronous and asynchronous learning environments. In addition to GeorgiaVIEW Vista, North Georgia also has the ability to offer a synchronous, collaborative learning environment through the addition of WIMBA to Vista courses. Existing student services are adequate to support online programs; additional special services will not be needed. Initially, NGCSU Department of Nursing will assign 1liz FTE to the DNP program representing the efforts of several different faculty members by dividing the instructional load according to the courses that are offered and the expertise of the faculty. The AEN grant will allow for a new faculty line and adjunct faculty or guest lecturers as deemed appropriate. We expect that the program will also require administrative support equivalent to 1/3 FTE that will be provided from existing administrative staff. The Director of the Library has been asked to investigate the cost of adding to the collection to support the DNP program. There are now two approved DNP programs in Georgia; one through the Medical College of Georgia and the other through Georgia Southern University. Our program will target nurses with an interest in rural health, where many of our MS graduates now practice. The strengths of the nursing faculty are a plus. NGCSU has extensive histories obtaining HRSA Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship grants to assist students with tuition. Existing student services are adequate to support online programs; additional special services will not be needed. Current NGCSU Faculty Members Available to Teach in the DNP Program · Grace Newsome, EdD, APRN, BC, FNP (Professor and Coordinator, MS program). Dr. Newsome is the program director of the Appalachian Nurse Practitioner Clinic and has extensive experience in leadership positions (Chair or the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) and in assessment and evaluation of programs. She is also an experienced family nurse practitioner with an active practice in the Clinic as well as having

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

experience serving on the Governor-appointed Health Strategies Council and the Advisory Board for the State Office of Rural Health. · Toni Barnett, PhD, APRN, BC, FNP (Professor and Chair, Department of Nursing) Dr. Barnett brings experience in health policy and leadership (Served on the Georgia Board of Nursing). Dr. Barnett also maintains clinical practice in the nurse-managed center. · Marina Slemmons, PhD, CPNP (Professor, MS Program) Dr. Slemmons has a strong background in research and evidence-based practice and is currently serving on the Executive Board for the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners bringing a national leadership perspective to the program. She is also fluent in the use of technology in nursing practice and education. · Michelle Byrne, PhD, RN (Professor, Coordinator ofMS, Nurse Educator Program) Dr. Byrne has expertise in qualitative research, quality improvement programs, and patient safety. She is also an expert author and legal consultant as well as currently serving as president of the Competency and Credentialing Institute (the certification agency for operating room nurses).

3. The proposed doctoral degree curriculum must be of high quality, including a significant requirement for independent, original research. The proposed curriculum has been developed jointly by a team of doctorally-prepared APRNs who are also experienced educators. Consistent with accreditation requirements, the curriculum was developed using national guidelines, specifically the following: · The Essentials ofMaster's Education for Advanced Practice Nursing (AACN, 2008) · The Essentials ofDoctoral Educationfor Advanced Practice Nursing (AACN, 2006) · NLNAC Standards and Criteria: Clinical Doctorate(1\TLNAC, 2008) · DNP Roadmap Task Force Report (AACN, 2006) · Practice Doctorate NP Competencies (NONPF, 2008) This design team also reviewed the nursing program accreditation standards and completed a comprehensive review of existing DNP programs' curricula to discover best practices. The group also reviewed the Exemplar Curriculum Templates developed by NONPF (National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties). The curriculum is inclusive ofthe theoretical foundation established nationally: role transition; health care systems, organizational behavior, and change; epidemiology and biostatistics for population health; evidenced based practice and practice inquiry; health care policy; healthcare finance and economics; ethics; informatics; technology; and leadership in health delivery. The proposed curriculum meets requirements for NLNAC andlor CCNE national accreditation ofDNP programs. The initial post-MSN curriculum consists of39-41 credit hours, depending on student choice of elective coursework. The program design extends over five semesters and includes didactic courses to meet all of the nationally specified DNP competencies, as well as 540 hours of supervised clinical practice. The clinical practice to credit hour ratio will be 4: 1. To increase the numbers of clinicians who can potentially serve as qualified nursing faculty in this time of acute shortage, electives will be provided in nursing education content. Students may elect either full-time or part-time study.

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

Two additional distinctions will be available in the proposed program curriculum: (l) elective courses will be offered to those students who wish to prepare for nursing faculty roles and (2) an extensive conceptual basis for rural nursing and the distinctive opportunities for DNP graduates to affect rural healthcare will be integrated throughout the program. Clinical practica and scholarly project courses will provide students with opportunities to engage in healthcare practice and research with rural populations in northern Georgia. North Georgia currently has practice arrangements with diverse clinical sites. Nursing faculty members are actively involved in clinical practice. Both of these arrangements strengthen the link with the practice environment so necessary for successful DNP programs and provide expert clinicians to serve as preceptors. North Georgia has a nurse-practitioner managed health service on our University campus where best clinical practices may be explored. North Georgia also has affiliations with volunteer clinics where underserved rural populations receive care. According to the AACN Essentials for Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (2006), PhD programs are designed to prepare nurse scientists and scholars, these programs focus heavily on scientific content and research methodology; and all require an original research project and the completion and defense of a dissertation or linked research papers. On the other hand, practice-focused doctoral programs, such as the proposed DNP, are designed to prepare experts in specialized advanced nursing practice. They focus heavily on practice that is innovative and evidence-based, reflecting the application of credible research findings. The two types of doctoral programs differ in their goals and the competencies of their graduates. They represent complementary, alternative approaches to the highest level of educational preparation in nursing. Careful attention in program marketing will be given to informing prospective students of the differences in the traditional PhD program and the DNP program, especially with regard to research preparation and prospective faculty roles after graduation. To address the portion of the criteria that there is a significant requirement for independent research, the research requirement for the proposed DNP program is spread over a series of five courses with an additional two supporting courses. The following shows the proposed courses with an initial plan for content: · Clinical Scholarship and Methods for Evidence-Based Practice I - Introduction to evidence based practice and knowledge application! translation, forming clinical questions, finding and evaluating evidence, application to practice · Clinical Scholarship and Methods for Evidence-Based Practice II - Outcomes research, intervention research, quality improvement, program evaluation · Project Development - development of the design & evaluation plan for the DNP capstone project which requires each student to identify a clinical project that addresses significant innovation that is evidence-based. This will be further developed in the two Capstone Project Courses under the student's advisor. · Capstone Project I & II - clinical project that is research-based and translational in nature. It will include selection & implementation of evidence-based interventions in a selected clinical site and the collection of data to evaluate the effectiveness ofthe interventions. Includes written & public presentation of findings and submission for publication in a peer-reviewed scholarly journal.

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

Supporting Courses · Epidemiology & Biostatistics - analysis of epidemiological, biostatistical, environmental, genetic, behavioral, & socioeconomic data to evaluate interventions & health care delivery models. · Informatics - design, select, use, & evaluate health care information systems that evaluate & monitor outcomes of care, systems, and quality improvement. Develop an evaluation plan using data extraction from practice information systems & databases. Ethical & legal issues relating to use of information & information technology. 4. A program may not be proposed ifthere is a cost-effective and high-quality alternative delivery approach that could be offered through a proximate institutional partnership and/or hosting arrangement. There are no similar programs in the immediate service area; two DNP programs have been approved for Georgia at this time: Georgia Southern University and the Medical College of Georgia programs. With over 150 students indicating an interest in the DNP program, as evidenced by the North Georgia needs assessment, and only 25 students being admitted at MCG and GS there is an urgent need for additional quality programs within the state. 5. The institution must demonstrate a history of success in delivering undergraduate and/or master's degrees in the discipline(s) of the proposed doctorate. North Georgia has delivered successful associate, baccalaureate, and master's programs in nursing for many years. Most pertinently, the master's program was started in 1998 and has graduated, as of May 2009, 10 classes of family nurse practitioners for a total of 141 health care providers for the North Georgia region. As a testament to the success of the program, our graduates have completed the certification exams to practice as an FNP, with an overall 97% pass rate and a 100% pass rate for the last four consecutive years. All programs are accredited by the NLNAC and the associate and baccalaureate programs are approved by the Georgia Board of Nursing (GBON). The GBON does not review graduate programs. The master's program was first accredited by the NLNAC in 2000 and has remained continually accredited since that time. 6. The institution must demonstrate that establishment of the program will not diminish its commitment to existing undergraduate and master's degree programs offered. Existing undergraduate and graduate programs at North Georgia will be enhanced by the existence of a DNP program. Since the DNP will begin as a post-master's program it will have no effect on the existing programs offered in the Department of Nursing. Again, it will only enhance those programs through exposure to and collaboration with these clinical expert students. Through their scholarly projects they will provide opportunities for the undergraduate and master's students to collaborate in research efforts to improve practice. Additionally, we expect opportunities to develop relationships and cooperative projects among not only the nursing programs, but also other graduate programs at the University such as the Doctor of Physical Therapy and Master of Business Administration.

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

Because the program will begin only with external funding, the initiation ofthe DNP will not have any budgetary impact on the existing programs. The plan is to continue admitting the same number of students in each of the existing programs. If Board of Regents' approval is given, the waiver will be time-limited: A sunset provision will be imposed, and a program cancelled, if appropriate success is not demonstrated by an established deadline.

Source: Final Report ofthe Committee on Professional/Applied Doctorate Degrees (Draft 5)

"Creating A More Educated Georgia"

www.usg.edu

Information

10 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

92694


Notice: fwrite(): send of 199 bytes failed with errno=104 Connection reset by peer in /home/readbag.com/web/sphinxapi.php on line 531