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2010

FACULTY OF SCIENCES

(a)

Undergraduate

CONTENTS

GENERAL INFORMATION......................................................................................................................... 3 FACULTY BOARD AND FACULTY STAFF............................................................................................. 6 LECTURING AND TECHNICAL STAFF .................................................................................................. 7 RULES FOR DEGREES Baccalaureus Scientiae (BSc) ......................................................................... .............................................. 15 BSc(Applied Geology) BSc(Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) BSc(Biotechnology) BSc(Chemical Sciences) BSc(Computer Science) BSc(Environmental & Water Science) BSc(Medical Bioscience) BSc(Mathematical & Statistical Science) BSc(Physical Science) Rules for the four-year BSc stream ................................................................................................................. 29 Baccalaureus Pharmaceuticae (BPharm)........................................................................................................ .44

PROGRAMMES AND CURRICULA Applied Geology..................................................................................................................................... 17 & 31 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology ............................................................... ................................ 18 & 32 Biotechnology ....................................................................................................... ................................ 19 & 33 Chemical Sciences ................................................................................................ ................................ 20 & 34 Computer Science ................................................................................................. ................................ 21 & 35 Environmental and Water Science ........................................................................ ................................ 22 & 37 Mathematical and Statistical Sciences ................................................................. ................................ 23 & 38 Mathematics ....................................................................................................... ................................ 23 & 38 Statistics ............................................................................................................. ................................ 24 & 39 Medical Biosciences .............................................................................................. ................................ 25 & 40 Pharmacy ............................................................................................................... ......................................... 44 Physical Science ................................................................................................... ................................ 26 & 41 English for Educational Development (EED) ..................................................... ....................................... 127 Science Foundation ............................................................................................... ....................................... 128

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GENERAL INFORMATION

CORRESPONDENCE WITH THE UNIVERSITY All postal correspondence should be addressed to the relevant person or department at: THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE PRIVATE BAG X17 BELLVILLE 7535 Should you not know the person or department, please direct all correspondence to: THE REGISTRAR UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE PRIVATE BAG X17 BELLVILLE 7535

CONTACT NUMBERS UWC Switchboard UWC Call Centre General Fax +27 (0)21 959-2911 +27 (0)21 959 3900/1/2/3 +27 (0)21 959-3126

THE UNIVERSITY'S WEBSITE: www.uwc.ac.za

ENQUIRIES AND APPLICATIONS BY STUDENTS Faculty related enquiries can be directly forwarded to: The Senior Faculty Officer Faculty of Sciences The University of the Western Cape Private Bag X17 Bellville 7535 Tel: Fax: Email: +27 (0)21 959 3426 +27 (0)21 959 2266 [email protected]

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BUILDINGS WHERE THE STAFF ARE ACCOMODATED DEPARTMENT Biodiversity and Conservation Biology Biotechnology Chemistry Computer Science Earth Sciences Environmental and Water Science Mathematics and Applied Mathematics Medical Biosciences School of Pharmacy Physics Statistics GENERAL BURSARIES AND LOANS Full particulars of bursaries and loans are set out in a separate brochure that is obtainable from: Financial Aid Office University of the Western Cape Private Bag X17 BELLVILLE 7535 Tel: +27 (0)21 959 3114 NAME OF BUILDING New Life Science Building New Life Science Building Chemistry (South Campus) Computer Science (South Campus) Old Arts Building Life Science Building Mathematics (South Campus) New Life Science Building Pharmacy Physics (South Campus) Statistics (South Campus)

CALENDAR The calendar is obtainable in the following separate parts: Part I Part II General Information Faculty of Science (a) Undergraduate (b) Postgraduate Part III Faculty of Arts (a) Undergraduate (b) Postgraduate Part IV Faculty of Economics and Management Sciences (a) Undergraduate (b) Postgraduate Part V Faculty of Education Part VI Faculty of Dentistry (a) Undergraduate (b) Postgraduate Part VII Faculty of Law Part VIII Faculty of Community and Health Sciences Part IX Schedule of Fees

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TEACHING AND EXAMINATION TIMETABLE A separate publication containing the Faculty's teaching and examination time-tables is obtainable from the Faculty Office during registration. NOTICE All particulars in this calendar are applicable as from January 1, 2010. The University reserves the right to amend any regulation or provision at any time without prior notice. No responsibility can be accepted for inaccuracies. Although every attempt has been made to ensure that the information is accurate, the University does not accept any liability in regard to inaccuracies of any of the contents in the Calendar.

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FACULTY BOARD Members The Rector (ex officio), Vice Rectors (ex officio). Dean: Prof JM van Bever Donker Professors: C Africa, GJ Amabeoku, F Ameer, C Arendse, P Baker, F Benyah, A Bheekie, RJ Blignaut, NC Butler, A Channing, A Christoffels, DA Cowan, S Davison, M de Kock, DLL Dietrich, PFK Eagles, BC Fielding, RL Fray, MJ Gibbons, P Gouws, IR Green, R Henkel, MD Hofmeyr, E Iwuoha, Q Johnson, B Julies, D Knoesen, C Koen, D Kotze, CJ Linder, R Lindsay, V Linkov, WT Mabusela, RH Madjoe,SF Malan, G Maneveldt, GS Maritz, D Marshall, D Mazvimavi, T Monsees, P Mugabo, B Ndimba, HO Nyongesa, C Okujeni, K Patidar, E Pool, LM Raitt, DJG Rees, JA Syce, M Tchokonte, G van der Horst, IM Venter, PJ Witbooi, Y Xu. Extraordinary Professors: J Agbinya, V Bajic, J Blackledge, E Braune, MJ Danson, RJ de Meijer, R Eubel, W Folk, M Gaunt, C Gehring, R Gorter, C Gray, G Green, W Hide, J Key, D Kilkenny, AJ Lastovica, EM Moll, WA Richter, C Seoighe, T Sewell, V Sewram, JF Sharpey-Shafer, R Shell, AR Slabas, P Valodia, E van der Merwe, D Wilson. Drs: SH Abdul-Rasool, A Akinlua, Z Arieff, R Bailie, M Benjeddou, C Cress, T de Oliviera, J de Smidt, W Fish, DW Fisher, S Halindintwali, DC Hiss, N Jahed, RE Julies, J Klaasen, R Knight, C Makasu, N Marcus, L Mbonile, R McBride, T Morris, E Mwambene, K Obikezi, RM Omar, MO Onani, L Petrik, DJR Pugh, A Sathiya Susuman, G Tati, S Titinchi, WD Tucker, IM Tuffin, K Ward, C Willemse. Messrs: MS Allie, AS Azad, R Bapoo, AP Burger, J Connan, LF Cyster, RN Domoney, N Ebrahim, H Harribhai, M Hendricks, A Ismail, J Joubert, Y Kippie, A Latief, PM McLaren, M Mdekazi, P Meyer, J Nel, MJ Norman, ACT Scheepers, FM Weitz. Mmes: MG du Preez, C Klein, L Maree, F Ngece, MB Parker, M Pretorius, H Samsodien, A Shaik, N Stiegler, K Wallace. Representative from Faculty of Education: Mr K Langenhoven Representative from Faculty of Arts: Mr K Goodman Rep from Faculty of Community & Health Sciences: Prof E Kortenbout Rep from Faculty of Economic & Management Sciences: Mr T Mjebeza

FACULTY OFFICE STAFF Dean: Deputy Deans: Prof JM van Bever Donker, Drs(Leiden), PhD(UCT) Prof C Africa, PhD (London) Prof PJ Witbooi, MSc (UWC), PhD (UCT) MD Dietrich, NDSOAD, NDH: PSE (PenTech) UC Syster, ADM (UWC) M Eckstein, BSc, BEd (UWC) M Mottie S Slinger, BA, HDE (UWC) N Nkula, BAdmin(Hons)(UWC) R Christians G Becorney 6

Secretary to the Dean: Senior Faculty Officer: Faculty Officers:

Admin Officer: Admin Assistant (Helpdesk): General Assistant:

LECTURING AND TECHNICAL STAFF DEPARTMENTS AND SCHOOLS

BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY (BCB) Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors: Prof LM Raitt, PhD (Stell) L van Heerden, Cert. ITC (CPUT), Dipl. Bookkeeping (Varsity College) A Channing, PhD, UED (Natal) M Gibbons, BSc (Hons) (Liverpool), PhD (UCT) MD Hofmeyr, MSc (Stell), PhD (UCT) G Maneveldt, PhD (UWC) LM Raitt, PhD (Stell) Prof E Moll, PhD(UN) RS Knight, PhD (UCT) PM McLaren, MSc (UWC), HED (UNISA) FM Weitz, MSc (UWC) LF Cyster, MSc (UWC) MGJ Hendricks, MSc (UWC) D Faroe, MSc (UWC) L Gelderbloem, BSc (Hons) (UWC) A King, BSc(Ed) (UWC) BJ Mouers, BA, LLB (UWC) V Gordon

Associate Professors: Extra-Ordinary Prof: Senior Lecturer: Lecturers: Chief Officers: Senior Officers:

Officer:

BIOTECHNOLOGY Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors: Prof P Gouws, BSc(Hons)(Stell), MSc(Pretoria), PhD (UWC) F Starkey DA Cowan, PhD(Waikato) S Davison, PhD (Otago) DJG Rees, MA, DPhil (Oxonford) WD Schubert, Dr.rer.nat. P Gouws, BSc(Hons)(Stell), MSc(Pretoria), PhD (UWC) B Ndimba, PhD(Durham) MJ Danson, PhD (Cambridge) C Gehring, PhD (London) AJ Lastovica, PhD(Natal) ST Sewell, PhD (London) AR Slabas, DPhil (Oxford) Z Arieff, BSc(Hons)(UCT), PhD(Stell) M Benjeddou, PhD (UWC) MG du Preez, BSc(Hons)(Stell), MSc(UWC) DJR Pugh, DPhil(Oxon) E Anthony, BSc, ADM(UWC), BSc(Hons)(UCT) C Gelderbloem, BSc(Hons)(UWC) C Jacobs, BSc(Hons)(UWC), BComm(Hons)(UCT) Z Abrahams, BSc(Hons)(UWC) S Nene, BSc(UZ), BSc(Hons)(UKZN) M Pretorius

Associate Professors: Extra-Ordinary Profs:

Senior Lecturers:

Lecturers: Senior Officers:

Officers:

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CHEMISTRY Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors: Associate Professor: Prof F Ameer, PhD (Natal) W Jackson IR Green, PhD (UCT) E Iwuoha, PhD (Ibadan) F Ameer, PhD (Natal) P Baker, PhD (US) WT Mabusela, PhD (UCT) M Onani, PhD (UKZN) L Petrik, PhD (UWC) S Titinchi (India) N Jahed, PhD (UWC) F Ngece, MSc (UWC) K Wallace, MSc (UCT) T Lesch, NatDiplAnalChem, BTech(Chem) A Mantyi, BSc(UWC) B de Wet, BSc(UWC) M Makhoba, BSc(UWC)

Senior Lecturers:

Lecturers:

Chief Officer: Senior Officers: Officer:

COMPUTER SCIENCE Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors: Extra-Ordinary Professors: Prof IM Venter, BSc, HED (US), MSc (UNISA), PhD (UP) R Abbott HO Nyongesa, BSc (Ashton Univ, UK), MSc(London), Phd(Sheffield) J Agbinya, BSc(Ife, Nigeria), MSc(Strathclyde), PhD (La Trobe) JM Blackledge, BSc, ARCS, PhD, DIC (London) IM Venter, BSc, HED (US), MSc (UNISA), PhD (UP) MJ Norman, BSc(Hons)(UWC), MSc(UCT) WD Tucker, BA (Trinity), MS (ASU), PhD(UCT) T Iyamu, PhD(UCT) J Connan, MSc (US) A Ismail, BSc(Hons), HDE(UWC), MSc(UP) D Leenderts Vacant

Associate Professors: Senior Lecturers: Extra-Ordinary Senior Lecturer: Lecturers: Senior Officer: Officers:

EARTH SCIENCES Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors:

Extra-Ordinary Professors: Senior Lecturers: Lecturers:

Prof C Okujeni, PhD(Berlin) W Davids D Mazvimavi BSc Hons (Univ of Zimbabwe), MSc (Vrije Univesiteit Brussel), PhD (Wageningen) C Okujeni, PhD (Berlin) JM van Bever Donker, Drs (Leiden), PhD (UCT), FGSSA Y Xu, MSc (Chengdu, PRC), PhD(UOFS), (UNESCO Chair in Hydrogeology) E Braune G Green A Akinlua, PhD (ILE-ILE) R Bailie, MSc (Wits), PhD (UJ), Pr. Nat. Sci AS Azad, MSc (NTNU, Norway) 8

Senior Officers:

RN Domoney, MSc (UWC) J Nel, MSc (UFS) ACT Scheepers, MSc (Stell) M Crowley, BSc Hons (UWC) P Meyer H Solomon, BSc Hons (Eritrea)

MATHEMATICS AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Professors: Associate Professors: Extra-Ordinary Professors: Senior Lecturers: E Mwambene, BSc(Hons)(Malawi), MSc(London), MSc(UZ), Dr.rer.nat(Vienna) GL Hendricks, Dip.Ex.Secr (Bellv Acad/Boston House), MDP(UWC) RL Fray, MSc (UWC), MSc, PhD(Stell.) PJ Witbooi, MSc(UWC), PhD(UCT) F Benyah, PhD (Univ of Western Australia, Perth) K Patidar, PhD (IIT Kanpur, India) J Key, MPHIL, PhD (London) C. Makasu, DPhil(UZ) N Marcus, BSc(Hons)(Unisa), PhD(UCT) E Mwambene, BSc(Hons)(Malawi), MSc(London), MSc(UZ), Dr.rer.nat(Vienna) W Fish, HDE, MSc (Math Ed) (UNISA), MSc (UCT), PhD (UWC) M Mdekazi, MSc (Wisconsin), MSc (UCT) MR Omar, HDE, PhD (UCT) B May, BSc, HDE, BEd, MSc(Math Ed) (UWC) A Taylor, BSc, HDE (UWC) F Karriem, MSc (UWC) J Wyngaardt, MSc (UWC)

Lecturers:

Senior Officer: Officers:

MEDICAL BIOSCIENCES Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistants: Professors: Dr DW Fisher, MSc (UCT), PhD (UWC) N Louw R Isaacs R Henkel, BEd, PhD (Marburg), Habil (Giessen) GS Maritz, BSc(Hons), PhD(Med.Sc), HonsB(B&A), MBA (Stell) G van der Horst, PhD(Stell), PhD(UPE), EM Cert. (Zeiss, Germany) C Africa, PhD (London) M de Kock, PhD(UP) DLL Dietrich, PhD(Vrije University, Amsterdam) BC Fielding, PhD (UWC) T K Monsees, BSc, MSc, PhD (Bremen), Habilitation (Giessen) E Pool, BSc(Hons)(UCT), PhD(Stell) S Abdul-Rasool, MBChB (Baghdad Univ), MSc (Al-NahrainUniv), PhD (UCT) DW Fisher, MSc (UCT), PhD (UWC) DC Hiss, PhD(Medicine)(UCT) JA Klaasen, MSc(UWC), PhD(Penstate, USA) 9

Associate Professors:

Senior Lecturers:

Lecturers:

Chief Officer: Senior Officers:

Officer:

AP Burger, MSc (UWC), Dipl Tertiary & Cont. Ed. (Stell) J de Smidt, BSc, MBChB, Dip(Alter. Medicine) (Stell) H Harribhai, B-Med Sci(Hons) (UDW) L Maree, MSc (Agric)(US) L Mbonile, MBChD (Dar), MPH (Pretoria) R McBride, PhD(UCT) T Morris, PhD(UWC) C Willemse, PhD (UWC) M Bennett, MSc (UWC) MS Allie, Dipl Animal Technology (RSA Tech), MAdmin (UWC) B Langa, BSc(Hons)(UWC) E Maboza, BSc(Hons)(UWC) Vacant

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY Director: Prof S Malan, DTE (Dipl Tertiary Educ), BPharm, MSc, PhD (( NWU Potchefstroom) Admin Assistant: Professors: R Symonds GJ Amabeoku, Dipl in Science (Bromley, London), BSc(Hons) (Portsmouth), MSc (Wales), PhD (Ahmadu Bello, Nigeria) NC Butler, MPharm(UWC), BSc(Hons)(Med.Sc)(Stell), PhD(Univ. Minn.) PFK Eagles, MPharm(UWC), PhD(UCT) S Malan, DTE (Dipl Tertiary Educ), BPharm, MSc, PhD ( NWU Potchefstroom) P Mugabo, BSc, MBCHB(Rwanda), MMed. (Louvain Belgium), PhD (Ghent Belgium) JA Syce, MPharm(UWC), PhD(Kentucky) R Eubel, PhD (US) R Gorter, MD PhD (Cologne, Germany) V Sewram, PhD (Univ Natal), MPH (UCT) P Valodia, MPharm(UWC), PhD(UCT) A Bheekie, BSc(Hons)(Dublin), BPharm (UDW), MPharm (UWC), PhD(UWC) KL Ward, MPharm, PhD (UWC) RA Bapoo, BSc, BPharm(UWC), BSc(Hons) (IndPharm)(NWU) N Ebrahim, MPharm(UWC) J Joubert, MSc, BPharm (NWU, Potchefstroom) K Obikezi, BPharm (Univ Nigeria), MPharm, PhD(UWC) MB Parker, MPharm (UWC) H Samsodien, MPharm(UWC) A Shaik, BPharm (UWC) V Jeaven, BSc(UWC) Y Kippie, BTech(CPUT) B Minnis

Extra-Ordinary Professors:

Associate Professor: Senior Lecturers: Lecturers:

Senior Officers: Assistant Officer:

PHYSICS Dept Chairperson: Admin Assistant: Prof D Knoesen, PhD (Stell) A Adams 10

Professors:

Associate Professors:

Extra-Ordinary Professors:

Senior Lecturers:

Lecturer: Chief Officer: Senior Officer: Officers: STATISTICS Dept Chairperson : Admin Assistant : Professors: Associate Professor: Extra-Ordinary Professors: Senior Lecturers:

D Knoesen, PhD (Stell) CJ Linder, BSc(Hons)(Rhodes), EdM (Science) (Rutgers), HDE. (Rhodes), EdD(Physics)(UBC) R Lindsay, BSc Hons.(Stell.), DPhil(Oxon) C Arendse, PhD(UWC) RH Madjoe, HDE, MSc (UWC), PhD (Louisiana) D Marshall, BSc(Hons)(UCT), DPhil(Oxon) M Tchokonte, MSc (Univ Yote), PhD (WITS) RJ de Meijer, PhD (Utrecht) D Kilkenny, PhD (St Andrews) WA Richter, PhD (Stell) JF Sharpey-Shafer, BA (Cantab), PhD (Liverpool) C Cress, BSc(Hons) (UCT), MSc(WITS), M.A., MPhil, PhD(Columbia) RE Julies, MSc (UWC), PhD (Stell) S Halindintwali, MSc (UNR), PhD (UWC) Vacant I Kartcheva, MSc (Sofia) TFG Muller, HDE, MSc (UWC) M van Rooyen Vacant Vacant

Lecturers :

Chief Officers: Senior Officer:

Prof RJ Blignaut, BSc (RAU), MSc(UCT), BSc (Hons), PhD(Pretoria) L Selbourne, BTh(Urbanium University-Rome) C Koen, PhD (UCT), PhD (Rand Afrikaans University) D Kotze, DCom (Stell), MSc(Unisa), MBL(Unisa) RJ Blignaut, BSc(RAU), MSc(UCT), PhD(Pretoria) R Shell, PhD (Yale) E van der Merwe, PhD (UPE) A Sathiya Susuman, PhD (Kerela University, India ) G Tati, PhD (Univ of Bristol), DEA (Univ of Paris, Pantheon Sorbonne), MSc (IFORD), Maitrise (Univ of Congo), Licence (Univ of Congo) A Latief, MSc (UWC) N Stiegler, DEA Demographie (Institut d'Etudes Demographiques deI'Universté de Bordeaux), Maitrise Administration Economique et Sociale (Universté Montesquieu Bordeaux IV) Licence (Universite Bordeaux I) L Corker, BSc(Hons), MCom (UWC), MSc(UCT) R Lombard, MSc (UWC)

INSTITUTES AND UNITS INTERNATIONAL OCEAN INSTITUTE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA (IOI- SA) Director: Programme Co-ordinator: IT Manager: Web Developer: Administrator: A Awad, MSc (UCT) J Collins, BSc (Hons) (UWC) M Cocks, MSc (UCT) Vacant J Plandt 11

INSTITUTE FOR MICROBIAL BIOTECHNOLOGY & METAGENOMICS (IMBM) Director: Deputy Director: Senior Administrator: Technical Officer: Prof DA Cowan, PhD (Waikato) IM Tuffin, PhD (UCT) H Goodman, PhD (UCT) B Braaf, Dip. Prod. Man. (UColl.)

INSTITUTE FOR WATER STUDIES (IWS) Director: D Mazvimavi BSc Hons (Univ of Zimbabwe), MSc (Vrije Univesiteit Brussel), PhD (Wageningen)

SOUTH AFRICAN HERBAL SCIENCE AND MEDICINE INSTITUTE (SAHSMI) Director: Sr Associate Director: Associate Director: Extra-Ordinary Professors: Visiting Professor: Senior Researcher: Chief Officer: Senior Officer: Financial Officer: Research Associates: Prof Q Johnson, BSc, HDE(UCT), MSc, PhD(UWC) Prof J Syce, MPharm(UWC), PhD(Kentucky) W Mabusela, BSc(Fort Hare), MSc(Rhodes), PhD UCT) B Folk, PhD (Stanford) D Wilson, MBChB (UCT) Prof M Estes, PhD (Texas) J Lees, B.s. (Boston), PhD (UWC) S Thamburan, BSc(Hons) Herb Sc, PhD (UWC) A Braaf, BSc(Hons)Herb Sc (UWC) A Borchjes, BCom(UWC) M Hess, BSc(Hons)(UWC) S Nyati, BSc(Hons)(UWC) X Wang, MBBS (China), MSc (UWC)

SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL BIO-INFORMATICS INSTITUTE (SANBI) Director: Personal Assistant: Deputy Director: Extra-Ordinary Professors: Prof A Christoffels, PhD (UWC)

V Bajic, PhD M Gaunt, PhD C Gray, PhD C Seoighe, PhD (Dublin) W Hide, PhD M Jonas, MSc (UWC) F Mullins M Salie D Gibbs P van Heusden M Albertyn A Kamau

Senior Lecturer : Lecturer: Admin Assistants: System Administrators: Developers:

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SOUTH AFRICAN INSTUTE FOR ADVANCED MATERIAL CHEMISTRY (SAIAMC) Director: Professor: Senior Lecturers: V Linkov, PhD (US) DL Key, PhD (Surrey, UK) B Bladergroen, PhD(UWC) S Ji (SCUT) L Khotseng, PhD (US) M Lototskyy (LSU ­ Ukraine) S Pasupathi , PhD (University Pisa) B Rodgers I Sprinceana M Orffer S Adams

Research Associates: Finance Manager: Technical Manager: Admin Officer: Admin Assistant:

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND RESOURCES UNIT (EERU) Coordinator: Admin Assistant: Horticulturalist: Education Officer: Technical Staff: Reserve Staff: C Klein, MSc (UWC), MEd (Rhodes), SMDP (US) N Kensley P Mpangela, Dip. Hort (CPUT) I Kinnear, BA (Hons), LSTD (UWC) L Classen F Michaels R Solomons

ARC (UNIT OF THE RANGE AND FORAGE INST.) Senior Researcher: Researcher: Vacant C Cupido, MSc (UStell) N Gabriels, BSc(Hons)(UWC) MI Samuels, MSc (UWC) MBV Swarts, BA (UWC)

Technical Staff:

ELECTRON MICROSCOPY UNIT Director: Electron Microscope Officer: BA Julies, NHD: PSE (PenTech), PhD (UWC) AB Joseph, BSc(Ed) (UWC)

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DEGREES The following degrees and diplomas are offered in the Faculty: In the pure Sciences Baccalaureus Scientiae ...................................................BSc BSc(Applied Geology) BSc(Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) BSc(Biotechnology) BSc(Chemical Sciences) BSc(Computer Science) BSc(Environmental & Water Science) BSc(Mathematical & Statistical Science) BSc(Medical Bioscience) BSc(Physical Science)

Please refer to University Calendar Part II(b) for specific Post-Graduate information. Baccalaureus Scientiae Honours ............. ................................... BSc (Hons) BSc(Hons)(Applied Geology) BSc(Hons)(Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) BSc(Hons)(Biotechnolgoy) BSc(Hons)(Environmental & Water Science) BSc(Hons)(Herbal Science) BSc(Hons)(Medical Bioscience) BSc(Hons)(Physical Science) BSc(Hons)(Population Studies) BSc(Hons)(Structural Biology) Postgraduate Diploma .......................................................PGD Postgraduate Diploma in Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) Magister Scientiae. ......................................................... MSc MSc(Applied Geology) MSc(Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) MSc(Bioinformatics) MSc(Biotechnology) MSc(Computational Finance) MSc(Environmental & Water Science) MSc(Herbal Sciences) MSc(Physical Science) MSc(Pharmaceutical Science) MSc(Structural Biology) Magister Philosophiae .....................................................MPhil MPhil(IWRM) Integrated Water Resource Management MPhil(Population Studies) Philosophiae Doctor..........................................................PhD In Pharmacy Baccalaureus Pharmaceuticae..............................................BPharm MagisterPharmaceuticae...................................................MPharm Doctor Pharmaceuticae.....................................................DPharm

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RULES FOR THE THREE YEAR BSc DEGREE B.1 ADMISSION Unless Senate decides otherwise, candidates will be required to meet the following criteria to be enrolled for the degree Baccalaureus Scientiae (BSc): B.1.1 Admission rules for applicants who matriculated from 2008: (a) The National Senior Certificate for Bachelor's Degree study plus a score of no less than 27 points calculated according to the university's approved points system, as well as the programme requirements indicated in B.1.5 below.

(b)

Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT).

OR (c) a qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed to be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

B.1.2

Admission rules for applicants who matriculated prior to 2008 (a) Unless Senate decides otherwise, no person shall be admitted to any of the programmes for the BSc degree without having obtained a full matriculation or age exemption. Furthermore, no person shall be admitted to any of the BSc programmes if he/she has not obtained a pass in Mathematics and either Physical Science or Biology at Higher grade with at least a D symbol or at Standard grade with at least a C symbol. (b) Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT). OR (c) a qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed to be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

B.1.3

Alternate Admission Alternate admission does not apply to this programme. Refer to Rule B.10 Selection As only a limited number of students can be admitted to the programmes, applicants will be subject to a selection procedure.

B.1.4

B.1.5

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS PER PROGRAMME:

PROGRAMME BSc (Environmental & Water Sc) BSc (Biotechnology)

COMPULSORY SUBJECTS - Mathematics at level 4 - English at level 4 (home or first additional language) 15

PRESCRIBED SUBJECTS Physical Science or Life Sciences at level 4

BSc (Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) BSc (Mathematical & Statistical Sciences) BSc(Medical Biosciences)

- Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language)

English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional lang) Mathematics at level 3

Life Sciences at level 4

BSc (Physical Science) BSc (Chemical Science) BSc (Applied Geology

English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 4

Physical Science at level 4

BSc (Computer Science)

English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 4

Physical Science or Life Sciences or Information Technology at level 4

B.2

DURATION: 3 years. COMPOSITION OF THE CURRICULUM Unless Senate decides otherwise A curriculum shall consist of a combination of modules with a total credit value of 360 credits: AT YEAR LEVEL 1: A total of 120 credits AT YEAR LEVEL 2: A total of 120 credits AT YEAR LEVEL 3: A total of 120 credits

B.3

B.3.1

B.3.2

Deviation from the rule. For a total credit value of more that 360 credits permission from Senate must be obtained. A sound academic rationale should accompany the application.

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B.4 B.4.1

CURRICULA FOR PROGRAMMES APPLIED GEOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Geology 111 Geology 112 Computer Literacy 114/124 Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Physics 111 Physics 121 Electives [Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c) OR 1 module from (d)] (a) Chemistry 114(N) and Chemistry 124(N) OR Chemistry 116(N) and Chemistry 126(N) (b) Life Sciences 141 Life Sciences 142 (c) Envrionmental & Water Science 131 Envrionmental & Water Science 132 (d) Mathematics 105

Num Code 351400 351401 371014/24 231150/51 336111 336121

Alpha Code APG111 APG112 COS114/124 EED117/127 PHY111 PHY121

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15

311014 311024 311016 311026 312141 312142 346430 346431 392105

CHE114 CHE124 CHE116 CHM126 LSC141 LSC142 ENV131 ENV132 MAT105 Sub-total

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 30 120

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Electives [Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)]: (a) Physics 212 Physics 222 (b) Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212

Num Code 351402 351403 351404 351405 336212 336222 346432 346433 346434 311027 311028

Alpha Code APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 PHY212 PHY222 ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 CHM211 CHM212 Sub-total

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

(c)

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Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Geology 311 Geology 312 Geology 321 Geology 322

Num Code 351406 351407 351408 351409

Alpha Code APG311 APG312 APG321 APG322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.2

BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 141 Life Sciences 142 Statistics 111 Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Electives (Choose 2 groups [4 modules] from the following): (a) Envrionmental & Water Science 131 Envrionmental & Water Science 132 (b) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121 (c) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 Biodiversity & Conservation 222 Electives (Choose 2 modules from one of the following groups): (a) Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 Envrionmental & Water Science 222 (b) Biotechnology 216 Medical Microbiology 251 Medical Microbiology 252

Num Code 312141 312142 381111 231150/51

Alpha Code LSC141 LSC142 STA111 EED117/127

Cred 15 15 15 15

346430 346431 325111 325121 311016 311026

ENV131 ENV132 MBS111 MBS121 CHE116 CHM126 Sub-total

15 15 15 15 15 15 120

Num Code 362020 362021 362022 362023

Alpha Code BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 BDC222

Cred 20 20 20 20

346432 346433 346434 346435 327216 356251 356252

ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV222 BTN216 MIC251 MIC252

20 20 20 20 20 20 20

Sub-total

120

18

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biodiversity & Conservation 311 Biodiversity & Conservation 312 Biodiversity & Conservation 321 Biodiversity & Conservation 322

Num Code 362031 362030 362032 362033

Alpha Code BDC311 BDC312 BDC321 BDC322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.3

BIOTECHNOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 141 Life Sciences 142 Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)) (a) Physics 116 (N) Physics 126 (N) (b) Mathematics 115 (N) Statistics 125

Num Code 312141 312142 231150/51 371014/24 311016 311026 336016 336026 390115 381125

Alpha Code LSC141 LSC142 EED117/127 COS114/124 CHE116 CHM126 PHY116 PHY126 MAM115 STA125 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 215 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 222 Biotechnology 213 Medical Microbiology 251

Num Code 327211 327215 327216 327222 327213 356251

Alpha Code BTN211 BTN215 BTN216 BTN222 BTN213 MIC251 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biotechnology 311 Biotechnology 322 Electives (Choose 2 modules) Biotechnology 323 Biotechnology 324 Biotechnology 312

Num Code 327311 327322 327323 327324 327312

Alpha Code BTN311 BTN322 BTN323 BTN324 BTN312 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

19

B.4.4

CHEMICAL SCIENCES Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Chemistry 114(N) Chemistry 124(N) Mathematics 105 OR Mathematics 115(N) Statistics 125 Electives (Choose 2 modules from one of the following groups): (a) Physics 111 Physics 121 (b) Physics 116 (N) Physics 126 (N) (c) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121 (d) Life Sciences 141 Life Sciences 142

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 311014 311024 392105 390115 381125

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 CHE114 CHE124 MAT105 MAM115 STA125

Cred 15 15 15 15 30 15 15

336111 336121 336016 336026 325111 325121 312141 312142

PHY111 PHY121 PHY116 PHY126 MBS111 MBS121 LSC141 LSC142 Subtotal

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

*Those having passed CHE116 & CHM126 may also be allowed to proceed with the Chemical Sciences program provided that the candidate has obtained at least 60% in each of these modules and is recommended by the HOD. Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212 Electives (Choose 2 modules from 2 groups or 4 modules from group (a) or (e)): (a) Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227 (b) Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Mathematics 212 (c) Medical Biosciences 231 Medical Biosciences 232 (d) Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 (e) Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 215 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 213

Num Code 311027 311028

Alpha Code CHM211 CHM212

Cred 20 20

336212 336222 336217 336227 392020 392022 392021 325231 325232 362021 362022 327211 327215 327216 327213

PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 MBS231 MBS232 BDC212 BDC221 BTN211 BTN215 BTN216 BTN213 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

20

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Chemistry 311 Chemistry 312 Chemistry 321 Chemistry 322

Num Code 311033 311034 311035 311036

Alpha Code CHM311 CHM312 CHM321 CHM322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.5

COMPUTER SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Computer Literacy 114 Eng for Educ Dev 127 Computer Science 101 Mathematics 105 Electives (Choose 2 modules from one of the following groups): (a) Geology 111 Geology 112 (b) Statistics 111 Statistics 121 Information Systems 132 (c) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (d) Physics 111 Physics 121 (e) Physics 116(N) Physics 126(N) Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Computer Science 211 Computer Science 212 Electives (Choose 2 modules from 2 of the following groups or 4 modules from one group) (a) Information Systems 231 Information Systems 232 Information Systems 233 Information Systems 234 (b) Mathematics 211 Mathematics 212 Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 (c) Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227 21

Num Code 371014 331151 372101 392105

Alpha Code COS114 EED127 COS101 MAT105

Cred 15 15 30 30

351400 351401 381111 381121 142132 392112 392122 336111 336121 336016 336026

APG111 APG112 STA111 STA121 IFS132 APM112 APM122 PHY111 PHY121 PHY116 PHY126 Subtotal

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

Num Code 371021 371022

Alpha Code CSC211 CSC212

Cred 20 20

142231 142232 142233 142234 392020 392021 381211 381221 381203 336212 336222 336217 336227

IFS231 IFS232 IFS233 IFS234 MAT211 MAT212 STA211 STA221 STA203 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Computer Science 311 Computer Science 312 Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following) Computer Science 313 Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312 Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333 Information Systems 341 Information Systems 342 Information Systems 351 Information Systems 352 Information Systems 361 Information Systems 313 Physics 312 Physics 322 Physics 317 Physics 327

Num Code 371032 371033 371031 392023 392024 392025 392026 381331 381332 381333 140342 336312 336322 336317 336327

Alpha Code CSC311 CSC312 CSC313 MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 STA331 STA332 STA333 IFS341 IFS342 IFS351 IFS352 IFS361 IFS313 PHY312 PHY322 PHY317 PHY327 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.6

ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 Electives ( Choose any 2 of the following groups): (a) Geology 111 Geology 112 (b) Physics 116(N) Physics 126(N) (c) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N)

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 346430 346431 351400 351401 336016 336026 311016 311026

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 ENV131 ENV132 APG111 APG112 PHY116 PHY126 CHE116 CHM126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

22

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 Envrionmental & Water Science 222 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) and (b) or 4 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 Biodiversity & Conservation 222 (b) Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Environmental & Water Science 311 Environmental & Water Science 312 Environmental & Water Science 321 Environmental & Water Science 322

Num Code 346432 346433 346434 346435

Alpha Code ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV222

Cred 20 20 20 20

362020 362021 362022 362023 351402 351403 351404 351405

BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 BDC222 APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Num Code 346436 346437 346438 346439

Alpha Code ENV311 ENV312 ENV321 ENV322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.7

MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL SCIENCE The Mathematics Stream Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Statistics 111 or Statistics 125 Mathematics 105 Statistics 121 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c); (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Physics 111 Physics 121 (c) Physics 116(N) Physics 126(N)

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 381111 381125 392105 381121 392112 392111 336111 336121 336016 336026

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 STA111 STA125 MAT105 STA121 APM112 APM122 PHY111 PHY121 PHY116 PHY126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

23

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Electives (Choose 4 modules from the following) Mathematics 212 Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 311 AND either Mathematics 321 or Mathematics 322 or Mathematics 312 Electives [Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)]: N.B.: You may not repeat the module chosen from the compulsory list above (a) Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312 (b) Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333

Num Code 392020 392022 392021 381211 381221 381203 336212 336222 336217 336227

Alpha Code MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 STA211 STA221 STA203 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Num Code 392023 392024 392025 392026

Alpha Code MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312

Cred 30 30 30 30

392024 392025 392026 381331 381332 381333

MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 STA331 STA332 STA333 Subtotal Final Total

30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

The STATISTICS stream Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Statistics 111 or Statistics 125 Mathematics 105 Statistics 121 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c); (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Physics 111 Physics 121 (c) Physics 116(N) Physics 126(N) (d) Economics 133 Economics 134/135 24

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 381111 381125 392105 381121 392112 392111 336111 336121 336016 336026 131033 131034/35

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 STA111 STA125 MAT105 STA121 APM112 APM122 PHY111 PHY121 PHY116 PHY126 ECO133 ECO134/135 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 Electives (Choose 3 modules from the following): Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Mathematics 212 Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227

Num Code 381211 381221 381203 392020 392022 392021 336212 336222 336217 336227

Alpha Code STA211 STA221 STA203 MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333 Electives (Choose 1 module from the following): Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312

Num Code 381331 381332 381333 392023 392024 392025 392026

Alpha Code STA331 STA332 STA333 MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.4.8

MEDICAL BIOSCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Life Sciences 141 Statistics 125 Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 312141 381125 311016 311026 325111 325121

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 LSC141 STA125 CHE116 CHM126 MBS111 MBS121 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

25

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Medical Biosciences 231 Medical Biosciences 232 Medical Microbiology 251 Medical Microbiology 252 Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following): Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 213 Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 222

Num Code 325231 325232 356251 356252 327211 327216 327213 362020 362021

Alpha Code MBS231 MBS232 MIC251 MIC252 BTN211 BTN216 BTN213 BDC211 BDC222 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Medical Biosciences 331 Medical Biosciences 332 Medical Microbiology 351 Medical Microbiology 352 Electives (Choose 1 module from the following): Biotechnology 324 Biodiversity & Conservation 322

Num Code 325331 325332 356351 356352 327324 362033

Alpha Code MBS331 MBS332 MIC351 MIC352 BTN324 BDC322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 20 20 30 30 130 370

B.4.9

PHYSICAL SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Eng for Educ Dev 117/127 Computer Literacy 114/124 Physics 111 Physics 121 Mathematics 105 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)); (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Geology 111 Geology 112 (c) Chemistry 114(N) Chemistry 124(N)

Num Code 231150/51 371014/24 336111 336121 392105 392112 392111 351400 351401 311014 311024

Alpha Code EED117/127 COS114/124 PHY111 PHY121 MAT105 APM112 APM122 APG111 APG112 CHE114 CHE124 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

26

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Physics 212 Physics 222 Mathematics 211 Electives (Choose (a) or 3 modules from (b)): (a) Physics 217 Physics 227 Mathematics 212 (b) Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Computer Science 211 Computer Science 212 Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Physics 312 Physics 322 Electives (Choose 2 modules from one of the following groups): (a) Physics 317 Physics 327 (b) Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 (c) Chemistry 311 Chemistry 312

Num Code 336212 336222 392020 336217 336227 392021 351402 351403 351404 351405 371021 371022 311027 311028

Alpha Code PHY212 PHY222 MAT211 PHY217 PHY227 MAT212 APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 CSC211 CSC212 CHM211 CHM212 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Num Code 336312 336322

Alpha Code PHY312 PHY322

Cred 30 30

336317 336327 392023 392024 311033 311034

PHY317 PHY327 MAT311 MAT321 CHM311 CHM312 Subtotal Final Total

30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B5 B.5.1

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAMME Modules from other faculties A maximum of 30 credits in modules from other faculties will be permitted, except in the case of Computer Science students who will be allowed to take Information Systems as a subject in their programme. At least 100 of the total number of credits obtained at second and third year level shall be in one and the same programme. Computer Literacy in Science (CLS) and English for Educational Development (EED): These are compulsory, credit bearing modules, comprising one semester module for Computer Literacy and one semester module for EED. Exemption from CLS and/or EED: Students who have developed these skills already, may apply to the Faculty for exemption from this requirement subject to the general rules of the university. The process to determine their level of competency in these modules may involve one or more assessment events. When exempted, such students must replace these modules with other modules of their choice to the same credit value. 27

B.5.2

B.5.3

B.5.4

B.5.5 B.5.5.1

Restriction on choice of modules: The following limitations apply as regard to modules that can be credited towards obtaining a degree or certificate. Credit will not be granted for: CHEMISTRY: CHE114 and CHE124 AND CHE116 and CHM126. PHYSICS: PHY111 and PHY121 AND PHY116 and PHY126 OR PHY112 and PHY113 and PHY116. MATHEMATICS: In the case of Mathematics a student will only be credited for either MAM111 or MAM115 Students who obtained credits prior to 1999 will not be allowed to obtain credits for the equivalent modules as offered from 1999.

B.5.5.2

B.6

ASSESSMENT Assessment is generally governed by Rule A5 as stipulated in the General Calendar: General Information Part 1 in addition to the following: Subminima Except where otherwise indicated, modules in which a practical component is taken require a sub-minimum of 40% in the practical component. Life Science: A sub-minimum of 50% in the practical component and a sub-minimum of 40% in each section of the final examination of each module. BCB modules: A sub-minimum of 50% in the practical component of each module Weight of practical component The percentage of the total marks allocated to the practical examination where it forms part of the theory evaluation shall not exceed 50%. For the purpose of promotion, the practical modules shall not be credited independently of the theory modules of a particular subject. Final mark Except where otherwise indicated, the final mark shall be obtained by means of a system of continuous evaluation, which will differ from subject to subject, combined with examinations as indicated in the University's Assessment Policy. Re-evaluation of practical modules No re-evaluation will be allowed for practical modules that are evaluated on a continuous basis. Attendance of practicals In the programme Medical Biosciences and Biotechnology a minimum attendance of 80% of the practicals is required to gain access to the examination in addition to the 40% subminimum needed in the coursework mark. PROMOTION TO THE FOLLOWING YEAR Unless Senate decides otherwise or unless specified differently for the programme concerned, the following will apply: A student shall be admitted to the second year of study when 90 credits have been obtained of the 120 credits required in the first year of study in one of the programmes listed in rule B.4 AND when all prerequisites for admission to the second year level modules have been met. 28

B.6.1

B.6.2 B.6.2.1

B.6.2.2

B.6.3

B.6.4

B.6.5

B.7

B.7.1

B.7.2

Promotion to the third year of study will be allowed when at least a total of 210 credits have been obtained after the second year of study and when all 120 credits of the first year of the curriculum have been obtained. Advance Registration Notwithstanding the above, a student who has not obtained sufficient credits to promote, may register for subject modules at the higher level in anticipation of promotion in the following year, provided all pre-requisites for the higher level module have been met and no time-table clashes will occur as a result of this registration. Students registering modules in anticipation may not register for more than 100 credits in total for that year. The maximum number of credits a year level 1 student may anticipate is 40 credits, on obtaining at least 75 credits at year level 1. The maximum number of credits a year level 2 student may anticipate is 60 credits, on obtaining at least 80 credits at year level 2. N.B.: Students are advised to complete all first year modules before proceeding to 3rd year level. Renewal of registration Students who are academically refused in terms of rule A.3.2.3 may apply in writing to the Dean to be re-admitted if they have completed 60% of the courses for the year of study concerned or when they can provide evidence of extenuating circumstances which have prevented them from doing justice to the course AND can show that these circumstances have changed to the extent that success upon re-registration can reasonably be expected. RULES FOR THE FOUR-YEAR BSc STREAM

B.8 B.8.1

B.8.1.1

B.8.1.2

B.9

B.10 B.10.1

ADMISSION Admission rules for applicants who matriculated from 2008: Unless Senate decides otherwise, candidates will be required to meet the following criteria to be enrolled for the degree Baccalaureus Scientiae (BSc) (a) The National Senior Certificate for Bachelor's Degree study plus a score of no less than than 23 points calculated according to the university's approved points system, as well as the programme requirements as specified in B.11 below. Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT). OR (c) a qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed to be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

(b)

B.10.2

Admission rules for applicants who matriculated prior to 2008 (a) Senate, upon recommendation of the faculty, may admit students with a full Matriculation exemption with Mathematics and either Science or Biology at Higher Grade with an E-symbol or Standard Grade with a D-symbol . (b) Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT). 29

OR (c) a qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed to be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

N.B.: In order to determine the level of competency, the Faculty may subject students applying for equivalent status, to one or more assessment events. B.10.3 Recognition of Prior Learning For students without an NSC, the university has very well established RPL assessment procedures (portfolio development course and test batteries) through which they can potentially enter degree, certificate or diploma programmes.

B.10.4

Selection As only a limited number of students can be admitted to the programmes, applicants will be subject to a selection procedure.

B.11

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Compulsory subjects · · · · · · Prescribed subjects Physical Science or Life Sciences at level 3

Programmes

BSc Environmental & Water Science (4-year stream) BSc Biotechnology (4-year stream) BSc Biodiversity & Conservation Biology (4-year stream) BSc(Medical Biosciences) (4- year stream)

English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 3 or Mathematics Literacy at level 4 English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 3 or Math Literacy at level 4 English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 3 English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 3 or Math 30

Life Sciences at level 3

BSc Mathematical & Statistical Sciences (4-year stream)

· · ·

Physical Science or Life Sciences at level 3

BSc Physical Science (4-year stream) BSc Chemical Science (4-year stream)

· · ·

Physical Science at level 3

BSc Applied Geology (4-year stream) BSc Computer Science (4-year Stream) · · ·

Literacy at level 4

English at level 4 (home or first additional language) Another language at level 3 (home or first additional language) Mathematics at level 3 or Math Literacy at level 5

Physical Science or Life Sciences at level 3 or Information Technology at level 4

B.12

DURATION Unless Senate decides otherwise, the minimum prescribed time to complete the degree is 4 years full-time study.

B.13

COMPOSITION OF THE CURRICULUM Unless Senate decides otherwise, a curriculum shall consist of a combination of modules with a total credit value of 360 credits: AT YEAR LEVEL 1: A total of 60 credits AT YEAR LEVEL 2: A total of 60 credits AT YEAR LEVEL 3: A total of l20 credits AT YEAR LEVEL 4: A total of 120 credits

B.14 B.14.1

CURRICULA FOR PROGRAMMES: APPLIED GEOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 151 (SF) Physics 151 (SF) Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 (b) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 152 (SF) Physics 152 (SF) Geology 111 Geology 112

Num Code 390151 340151 346430 346431 311016 311026

Alpha Code MAM151 PHY151 ENV131 ENV132 CHE116 CHM126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Num Code 390152 340152 351400 351401

Alpha Code MAM152 PHY152 APG111 APG112 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

31

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Electives [Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)]: (a) Physics 212 Physics 222 (b) Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 (c) Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212

Num Code 351402 351403 351404 351405 336212 336222 346432 346433 346434 311027 311028

Alpha Code APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 PHY212 PHY222 ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 CHM211 CHM212 Sub-total

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Geology 311 Geology 312 Geology 321 Geology 322

Num Code 351406 351407 351408 351409

Alpha Code APG311 APG312 APG321 APG322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.2

BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 151(SF) Introduction to Mathematics 150 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)): (a) Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 (b) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) (c) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121

Num Code 361151 390150 346430 346431 311016 311026 325111 325121

Alpha Code LFS151 MAM150 ENV131 ENV132 CHE116 CHM126 MBS111 MBS121 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

32

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 152(SF) Statistics 151(SF) Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)): (a) Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 (b) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) (c) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 Biodiversity & Conservation 222 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) : (a) Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 Envrionmental & Water Science 222 (b) Biotechnology 216 Medical Microbiology 251 Medical Microbiology 252

Num Code 361152 381151 346430 346431 311016 311026 325111 325121

Alpha Code LFS152 STA151 ENV131 ENV132 CHE116 CHM126 MBS111 MBS121 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Num Code 362020 362021 362022 362023 346432 346433 346434 346435 327216 356251 356252

Alpha Code BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 BDC222 ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV222 BTN216 MIC251 MIC252 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biodiversity & Conservation 311 Biodiversity & Conservation 312 Biodiversity & Conservation 321 Biodiversity & Conservation 322

Num Code 362031 362030 362032 362033

Alpha Code BDC311 BDC312 BDC321 BDC322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.2

BIOTECHNOLOGY Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 151(SF) Introduction to Mathematics 150 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)): (a) Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 (b) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121 33

Num Code 361151 390150 346430 346431 325111 325121

Alpha Code LFS151 MAM150 ENV131 ENV132 MBS111 MBS121 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 152(SF) Statistics 151(SF) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 215 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 222 Biotechnology 213 Medical Microbiology 251

Num Code 361152 381151 311016 311026

Alpha Code LFS152 STA151 CHE116 CHM126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

Num Code 327211 327215 327216 327222 327213 356251

Alpha Code BTN211 BTN215 BTN216 BTN222 BTN213 MIC251 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biotechnology 311 Biotechnology 322 Electives (Choose 2 modules) Biotechnology 323 Biotechnology 324 Biotechnology 312

Num Code 327311 327322 327323 327324 327312

Alpha Code BTN311 BTN322 BTN323 BTN324 BTN312 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.4

CHEMICAL SCIENCES Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name

Physics 151(SF)

Mathematics 151 (SF) Life Sciences 141 Life Sciences 142 Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name

Num Code 340151 390151 312141 312142

Alpha Code PHY151 MAM151 LSC141 LSC142 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

Physics 152(SF)

Mathematics 152 (SF) Chemistry 114 (N) Chemistry 124 (N)

Num Code 340152 390152 311014 311024

Alpha Code PHY152 MAM152 CHE114 CHE124 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

34

*Those having passed CHE116 and CHM126 may also be allowed to proceed with the Chemical Sciences program provided that the candidate has obtained at least 60% in each of these modules and or is recommended by the HOD.

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212 Electives (Choose 2 modules from 2 groups or 4 modules from group (a) or (e)): (a) Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227 (b) Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Mathematics 212 (c) Medical Biosciences 231 Medical Biosciences 232 (d) Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 (e) Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 215 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 213

Num Code 311027 311028

Alpha Code CHM211 CHM212

Cred 20 20

336212 336222 336217 336227 392020 392022 392021 325231 325232 362021 362022 327211 327215 327216 327213

PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 MBS231 MBS232 BDC212 BDC221 BTN211 BTN215 BTN216 BTN213 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Chemistry 311 Chemistry 312 Chemistry 321 Chemistry 322

Num Code 311033 311034 311035 311036

Alpha Code CHM311 CHM312 CHM321 CHM322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.5

COMPUTER SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 151(SF) Physics 151(SF) Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following): Geology 111 Geology 112 Information Systems 132 Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122

Num Code 390151 340151 351400 351401 142132 392112 392122

Alpha Code MAM151 PHY151 APG111 APG112 IFS132 APM112 APM122 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

35

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 152 (SF) Statistics 151 (SF) Computer Science 101 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Computer Science 211 Computer Science 212 Electives (Choose 2 modules from 2 of the following groups or 4 modules from one group) (a) Information Systems 231 Information Systems 232 Information Systems 233 Information Systems 234 (b) Mathematics 211 Mathematics 212 Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 (c) Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227

Num Code 390152 381151 372101

Alpha Code MAM152 STA151 COS101 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 30 60

Num Code 371021 371022

Alpha Code CSC211 CSC212

Cred 20 20

142231 142232 142233 142234 392020 392021 381211 381221 381203 336212 336222 336217 336227

IFS231 IFS232 IFS233 IFS234 MAT211 MAT212 STA211 STA221 STA203 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Computer Science 311 Computer Science 312 Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following) Computer Science 313 Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312 Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333 Information Systems 341 Information Systems 342 Information Systems 351 Information Systems 352 Information Systems 361 Information Systems 313 Physics 312 Physics 322 Physics 317 Physics 327 36

Num Code 371032 371033 371031 392023 392024 392025 392026 381331 381332 381333 140342 336312 336322 336317 336327

Alpha Code CSC311 CSC312 CSC313 MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 STA331 STA332 STA333 IFS341 IFS342 IFS351 IFS352 IFS361 IFS313 PHY312 PHY322 PHY317 PHY327 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.6

ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 151 (SF) Introduction to Mathematics 150 Electives ( Choose any 2 of the following groups): (a) Geology 111 Geology 112 (b) Physics 116(N) Physics 126(N) (c) Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N) Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 152 (SF) Statistics 151 (SF) Environmental & Water Science 131 Environmental & Water Science 132 Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Envrionmental & Water Science 211 Envrionmental & Water Science 212 Envrionmental & Water Science 221 Envrionmental & Water Science 222 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) and (b) or 4 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 212 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 Biodiversity & Conservation 222 (b) Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Environmental & Water Science 311 Environmental & Water Science 312 Environmental & Water Science 321 Environmental & Water Science 322

Num Code 361151 390150 351400 351401 336016 336026 311016 311026

Alpha Code LFS151 MAM150 APG111 APG112 PHY116 PHY126 CHE116 CHM126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Num Code 361152 381151 346430 346431

Alpha Code LFS152 STA151 ENV131 ENV132 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

Num Code 346432 346433 346434 346435

Alpha Code ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV222

Cred 20 20 20 20

362020 362021 362022 362023 351402 351403 351404 351405

BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 BDC222 APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 Subtotal

20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Num Code 346436 346437 346438 346439

Alpha Code ENV311 ENV312 ENV321 ENV322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 120 360

37

B.14.7

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICAL SCIENCE The MATHEMATICS Stream Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 111 or Statistics 125 Mathematics 151 (SF) Statistics 121

Physics 151(SF)

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 152 (SF)

Num Code 381111 381125 390151 381121 340151

Alpha Code STA111 STA125 MAM151 STA121 PHY151 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 60

Physics 152(SF)

Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Chemistry 114 (N) Chemistry 124 (N)

Num Code 390152 340152 392112 392111 311014 311024

Alpha Code MAM152 PHY152 APM112 APM122 CHE114 CHE124 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Electives (Choose 4 modules from the following) Mathematics 212 Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227

Num Code 392020 392022 392021 381211 381221 381203 336212 336222 336217 336227

Alpha Code MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 STA211 STA221 STA203 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

38

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 311 AND either Mathematics 321 or Mathematics 322 or Mathematics 312 Electives [Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)]: N.B.: You may not repeat the module chosen from the compulsory list above (a) Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312 (b) Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333

Num Code 392023 392024 392025 392026

Alpha Code MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312

Cred 30 30 30 30

392024 392025 392026 381331 381332 381333

MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 STA331 STA332 STA333 Subtotal Final Total

30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

The STATISTICS stream Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 111 or Statistics 125 Mathematics 151 (SF) Statistics 121

Physics 151(SF)

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 152 (SF)

Num Code 381111 381125 390151 381121 340151

Alpha Code STA111 STA125 MAM151 STA121 PHY151 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 60

Physics 152(SF)

Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Chemistry 114 (N) Chemistry 124 (N)

Num Code 390152 340152 392112 392111 311014 311024

Alpha Code MAM152 PHY152 APM112 APM122 CHE114 CHE124 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

39

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 211 Statistics 221 Statistics 203 Electives (Choose 3 modules from the following): Mathematics 211 Mathematics 221 Mathematics 212 Physics 212 Physics 222 Physics 217 Physics 227

Num Code 381211 381221 381203 392020 392022 392021 336212 336222 336217 336227

Alpha Code STA211 STA221 STA203 MAT211 MAT221 MAT212 PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Statistics 331 Statistics 332 Statistics 333 Electives (Choose 1 module from the following): Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 Mathematics 322 Mathematics 312

Num Code 381331 381332 381333 392023 392024 392025 392026

Alpha Code STA331 STA332 STA333 MAT311 MAT321 MAT322 MAT312 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

B.14.8

MEDICAL BIOSCIENCES Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 151 (SF) Introduction to Mathematics 150 Chemistry 116(N) Chemistry 126(N)

Num Code 361151 390150 311016 311026

Alpha Code LFS151 MAM150 CHE116 CHM126 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 60

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Life Sciences 152 (SF) Statistics 151 (SF) Medical Biosciences 111 Medical Biosciences 121

Num Code 361152 381151 325111 325121

Alpha Code LFS152 STA151 MBS111 MBS121 Subtotal

Cred 15 20 15 15 60

40

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Medical Biosciences 231 Medical Biosciences 232 Medical Microbiology 251 Medical Microbiology 252 Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following): Biotechnology 211 Biotechnology 216 Biotechnology 213 Biodiversity & Conservation 211 Biodiversity & Conservation 222

Num Code 325231 325232 356251 356252 327211 327216 327213 362020 362021

Alpha Code MBS231 MBS232 MIC251 MIC252 BTN211 BTN216 BTN213 BDC211 BDC222 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Medical Biosciences 331 Medical Biosciences 332 Medical Microbiology 351 Medical Microbiology 352 Electives (Choose 2 modules from the following): Biotechnology 324 Biodiversity & Conservation 322

Num Code 325331 325332 356351 356352 327324 362033

Alpha Code MBS331 MBS332 MIC351 MIC352 BTN324 BDC322 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 20 20 30 30 130 370

B.14.9

PHYSICAL SCIENCE Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 151 (SF)

Physics 151(SF)

Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)): (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Chemistry 114 (N) Chemistry 124 (N) (c) Geology 111 Geology 112

Num Code 390151 340151 392112 392111 311014 311024 351400 351401

Alpha Code MAM151 PHY151 APM112 APM122 CHE114 CHE124 APG111 APG112 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

41

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Mathematics 152 (SF)

Physics 152(SF)

Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c)): (a) Mathematics 112 Mathematics 122 (b) Chemistry 114 (N) Chemistry 124 (N) (c) Geology 111 Geology 112

Num Code 390152 340152 392112 392111 311014 311024 351400 351401

Alpha Code MAM152 PHY152 APM112 APM122 CHE114 CHE124 APG111 APG112 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 60

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Physics 212 Physics 222 Mathematics 211 Electives (Choose 3 modules from (a) or (b)): (a) Physics 217 Physics 227 Mathematics 212 (b) Geology 211 Geology 212 Geology 221 Geology 222 Computer Science 211 Computer Science 212 Chemistry 211 Chemistry 212

Num Code 336212 336222 392020 336217 336227 392021 351402 351403 351404 351405 371021 371022 311027 311028

Alpha Code PHY212 PHY222 MAT211 PHY217 PHY227 MAT212 APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 CSC211 CSC212 CHM211 CHM212 Subtotal

Cred 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Physics 312 Physics 322 Electives (Choose 2 modules from (a) or (b) or (c) below: (a) Physics 317 Physics 327 (b) Mathematics 311 Mathematics 321 (c) Chemistry 311 Chemistry 312

Num Code 336312 336322 336317 336327 392023 392024 311033 311034

Alpha Code PHY312 PHY322 PHY317 PHY327 MAT311 MAT321 CHM311 CHM312 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 120 360

42

B.15 B.15.1

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAMME A maximum of 30 credits in modules from other faculties will be permitted, except in the case of Computer Science students who will be allowed to take Information Systems as a subject in their programme. At least 100 of the total number of credits obtained at third and fourth year level shall be in one and the same programme. Computer Literacy in Science (CLS) and English for Educational Development (EED): These are compulsory, credit bearing modules, comprising one semester module for Computer Literacy and one semester module for EED. Exemption from CLS and/or EED: Students who have developed these skills already, may apply to the Faculty for exemption from this requirement subject to the general rules of the university. The process to determine t heir level of competency in these modules may involve one or more assessment events. When exempted, such students must replace these modules with other modules of their choice to the same credit value. Restriction on choice of modules:

B.15.2

B.15.3

B.15.4

B.15.5

B.15.5.1 The following limitations apply as regard to modules that can be credited towards obtaining a degree or certificate. Credit will not be granted for: CHEMISTRY: CHE114 and CHE124 AND CHE116 and CHM126. PHYSICS: PHY111 and PHY121 AND PHY116 and PHY126 OR PHY112 and PHY113 and PHY116. MATHEMATICS: In the case of Mathematics a student will only be credited for either MAM111 or MAM115 B.15.5.2 Students who obtained credits prior to 1999 will not be allowed to obtain credits for the equivalent modules as offered from 1999. B.16 ASSESSMENT Assessment is generally governed by Rule A5 as stipulated in the General Calendar: General Information Part 1 in addition to the following: Sub-minima Except where otherwise indicated, modules in which a practical component is taken require a sub-minimum of 40% in the practical component. Life Science: A sub-minimum of 50% in the practical component and a sub-minimum of 40% in each section of the final examination of each module. BCB modules: A sub-minimum of 50% in the practical component of each module

B.16.1

B.16.2

Weight of practical component

B.16.2.1 The percentage of the total marks allocated to the practical examination where it forms part of the theory evaluation shall not exceed 50%. B.16.2.2 For the purpose of promotion, the practical modules shall not be credited independently of the theory modules of a particular subject. B.16.3 Final mark Except where otherwise indicated, the final mark shall be obtained by means of a 43

system of continuous evaluation, which will differ from subject to subject, combined with examinations as indicated in the University's Assessment Policy. B.16.4 Re-evaluation of practical modules No re-evaluation will be allowed for practical modules that are evaluated on a continuous basis. Attendance of practicals In the programme Medical Biosciences and Biotechnology a minimum attendance of 80% of the practicals is required to gain access to the examination in addition to the 40% subminimum needed in the coursework mark. PROMOTION TO THE FOLLOWING YEAR: Unless Senate decides otherwise and subject to rule A.3.2.3 No student shall be promoted to the second year of study unless at least 45 credits have been obtained. No student shall be promoted to the third year of study unless at least 200 credits have been obtained. For the final two years of the programme, the rules as for the three year stream apply, including Advance Registration. ADVANCE REGISTRATION Registration in anticipation may be permitted upon application in writing to the Dean. Each application will be dealt with on its merits in order to determine which module(s) may be anticipated. RENEWAL OF REGISTRATION Students who are academically refused in terms of rule A.3.2.3 may apply in writing to the Dean to be re-admitted if they have completed 60% of the courses for the year of study concerned or when they can provide evidence of extenuating circumstances which have prevented them from doing justice to the course AND can show that these circumstances have changed to the extent that success upon re-registration can reasonably be expected.

B.16.5

B.17

B.17.1

B.17.2

B.17.3

B.18

B.19

RULES FOR THE BPHARM DEGREE B.20 B.20.1 ADMISSION Admission rules for applicants who matriculated from 2008: Unless Senate decides otherwise, candidates will be required to meet the following criteria to be enrolled for the degree Baccalaureus Pharmaceuticae (BPharm): (a) The National Senior Certificate for Bachelor's Degree study plus a score of no less than 27 points calculated according to the university's approved points system, as well as the following specific subject requirements: Level 4 in English (Home or first additional language) Level 3 in Another language (Home or first additional language) Level 4 in Mathematics or Level 6 for Mathematics Literacy Level 4 in Physical Science Level 4 in Life Science 44

(b) (c)

Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT). OR qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

B.20.2

Admission rules for applicants who matriculated prior to 2008: Unless Senate decides otherwise, candidates will be required to meet the following criteria to be enrolled for the degree Baccalaureus Pharmaceuticae (BPharm): (a) Matriculation Exemption with a pass in: · Mathematics ( D symbol HG or C symbol SG) and · Biology (D symbol HG or C symbol SG) and · Physical Science (D symbol HG or C symbol SG) Students will be required to write the National Benchmark Test (NBT). OR qualification or level of competence which the Senate of the University has deemed be equivalent to the requirements stipulated in (a) and (b) above.

(b) (c)

B.20.3

Selection Where the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available places in a study programme, the University reserves the right not to select all applicants who meet the minimum admission criteria. Equal status Senate, upon recommendation of Faculty, may grant persons who have obtained adequate competencies in the modules listed in Rule B.22, equivalent status for purposes of admission. In order to obtain the equivalent status, such persons shall apply in writing to the Faculty when applying for admission to the University. N.B.: In order to determine the level of competency, Faculty may subject students applying for equivalent status, to one or more assessment events.

B.20.4

B.21

DURATION The curriculum shall extend over four years, followed by one year of internship under the auspices of the SA Pharmacy Council. The internship may be done in a community, hospital, industrial practice or at an approved university. COMPOSITION OF CURRICULUM The curriculum shall consist of modules with a total credit value of 495 credits divided as follows: Year Level 1 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Human Biology 113 Human Biology 123 Chemistry 114(N) Chemistry 124(N) Physics 151(SF) Introduction to Mathematics Statistics 125 Introduction to Xhosa (SC) OR Introduction to Afrikaans (SC) 45

B.22

Num Code 301113 301123 311014 311024 340151 390150 381125 296003 201003

Alpha Code HUB113 HUB123 CHE114 CHE124 PHY151 MAM150 STA125 XHO002 AFR002 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 10 10 115

Year Level 2 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Biotechnology 216 Pharmacy 211 Pharmacy 221 Pharmacy 223 Pharmacy 214 Pharmacy 224 Pharmacy 215 Pharmacy 225

Num Code 327216 331011 331014 331015 331012 331016 331013 331017

Alpha Code BTN216 PHA211 PHA221 PHA223 PHA214 PHA224 PHA215 PHA225 Subtotal

Cred 20 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 125

Year Level 3 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Pharmacy 311 Pharmacy 312 Pharmacy 313 Pharmacy 314 Pharmacy 321 Pharmacy 322 Pharmacy 323 Pharmacy 324

Num Code 334311 334312 334313 334314 334321 334322 334323 334324

Alpha Code PHA311 PHA312 PHA313 PHA314 PHA321 PHA322 PHA323 PHA324 Subtotal

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 120

Year Level 4 Compulsory Modules (Choose all) Module Name Pharmacy 411 Pharmacy 414 Pharmacy 415 Pharmacy 416 Pharmacy 417 Pharmacy 421 Pharmacy 424 Pharmacy 403 Pharmacy 405

Num Code 332411 332414 332415 332416 332417 332421 332424 332403 332405

Alpha Code PHA411 PHA414 PHA415 PHA416 PHA417 PHA421 PHA424 PHA403 PHA405 Subtotal Final Total

Cred 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 135 495

` B.23

ASSESSMENT Assessment is generally governed by Rule A5 as stipulated in the General Calendar: General Information Part 1 in addition to the following: Subminima Modules in which a practical component is taken, a sub-minimum of 40% is required in the practical part. Weight of practical examinations The percentage of the total marks allocated to the practical examinations shall not exceed 40%.

B.23.1

B.23.2

46

B.24

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAMME NONE PROMOTION TO THE FOLLOWING YEAR LEVEL Unless Senate decides otherwise and subject to rule A3.2.3: No student shall be admitted to the next year of study unless all the modules at the previous year of study have been successfully completed after no more than two attempts. No student shall be promoted to the third year level unless he/she has passed in all the modules at the second year level. No student shall be promoted to the fourth year level unless he/she has passed in all the modules at the third year level. ADVANCE REGISTRATION Notwithstanding the above, a student who has not obtained sufficient credits to promote, may register for modules at the higher level in anticipation of promotion in the following year, provided all pre-requisites for the higher level module have been met and no time-table clashes will occur as a result of this registration. Students registering modules in anticipation may not register for more than 90 credits in total for that year.

B.25

B.25.1

B.25.2

B.25.3

B.26 B.26.1

B.26.1.1 The maximum number of credits a BPharm I student may anticipate is 40 credits, on obtaining at least 60 credits at the BPharm I level. B.26.1.2 The maximum number of credits a BPharm II student may anticipate is 60 credits, on obtaining at least 210 credits at the BPharm II level. B.26.1.3 The maximum number of credits a BPharm III student may anticipate is 60 credits, on obtaining at least 310 credits and the completion of the BPharm II curriculum. B.27 RENEWAL OF REGISTRATION Students excluded in terms of rules B.25.1 ­ B.25.3 may apply in writing to the Dean to be readmitted if they can provide evidence of extenuating circumstances which have prevented them from doing justice to the course AND can show that these circumstances have changed to the extent that success upon re-registration can reasonably be expected. N.B.: STUDENTS REGISTERED PRIOR TO 2009!! (Rules as per 2008 Undergraduate Faculty Rules, apply).

B.28

47

SYLLABUS DEGREE COURSE: BSc (Applied Geology) Module Lectures per week Tutorials per week Practicals per week 111,112 3 1hr 3hrs 211,212,221,222 3 6hrs 311,312,321,322 3 6hrs

Assessment: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules Practical components: Each module has a compulsory practical component. N.B.: Those intending a career in Applied Geology must take all 1st, 2nd and 3rd year modules. NonGeology majors could select modules in consultation with the Departmental Chairperson or designated academic staff. Field School modules run for a period of two weeks during the vacation. Continuous Assessment Breakdown First Year % of final mark APG111 APG112 Tests/ Assignments 25 25 Practicals 20 20 Main Test 50 50 Tutorials 5 5

Breakdown of learning hours: First Years APG111 APG112 Lectures 48 48 Tutorials 16 16 Test and Assignments 6 6 Self study 32 32 Practicals 48 48 Total of learning hours 150 150

Breakdown of Learning Hours: 2nd year Geology APG211 42 40 16 84 18 APG212 42 40 16 84 18 APG221 20 20 APG222 42 40 16 84 18

Contact with Lecturer/Tutor Self-study Assignments and Tasks Practicals Tests and Examinations Field work/Practicals Report writing Total learning hours

200

200

140 20 200

200

48

Continuous Assessment Breakdown Second Year % of Final Mark APG211 APG212 APG221 APG222 Tests/Assignments 25 25 25 Practicals 25 25 25 Main Test 50 50 50 Report 60 Field work, maps & field 40 notes

Continuous Assessment Breakdown: 3rd Year Geology APG311 APG312 APG321 Tests & Assignments 25 25 25 Main Test 50 50 50 Practicals 25 25 25 Lectures Main Test & Report writing Practicals & fieldwork Breakdown of learning hours: 3rd Year Geology APG311 APG312 APG321 Contact with lecturer 42 42 42 Assignments and tests 60 60 60 Practicals 84 84 84 Tests and examinations 30 30 30 Selfstudy 84 84 84 Other Total learning hours 300 300 300 FIRST YEAR MODULES

APG322 10 40 50 10 40 50 APG322 42 80 84 30 64 300

APG111 Geology 111 (15 credits) Main Content: · The Earth in the Universe. · Structure of the Earth, Isostasy, Plate Tectonics. · Rock Cycle, Earth Quakes, Geologic Time, Palaeomagnetism. · Introduction to minerals and rocks, classification of minerals and rocks. Main Outcomes: Students should be able to: · Explain the basic Earth processes, · Identify major rocks and minerals as products associated with these processes APG112 Geology 112 (15 credits) Main Content: · Geology of Southern Africa; Earth dynamics and Earth resources · Historical Geology of Southern Africa · Introduction to structural Geology and mapping techniques · Introduction to the mineral, gas and petroleum deposits Main Outcomes: Students should · Grasp basic concepts of stratigraphy and Earth dynamics and · Develop the ability to relate the underlying principles to the formation of mineral, gas and petroleum deposits. 49

SECOND YEAR MODULES TIME TABLE GROUP TWO: APG211, APG212 APG211 Geology 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: APG111 or GEL 131] Main Content: · Theory of light interacting with crystalline substances. · Identification of rocks and minerals in hand specimen and under the polarization microscope. · Crystallography · Basic principles of chemistry and applications in geology; atomic theory, electron configuration, periodic table, radioactivity etc. · Rocks, minerals and element substitution. · Surface/ Solution equilibria and radiometric dating · Geochemical cycle of elements Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion, a student will be able to · Know the principles of interaction between light and crystalline material and the use in identification of minerals. · Be able to identify major rocks in handspecimen. · Be able to use a polarization microscope in identification of minerals in thin sections. · Relate basic principles of chemistry to geological processes · Solve geological problems through application of chemistry. · Understand geochemistry as a discipline in earth science APG212 Geology 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: APG111 and APG112 OR GEL 131 and GEL132] Main Content: · Principles of Aerial Photography (a) Principles of Satellite Imagery. · Construction of Base Maps and Geological Maps. · Projection Techniques and Conventions. · Description and analysis of deformed rocks · Stereographic projection methods and techniques in structural analysis. · Concepts of stress, translation, rotation and strain. · Rock mechanics and tectonic settings. Main Outcomes: Student should · Know the principles of analysis of regional photogrammetry surveys. · Develop skills for acquisition and analysis of remotely sensed data, especially digital satellite image data. · Have a conceptual understanding of map construction. · Understand principles and analysis of rock deformation · Develop skills for the structural analysis of deformed rocks. · Have a conceptual understanding of tectonic settings and rock mechanics. TIME TABLE GROUP ONE: APG221, APG222 APG222 Geology 222 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: APG111 and APG112 and APG211 OR GEL131 and GEL132 and GEL231 and GEL234] Main Content: · Depositional processes · Description of sedimentary rocks · Sediment classification and textures · Formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks · Classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks 50

Main Outcomes: Student should: · Be aware of the basic principles/ processes of sediment deposition and depositional environments. · Develop skills to describe sedimentary rocks · Have a conceptual understanding of the classification of sedimentary rocks and associated textures · Be able to recognize and describe igneous and metamorphic rocks and associated textures in handspecimen and under the microscope. · Relate changes in the mineralogy of igneous and metamorphic rocks to variation in the chemistry of the rocks. · Have a conceptual understanding mineralogy of rocks, associated textures and various igneous and metamorphic rock forming processes.

DURING VACATION APG221 Geology 221 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: APG111 and APG112 and APG211 and APG212 OR GEL131 and GEL234] Main Content: · Geological mapping techniques. · Structural analysis of geological data · Reporting geological data and report writing. Main Outcomes: Student should: · Become aware of, instinctively observe and vividly describe the occurrence and spatial arrangement of various types of rocks in the field. · Be able to position themselves in the field and record information collected in the field in geological maps at various scales. · Undertake geological measurements in the field. · Write geological reports on field exercises. THIRD YEAR MODULES APG311 Geology 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: GEL211 and GEL212 and GEL221 and GEL222 OR APG211 and APG212 and APG221 and APG222] Main Content: · Database management, vector maps and raster maps · Geological data and GIS · Application of GIS to geological industry. · Basic elements in 2D and 3D geological models in geology. · Introduction to computer modeling packages in applied geological industry. · Construction of geological/geochemical/ maps and sections. · Integration of geological maps and sections into 2D and 3D models related to element migration and hydrocarbon occurrence and flow dynamics. Main Outcomes: Student should: · Know the principles and applications of spatial and related techniques in geology. · Develop skills for the construction of GIS raster and vector maps using geological data · Have a conceptual understanding of data management, data querying and spatial analysis. · Understand principles of modeling geological processes and geological setting. · Develop skills to integrate geological data into computer-based models; process and analyze and evaluate resulting images. · Have a conceptual understanding of the application of geological models in the search for various Earth resources

51

APG312 Geology 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: APG112 and GEL211 and GEL221 and GEL212 and GEL222 OR APG211 and APG212 and APG221 and APG222] Main Content: · Facies Analysis · Stratigraphic methods. · Basin analysis. · Formation of petroleum, hydrocarbon occurrence, source rocks, host rocks and traps. · Seismic sections, logging and reservoir modeling. Main Outcomes: Student should: · Be aware of the principles/ processes of facies analysis and depositional environments. · Develop skills for the stratigraphic interpretation of sedimentary rock sequences. · Have a conceptual understanding of the geological setting of sedimentary rocks in basins and their attributes. · Understand principles of petroleum formation and hydrocarbon occurrence. · Developed skills to interpretation of seismic sections, various logs. · Have a conceptual understanding of a reservoir and host rocks. APG321 Geology 321 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: APG112 and GEL211 and GEL221 and GEL212 and GEL222 OR APG211 and APG212 and APG221 and APG222] Main Content: · Introduction to mineral economics and genetic classification of ore deposits. · Magmatic, hydrothermal and sedimentary ore deposits and ore deposit models. · Concepts of mineral exploration and ore deposit evaluation. · Application of advanced geochemical concepts in geology; aqueous solutions, isotope geochemistry, thermodynamics and surficial equilibria. · Application of geochemical principles in geochemical exploration and in protecting the environment. Main Outcomes: Student should: · Know the principles of concentration/ deposition of mineral deposits in the context of various geological processes. · Be aware of the occurrence of various genetic types of ore deposits in relation to associated host rocks, mineralogy of ores, ore grades and geological setting. · Have a conceptual understanding of ore deposit formation and various geological processes as well as ore deposit exploration and evaluation. · Have a firm understanding of advanced concepts in geochemistry and their application in geology. · Develop skills for the acquisition and analysis of geochemical data. · Have a conceptual understanding of element dispersion and isotopic fractionation and its application in geology. APG322 Geology 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: APG112 and (GEL211 and GEL221 and GEL212 and GEL222) OR (APG211 and APG212 and APG221 and APG222) AND APG311 and APG312] Main Content: · Advanced geological mapping techniques. · Structural analysis of geological data · Reporting geological data and report writing. · Concept of Plate Tectonics · Stereographic projection methods and techniques in structural analysis. · Mechanics of Plate Motions · Ductile and Brittle Deformation in the Crust and Mantle.

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Main Outcomes: Student should: · Become aware instinctively observe and vividly describe the occurrence and spatial arrangement of various types of rocks in the field. · Record information collected in the field in geological maps at various scales. · Undertake an advanced structural analysis of data collected in the field. · Write geological reports on field mapping. · Understand the principles of geotectonics, and geotectonic evolution of the Earth. · Develop skills for the acquisition and analysis of structural geology data at regional and global level. · Have a conceptual understanding of global tectonic settings and associated Earth resources.

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc (Biodiversity & Conservation Biology) SYLLABUS LIFE SCIENCE Semester modules 141, 142 151, 152 Lectures per week 3 3 Tutorials per week 1 1 Practicals per week 1 1 Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules Practical: Each module has a compulsory practical component

FIRST YEAR MODULES LSC141 Life Sciences 141 (15 credits) Main Content: Cell structure and organelles and an introduction to processes taking place in them. DNA replication; DNA control of protein synthesis and thereby biochemical processes, mitosis, meiosis, chromosomes and genes, Mendelian and biochemical genetics, principles of evolution. Main Outcomes: Learners should develop: An understanding of cell structure, cell function and molecular processes of the cell. Practical skills in microscopy. An ability to assimilate information from various sources and be able to present such information in written form. LSC142 Life Sciences 142 (15 credits) Main Content: Brief description of the origin of the universe and the solar system. Basic rules of classification, the diversity of life including all life forms: viruses and monera, protista and fungi, plant diversity, invertebrate diversity, vertebrate diversity. Biotic and abiotic components of the biosphere, levels of organization (biosphere, biomes, ecosystems, and populations) and the unifying role of ecology in biology, population dynamics, interactions within communities, energy flow, food webs, nutrient cycling, human impact and environmental concerns. Basic philosophy of science and basic principles of statistics (replication, means and standard deviation). Main Outcomes: Learners should: Be able to classify all life forms. Develop practical laboratory and observational skills and report writing, and understand the importance of ecosystem functioning in their lives. Be able to apply the methods and concepts of scientific research including the collection and analysis of simple ecological data from the laboratory and field. LFS151 Life Sciences 151 (15 credits) Main Content: Cell structure and organelles and an introduction to processes taking place in them. DNA replication, DNA control of protein synthesis and thereby biochemical processes, mitosis, meiosis, chromosomes and genes. Mendelian and biochemical genetics, evolution. Main Outcomes: Learners will have an understanding of cell structure, cell function and molecular processes of the cell. Learners will develop practical skills in microscopy, be able to assimilate information from various sources and, be able to present such information in written form. Learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Nature of Science. 54

LFS152 Life Sciences 152 (15 credits) Main Content: Basic rules of classification. The diversity of life including: viruses, monera, protista, fungi, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. Biotic and abiotic components of the biosphere, levels of organization and the unifying role of ecology in biology. Population dynamics, community ecology and ecosystem functioning. Main Outcomes: Learners will understand basic rules of classification for all life forms; Develop practical skills such as dissections and practical report writing. They will understand the importance of ecosystem functioning and be able to apply the methods and concepts of scientific research including the collection and analysis of simple ecological data from the laboratory and field. Learners will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the Nature of Science.

SYLLABUS BIODIVERSITY and CONSERVATION BIOLOGY MODULE BDC211, BDC212, BDC221, BDC222 BDC311, BDC312, BDC321, BDC322 3 2 x 3 hour 3 2 x 3 hour

Lectures per week Practicals per week

Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules Practical component: Each module has a compulsory practical component. The following modules may include a field trip: Continuous Assessment Breakdown: Second Year (% of final mark) BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 BDC222 Theory Tests 10 10 10 10 Practicals 40 40 40 40 Tests 10 10 10 10 Final Exam 40 40 40 40 Breakdown of learning hours: Second Year BDC211 BDC212 BDC221 Contact with lecturer/tutor 36 36 36 Assignments and tasks 30 30 30 Practicals 72 72 72 Tests and examination 12 12 12 Self-Study 50 50 50 TOTAL Learning hours 200 200 200 Breakdown of learning hours: Third Year BDC311 BDC312 BDC321 Contact with lecturer/tutor 36 36 36 Assignments and tasks 80 80 80 Practicals 72 72 72 Tests and examinations 12 12 12 Selfstudy 100 100 100 TOTAL Learning hours 300 300 300 55

BDC222 36 30 72 12 50 200

BDC322 36 80 72 12 100 300

Continuous Assessment Breakdown: Third Year BDC311 BDC312 BDC321 Theory Tests 10 10 10 Assignments 10 10 10 Practicals 10 10 10 Practical Test 10 10 10 Practical examination 20 20 20 Final Examination 40 40 40

BDC322 10 10 10 10 20 40

SECOND YEAR MODULES BDC211 Biodiversity & Conservation 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: LSC142 or LSC152] Main Content: Evolution, classification and identification of invertebrate and vertebrate animals; a comparative study of the structure and function of three of the following systems: skeletal, circulatory, reproductive, endocrine, digestive, respiratory and excretory. Main Outcomes: Learners will be able to explain invertebrate and vertebrate animal evolution, classification, systematics and organization, and will be able to identify invertebrate and vertebrate animals. They will be able to demonstrate basic animal structure and function, and understand how animals work. They will develop practical skills as well as presentation skills. BDC212 Biodiversity & Conservation 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: LSC141 or LFS151] Main Content: Plant growth and development, including an overview of selected plant hormones; Nutrient and mineral assimilation, with emphasis on nitrogen; Photosynthesis in C3 plants, with an exploration of alternative pathways; Plant mineral nutrition; Plant water relations; Environmental effects on plant growth and development; Plant stress physiology. Main Outcomes: Learners will be able to: Use plant growth substances to manipulate plant growth; Predict the effects of environmental change on plants with different photosynthetic pathways; Compare the roles of various nutrients; Understand and evaluate the role that key environmental conditions have on a plant's physiology and the impact of this on its abundance and distribution. BDC221 Biodiversity & Conservation 221 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: LSC142 or LSC152] Main Content: The diversity of photosynthetic organisms and lower plants; Evolutionary relationships among photosynthetic organisms and lower plants; The origin of organelles by endosymbiosis; Growth and organization; Life cycles and their environmental correlates. Identification and classification systems; Plant characters of use in cladistic methods; Sources of taxonomic information; A review of flowering plant diversity in the fynbos, with special attention to the most species rich and endemic taxa. Main Outcomes: Learners will be able to: Distinguish between different photosynthetic organisms and lower plants to the higher taxonomic levels; Compare alternation of generation in various photosynthetic organisms and lower plants, and will understand the ecological implications of this division. Identify and classify key fynbos plant families and explain how plants are grouped together; recognize the diversity and functional significance of morphological and reproductive structures found amongst flowering plants. 56

BDC222 Biodiversity & Conservation 222 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: LSC141 and LSC142 or LSC152 and COS114 or COS124] Main Content: Basic population dynamics and life-tables. Age-structured population models. Population census techniques. Intraspecific competition and derivation of the logistic growth equation. Modeling populations showing logistic growth. Harvesting natural populations ­ deterministics and stochastic models. Population fluctuations ­ key factor analysis; Adaptation and the theory of natural selection; Speciation processes and patterns; Reconstruction of phylogeny, evolution and classification; Concepts and principles of cladistics, modern systematics and taxonomy. Main Outcomes: Students will be able to Collect field data and use them to estimate population sizes of a number of different organism types; Identify factors that contribute to population size, and should be to determine the importance of different processes to population growth; Build simple models of populations, simulate population growth, and use models to determine the most appropriate method of exploiting populations sustainability; Evaluate the evidence for speciation and evolution; Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the theory of evolution and phylogenetics, and apply cladistic methodology and software to various kinds of data in order to discover the historical relationships of organisms; Apply the rules of nomenclature; Demonstrate the process of new species description. THIRD YEAR MODULES Compulsory Modules: BDC311 Biodiversity & Conservation 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BDC211 and BDC221 OR BCB211 and BCB212 and BCB221 and BCB222] [Prohibited combinations: BDB242 and BCB321] Main Content: Interaction of animals with the environment in selected ecosystems with reference to energy, temperature and water relations. Principles and context of survey design; Statistical constraints on survey design; Indices of species and genetic diversity; Techniques for analysing genetic, species and habitat diversity in marine and terrestrial environments; Collecting physical environmental data; Integrating, analyzing and interpreting information on biodiversity. Main Outcomes: Students will understand the role that physiology plays in influencing an animal's survival in a changing environment: be able to undertake basic physiological experiments on animals, analyse and interpret the data collected; Understand the concepts and constraints underlying surveys of biodiversity, and the implications of biodiversity assessments; Conduct biodiversity assessments in a variety of habitats. BDC312 Biodiversity & Conservation 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BDC212 and either BCB211 or BCB221] Main Content: Conservation biology; Protected areas, global and national analysis; Sustainability; Examples from rural communities and livestock rearing; The concept of the ecological footprint; Balancing conservation with development; Introduction to environmental legislation; Integrated environmental management and strategic environmental analysis; Introduction to integrated catchment management; Introduction to integrated coastal area management; Restoration and environmental monitoring; Renewable natural resources economics; Value of eco-tourism; Working with local communities for undertaking action research; Birth of green politics; Traditional and molecular characters in genetic studies, techniques for acquiring molecular data in the laboratory and from the internet. Interpretation of data derived from studies of proteins, and various kinds of DNA sequences. The use of molecular data in conservation. Main Outcomes: Students will understand the concept of ecosystems and the way they function; Understand a suite of different ecosystems; discuss the impacts of anthropogenic change on ecosystem integrity; Understand the application of genetic data to conservation practice; Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the theory of laboratory procedures used to study molecular genetics, and apply advanced analytical methodology and software to various kinds of molecular data. 57

BDC321 Biodiversity & Conservation 321 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BDC211, BDC221, BDC222, BDC241 and either BCB211 or BCB221] Main Content: An overview of interspecific interactions; Basic community characteristics; Numerical analysis of field data; Defining statistical relationships between community structure and environmental parameters; Ecological management of biological communities.; Patterns of landscape biodiversity globally and nationally; Spatial patterns and scale; Space and temporal patterns ­ regime shifts; Fragmentation; Tools for doing spatial analysis- geographical information systems, remote sensing and geostatistics; Quantifying the environment using patch metrics; Linear versus non linear habitats; Identifying anthropogenic signatures at the landscape level; Conserving landscape; Reserve network design. Main outcomes: Students will understand the principles of community ecology, and be able to identify the main forces responsible for structuring biological communities; be able to collect field data and analyse it numerically; analyse landscape patterns, identify temporal changes and signatures of anthropogenic impacts; prepare these analyses as consultant reports. BDC322 Biodiversity & Conservation 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BDC211 and BDC221 OR BCB221 and BCB231] ]Prohibited combinations: BCB322 AND BCB342] Main Content: Conceptual overview of ecosystems and their characteristics and drivers; Overview of anthropogenic and natural impacts on ecosystem integrity; Exploration of selected marine and terrestrial ecosystems; Continental drift and glaciation; Theories of biogeography and biogeographic reconstruction; Continental drift and glaciation; Theories of biogeography and biogeographic reconstruction; Phylogeography; Latitudinal gradients in diversity; Interactions of body and population size on diversity and distribution; Island biogeography theory and its applications for conservation. Main Outcomes: Students will understand the concept of ecosystems and the way they function; know the characteristics of a suite of different ecosystems; be able to discuss the impacts of anthropogenic change on ecosystem integrity; understand the principles of community ecology, and be able to identify the main forces responsible for structuring biological communities; will be able to collect field data and analyse it numerically.

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc (Biotechnology) SYLLABUS BIOTECHNOLOGY MODULE Lectures per week Practicals per week 211, 213, 214, 215 311, 322, 323, 324, 312 216, (223* ­ Not offered in 2010) 3 3 2 x 3 hour 2 x 3 hour

Evaluation: Continuous and exam-based evaluation will be used in all modules. Practical: Most modules have a compulsory practical component.

Continuous Assessment Breakdown: Second Year (% of final mark) 211 222 213 214 215 223* 216 Tests 20 20 20 30 20 20 Test & Assign 30 Pracs 30 35 30 30 40 30 Essays & Tutorials 10 10 Tutorials 20 Assignments 10 5 10 Exam 40 40 40 40 40 40 40 Breakdown of Learning Hours Second Year Biotechnology Contact with Lect/Tutor Assign/ Tasks Tests/ Exams Self study Pracs Other Total learning hours 211 42 28 8 80 42 200 222 35 21 8 52 84 200 213 42 32 6 64 56 200 214 50 20 10 64 56 200 215 42 24 15 64 0 55 200 223* 42 70 6 40 42 200 216 48 18 10 68 56 200

Continuous Assessment Breakdown: Third Year (% of final mark) BTN311 Class tests and Assignments Practicals Essays and Tutorials Final Exam Total BTN322 BTN323 BTN324 BTN312

20 30 10 40 100

30 30 40 100

30 30 40 100

30 30 40 100

30 30 40 100

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Breakdown of Learning Hours: Third Year Biotechnology BTN311 BTN322 BTN323 BTN324 Contact Lecturer/Tutor 70 56 70 70 Assign and Tasks 40 12 40 40 Tests and Examination 7 5 7 7 Practicals 112 84 112 112 Selfstudy 71 113 71 71 Essay 30 Poster Total learning hrs 300 300 300 300

BTN312 70 40 7 112 71

300

SECOND YEAR MODULES COMPULSORY MODULES BTN211 Biotechnology 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAM111 or MAM115; CHE114 and CHE124 or CHE116 and CHM126; LSC141 and LSC142] Main Content: · Introduction to microbiology, history and scope. · Diversity of microorganisms in terms of nutrition, growth and genetics. · Hands-on introduction to safe handling of microorganisms. · Techniques for microbial culturing, identification, and genetic analysis. · Use of molecular and classical methods for the classification of microorganisms. · Role and significance of different groups of microorganisms in foods, plants, humans and animals. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module students will be able to: · Demonstrate that they acquired the basic techniques used in the Microbiology laboratory. · Explain the fundamental theory of microbial taxonomy, structure and physiology. · Analyze the different groups of microorganisms important to humans. *BTN222 Biotechnology 222 (for BTY students only) (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114 and CHE124 OR CHE116 and CHM126, COS114 or COS124 AND MAM111 or MAM115] [Prohibited module combination: Only Student registered for BSc (Biotechnology) are eligible to register as the new Life Science building computer laboratory can only accommodate 100 students. Main Content: · DNA and RNA structure and function. · Translate DNA sequence into RNA, then protein sequence. · Protein structure and function. · Computational tools to manipulate 3-dimensional structures (in 2-dimensions) to identify structures and to predict function based on structure. Main Outcomes At the end of this module, students will be able to: · demonstrate their understanding of the structure of DNA, RNA and proteins and how these underlying structures inform the respective functions of these molecules. · Furthermore, students will be able to analyse the 3-dimensional structures (in 2-dimensions), perform in silico transcription and translation of DNA using computational methodology and predict function based on structure.

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BTN215 Biotechnology 215 [Pre-requisites: CHE114, CHE124 or CHE116, CHM126. Advised: MAM111 or MAM115] Main Content: · Significant Digits · Solutions, Mixtures and Media · Moles and Molecular Weight · pH · Quantitation of Nucleic Acids · Determining the concentration of single-stranded DNA · Measuring RNA concentration · Mathematical Applications · Graphs · Proteins · Enzyme Kinetics · Calculations in Molecular Biology I · Calculations in Molecular Biology II Main Outcomes: Students should be able have a clear understanding of: · the mathematical applications in Molecular Biology · mathematical applications in Biotechnology · assay writing · oral presentations

(20 credits)

BTN216 Biotechnology 216 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114, CHE124 or CHE116, CHM126 Advised: LSC141, MAM115] Main Content: · Weak interactions in an aqueous environment · The energetics of life · Introduction to protein structure and function · Carbohydrates · Lipids · Membranes and cell surfaces Main Outcomes. On completion of the module, students will have obtained the following: · demonstrate that they acquire the basic techniques used in Microbiology · explain the fundamental theory of microbial taxonomy · have a detailed understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters that affect microbial growth in food · demonstrate the applications of HACCP and other food safety management tools · understand the dynamics of food borne pathogens ELECTIVES: BTN213 Biotechnology 213 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114 & CHE124 or CHE116 & CHM126, LSC141, HUB111 or HUB131 or LSC141 & LSC142] Main Content: · Basic microbial genetics · Gene transfer · Prokaryotic recombinant technologies and rgene expression · Assessment of microbial diversity · Key microbial groups in the environment · Microbial bioremediation · Parameters that affect microbial growth 61

· Organisms naturally occurring in foods · Food safety and spoilage · Introduction to food borne diseases Main Outcomes: Students should obtain an understanding of: · Basic microbial genetics and genomics and the molecular processes of microbial gene expression · The diversity of microorganisms in different environments · Methods for accessing microbial diversity · An awareness of the importance of microorganisms in the environment · Practical methods in microbial isolation, identification and recombinant techniques · The basics of food microbiology · The importance of quality and safety in the food industry *BTN223 Biotechnology 223 (Not offered in 2010) (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114, CHE124 or CHE116, CHM126 Advised: LSC141, MAM115] Main Content: · Introduction to enzyme kinetics · Principles of anabolic and catabolic processes · Intermediary metabolism ­ glycolysis and Krebs cycle · Biochemistry of oxidative phosphorylation · Biochemical role of cellular organelles · Introduction to metabolomics Main Outcomes: The students will understand: · The fundamental principles governing metabolism including enzyme kinetics. · They will be able to explain where in the cell anabolic and catabolic reactions take place and relate biochemical processes to structural requirements. · In addition, the students will be able to explain the central roles and biochemistry of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. · Finally, the students will apply their knowledge of individual reactions and pathways to the functioning of the whole cell. BTN214 Biotechnology 214 [For Dietetics students ONLY.] Main Content: · Introduction to microbiology, history and scope · Diversity of food borne microorganisms, in terms of nutrition, growth and genetics. · Hand on introduction to safe handling of microorganisms. · Techniques for microbial culturing and identification. · Intrinsic and extrinsic parameters · Adaptations to food environments · Food preservation · Food borne pathogens · Quality and Safety Management THIRD YEAR MODULES COMPULSORY MODULES: BTN311 Biotechnology 311 [Pre-requisites: BTN221, BTN225, BTN322] Main Content: · Cutting and joining DNA molecules 62 (20 credits)

(30 credits)

· · · · · · · · · · ·

Cloning vectors and cloning strategies Recombinant selection and screening Analyzing DNA sequences The polymerase chain reaction and applications Directed mutagenesis and protein engineering Manipulation of gene expression Molecular basis of viral vector technologies Viral vectors for vaccine delivery Viral vectors for gene therapy DNA and chromosome structure, organization and function. Physical and genetic mapping. Proteomics definition, background and principle. Protein sample preparation, quantification and separation methods, staining approaches, and sample analysis Main Outcomes: At the end of this module students will have: · Understanding of the major research techniques employed in biotechnology · Technical expertise in the basic methods of DNA manipulation · Understanding of the molecular basis of viral vector technologies. · Applications of viral vector technologies · Understanding of the latest developments in the use of virus biotechnology. · Fundamental understanding of human chromosomes, mapping of the genome and human genetic diseases · Understanding of methodologies in proteomics · Application of proteomics as a tool in molecular research

BTN322 Biotechnology 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BTN211 and BTN215 and BTN216 and BTN222] Main Content: Topics illustrative of protein structure/function relationships, chosen from (inter alia): · Haemoglobin and the transport of oxygen · p53 and the control of cancer · Membrane proteins and ion channels · Protein synthesis and turnover · Enzyme catalysis · Design of the HIV protease inhibitor Introductions to major protein methodologies, including: · Protein expression and purification · Introduction to X-ray crystallography · Introduction to NMR spectroscopy · Introduction to Mass spectrometry Main Outcomes: Students will be able to explain: · how the structure of proteins influences their function, through study of a number of model systems, · methods available for the production and investigation of protein structure and function. ELECTIVES: BTN323 Biotechnology 323 [Pre-requisites: BTN222 and BTN215] Main Content: · Introduction to genomes and genomic organisation · Experimental methods · Introduction to Bioinformatics and Databases · Sequence Alignment and BLAST · Variation, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics 63 (30 credits)

· Molecular Evolution · Proteomics and Functional Genomics · Microarray Analysis · Gene discovery Main Outcomes: At the completion of the modules, students should be capable of: · Explaining of the organization of genomes · Using main web-resources (databases and tools) · Analysing data generated in genomics and proteomic projects (basic) · Annotating sequence data · Implementing the basic tools for computational gene discovery BTN312 Biotechnology 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: BTN211 and BTN215 and BTN216 and BTN222] Main Content: · Diversity of microorganisms in different environments · Methods for assessing (both quantitatively and qualitatively) microbial diversity and community structure (including phylogenetic markers, 16S library analysis, DGGE, ARISA etc) · Methods for assessing in situ microbial activity (including labeling technologies, transciptomic analysis etc) · Methods for accessing metagenomes and identifying novel genes and pathways (vectors, library construction, screening technologies) · The use of microorganisms and their products in industry, including first, second and third generation processes) · Fermentation processes · Downstream processing · Enzyme recovery, immobilization · Biocatalysis and biotransformations · Examples of biotransformation reactions Main Outcomes: On the completion of this module, students will be able to: · Explain the diversity of microorganisms in different environments, and methods for assessing (both quantitatively and qualitatively) microbial diversity, microbial activity and community structure. · Apply methods for accessing metagenomes, for identifying novel genes and pathways and for exploiting these genes for industrial use via cloning, expression, fermentation and recovery. · Apply methods used in industry for biocatalysis and iotransformations, and the use of whole cells, immobilized biocatalysts and free enzymes. · Explain cofactor recycling · Explain the use of biological systems, particularly microorganisms, in large scale industry for the production of commodity and high value products. BTN324 Biotechnology 324 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: BTN211] [Prohibited Combination: BTY214] Main Content: · Diversity of food borne microorganisms · Intrinsic and extrinsic parameters · Adaptations to food environments · Food preservation and fermentations · Food borne pathogens · Molecular detection techniques · Management of food safety · Total Quality Management · The students will understand the fundamental principles of plant molecular biology and their application to plant biotechnology. They should be able to explain the major steps leading from 64

transgene identification to the making of transgenic plants. Students should also be able to comprehend the use of "omics" technologies the identification. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module, students will have obtained the following: · A detailed understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters that affect microbial growth in food · Microbial flora of food and fermented products · Demonstrate the applications of HACCP and other food safety management tools · Analyze the molecular detection techniques · Introduction to plant molecular biology · Plant transformation and regeneration systems · Molecular and genetic evaluation of transgenics · Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics as tools in plant biotechnology

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc (Chemical Sciences) SYLLABUS

Continuous Assessment Breakdown First year (% of final mark) 118 128 114 116 124 126 Test 1 15 15 10 10 10 10 Test 2 15 15 10 10 10 10 Test 3 15 15 10 10 10 10 Test 4 15 15 10 10 10 10 Practicals 20 20 20 20 20 Exam 40 40 40 40 40 40 A minimum of 40% on average of the 4 tests must be achieved to pass the module.

Breakdown of Learning hours First year 118 128 Contact with lecturer 42 42 Tutorials 14 Tests & Examination 7 7 Practicals 42 21 Self study 45 80 TOTAL 150 150

114 42 14 7 42 45 150

116 42 14 7 42 45 150

124 42 14 7 42 45 150

126 42 14 7 42 45 150

Continuous Assessment Breakdown Second Year % of Final Mark 211 212 Tests 25 25 Assignments 5 5 Practicals 25 25 Attendance 5 5 Final Exam 40 40 Breakdown of Learning Hours: 2nd Year 211 Contact with Lecturer 56 Assignments & Tests 42 Practicals 42 Test & Examination 12 Self-Study 48

212 56 42 42 12 48

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Continuous Assessment Breakdown for Third Year(% of Final Mark) CHM311 CHM312 CHM321 CHM322 Tests 25 25 25 25 Examination 40 40 40 40 Assignments 5 5 5 5 Practicals 25 25 25 25 Attendance 5 5 5 5 100 100 100 100 Breakdown of Learning Hours : 3rd Year CHM311 CHM312 Contact with Lecturer 84 84 Assignments and tasks 60 60 Practicals 84 84 Tests and examinations 12 12 Selfstudy 60 60 Other 0 0 Total Learning time 300 300

CHM321 84 60 84 12 60 0 300

CHM322 84 60 84 12 60 0 300

SYLLABUS FIRST YEAR LEVEL MODULES CHE114 Chemistry 114(N) (15 credits) Main Content: · Atomic Structure, Periodic Table of Elements, · Chemical Formulae and Equations, · Stoichiometry and the Mole Concept, · Thermochemistry, Redox reactions, The Gaseous State, Quantum Theory of the Atom, · Electronic Configuration and Periodicity, · Ionic and Covalent Bonding, · Molecular Geometry and Chemical Bonding Theory. Main Outcomes: An understanding and practice of · Basic principles and concepts of general chemistry ­ atomic structure, bonding and stoichiometry. CHE124 Chemistry 124(N) (15 credits) Main Content: · Chemical Equilibrium, Acid-base concepts, pH, Solubility, Kinetics, Electrochemistry, Solutions, · Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Alkanes, Alkenes, Carbonium Ions, Alkynes, Alkyl Halides, Alcohols, Phenols, Ethers, · Aldehydes and Ketones, Carboxylic Acids, Acid Chlorides, Anhydrides, Esters, Amines and Amides. Main Outcomes: An understanding of · basic concepts and principles in general and organic chemistry. CHEMISTRY FOR LIFE SCIENCES (SERVICE MODULES) CHE116 Chemistry 116(N) Main Content: · Atomic Structure, Chemical Formulae and Equations, · Stoichiometry, Electronic Structure of Atoms, 67 (15 credits)

·

Chemical Bonding Theory and Molecular Geometry, Thermochemistry, Redox reactions, The Gaseous State, · Introduction to Organic Chemistry: Alkanes and Cycloalkanes, Alkenes. Main Outcomes: An understanding and practice of: · the fundamentals of atomic theory, energetics of chemical reactions and basic organic chemistry. CHM126 Chemistry 126(N) (15 credits) Main Content: · Reaction Kinetics, Equilibrium, · Acids and Bases, Acid Ionisation Equilibria, · Solubility and Solutions, · Alcohols, Phenols, Ethers, Thiols, Sulphides, Aldehydes and Ketones, · Carboxylic Acids and Derivatives, Carbohydrates, Amines, Amino Acids and Proteins, Lipids and Fats. Main Outcomes: Understanding and practice fundamental concepts in: · general and organic chemistry as applied in the life sciences. CHEMISTRY FOR DENTISTRY (SERVICE MODULES) CHE118 Chemistry for Dentistry (15 credits) Main Content: · Introduction to Chemistry, Periodic Table, · Atoms Molecules and Ions, · Chemical Formulae, Mole Concept, · Chemical Reactions, Chemical Bonds, Redox Reactions, · Gasses, Solutions, Acids and Bases, · Hydrocarbons, Alcohols and Ethers, Aldehydes and Ketones, · Carboxylic Acids and Esters, Amines and Amides, Carbohydrates, Proteins, Lipids. Main Outcomes: To understand basics of: · inorganic and general chemistry and introduction to organic chemistry CHM128 Chemistry 128 (CHS) (Syllabus as for Chemistry CHE118). (15 credits)

SECOND LEVEL MODULES CHM211 Chemistry 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114,124 or CHE116,CHM126] Main Content: · Aromatic Chemistry, Stereochemistry, Bi-Functional Conjugated Systems. · Atomic properties of elements, diagonal relationships in the periodic table, descriptive chemistry of the important classes of main group elements, physical properties of transition metals. · Introduction to Organometallic chemistry. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of organometallic chemistry of transition metals · Identify and categorize the different reactions of aromatic compounds. · Classify and execute stereochemical relationships. · Recognize and recall the basics of organometallic chemistry. · Distinguish the different reactions of organic and inorganic chemical compounds. 68

CHM212 Chemistry 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHE114, 124 or CHE116, CHM126] Main Content · Gravimetry, titrimetric methods for acids/baseis, redox titrations, complexometric titrations, precipitation, pH measurements, kinetic molecular theory, van der waals equation for real gases, laws of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, theory of elementary reactions. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · Interpret and illustrate the practice of wet analytical techniques. · Mathematically translate and explain the principle, theories and laws governing simple chemical systems.the descriptive chemistry of selected groups of elements. · An ability to predict the general trends in atomic properties of elements in the periodic table. · An understanding of the basic principles of solid state chemistry. THIRD LEVEL MODULES CHM311 Chemistry 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHM211 and CHM212] [Co-requisites: MAT105 or MAM115 and STA125] Main Content · Entropy and third law of thermodynamics, phase transformation phenomena, determination of reaction rates, theories of unimolecular gas phase reactions and catalysed reactions. · Old quantum theories of oscillators, photoelectric effect, atomic spectra, and Compton effect; postulates of quantum mechanics; · Schrödinger equation and applications to particle motion, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator approximations, molecular spectroscopy and hydrogen atom. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · Ability to perform experiments and solve problems involving thermodynamic and kinetic transformations of matter. · Ability to construct and solve the Schrödinger equations for translational, rotational and vibrational motions and their application in simple atomic structure and molecular spectroscopy. CHM312 Chemistry 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHM211 and CHM212] Main Content · Characteristics and types of chemical industries; · basic principles of process design; sources and properties of organic and inorganic raw materials; industrial chemistry processes including cracking, desulphurization, distillation., · Fischer Tropsch process, hydrogenation, liquefaction, and syn gas systems; · pharmaceutical industry; chloro-alkali process; fuel cells, batteries and capacitors; electrolysis; electroplating, electrocatalysis and electrosynthesis; · kinetics and technology of corrosion of metals and its prevention; potentitiometric sensors or ion selective electrodes; amperometric sensors; environmental electrochemistry. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · Understand the principles, techniques, characteristics & applications of chemical processes and pharmaceutical industries and their products. · Understand the nature and control of corrosion phenomena; as well as the role of electrochemistry chemical industries and in energy generation; electrochemical sensors and environmental electrochemistry.

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CHM321 Chemistry 321 (30 Credits) [Pre-requisites: CHM211 and CHM212] Main Content · Molecular rearrangements, applications of organometallic chemistry to organic synthesis, advance synthetic methodologies, non-benzenoid aromatics, heterocyclic aromatic systems, carbohydrate chemistry; · Bonding theories in inorganic chemistry, introduction to co-ordination chemistry, stability of complex ions, · physical methods in inorganic chemistry (1H and multinuclear NMR, infrared mass spectrometry, ESR, Mossbauer, Thermal analysis). Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · Classify and tabulate the different organic rearrangements. · Comprehend the relationships between confirmation and reactivity. · Execute synthetic protocols of mono- and polysaccharides, heterocyclic aromatics and organometallic systems in organic chemistry. · Explain the bonding in co-ordination and inorganic chemistry. · Implement physical methods to characters co-ordination and organometallic compounds CHM322 Chemistry 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CHM211 and CHM212] Main Content · Molecular spectroscopy (uv-visible and infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, 1H-NMR and 13CNMR). · Atomic spectroscopy (atomic absorption, atomic emission spectroscopy). · Separation science (principles of chromatography, gas chromatography, liquid chromatography). · Electroanalyticl analytical techniques (introduction to electroanalytical chemistry, potentiometry, coulmetry, voltammetry). Main Outcomes: At the end of this module the student must be able to achieve the following: · ntroduction of various instrumental analysis techniques with respect to their principles, instrument components and applications. · an ability to apply these techniques to synthetic materials (organic and inorganic).

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc(Computer Science) Continuous Assessment Breakdown for first and second year final mark COS114 and COS124: Continuous assessment including assignments/projects, quizzes and on-line tests. COS101: Continuous assessment including assignments and quizzes (10%), practicals/ projects (20%), theoretical assessments (20%) and a comprehensive final assessment (50%). CSC211 and CSC212: Continuous assessment (30%), Practical (20%) and Comprehensive final assessment (50%). Breakdown of learning hours COS124 COS101 CSC211 32 10 10 66 32 150 70 28 26 104 72 300 42 28 9 37 84 200

COS114 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor Assignment Tasks Tests & Exams Self study Practical/Tutorials Total hours 32 10 10 66 32 150

CSC212 42 28 9 37 84 200

Compulsory Modules: COS101 and MAM I and COS114, EED127 1st Year Level: CSC211 and CSC212 2nd Year Level: CSC311 and CSC312 3rd Year Level: Continuous Assessment Breakdown for Third years: % of Final Mark CSC311: Operating Systems: Continuous evaluation including assignments/projects (50%) and quizzes (50%). Computer Networks and Theory of Computation: Continuous evaluation including assignments/projects and quizzes (20%), practical (20%) and theoretical (20%) assessments and a comprehensive final assessment (40%). CSC312: Continuous evaluation 35%, Project 25%, Final examination 40% CSC313: Determined by the lecturer, but typically, continuous evaluation including assignments, practicals, tutorials, quizzes, tests and an end of term examination.

Breakdown of learning hours CSC311 CSC312 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 24 24 Assignments and Tasks 28 28 Practicals 84 84 Tests & Exams 9 9 Self study 137 137 Other Total learning hours 300 300

CSC313 24 28 84 9 137 300

FIRST YEAR MODULES Restrictions on Computer Literacy Modules COS114 and COS124: Number of students allowed in each group is dependent on the space in laboratories (currently 50 machines in laboratory) 71

COS114 (1st semester) or COS124 (2nd semester) (15 credits) Computer Literacy 114 Main Content: Practical Concepts: · Introduction to an operating system, e-mail and the Internet; · Applications software including word processing and spreadsheets; · Introduction to database management; · Introduction to presentation graphics and; · The integration of the above mentioned application programs. Theoretical Concepts: · System programs; · Data and data organization; · Files and records, file management; · Principles and usage of basic software; · Systems programs; · Data and data organisation; · Computer architecture; · The computer marketplace; · Local area networks and e-mail; · The Internet, data security and control. Main Outcomes: At the successful completion of this course the student should have: · The ability to use computers (including e-mail and Internet), software and multimedia to create and edit documents; · The skilful use of worksheets and databases; · Ability to integrate different application software packages; · An understanding of programs, data, files and file organization on a computer system, computer architecture, the computer marketplace; local area networks and e-mail; the Internet, data security and control. FIRST YEAR MAIN STREAM MODULES Restrictions on Computer Science COS101: Number of students allowed in each group is dependent on the space in laboratories (currently 50 machines in laboratory) COS101 Computer Science 101 (30 credits) [Co-requisites: Computer Literacy (COS114 or COS124) and 1st Year Mathematics, EED] Main Content: · Problem solving, algorithm design, trace tables, constructs; · Abstraction; · Pseudocode; · Structured diagramming techniques (top-down design); · Arrays and data structures; · Development and application of simple algorithms; · High level programming language fundamentals; · Basic data types and methods; · The Software Development Life Cycle · Design tools and object oriented design · Inter-modular communication: Parameter passing and variable scope; · Objects as parameters; · Introduction to inheritance; · Data modeling, File I/O and recursion. 72

Main Outcomes: At the successful completion of this course the student should have: · The ability to read, understand and solve problems; · Problem solving techniques and improved analytical thinking; · An understanding of sequence, selection and repetition control structures; · Ability to design an algorithm to solve a given problem; · Express an algorithm in pseudocode / structured diagram; · Implementation of algorithms in a high-level programming language (e.g.Java); · An understanding of the Software Development Cycle; · Parameter passing and the use of arrays; · Understand and implement the Object Oriented (OO) paradigm and inheritance; · Design and present a team project. SECOND YEAR MODULES CSC211 Computer Science 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: COS101, COS114 or COS124, 1st Year Mathematics] Main Content: · Data structures; · Implementation of algorithms for manipulation; · The time and space complexity of the algorithms; · Efficiency of algorithms; · Correctness of algorithms by induction proofs; · Loop invariants; · Asymptotic bounds for algorithms. Main Outcomes: At the successful completion of this course the student: · Can implement many algorithms that run correctly on computing machinery; · Can derive and explain the time and space complexity of algorithms; · Is able to tackle software problems from a procedural, object-oriented approach; · Construct models and produce working products from tools that the student has produced ab inito. CSC212 Compute Science 212 (20 credits) [Co-requisite modules: CSC212 or equivalent] Main Content: · Recursion, searches and traversal, divide and conquer, greedy algorithms, dynamic programming; · program correctness, primitive recursive functions, mu-recursive functions, partial functions, ChurchTuring thesis, time complexity of algorithms, average case complexity; · Classes P and NP, reducibility, NP-completeness, decidability, certificates; · Probabilistic algorithms. Main Outcomes: At the successful completion of this course the student should have · Familiarity with standard algorithmic methods and ability to apply them; · Understand the importance of efficiency of algorithms and evaluate their complexity; · Understand the nature of computationally intractable problems and the role of heuristics; · Improved analytical thinking and problem solving skills. CSC213 Compute Science 213 (20 credits) [Prerequisites: COS101, 1st Year Mathematics] Main Content: · Special topics as determined by the lecturer, visiting academic or industrial partner. Main Outcomes. At the successful completion of this course the student should · have the knowledge and skills pertaining to a topic in Computer Science that is not covered by or that is an extension to an existing Computer Science level 6 module. 73

THIRD YEAR MODULES CSC311 Computer Science 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CSC211 and CSC212] Main Content: Operating Systems: · History of operating systems. · Operating system concepts and structure. · Emphasis on processes (communication and scheduling). · Basic Input/Output. · Some memory management, file systems and device drivers. Computer Networks: · Communications media. · Network standards and layers. · Communications protocols. · Network architectures. · Client/server and peer-to-peer networks, Network design. · Network operations and operating systems. · Network administration. Main Outcomes Operating Systems: · Explain the fundamental tasks performed by a modern operating system. · Ability to implement fundamental operating systems tasks and algorithms. Computer Networks: · Be able to transform network needs to network design and implementation. · Be able to build networks with current network topologies, protocols, operating systems, and applications. · Be able to diagram a network with a design tool. · Develop an appreciation of standards and protocols. Theory of Computation: · Explain basic concepts of the theory of computation. · Be able to solve problems involving automata and regular expressions. CSC312 Computer Science 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CSC211 and CSC212] [Co-requisite: CSC311] Main Content: · Definition of software engineering, principles, goals, process, methods and tools. · The evolving role of software. · SE paradigms / process models. · Object-oriented analysis & design. · Introduction to formal specification. · Verification and validation. · Software quality assurance / reliability. · Unified Modeling Language (UML). · File systems and databases. · Modeling. · Database design principles. · Database models. · Normalization. · Structured Query Language. · Human factors of interactive software. · Theories, principles and guidelines of HCI design including command line interface (CLI), graphical 74

user interface (GUI) and application programmatic interface (API). · Event-driven application design and development. · Direct manipulation. · Interaction devices · System and feedback messages. Main Outcomes: · Interpret and implement principles, processes, methods and tools for quality software development. · Use UML to specify, visualize, construct and document a software system. · Explain the Relational Model Concepts & Principles. · Represent the Architecture for a Database System. · Design a Relational Database. · Implement a Relational Database. · Analyse interface needs for interactive applications. · Design and implement effective user interfaces with CLI, GUI, and API. · Understand the importance of feedback and help systems. CSC313 Computer Science 313 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: CSC211 and CSC212 and MAT105] Main Content: Special topics as determined by the lecturer, visiting academic or industrial partner Main Outcomes: Knowledge and skills pertaining to a topic in Computer Science that is not covered by or that is an extension to an existing Computer Science level 8.1 module

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc(Environmental and Water Science)

Continuous Assessment Breakdown % of Final Mark ENV131 ENV132 Practicals 50 50 Breakdown of learning hours ENV131 Theory Contact 42 Theory Selfstudy 30 Practical Contact 42 Practical selfstudy 10 Assignments and Tasks 16 Tests and Examinations 10 Total learning hours 150

ENV132 42 30 42 10 16 10 150

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 2ndYear % of Final Mark ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV212 Practicals 40 40 40 40

Breakdown of learning hours: Environmental & Water Science (ENV) ENV211 ENV212 ENV221 ENV222 Theory Contact 42 42 42 28 Theory Selfstudy 24 27 24 32 Practical Contact 84 84 84 84 Practical selfstudy 10 101 10 16 Assignments and Tasks 30 30 30 30 Tests and Examinations 10 7 10 10 Total learning hours 200 200 200 200

Breakdown of learning hours: 3rdYear ENV ENV311 ENV312 ENV321 Contact with lecturer 42 42 42 Assignment and tasks 30 30 30 Practicals 84 84 84 Tests and examinations 10 10 10 Self study 84 84 84 Fieldwork (pumping test) 50 50 50 Fieldwork and report writing TOTAL LEARNING TIME 300 300 300 Continuous Assessment Breakdown for Third years: % of Final Mark ENV311 and ENV321:

ENV322 42 78 0 0 100 80 300

Assignments, Class tests, Completion of practical exercises, Practical test, Presentations, Attendance. Final theory examination: 50% ENV312: Continuous evaluation through tests, assignments, presentations and final examination. Coursework contributes 40% of the total mark. Final Exam: 60%. ENV322: Assignments, Participation in Field Work, Presentation.. Final Report: 60%. 76

SYLLABUS MODULE Lectures per week Tutorials per week Practicals per week 131 132 3x1hr 1x1hr 1x6hr 211 221 3x1hr 1x6hr 212 222 311, 312, 321, 322 3x1hr 1x6hr

3x1hr 2x1hr 2x3hr 1x6hr

FIRST YEAR MODULES ENV131 Environmental and Water Science 131 (15 credits) Main Content: · Principles of environmental and water science · Earth systems · Concepts of environmental geology · Main rock types and their composition · Natural hazards · Environmental problems · Human interaction with the environment Main Outcomes: · It is expected that on completion of this module, students will be able to: · Explain the fundamental principles of Environmental and Water Science within a geological context · Identify and explain potential natural disasters. ENV132 Environmental and Water Science 132 Main Content: · Climatological processes · Factors controlling our weather · South African weather patterns in a global context · Synoptic weather maps · Water supply-weather pattern relationships · El Nino and rainfall variability · General Geomorphology Main Outcomes: · It is expected that on completion of this module, students will be able to: · Explain the basic factors controlling South African weather · Predict the South African weather patterns in a global context · Interpret a synoptic weather map · Identify typical South African landforms SECOND YEAR MODULES Students majoring in Environmental and Water Science will be required to take all 8 modules. Non-majors in Environmental and Water Science (e.g. Chemistry, Physics and Botany majors) can take courses from timetable groups 1 or 2. ENV211 Environmental and Water Science 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: ENV131, ENV132 or EWS131,EWS132] Main Content: · Hydrologic cycle, its components and processes, different scales of hydrologic cycle, water balance; · Rainfall characteristics, methods of obtaining aerial rainfall; · Hydrological process on land (interception, infiltration, runoff processes, stream flow generation mechanisms), runoff estimation methods; 77 (15 credits)

· Hydrographs, its construction and interpretation, · Flooding: types of flooding, causes and mitigation measures, · The influence of human activities on catchment hydrology, · General fluvial geomorphology · Erosion, transportation and deposition on slopes · Estuarine processes · River health monitoring and River rehabilitation Main Outcomes: It is expected that on completion of this module student will be able to: · Explain the hydrologic cycle and behaviour of water in the terrestrial environment · Illustrate rainfall characteristics, runoff processes on hill slope slopes, flooding and its causes · Construct and interpret hydrographs · Identify types of floods and explain causes of flooding · Recognize the influence of human activities on catchment hydrology. · Describe the geomorphological processes operating in rivers, on slopes, in estuaries and coastal areas. ENV212 Environmental and Water Science 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: ENV131, ENV132 or EWS131, EWS132] Main Content: · The physical characteristics of soils · Soil mineralogy · Soil chemistry · Techniques in soil sample collection: augering, digging soil pits · Physical soil analyses: soil moisture, bulk density, particle density, sieving and settling tube analyses, ph and conductivity, organic content determination, pF curve construction · Soil erosion · Soil contamination Main Outcomes: · Identify the physical characteristics of a soil · Explain the mineralogy and chemistry of soils in general and clay minerals in particular · Illustrate how a soil's physical characteristics affect its susceptibility to erosion · Demonstrate their ability to apply the various techniques of physical soil analyses · Interpret their analytical results and to present these through oral and written reports ENV221 Environmental and Water Science 221 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: ENV131, ENV132 or EWS131,EWS132] Main Content: · Role of groundwater in the Hydrologic cycle, · Groundwater recharge mechanisms, and methods of recharge estimation; · Aquifers and their properties, · Basic principles of groundwater flow, · Constituents / chemistry of groundwater · Groundwater sampling · Classification of groundwater based on quality · Water quality standards · Socio-economic, ecologic and environmental services groundwater offers. Main Outcomes: On completing this topic students will be able to: · Recognize the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, · Describe the occurrence and behaviour of groundwater in the environment, · Illustrate properties of aquifers, · Explain basic principles of groundwater flow and constituents in groundwater, · Classify groundwater based on water quality parameters, · Categorize various roles groundwater plays. 78

ENV222 Environmental and Water Science 222 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124] [Prohibited combination: Students will not obtain credit for ENV222 and APG311] Main Content: · GIS Concepts: definition, characteristics, history, evolution, application areas etc. · Introduction to cartography: Maps, feature types, map symbology, spatial relationships, and scale concepts; · Spatial Data: Spatial data models, data structure, spatial reference systems, Map projections, Geographical databases, data sources and quality issues; · GIS functionality (data input, data generation, data manipulations, data analysis and data output); · Introduction to ArcGIS 9 (ArcView 9.x) and its functionality; · GIS application in natural resource studies. Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will: · Recognize geographical feature types and explain map symbology & spatial relationships; · Explain the main concepts and data models that underpin GIS; · Explain the analytical functionality of GIS and infer main limitations of GIS packages; · Use GIS software and demonstrate its utility in selected "real world" applications in water related environmental science and Earth Sciences.

THIRD YEAR MODULES Students majoring in Environmental and Water Science will be required to take 4 modules. Non-majors in Environmental and Water Science (e.g. Chemistry, Physics and Biology majors) can take courses from timetable groups 1 or 2. Students taking Geology as second major cannot obtain credit for both ENV222 and APG311. N.B.: At 3rd year level there are 2 modules each semester. Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules. Practicals: Each module has a compulsory practical component contributing 40% of the final mark. TIMETABLE GROUP 1 ENV311 Environmental and Water Science 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124] Main Content: · Determination of aquifer parameters · Design and interpret pumping tests for aquifer assessment · Regional groundwater flow in geological formations · Groundwater flow to wells · Interpretation of numerical flow simulations for groundwater · Mechanisms of dewatering processes · Main chemical processes and reactions in aquifer systems · Basic concept of isotope applications in hydrogeology · Analytical and numerical simulation of groundwater flow · Basics of mass transport and contaminant transport in aquifers Main outcomes: It is expected that on completion of this module student will be able to: · Explain methods used for aquifer characterization · Explain flow dynamics of groundwater in three types of boundary conditions · Interpret numerical flow simulations for groundwater. · Realize that water resources naturally interact with the environment and are affected by anthropogenic influences 79

· ·

Explain chemical reactions and processes between water and rocks Describe mass transport and contaminant transport in groundwater.

ENV312 Environmental and Water Science 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124] Main Content: · Theoretical overview of environmental management principles and practices. · South African environmental management policy and procedures: Environment Conservation Act, National Environmental Management Act, Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations etc. · Case studies on the most common types of applications for activities in South Africa, dealing with environmental impacts and technologies applied to solve environmental problems. Main outcomes: At the end of this module, students will be able to: · Explain the basic principles and practices of environmental management · Identify the key documents in the South African environmental management policy and procedures · Produce a Basic Assessment process and a Scoping/Environmental Impact Assessment process ENV321 Environmental and Water Science 321 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124] EWS 131, EWS132, EWS212, EWS 221, EWS311 or equivalent Main Content: · Different scales of water resources · Water resource development programmes · Methods of utilization of water resources · Concepts of sustainable development and management of water resources · Water resource protection concepts including Resource Directed Measures (RDM) · Concept of ecohydrology · General characteristics of water resources in Africa, especially in South Africa · Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) concepts Main outcomes: It is expected that on completion of this module student will: · Identify different scales of water resources and illustrate water resource development and utilization programmes, · Interpret groundwater functions as hydrological, ecological and environmental system components · Illustrate methods of water resource protection · Explain the concepts of sustainable development and means of achieving integrated management of water resources. ENV322 Environmental and Water Science 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124] All relevant EWS second and third year Compulsory Modules Main Content: · The writing of a proposal · Environmental field techniques · Setting up of equipment in field and sampling · Data collection, data analysis · Data Interpretation · Report Writing Main outcomes: On completing this module students will: · Be able to write a research proposal · Be able to use environmental field techniques · Demonstrate their ability to gather meaningful environmental data · Demonstrate that they can analyze and interpret the data · Be able to write up a scientific report on the results

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc(Mathematical and Statistical Science)

Continuous Assessment Breakdown % of Final Mark: First Year Mathematics MAT MAM MAM MAM QSA105 105 150, 151, 115 110 QSC101 152 126 Examinations 50 50 40 50 50 Tut Tests 20 20 12 20 20 Class Tests 30 30 48 30 30

MAM 112, 122 50 20 30

Breakdown of learning hours: First Year MATHEMATICS MAT MAM MAM MAM110, 126 105 151,152 115, 150 QSA105, QSC101 112, 122 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 84 84 42 42 Assignments and Tasks 28 84 10 2 Tests & Exams 14 20 10 10 Self study 146 84 60 32 Practicals 28 56 28 14 Total learning hours 300 300 150 100

Breakdown of learning hours: 2nd Year MATHEMATICS MAT211 MAT212 MAT221 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 42 42 42 Assignments and Tasks 28 28 28 Tests and Examinations 10 10 10 Self study 106 106 106 Practicals 14 14 14 Total learning hours 200 200 200

Continuous Assessment Breakdown % of Final Mark: 2nd Year MATHEMATICS MAT211 MAT212 MAT221 Examinations Tutorial Tests Class Tests Continuous Assessment 50 20 30 100 50 20 30 100 50 20 30 100

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Continuous Assessment Breakdown 3rd Year of Final Mark: MATHEMATICS Examinations Tutorial Quizzes Class Tests Tutorial Test Assignments Cont.Assessm. 50 25 25 100 50 20 30 50 30 20 100 50 25 25 50 25 25

100

100

100

Breakdown of learning hours: 3rd Year MATHEMATICS

Contact with Lecturer/Tutor Assignments and Tasks Tests and Examinations Self study Practicals Total learning hours

10 5 50 21 100

10 5 45 16 100

16 6 30 100

10 5 45 16 100

15 5 50 100

MATHEMATICS SYLLABUS MODULE Lectures per week Tutorials per week Practicals per week 105 151 152 3 3 1 1x3hrs 150 115 3 211,212, 221 311,321,322,312

2x3hrs

2x3 hrs

Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules Practical components: Each module has a compulsory practical component.

FIRST YEAR MODULES MAT105 Mathematics 105 (year course) (30 credits) Main Content: · Sets and real and complex numbers and the coordinate system. · Main types of functions that occur in calculus · Limits and continuity and the derivative of a function · Differentiation rules and implicit differentiation · Curve sketching, related rates and optimization · Properties of the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of integration, table of integrals, numerical methods and improper integrals · Areas under a curve, volumes, arc length and average value of a function · Row echelon forms and Gauss-Jordan elimination 82

Solutions of a system of linear equations using determinants (Cramer's rule) and inverse of matrices, dot product, cross product, and equations of lines and planes in 3d-spaces. Main Outcomes. It is expected that on completion of this module students are able to: · Use the basic properties of functions (composition, transformations, combinations, graphs) in different contexts. · Use the basic properties of numbers including complex numbers in different contexts. · Use the concepts of limits, continuity and derivative with an emphasis on meanings in different mathematical contexts. · Use the differentiation techniques correctly in solving problems real world problems. · Use different methods to determine the definite integral as a limit of Riemann sums. · Use the basic methods of integration correctly to solve problems. · Use systematic methods for solving matrix equations. · Use their knowledge of vectors and coordinate systems to solve problems in three-dimensional space. MAM115 Mathematics 115(N) (15 credits) Main Content: · Functions and limits; · differentiation · curve sketching; application of differentiation; · integration · multivariable Calculus Main Outcomes. On completing this module students will be able to: · Implement mathematical methods and techniques of Differential and Integral calculus in the Life Sciences and Pharmacy. MAM151 Mathematics 151 (SF) (15 credits) Main Content: · Sets and real numbers · Complex variables · The coordinate system and straight lines · Function characteristics and representation · Main types of functions that occur in calculus · Limits and continuity · The derivative of a function · Differentiation rules covering all functions and combinations discussed in MAM111. · Implicit differentiation · Curve sketching · Conic sections · Related rates and optimization. Main Outcomes: · Understanding of the basic ideas concerning functions, their graphs, and ways of transforming and combining them. · An appreciation of the basic ideas of the number system, including complex numbers. · Understanding of the limit concept, continuity and the definition of the derivative, with an emphasis on meanings in different mathematical contexts · Proficiency in differentiation techniques · Use of the derivative in solving problems. MAM152 Mathematics 152 (SF) (15 credits) [Pre-requisite: MAM151 or MAM111] Main Content: · Area and the definite integral, properties of the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, techniques of integration and the table of integrals, numerical methods and improper integrals 83

·

· · · · · · · · ·

Areas under a curve, volumes, arc length and average value of a function Row echelon forms and Gauss-Jordan elimination Solutions of a system of linear equations using determinants (Cramer's rule), matrix algebra and solutions of a system of linear equations using the inverse of a matrix, dot product, cross product, and equations of lines and planes in 3d-spaces. Main Outcomes: Understanding of the definite integral as a limit of Riemann sums, and the connection between the derivative and the definite integral brought out by the fundamental theorem of calculus. Proficiency in the basic methods of integration Use of the integration to solve problems Understanding of systems of linear equations as matrix equations and systematic methods for solving matrix equations Understanding of vectors and coordinate systems for three-dimensional space.

MAM150 Introduction to Mathematics (15 credits) Main Content: · Basic numeracy, trigonometry, logarithms and exponents, basic geometry. · Functions and their graphs, limits and continuity; · Rates of change, definition of derivative, rules for finding derivatives · Curve sketching; application of differentiation; · Integration including areas between curves, volumes of solids, numerical integration · Multivariable Calculus. Main Outcomes: · To have gained insight into the areas of basic mathematics and differential calculus in a form that will be of maximum use to students whose major area is life science · To have gained insight into the areas of application of differentiation, integral calculus and its application in a form that will be of maximum use to students whose major area is life sciences. MAM126 Mathematics 126 (EMS) (10 credits) Main Content: · Mathematics of Finance. · Differential and Integral Calculus. · Applications to Managerial Sciences. Main Outcomes: · Develop Mathematical and Computational Skills · Interpret Literature pertaining to Managerial Sciences that contains Mathematical Sciences. MAM110 Mathematics 110 (Numeracy) (15 credits) Main Content: · Fractions and percentage and ratio. · Basic algebra. · Exponents and scientific notation. · Solving equations. · Understanding simple graphical representations. · Measurement (lengths area and volume) and conversions of units. Main Outcomes: · To gain knowledge of basic mathematical literacy needed to manage content in other modules. QSC101 Quantitative Skills for Commerce Main Content: · Linear and quadratic functions. · Substitution in formulae. · Statistical graphs, cost. 84 (10 credits)

· Revenue, profit, interest, ratio and proportion. Main Outcomes: · To gain knowledge of Basic Mathematical Literacy needed · To manage content in other modules QSA105 Quantitative Skills for Commerce (B ADM) (10 credits) Main Content: · Fractions and Percentage and Ratio · Basic Algebra · Exponents and Scientific Notation · Solving Equations · Understanding Simple Graphical Representations · Conversions of Units · Logarithms and Logarithmic Graphs · Series (Interest) Main Outcomes: On completion of this module students will be able to: · Carry out the basic mathematical operations such as adding fractions, calculating percentages, working with ratio and proportion, converting between different measuring units, currencies and number systems (Scientific notation, decimal form) working out interest rates, solving equations, drawing graphs of functions including exponential and logarithmic functions, required in Business Administration. APM112 Mathematics 112 (15 credits) Main Content: · The logic of Compound statements. · The logic of Quantitative Statements. · Elementary Number Theory and Methods of Proof. · Sequences and Mathematical Induction. · Set theory. Main Outcomes: · have a good understanding of sets and their operations · be able to use a mathematical induction as a tool in proofs · be able to use various methods of proof to solve problems · be able to apply their knowledge in applications to switching circuits and logic gates. APM122 Mathematics 122 [Co-requisite: APM112] Main Content: · Counting techniques. · Functions and application. · Recursion, O-notation and efficiency of Algorithm. · Relations and applications. Graphs and Trees. Main Outcomes: Students should · Apply graph theory to various problem situations · Appreciate the interdisciplinary nature of graphs · Transfer practical real life problems to a graph · Be able to apply various counting techniques in practical situations · Apply their knowledge of functions and relations in computer science · of vectors and coordinate systems for three-dimensional space. (15 credits)

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SECOND YEAR MODULES MAT211 Mathematics 211 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAM111 and MAM121 (or MAM151 and MAM152)] Main Content: Paper 1 · Sequences · Infinite series (convergence tests, alternating series, conditional convergence, power series, Taylor & Maclaurin Series). · Introduction to conic sections, polar coordinates and parametric equations · Vectors & vector-valued functions · Partial derivative (chain rule, maxima and minima of functions of two variables, Lagrange Multipliers). · Multiple Integrals Paper 2 · Matrices and Gaussian elimination, determinants. · Vector Spaces (subspaces, linear independence, basis, dimension, Solution of Ax=0 and Ax=b, graphs and networks, linear transformation). · Orthogonality (projection and least spaces, Gram-Schmidt, Fast Fourier transform) · Eigenvalues and eigenvectors · Positive definite matrices (Finite element method) · Linear Programming and Game Theory Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will be able to: · Use different convergence tests for series. · Use their knowledge of multi-variable calculus to solve problems in various contexts. · Use their knowledge of vector calculus to solve problems in a variety of contexts. · Use computer software such as MAPLE to solve problems. · Use their knowledge of linear algebra to solve problems in business, sciences and engineering (eg. linear modes in business, science, and engineering). · Select appropriate methods to solve problems. · Carry out proofs of mathematical statements. · Use computer software in linear algebra to solve real world problems. MAT212 Mathematics 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAM111 and MAM121 (or MAM151 and MAM152)] [Co-requisite: MAT211] Main Content: · First-Order equations · Homogeneous linear differential equations with constant coefficients. · Nonhomogeneous linear differential equations. · Numercial solutions of nonlinear algebraic equations. · Newton's methods for systems of nonlinear equations. · Polynomial Interpolation. · Numerical differentiations and numerical integration. · Iterative methods for linear system. Main Outcomes. On completing this module students will be able to: · Formulate differential equations from given physical situations. · Solve linear ordinary differential equations. · Interpret the solutions in the given physical context. · Solve linear systems of differential equations. · Use Newton's method to solve systems of nonlinear equations. · Use different formulas for polynomial interpolation · Use different formulas to numerical differentiation and numerical integration with error estimates. 86

MAT221 Mathematics 221 [Pre-requisites: MAM111 and MAM121 (or MAM151 and MAM152)] [Co-requisite: MAT211] Main Content: Paper 1 · Vector fields. · Line integrals and independence of path. · Green's Theorem. · Surface integrals and the Ddivergence theorem. · Stokes' Theorem. · Applications to fluid flow and heat. Paper 2 · Sets, relations, functions, partitions and binary operations on sets. · Integers, rational numbers and real numbers. · Introduction to groups and rings and partially ordered sets. · Cardinal numbers and ordinal numbers. Main Outcomes. On completing this module students will be able to: · Perform basic operations in vector fields. · Evaluate and interpret line integrals. · Use Green's Theorem to evaluate line integrals. · Use the Divergence Theorem to evaluate surface integrals. · Apply Stokes' Theorem to vector fields. · Identify properties of sets, relations and functions. · Identify and prove properties of groups, rings and partially ordered sets. THIRD YEAR MODULES

(20 credits)

MAT311 Mathematics 311 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAT105 [or (MAM151 and MCM152) or (Mam111 and MAM121] and MAT211 and MAT221 [or (MAM211 and MAM221 and MAM231 and MAM241)] Main Content: · Bounded subsets of real numbers · Suprema, Supremum property,Existence of irrational roots · Inner product and normed spaces · Open sets,Nested cells theorem, Cluster point · Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem (for sets),Compactness · Heine-Borel theorem ,Connectedness · Sequences ,Convergence and subsequences,Monotone convergence theorem, Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem for sequences, Cauchy sequences, global continuity theorem · Preservation of compactness and connectedness · Uniform continuity, Fixed point theorems · Operations, Groups & subgroups, Normal subgroups and factor groups, Cyclic groups, · Homomorphisms & fundamental homomorphism theorem, Permutation groups, Cayley's theorem Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will be able to: · Explain the notions of open subset, bounded-ness and finiteness, connectedness and compactness in Euclidean space. · Explain the notions of continuity and uniform continuity of functions between subspaces of Euclidean space, and in relation to sequences, compactness and connectedness. · Use their knowledge of the basic theory of groups to provide examples and counter-examples of various concepts. 87

· ·

Carry out proofs of mathematical statements. Use new knowledge in unfamiliar but similar situations.

MAT321 Mathematics 321 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAT105 [or (MAM151 and MAM152) or (MAM111 and MAM121] and MAT211 and MAT221 [or (MAM211 and MAM221 and MAM231 and MAM241)] Main Content: · Complex numbers and properties · Elementary complex functions and properties · Analytic functions · Contour integral and properties · Taylor and Laurent series · Residue theory · Rings, subrings, integral domains, fields, field of quotients. · Quotient rings, prime ideals, maximal ideals. · Polynomial rings, factorization, irreducibility tests. · Field extensions. · Finite field construction. · Constructibility by ruler and compass. Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will be able to: · Use properties of complex numbers and complex functions in problem solving. · Use the properties of analytic functions to solve problems. · Use contour integrals in various situations. · Use Taylor and Laurent series to solve problems · Use Residue theory to solve problems. · Generalize concepts from Groups to Rings. · Use different methods to test for irreducibility of polynomials. · Use the theory to construct finite fields. · Use their knowledge of field extensions to prove the impossibility of certain geometric constructions using ruler and compass. MAT322 Mathematics 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAT105 [or (MAM151 and MAM152) or (MAM111 and MAM121] and MAT211 and MAT221 [or MAM211 and MAM221 and MAM231 and MAM241)] Main Content: · Elementary probability theory · Normal random variables · Geometric Brownian motion · Present value analysis · Introduction to derivatives · Pricing contract via arbitrage, The arbitrage theorem · The Black-Scholes formula · Vanilla options · Multi-period binomial model method · Option valuations by expected utility · Exotic options · Portfolio optimization · Autoregressive models and mean reversion · Simulations-random walk, Monte Carlo methods Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will be able to: · Implement the basic tools of the geometric Brownian motion of stock prices. · Use their knowledge of elementary cases of pricing via arbitrage of options to solve problems. 88

· · · · · · · · ·

Use their knowledge of vanilla and exotic options and their valuation to solve problems. Use the Black-Scholes formula to solve problems. Use the n-period binomial model method to solve problems. Use their knowledge of Monte Carlo simulation to solve problems. Use their knowledge to pose a problem numerically. Use different techniques to discretise partial differential equations and associated boundary conditions. Implement different techniques to solve finite difference problems. Use different methods for convergence and stability analyses. Use MAPLE/ MATLAB in problem solving.

MAT312 Mathematics 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAT105 [or (MAM151 and MAM152) or (MAM111 and MAM121] and MAT211 and MAT221 [or MAM211 and MAM221 and MAM231 and MAM241)] Main Content: · POPULATION GROWTH MODELS: Single Species Models (Exponential and Logistic Growth Models. Applications and Case Studies). · PHASE PLANE ANALYSIS OF DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS: Equilibrium Solutions and Stability; Direction Fields, Phase Portraits. Null-clines. Stability of Linear and Almost Linear systems. · INTERACTING SPECIES MODELS: Predator-Prey Models, Competing Species Models, Cooperating Species Models. Multi-Species Models, Food Chains. · MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF EPIDEMICS: The SIR, SIRS, SEIR, SIS and SI models for infectious diseases. The Basic Reproduction Number R_0. Analysis of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Applications to Models for Malaria, Measles, TB and HIV transmission. · Environmental Modeling · Dynamic optimization: discrete case, Euler' equation in variational calculus,Hamiltonian method. · Natural resources: Fishing, forestry, mining · Groundwater flow: Darcy's law, Laplace's equation, Dupuit's theory, pumping from a well. · Diffusion: in 1,2,3 dimensions, instantaneous and continuous sources, reflecting boundaries. · Numerical methods and basics of PDE's for the topics mentioned above. Main Outcomes: On completing this module students will be able to: · Use their knowledge to develop mathematical models for single species as well as interacting species. · Use their knowledge to determine conditions for mutual co-existence, or extinction of interacting species. · Use their knowledge to formulate mathematical models for the transmission of certain diseases. · Use their knowledge to determine threshold values disease-free and endemic equilibria. · Use their knowledge to suggest possible ways of combating the spread of certain diseases. · Use their knowledge of dynamic optimization, discrete and continuous, analytic and numerical solutions in problem solving. · Use their knowledge to model situations such as natural resource exploitation, contaminant transport (groundwater flow and diffusion) and other environmental problems. Continuous Assessment Breakdown 1st Year of Final Mark: STATISTICS 111 121 125 Tests and Assignments 50 50 50 Examination 50 50 50 Breakdown of learning hours: STATISTICS STA111 STA121 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 40 40 Assignments and Tasks 0 0 Tests and Examinations 6 6 Self study 44 44 89

STA125 40 0 6 44

Practicals Total learning hours

60 150

60 150

60 150

Breakdown of learning hours: STATISTICS STA211 STA203 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 60 85 Assignments and Tasks 40 30 Tests and Examinations 5 10 Self study 65 20 Practicals 30 55 Total learning hours 200 200

STA221 60 40 5 65 30 200

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 2nd Year of Final Mark: STATISTICS STA211 STA203 STA221 Tests and Assignments 50 30 50 Practicals 30 Examination 50 40 50 Continuous Assessment Breakdown 3rd Year of Final Mark: STATISTICS STA331 STA332 STA333 Tests and Assignments 50 50 50 Practicals Examination 50 50 50 Breakdown of learning hours: 3rd Year STATISTICS STA331 STA332 Contact with lecturer 130 130 Assignments and Tasks 50 50 Tests and Examinations 10 10 Self study 60 60 Practicals 50 50 Total learning hours 300 300 STATISTICS SYLLABUS MODULE Lectures per week Practicals per week 111,121 125 3 1 211, 221 4 1 203 0 1 331,332 333 3 2 x 3 hour

STA333 130 50 10 60 50 300

FIRST YEAR MODULES (15 credits) STA111 Statistics 111 (1 semester module) [Entry Level Requirement: Matric/NSC Mathematics as required by the programme or equivalent] [Prohibited module combination: STA125/ STA142/BUS131/BUS132/STA151] Main Content: · Descriptive statistics · Regression analysis · Introductory probability · Inferential statistics, sampling distributions. · Index numbers, time series. 90

st

Main Outcomes: To be able to · recognize the importance of statistics in both the private and public sectors · summarize the data using a few summary measures (e.g. mean and standard deviation) · do simple statistical analysis · use a computer to analyse the data. (15 credits) STA121 Statistics 121 (2nd semester module) [Entry Level Requirement: Matric Mathematics as required by the programme, or equivalent knowledge of STA111 or STA125] Main Content: · Questionnaire design and analysis · Planning of surveys. Main Outcomes: To be able to · analyse survey data · obtain knowledge on questionnaire design and planning of surveys. (15 credits) STA125 Statistics 125 (2nd semester module) [Entry Level Requirement: Matric Mathematics as required by the programme or equivalent] [Prohibited module combination: STA125/ STA142/BUS131/BUS132/STA151] Main Content: · Descriptive statistics · Regression analysis · Introductory probability · Inferential statistics, sampling distributions. · Index numbers, time series. Main Outcomes: To be able to · recognize the importance of statistics in both the private and public sectors · summarize the data using a few summary measures (e.g. mean and standard deviation) · do simple statistical analysis · use a computer to analyse the data. STA151 Statistics 151 (SF) (year course) [Pre-requisite: Matric/NSC Mathematics as required by the 4-year extended programme] [Prohibited module combination: STA125/ STA142/BUS131/BUS132/STA151] Main Content: · Descriptive statistics · Regression analysis · Introductory probability · Confidence intervals · Hypothesis testing · Statistical computer literacy · Presentation and computer skills directed towards probabilistic reasoning · Non-parametric statistics · Sampling techniques Main Outcomes: To be able to · recognize the importance of statistics in both the private and public sectors · summarize the data into a few summary measures (e.g. mean and standard deviation) · do simple statistical analysis · use a computer to analyse the data and present data graphically. · Science communications; scientific investigation. · Probabilistic reasoning skills · Introduction to sampling techniques. 91 (15 credits)

SECOND YEAR LEVEL STA211 Statistics 211 (semester module) (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAM111, MAM121 or MAM115/ MAM126 and BUS131/BUS132/STA151/ STA142/STA125 or MAM111, MAM121, STA111, STA121] [Co-requisite: STA203] Main Content: · Definition of Statistical terms · Probability theory · Discrete and continuous probability distributions · Moments and moment generating functions · Sampling and sampling distributions. Main Outcomes: To be able to gain insight into · Probability theory · discrete and continuous distributions · moments and moment generating functions · sampling and sampling distributions. STA221 Statistics 221 (2nd semester module) [Pre-requisite: Attendance of STA211 or equivalent; Co-requisite: STA203] Main Content: · Central limit theorem · Transformations · Point and interval estimation · Hypothesis tests · Regression analyses using matrices · ANOVA · Categorical data analyses. Main Outcomes: To be able to · perform statistical inference with the use of estimation and hypothesis tests · explore linear models in more detail · perform analysis of variance and categorical data analysis. (20 credits)

STA203 Statistics 203 (year course) (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: COS114 or COS124, STA111/STA125 /STA142/BUS131/BUS132/STA151 or equivalent] Main Content: Spreadsheet and SAS Programming · Descriptive statistics · Distributions · Writing of SAS Programmes · Reading and importing data · Manipulation and summarizing data with reports and graphs. Main Outcomes: To be able to · develop advanced computer literacy skills using spreadsheets; · perform data analysis using spreadsheets and SAS programming; · write reports that summarize results.

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THIRD YEAR MODULES STA331 Statistics 331 (1ST semester module) [Pre-requisite: STA211 or equivalent] · Multivariate distributions. · Limit theories. · Advanced estimation and hypothesis testing. · Statistical programming techniques. Main Outcomes: To be able to · Describe and apply multivariate distributions · Execute advanced inference · Execute statistical programming techniques. STA332 Statistics 332 (2nd semester module) [Pre-requisite: STA211, STA221,STA203, attendance of STA331 or equivalent] Main Content: · Advanced linear models · Analysis of variance and advanced regression analysis. · Understanding and interpretation of computer output Main Outcomes: To be able to · Execute advanced linear models for estimation · Perform advanced analysis of variance and multivariate regression. · Design and execute data analysis using statistical package; · Write reports summarizing and interpreting results. (30 credits)

(30 credits)

(30 credits) STA333 Statistics 333 (2nd semester module) [Pre-requisite: STA111 or STA125 or STA142 or STA151 or BUS131 or BUS132 or equivalent] Main Content: · Sources of demographic data. · Basic sampling methods · Survey questionnaire design. Main Outcomes: To be able to · Become familiar with cross-sectional designs from a social-demographic perspective; · Apply statistics in the population studies environment. · Understand basic sampling procedures; · Understand the different sources of demographic data such as surveys and censuses; · Learn how to design a questionnaire and conduct a demographic survey.

93

DEGREE COURSE: BSc(Medical Bioscience)

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 1st Year % of Final Mark: MBS111 HUB113 HUB123 HUB117 MBS121 HUB118 HUB128 HUB127 Examinations 50 50 50 20 Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 20

Breakdown of Learning Hours 1st Year = 150 Hours Total MBS111 HUB113 HUB118 HUB117 MBS121 HUB123 HUB128 HUB127 Contact with Lecturer/ 98 98 98 75 Tests and Examinations 6 6 6 Assignments and Tasks 10 10 10 15 Self Study 15 15 15 38 Other 21 21 21 22

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 2nd Year % of Final Mark MBS231, MBS232 MIC251, MIC252 Examinations Tutorials Continuous Assessment 50 50 50 50

Breakdown of Learning Hours 2nd Year MBS231, MBS232 Contact with Lecturer/ Tutor 100 Assignments and Tasks 20 Self Study 50 Other (Library, Internet, 30 Study,admin) Total Learning Hours 200

MIC251,MIC252 120 10 50 20 200

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 3rd Year % of Final Mark MBS331 MBS332 MIC351 MIC352 Examinations 50 50 50 50 Tutorials Continuous 30 30 50 50 Assessment Practical Assignments 20 20

94

Breakdown of Learning Hours 3rd Years MBS331, MBS332 70 45 3 70 112 300 MIC351 120 10 50 20 200 MIC352 120 10 50 20

Contact with Lecturer/Tutor Assignments and Tasks Examinations Self Study Practicals Other (library, internet, study, admin) Total Learning Hours

200

MEDICAL BIOSCIENCES MBS 111 121 3 x 1hr 1 x 1hr 1 x 3hr HUB 113 123 6 x 1hr 1 x 1hr 2 x 3hr HUB MBS 118, 117 231, 232 128, 127 331, 332 3 x 1hr 1 x 1hr 2 x 3hr 5 x 1hr 4 x 2hr MIC 251, 252 351, 352 3 x 1hr 1 x 1hr 2 x 2.5hr

MODULE

Lectures per week Tutorials per week Practicals per week

Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules. Practical Component: Each module has a compulsory practical component.

FIRST YEAR MODULES COMPULSORY MODULES: MBS111, MBS121 Medical Biosciences, Dietetics, Natural Medicine students HUB113, HUB123 Pharmacy students HUB117, HUB127 Physiotherapy & Occupational Therapy students HUB118, HUB128 Nursing students MBS111 Medical Biosciences 111 (15 credits) Main Content: Organization and Function from Chemical to Systemic Level · The scope of human biology and functional organization of the body · The concepts of homeostasis, human diseases and disease-forming organisms Embryology and Histology · Essentials of early human development · Essentials of the histology of tissue types Systems of Support and Movement · Gross anatomy of the skeletal system · Gross anatomy of the muscle system · Articulations and movement. Main Outcomes: Students should have a basic Understanding of the organization of the human body, and the concepts of health, Human diseases and disease-causing agents. Understanding of the early development of the fetus. Understanding of the histology the main tissue types 95

Knowledge of the gross anatomy and general functions of the skeletal and muscle systems, and the characteristics of joints types. Ability to execute selected laboratory techniques related to the evaluation of tissue types, the muscle and skeletal systems. MBS121 Medical Biosciences 121 (15 credits) [Pre-requisite: LSC141 or at least 40% CEM] Main Content: · The study of the neuron and the major neural pathways of the CNS · Physiology of muscle contraction · Introduction to Endocrine Regulation · The macro-and microscopic study and embryology of blood, the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. · The coordinated physiological functions of blood, immunity, muscle, the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. Main Outcomes: - Students should be able to Have a good knowledge of the functioning of neurons, the transduction of sensory stimuli, how this information is processed and responded to by CNS. Understand the functional anatomy of the nervous system and the major sensory and motor pathways. Have a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of selected physiological and organ systems viz. the physiology and the lymphatic system. Develop selected basis laboratory competencies. Collect experimentally-based data and perform basic statistical analysis. Develop information processing skills, such as searching for and evaluating information. HUB113 Human Biology 113 (15 credits) Main Content: Organization and Function from Chemical to Systemic Level · The scope of human biology and functional organization of the body · Homeostasis, human diseases and disease-forming organisms · The main chemical compounds, nutrition and cellular metabolism · Review of cellular organization and functions of cellular components · Essentials of early human development · Essentials of the histology of tissue types Systems of Support and Movement · Gross anatomy and basic physiology of the skeletal and muscle systems. · Articulations and movement Main Learning Outcomes: - Students should have Understanding of the organization of the human body, and the concepts of health, human diseases and disease causing agents Knowledge of the basic structure and general functions of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes and nucleic acids Knowledge of human nutrition and cell metabolism Knowledge of the structure-function relationships of components of the generalized body cell, and of examples of specialized cells Understanding of protein synthesis, cell growth and cell division Understanding of the early development of the foetus Understanding of the histology the main tissue types Knowledge of the gross anatomy and functions of the skeletal and muscle systems, and the characteristics of joints types Ability to execute selected laboratory techniques related to the evaluation of tissue types, the muscle and skeletal systems Develop appropriate habits and attitudes needed for a career in health care promotion

96

HUB123 Human Biology 123 (15 credits) Main Content: Systems or Regulation and Maintenance · An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems Main Learning Outcomes: - Students should Understand the functional anatomy of the nervous system and the major sensory and motor pathways Have basic knowledge of the functioning of neurons, the transduction of sensory stimuli, how this information is processed and responded to by the CNS Have a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the various organ systems viz. the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems Develop selected basic laboratory competencies Develop information processing skills, such as searching and evaluating information Develop appropriate habits and attitudes needed for a career in health care promotion HUB118 Human Biology 118 (15 credits) Main Content: Organization and Function from Chemical to Systemic Level · The scope of human biology and functional organization of the body · Homeostasis, human diseases and disease forming organisms · The main chemical compounds, nutrition and cellular metabolism · Review of cellular organization and functions of cellular components · Essentials of the histology of tissue types Systems of Support and Movement · Gross anatomy of the skeletal system · Gross anatomy of the muscle systems · Articulations and movement Main Outcomes: - Students should have a basic Understanding of the organization of the human body, and the concepts of health, human diseases and disease causing agents. Knowledge of the basic structure and general functions of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes and nucleic acids. Knowledge of human nutrition and cell metabolism. Knowledge of the structure-function relationships of components of the generalized body cell, and of examples of specialized cells. Understanding of protein synthesis, cell growth and cell division. Understanding of the histology the main tissue types. Knowledge of the gross anatomy and functions of the skeletal and muscle systems, and the characteristics of joints types. Ability to execute selected laboratory techniques related to the evaluation of tissue types, the muscle and skeletal systems. HUB128 Human Biology 128 (15 credits) Main Content: · An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems. Main Outcomes: Students should Understand the functional anatomy of the nervous system and the major sensory and motor pathways. Have basic knowledge of the functioning of neurons, the transduction of sensory stimuli, how this information is processed and responded to by the CNS. Have a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the various organs. Have knowledge of the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems. Develop selected basic laboratory competencies. Develop information processing skills, such as searching and evaluating information.

97

HUB117 Human Biology 117 (15 credits) Main Content: Organization and Function · The scope of human biology and functional organization of the body. · Essentials of early human development. · Essentials of the histology of the basic tissue types. Systems of Support and Movement · Gross anatomy of the musculo-skeletal system. · Gross anatomy of nerve supply to muscle groups. · Articulations and movement of the upper limb with special reference to the functions of the hand. · Movements of the lower limb in walking and running. Movements of the trunk. Main Outcomes: - Students should Explain the organization of the human body, and the concepts of health, human diseases and the disease causing agents. Explain the gross anatomy and general functions of the skeletal and muscle systems, and the characteristics of joints types. Know and explain the components of the locomotor system. Master basic biomechanical concepts. Explain the anatomy and physiology of movement. Explain and classify the roles of the skeleton, joints, muscles and nerves in movements. Recognize some of the effects of dysfunction of parts of the neuromuscular system. Explain and classify the early development of the foetus. Explain and classify the histology of the basic tissue types. HUB127 Human Biology 127 (15 credits) Main Content: Principles and components of control systems. Membranes: general functions, composition, and specific membrane transport processes. Intercellular signaling: receptors and chemical signals. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system (CNS), the physiology of the muscular system, blood and immunology. Main Outcomes: - Students should be able to explain and classify The principles and components of control systems, and examples thereof. The various membrane transport and communication processes of the cell The functional anatomy of the central nervous system and the major sensory and motor pathways. The functioning of neurons, the transduction of sensory stimuli, how this information is processed and responded to by the CNS. The physiology of the muscular system, neuro-muscular junction, blood and the immune system. Learners will be able to: Recognize some of the effects of dysfunction of parts of the neuromuscular system Develop information processing skills, such as searching for and evaluating information. SECOND YEAR MODULES COMPULSORY MODULES: MBS231, MBS232, MIC251, MIC252 Medical Biosciences students MBS213, MBS214, MBS215, MBS216 Physio- & Occupational Therapy students HUB218, HUB228 Nursing students MBS231 Medical Biosciences (20 credits) [Co-requisite: MBS111 and MBS 121 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Physiology of the special senses (e.g. eye, ear, taste and smell), motor systems and the functions of the cerebellum. · The physiological and anatomical mechanisms involved in thermoregulation and endocrine regulation of homeostasis in man. 98

Main Outcomes: Students should: Understand the structural and functional organization of the nervous system with special emphasis on the special senses and control of movement. Understand how man regulates his body temperature in normal and extreme conditions. Understand how the endocrine system maintains homeostasis. Have insight into some of the effects of loss of function of parts of the neuromuscular system Understand the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems Understand how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated Know and understand intercellular signaling: Receptors and chemical signals (local, neurological and hormonal) Have an appreciation of the consequences of dysfunction in the various body systems ­ selected examples Develop basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format.

MBS232 Medical Biosciences 232 (20 credits) [Co-requisite: MBS231, MBS111 and MBS 121 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the reproductive, respiratory, urinary and digestive systems. · Cellular metabolic processes. Main Outcomes: The student should have A detailed understanding of the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems A detailed understanding of the mechanisms whereby the specified organs systems, individually and collectively, contribute to body homeostasis A detailed understanding of how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated. An appreciation of the consequences of dysfunction in the various body systems ­ selected examples. Laboratory competencies related to the investigation of the form and function of the specified systems. Basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format. Understand the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins.

MIC251 Medical Microbiology 251 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: LSC141] Main Content: The history and philosophy of medical microbiology; Microbes as parasites (micro-and microparasites, intracellular and extracellular life, systems of classification); Eucaryotes (disease-causing fungi, protozoa, helminthes, arthropods); Procaryotes structure, nutrition, growth and survival, gene expression); Host-parasite interactions (characteristics and evolution of parasitism, the infectious process, parasite and host adaptions, basic immunity); Hospital acquired infections (predisposing factors, types and dynamics); Infection control (use of antimicrobials, sterilization, disinfection and decontamination procedures, laboratory safety rules, protective clothing, adequate waste disposal, diminishing reservoirs, social environmental factors, health education, vector control, immunization).

Main Outcomes: Students will be able to explain The history and philosophy of medical microbiology and the organisms of medical importance. Host-parasite relationships, thus explaining why some microbes live in symbiosis with the host and others cause infection. Basic principles of immunity. Infection control and its application in clinical medicine. 99

MIC252 Medical Microbiology 252 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: MIC251] Main Content: · Immunology Normal flora of the human body; characteristics and evolution of parasitism; parasite and host adaptions; cells and organs of the immune system; innate; alternative complement pathway; major histocompatibility complex; humoral immunity; classic complement pathway; cell-mediated immunity; immunoregulatory mechanisms; pathologic consequences of the immune response. The Host Community Classes of host populations; co-evaluation of host and parasite; herd immunity; cycles of disease. Emergence Factors for Infectious Disease Human population shifts and behaviour; microbial adaptation and change; breakdown of public health measures; emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases; factors favouring global eradication of an infectious disease. The Infectious Process An overview of bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoal pathogenesis; features of surface and systemic infections; mechanisms of spread through the body; genetic determinants of spread and replication. Microbial Pathogenic Mechanisms The role of bacterial biofilms; parasite survival; interactions of human cancer viruses with their hosts. Main Outcomes: Students will be able to explain, summarize and classify: The normal human microflora and understand the role they play in disease prevention. The scope of immunology. The pathogenic mechanisms of medically important parasites. The features of surface and systemic infections and how the human host responds to these infections. HUB218 Human Biology 218 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB118 and/or HUB128] Main content: · Plasma membrane - general functions, composition, and specific membrane transport processes · Genes and gene expression · Clinical applications and consequences of cellular dysfunction · The cell cycle, somatic and reproductive cell division · Cellular metabolic processes · Principles and components of control systems · Intercellular signaling - receptors and chemical signals (local, neurological and hormonal) · Models of mechanisms of hormone action · Macro- and microscopic structure and functions of the cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary and digestive systems · Topographical (surface) anatomy of these organ systems and vessels Main outcomes:The student should be able to: Understand the various membrane transport and communication processes of the cell Understand how genetic information is transferred from DNA to proteins Understand the phases and changes cells undergo during their life cycle and the regulation thereof Understand the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids Understand the principles and components of control systems Executing investigative experiments, and report it in an acceptable scientific style and format Appreciate the body systems structure and physiology and consequences of dysfunction in the various body systems Demonstrate laboratory competencies related to the investigation of the form and function of the specified systems.

100

HUB228 Human Biology 228 (20 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB118 and/or HUB128] Main content: · The language of anatomy · The anatomy and physiology of bone and muscle at a basic level · The skeletal and muscular systems of the body at a basic level · The anatomical and functional organization of the nervous system · Basic neurophysiology and neural integration · Components, organization and function of the sensory and motor pathways · The autonomic nervous system at a basic level · Basic higher brain functions · The structure and function of the endocrine system · The structure and function of the reproductive system Main outcomes: The student should have a detailed understanding of: Macro- and microscopic structure of bone and the process of bone healing Macro- and microscopic structure of muscle and the physiology of muscle contraction Surface anatomy, skeleton, joints muscles, nerves and movements of the head and neck, upper limb, back thorax, abdomen, pelvis, perineum and lower limb Signaling in the nervous system Brain, spinal cord, cranial and spinal nerves General and special senses The anatomy, physiology and regulation of the autonomic nervous system Macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the endocrine system Macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the reproductive system MBS213 Medical Biosciences 213 (10 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB 117 and HUB 127 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the digestive system. · Cellular metabolic processes. Main Outcomes: The student should have A detailed understanding of the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems A detailed understanding of the mechanisms whereby the specified organs systems, individually and collectively, contribute to body homeostasis A detailed understanding of how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated. Laboratory competencies related to the investigation of the form and function of the specified systems. Basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format. Understand the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins MBS214 Medical Biosciences 214 (10 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB 117 and HUB 127 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Organization and function the of central and peripheral nervous systems · Macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the respiratory system . Main Outcomes: - Students should have An understanding of the functional organization of the nervous system Insight into some of the effects of loss of function of parts of the neuromuscular system A detailed understanding of the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems A detailed understanding of how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated An appreciation of the consequences of dysfunction in the various body systems ­ selected examples Basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format 101

MBS215 Medical Biosciences 215 (10 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB 117 and HUB 127 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Embryology, macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the cardiovascular and urinary systems, including acid base regulation. Main Outcomes: The student should have A detailed understanding of the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems A detailed understanding of the mechanisms whereby the specified organs systems, individually and collectively, contribute to body homeostasis A detailed understanding of how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated. Laboratory competencies related to the investigation of the form and function of the specified systems. Basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format. MBS216 Medical Biosciences (10 credits) [Pre-requisite: HUB 117 and HUB 127 or equivalent prior knowledge] Main Content: · Embryology, macro- and microscopic structure and coordinated functions of the endocrine and reproductive systems Main Outcomes: The student should have: a detailed understanding of the macro- and microscopic structure of the specified systems a detailed understanding of the mechanisms whereby the specified organs systems contribute to body homeostasis. a detailed understanding of how the functions of these systems are regulated and coordinated intercellular signaling: Receptors and chemical signals (local, neurological and hormonal) an appreciation of the consequences of dysfunction in the various body systems ­ selected examples laboratory competencies related to the investigation of the form and function of the specified systems basic competencies in executing investigative experiments, and reporting it in an acceptable scientific style and format THIRD YEAR MODULES

COMPULSORY MODULES: MBS331, MBS332, MIC351, MIC352 PSE319, PSE329

Medical Biosciences students Dietetics students

MBS331 Medical Biosciences (30 credits) [Co-requisite: MBS231, MBS232 and/or at least 40% CEM of these modules] Main Content: Control Mechanisms. · Normal and abnormal cell growth with special reference to programme cell death (apoptosis) cancer. · Cell communication and signal transduction pathways and their relation to disease states. · Application of neuro regulators with receptors and mediation of function through these receptors. Applied Reproduction. · Macro- and micro-anatomy of female and male reproductive systems with special reference to humans. · Advanced comparative aspects of gamete production, transport, function and control of gestation and parturition. · Fertility and infertility. · Artificial control of reproduction and reproductive health, including family planning and contraception. · Pathophysiology of the reproductive system. Research Methodology 1 102

Selection of and planning of a research project; Budget, Funding and Proposal writing and Protocol writing. · Execution of research: Various hands on laboratory techniques; Generation and capturing of data. · Data collection and analysis: Methods in collection of different categories of scientific data; Quantification and interpretation of scientific data. · Literature research and interpretation: Overview of all methods of literature retrieval and organisation. · Application of knowledge in writing a literature review on a chosen topic and a powerpoint presentation. Main Outcomes: Control Mechanisms And Applied Reproduction: The student will acquire a sound knowledge of: · advanced cellular and molecular control mechanisms and the molecular basis of selected diseases, e.g. cancer, cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer's and malaria. · communication in the nervous system, · Male and female reproduction. This includes macro- and micro-anatomy of the male and female reproductive systems, and reproductive health including fertility /infertility, family planning and STD's. Research Methodology: The student should · have an understanding of laboratory techniques (laboratory mathematics, buffer systems, pH, preparation of solutions, pipetting techniques, use of weighing instruments, etc.) and scientific research Methodology (literature search, description of data with the aid of statistical methods), · develop competencies in information management, · be able to find, summarize and interpret scientific literature, · be able to quantify and interpret scientific data. MBS332 Medical Biosciences 332 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MBS231, MBS232 and/or at least 40% CEM of these modules] Main Content: Anatomical, Molecular and Systems Biology Lifestyle and health. The physiological basis of: · selected cardiac, lung and vascular diseases; · role of lifestyle on development and health; · histopathology/pathophysiology of the respiratory system with reference to emphysema, AIDS and tuberculosis; · muscle adaptations to endurance and resistance training; · muscle structure adaptations to a decreased physical activity; · controlling food intake and factors that control hunger and satiety with regards to energy expenditure and its effects on obesity. Research Methodology. · Project management: Application of skills gained in the first semester Research Methodology lectures re quantification and interpretation of scientific data; · Data collection and analysis: Methods in collection of different categories of scientific data, Quantification and interpretation of scientific data; · Execution of research: Conduct laboratory research, Generation of data.; · Writing of a scientific report on the research project: Application of knowledge in writing a report on the research project and presentation of a seminar. Main Outcomes: Anatomical, Molecular and Systems Biology: Lifestyle and health. The student should have an understanding of the: · physiological basis of lung development and selected cardiovascular and lung diseases; · principles that underpin selected/some techniques used in heart and lung research. Student should also be able to interpret the data; 103

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nutrition and metabolism in maintenance of health and the consequences of obesity and anorexia nervosa; the role of exercise in health maintenance; · the role of exercise in maintaining energy balance and reducing/preventing obesity; changes to muscle histology during exercise. Research Methodology 2: · The student should be competent in the planning, execution and presentation of a research project. MIC351 Medical Microbiology 351 [Pre-requisites: MIC251, MIC252] Main Content: · The language of Clinical Microbiology; · Infections of the skin; · Respiratory tract infections; · Infections of the digestive tract; · Systemic infections initiated in the gastro-intestinal tract; · Genito-urinary tract infections; · Infections of central nervous system; · Multisystem zoonoses and vector-borne infections. Main Outcomes: The student will be able to: · explain the modes of transmission of infectious diseases · explain the pathogenesis of common systems based infections · identify the aetiological agents in infectious diseases and their treatment · identify the symptoms of human infectious diseases. (20 credits)

·

MIC352 Medical Microbiology 352 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: MIC351] Main Content: Isolation and characterization of bacterial, viral and fungal pathogens from clinical specimens (skin, eye, respiratory tract, gastro-intestinal tract, genito-urinary tract); Diagnostic immunology; Diagnostic molecular biology; Molecular epidemiology. Main Outcomes: Students will be able to: · explain the principles of different diagnostic tests · perform routine diagnostic laboratory tests · use specialized techniques in the research medical microbiology laboratory, such as basic immunology and molecular biology · trace an epidemic using epidemiological patterns.

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APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY FOR DIETETICS PSE 319: PHYSIOLOGY 319 [Pre-requisite modules: MBS 231 and 232 Topic based discussions to supplement therapeutic nutrition: Topics include Lab tests - The role of lab tests and interpretation of results, Acid-base disturbance, Renal dysfunction & consequences (potassium, calcium, phosphate & magnesium, homeostasis), Reproductive systems (include fertility and diet/lifestyle), Nutrition & GIT, Malnutrition, Short bowel syndrome and Oncology. PSE 329: PHYSIOLOGY 329 [Pre-requisite modules: MBS 231 and 232 Topic based discussions to supplement therapeutic nutrition: Liver disorders and gallstones, Inborn errors of metabolism, Respiratory Diseases, Plasma enzymes in diagnosis, Anemia and Disorders of haem metabolism, CVS Disease, Burns, Genetics and DNA based technology in clinical biochemistry, Food-borne illnesses, Premature development, Pregnancy and fertility.

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DEGREE COURSE: BPharm Continuous Assessment Breakdown % of final mark 2ndYear Pharmacy PHA211 PHA221 PHA214 PHA215 PHA223 PHA224 PHA225 Class tests 2 50 50 20 80 60 50 Pharm calc tests 10 Poster presentation 10 Research proj. Oral presentation 10 33 10 Written Paper 67 Practical 40 20 12 30 Exam 50 50 30 50 50 50 Contin. Eval. 50 70 8 Evaluation 50 50 50 50 Assignments 25 30 20 Exercise 5 Case Study 15 Portfolio 40 Peer assessment 5

Lectures Pre-prac lect Tutorials Prac session Assign/Tasks Research project Self study Tests Practical test Externship Examinations Tot. learning time

Breakdown of learning Hours- 2nd Year Pharmacy PHA211 PHA214 PHA221 PHS224 PHA215 PHA223 32 48 32 48 16 16 40 40 16 20 32 39 46 26 42 2 2 2 2 3 48 2 2 1 2 150 150 150 150

PHA225 48

40 20 38 2

2 150

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Continuous Assessment Breakdown % of Final mark 3rd Year Pharmacy PHA312 PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA322 313 324 314 321 311 323 Class Tests 2 40 80 45 70 55 550 80 Quizzes 5 10 5 5 Essays/Assignments 20 10 10 10 Oral Presentation 5 Practical Mark 30 12 10 10 12 Examination 50 67 50 50 50 50 67 Continuous 8 15 50 8 Assessment Oral Examination 33 33 Practical Assessment 20 20 Externship Portfolio 20 Essay Project Case Study 10 Research Project 20

Lectures Pre-prac lecture Practical sessions Assign/Tasks Self Study Tests Examinations Tot. learning time

Breakdown of Learning Hours - 3rd Year Pharmacy PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA 312 313 324 314 321 311 323 32 32 48 32 32 32 48 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 32 20 20 49 49 46 49 49 49 46 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 150 150 150 150 150 150 150

PHA 322 32 32 32 20 49 2 1-3 150

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Breakdown of learning Hours ­ 4th Year Pharmacy PHA 411 48 20 77 2 PHA 414 48 24 24 49 2 PHA 415 48 48 49 2 PHA 416 48 48 49 2 PHA 417 48 8 89 2 PHA 421 48 50 47 2 PHA 424 48 20 24 31 2 PHA 403 32 26 57 2 32 1 150 120 60 2 PHA 405 41

Lectures Prac session Assign/Tasks Research Project Self study Tests Prac Project Oral Exam Exams (hrs) Portfolio Tot learning time

3 150

3 150

3 150

3 150

3 150

3 150

1 24 150

2 150

Continuous Assessment Breakdown of final mark % of 4th year Pharmacy PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA PHA 411 414 415 416 417 421 424 403 405 Class tests 3 70 50 70 70 70 70 45 10 70 Externship Practicals 15 Project/Report 10 35 20 30 Oral Presenta 10 5 10 10 20 Tutorial 10 Exam 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Contin. Eval 10 10 50 Evaluation 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 Essay/Assign 10 30 20 10 10 Quizzes 5 10 20 10 Workshop 5

SECOND YEAR MODULES Prerequisites: All B Pharm I modules. PHA211 Pharmacy 211 (15 credits) (3 lectures + 1 practical per week) Main Content: · Introduction to Pharmaceutics: GMP, legislative issues, reference material, overview of dosage forms, pharmaceutical calculations. Solutions. pH and buffers. · Interfacial phenomena. Emulsions. Practical work: Compounding of selected extemporaneous preparations. · Labeling and prescription terminology. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module the student will: · Have a basic understanding of `Good Manufacturing Practice' and the relevant legislation affecting manufacturing processes. · Be able to identify the various dosage forms and the appropriate use of reference material. 108

· · · ·

Be able to identify, analyse and solve pharmaceutical problems using calculations Have an understanding of certain concepts in pharmaceutics such as solubility, pH and buffers and interfacial phenomena. Be capable of identifying and explaining the relevant physical and chemical factors impacting on the formulation of various pharmaceutical preparations. Be capable of the extemporaneous preparation and appropriate labeling of various dosage forms.

PHA221 Pharmacy 221 (15 credits) (3 lectures + 1 practical per week) Main Content: · Comminution. Particle size analysis. Mixing. Granulation. Polymorphism. Colloidal systems. · Rheology and viscosity. Suspensions. · Practical work: Compounding of selected extemporaneous preparations, appropriate packaging materials. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have an understanding of formulation) processes such as comminution, particle size analysis, mixing and granulation. · Have an understanding of concepts such as rheology, viscosity and polymorphism. · Be capable of understanding colloidal systems and the formulation of suspensions. · Be capable of identifying and explaining various pharmaceutical phenomena, with particular reference to formulation and stability. · Be able to identify, analyse and solve pharmaceutical problems using calculations. · Be capable of the extemporaneous preparation and appropriate packaging of various dosage forms. PHA223 Pharmacy 223 (3 lectures + 1 practical per week) (15 credits) Main Content: · Introduction to pharmacology. · Basic pharmacodynamics. · Qualitative pharmacokinetics. · Chemical transmission and the autonomic nervous system. · Practical work: Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic computer simulations. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will: · Have an understanding of relevant terms in pharmacology. · Have an understanding of pharmacodynamics. · Have an understanding of pharmacokinetics and the effects of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion on the kinetics of drugs. · Have an understanding of therapeutic effects, adverse drug reactions and paradoxical drug reactions. · Have an understanding of the drugs affecting the peripheral nervous system, including their mechanism of action, indications, adverse drug reactions, contra-indications and possible drug interactions. · Be able to apply the theoretical knowledge learnt to computer simulation practicals. PHA214 Pharmacy 214 (3 lectures per week) (15 credits) Main Content: · Community Health Sciences: Community health, socio-political health context, national heath programmes, primary health care. · Pharmacy as a profession: Concept of a profession, history of pharmacy, philosophy of pharmaceutical care. · National Drug Policy. · Introduction to Pharmacy Legislation: the Pharmacy Act. · Structure of pharmacy in South Africa: Control of pharmacy, pharmacy ownership.

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Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student should · Have a broad understanding of the context of health care in South Africa, with particular reference to Primary Health Care. · Have an understanding of pharmacy as a profession in terms of the past, present and future. · Have an understanding of the philosophy of pharmaceutical care and the steps involved in the pharmaceutical care process. · Have an understanding of the legal framework within which the pharmacy profession operates as opposed to the general public and the consequences should there be any deviation from this framework PHA224 Pharmacy 224 (3 lectures per week) (15 credits) Main Content: · Medicines Control Act: Control of the sale of medicines (Section 22A), validity of prescriptions. · Stock management: Basic principles of stock control, GDP, SOPs. Elements of Marketing: Merchandising, Personal selling. · Financial Management: Introduction to bookkeeping, ratio analysis, break-even analysis. · Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will: · Have an understanding of the legislation governing the sale of medicines. · Have a basic understanding of stock control and `Good Distribution Practices' · Be capable of implementing stock control procedures. · Be capable of performing basic selling and merchandising functions within the pharmacy practice · Have a basic understanding of financial records and be able to utilise these to make calculated decisions on the improvement of the practice. PHA215 Pharmacy 215 (15 credits) (2 lectures + 1 practical per week) Main Content: · Good Pharmacy Practice. Medical terminology. Patient assessment: History taking, patient assessment and screening. · Selected conditions: Upper respiratory tract infections, allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis, dermatology, GIT disorders, muscular system disorders, genito-urinary tract disorders, common oral problems, parasitic infections. · Patient care records. Practical work: Community pharmacy externship. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the students will: · Have a good understanding of the principles of Good Pharmacy Practice. · Be able to understand and use medical terms · Be able to draw up a patient history profile · Be able to assess and screen the patient for referral or pharmacist-initiated therapy. · Have an understanding of the clinical signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis and treatment of selected conditions. · Be capable of maintaining patient records · Be capable of applying the principles of pharmaceutical care in a practice setting. · Be able to demonstrate the application of theoretical knowledge in a practice setting through the use of a portfolio of case studies. PHA225 Pharmacy 225 (15 credits) (3 lectures + 1 practical per week) Main Content: · Microbiology: General microbiology, medical microbiology, microorganisms of pharmaceutical importance. · Parasitic organisms of pharmaceutical importance. · Plants of pharmaceutical importance: Evaluation and quality assurance of herbal medicines, selected chromatographic techniques, phytochemicals. 110

· Practical work: Assay and analysis of phytochemicals. Main Outcomes: · Upon successful completion of this module, the student will: · Have an understanding of the basic principles of microbiology, medical microbiology and the microorganisms of pharmaceutical importance. · Have an understanding of the life cycles of various parasites of pharmaceutical importance · Have an understanding of the therapeutic or medicinal value of plants and methods of identifying and evaluating medicinal plants, or crude drugs derived from such plants. · Have an understanding of the chemistry of organic plant constituents (secondary metabolites) that can either induce physiological / pharmacological responses or that are inert but of economic importance as food or manufacturing aids. · Be capable of performing the isolation, chemical and physical analysis and quality assurance of phytochemicals. PHARMACY THIRD YEAR MODULES Prerequisites: PHA211 and PHA221 PHA311 Pharmacy 311 (15 credits) Main Content: · Sterilisation. Sterility testing. · Anti-microbial limitation or destruction. · Pyrogens. Routes of parenteral administration. Antibiotic manufacture and biological assays. Surgical dressings. · Waste disposal and environmental health care. · Practical work: Sterile technique. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, students will · Have an understanding of the requirements for sterilization, sterility testing and anti-microbial limitation. · Have an understanding of pyrogens and the formulation of pyrogen free preparations. · Have an understanding of the routes of parenteral administration. · Have an understanding of the processes involved in antibiotic manufacture. · Have an understanding of medical waste disposal and the impact on environmental health care. · Capable of the extemporaneous preparation of sterile products. PHA312 Pharmacy 312 (15 credits) [Pre-requisite: PHA225 (Biochemistry 211 and 221)] Main Content: · Theory and principles of quality control · Methods of quality control: Complexometric titrations, Spectrophotometric techniques (UV, IR, Visible and fluorimetry). · Advanced analytical methods: Gas chromatography, HPLC. · Practical work: Laboratory techniques, methods of analysis. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have an understanding of the theoretical and practical principles involved in the analysis and quality control of drugs · Be able to apply chemical and physicochemical methods as well as instrumentation methods of analysis of pharmaceutical substances. · Be able to interpret spectra obtained from spectroscopic techniques to deduce and/or identify the chemical structure of organic compounds · Be able to apply the principles of quality assurance in the registration and control of medicines · Be able to perform validation of experimental methods and their results. 111

PHA313 Pharmacy 313 (15 credits) Main Content: · Basic principles of pathophysiology. · Autocoids: Introduction, Histamine and antihistamines; Serotonin and drugs affecting the serotoninergic system; migraine and anti-migraine drugs; · Eicosanoids; Peptides; Purines; Platelet activating factor, Bradykinin, Substance P and Cytokines; Anti-inflammatory drugs; Analgesics. · Drugs affecting the respiratory system. · Drugs affecting the gastro-intestinal system. · Vitamins · Practical work: Applied Pharmacology (case studies). Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have an understanding of pathophysiology of common conditions · Have an understanding of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs affecting various organ systems. · Have an understanding of various disease states, the clinical application of drugs in the treatment of these disease and the possible adverse effects and drug interactions of these agents, with particular emphasis on the Essential Drugs Programme guidelines. PHA314 Pharmacy 314 (15 credits) [Pre-requisite: PHA214, PHA224] Main Content: · The Medicines Control Act (continued). · Modern Pharmacy Practice: Marketing; Dispensing practices; Financing; Human resource management. · Psychosocial aspects of pharmacy practice: Illness behavour/sick role; Health beliefs; Techniques for changing health behaviours. · Self medication: Reasons for self-medication; Types of self-medication; Role of the pharmacist. · Pharmacy ethics. Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have an understanding of the Medicines Control Act and its impact on pharmacy practice. · Have a basic understanding of modern pharmacy practice issues and the factors governing dispensing practices, financing and human resource management in South Africa. · Be capable of implementing marketing strategies for the promotion of the pharmacy and specific products. · Be able to demonstrate an understanding of factors affecting patient behaviour. · Be able to analyse the general principles relating to responsible self-medication. · Be capable of differentiating between ethics, morality and ethical theories, principles and actions. PHA321 Pharmacy 321 (15 credits) Main Content: · Introduction to pharmaceutical technology. · Tablets and tabletting. · Filtration. · Extractions. · Heat transfer, evaporation and drying. · Distillation. Medicine registration. · Principles of Good Manufacturing Practices. · Kinetics. · Practical work: The production and testing of pharmaceutical dosage forms and experiments illustrating pharmaceutical principles.

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Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have an understanding of formulation techniques and the technology required in the production of pharmaceuticals. · Have an understanding of "Good Manufacturing Practices" and its application in the production of quality pharmaceutical products. · Have an understanding of the medicines registration process · Be able to use kinetics in the determination of expiry dates · Be capable of the production of laboratory scale samples of various dosage forms. PHA322 Pharmacy 322 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHA225] Main Content: · Physical and chemical properties · Structure-activity relationships · Synthesis design and mechanism of action of selected drugs: Psychopharmaceuticals; Local anaesthetics; Organometallic diagnostic agents; Radiopharmaceuticals; Synthetic antimicrobial agents; Vitamins and coenzymes · Tutorial: case studies. Main Outcomes: Have an understanding of · the chemistry of certain drugs, which includes their synthesis, structure activity relationships, molecular mechanism of action and design. · Be able to explain drugs as organic chemicals whose biological activities derive from their chemical structures and physico-chemical properties. PHA323 Pharmacy 323 (15 credits) Main Content: · Immunopharmacology: Introduction ­ the immune system; Immunosuppressive agents; Immunomodulating agents; Immunologic response to drugs and drug allergy. · Cardiovascular and renal drugs: Drugs acting on the cardiovascular system; Drugs affecting the blood (haematopoeitic system); Drugs acting on the renal system. · Drugs acting on the Endocrine system: Hormones of the pituitary and thyroid glands; Pancreatic hormones and anti-diabetic drugs; Adrenalocorticosteroids and adrenocorticol antagonists; Agents that affect bone mineral homeostatis. · Drugs acting on the Central nervous system: Introduction; General and Local anaesthetics; Anxiolytic and hypnotic drugs; Anti-depressant drugs; Neuroleptic drugs (anti-psychotic agents); Drugs used in Parkinson's diseases; Antiepileptic drugs. · Practical work: Applied pharmacology (case studies). Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the students will · Have an understanding of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of drugs affecting various organ systems. · Have an understanding of various disease states, the clinical application of drugs in the treatment of these diseases and the possible adverse effects and drug interactions of these agents, with particular emphasis on the Essential Drugs Programme guidelines. PHA324 Pharmacy 324 [Pre-requisites: PHA214, PHA224] Main Content: · Immunisation of infants and young children. · Communicable diseases. · Common gynaeocological complaints. · Pregnancy and infant care. · Family planning. 113 (15 credits)

· Practical clinical skills. · Hospital externship. · Dermatology Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the student will · Have a sound knowledge of selected diseases so as to decide if a patient should be referred to a medical practitioner or may be treated by the pharmacist. · Be conversant with the theoretical and practical knowledge required for the diagnosis and treatment of selected disease states. · Be able to recognize common ailments of pregnancy and infancy and be able to match these with the appropriate pharmaceutical care. · Be able to describe the method, mechanism of action, advantages, disadvantages and counseling or special advice required for all commonly used contraceptive methods. · Be able to demonstrate the application of theoretical knowledge in a practice setting through the use of portfolio of case studies.

FOURTH YEAR MODULES PHA411 Pharmacy 411 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHA311 and PHA321] Main Content: · Pre-formulation · Novel dosage forms · Coating of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms · Capsules · Topical drug delivery · Suppositories · Ophthalmic solutions · Aerosols · Liquid preparations · Containers and packaging · Modified release medication Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module students will · Be able to identify the physico-chemical and biopharmaceutical properties of components of pharmaceutical products. · Have an understanding of the concepts involved in the making of advanced pharmaceutical formulations. · Have an understanding of the various packaging and pre-packing methods and the use of appropriate packaging materials. · Have an understanding of the effect of formulation on the ultimate quality and use of different dosage forms. PHA414 Pharmacy 414 [Pre-requisites: PHA314 and PHA324] Main Content: · Professional Management - Pharmacy registration - Miscellaneous legislation affecting pharmacy · Patient-centred pharmacy practice - Communication - Patient counseling - Patient Adherence · Financial Management 114 (15 credits)

· · · · · · · · · ·

- Budgetary control - Stock management Insurance Needs Medicines information course Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the learner will: have an understanding of professional management issues such as registration requirements. be able to analyse the financial status of a pharmacy practice. have an understanding of the principles of "stock management" and its affect on a practice be able to assess and implement the insurance requirements for a practice (15 credits)

PHA415 Pharmacy 415 [Pre-requisites: PHA215, PHA313, PHA323, PHA312 and PHA322] Main Content: · Pharmacotherapy of chronic conditions of commonly used drugs. · Design of steroidal drugs. Main Outcomes: At the end of the module students will be able to: · Explain the pharmacotherapy of chronic conditions of commonly used drugs. · Explain the design of steroidal drugs.

PHA416 Pharmacy 416 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHA215, PHA313, PHA323, PHA312, PHA322] Main Content: · Principles of quantitative pharmacokinetics and pharmaceutical biotechnology in drug design. Main Outcomes: · At the end of the module students will be able to: - apply the principles of quantitative pharmacokinetics and pharmaceutical biotechnology in drug development. PHA417 Pharmacy 417 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHA215, PHA322, PHA313 and PHA323] Main Content: · Chemotherapeutic agents and cancer therapy. Main Outcomes: At the end of the module students will be able to: · Apply the main chemotherapeutic principles and chemistry of commonly encountered drugs. PHA421 Pharmacy 421 [Pre-requisites: PHA311 and PHA321] Main Content: · Parenteral formulations: - Particulate matter - Intravenous admixtures and incompatibilities - Total parenteral nutrition - Nosocomial infections · Manufacture of sera and vaccines - Cold chain maintenance · Production of sterile parenterals - Ultra-violet disinfection - Laminar flow units - Clean rooms for production of parenterals 115 (15 credits)

- Personnel as a source of microbial and particulate matter - Clothing for clean rooms · Micro-organisms used in the production of pharmaceuticals · Biopharmaceuticals Main Outcomes: · Upon successful completion of this module, the learner will: be capable of ensuring that all injectable formulations are appropriate, correctly mixed and free of particulate matter. be capable of monitoring the appropriate use of `Total Parenteral Nutrition' · `Home Parenteral Nutrition' and `Enteral Nutrition'. be capable of monitoring the correct use of infusion sets to prevent nosocomial infections. have an understanding of the procedures involved in the manufacture of vaccines and antisera. be capable of maintaining the cold chain, with respect to the correct storage of vaccines, temperature monitoring and emergency procedures for cold chain maintenance. have an understanding of sterility in the production of parenterals have an understanding of the role of microorganisms in the production of pharmaceuticals. have an understanding of the role of formulation on the bioavailability of active ingredients.

PHA424 Pharmacy 424 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHA314 and PHA324] Main Content: · Patient-centred pharmacy practice: Communication Patient compliance Patient counselling · Topics in pharmacy practice: Special care (selected topics) National health programmes (selected topics) Veterinary medicine (selected topics) Complementary medicines (selected topics) · Reproductive health · Drug wise counseling · Clinical aspects Main Outcomes: Upon successful completion of this module, the learner will: · Be able to identify current issues of relevance to various stakeholders in the pharmacy profession. · Be capable of dealing with medicine queries through the use of various information sources. · be able to recognize various communication styles and identify how to adopt these in a specific patient encounter. · be able to interact with individual patients and recognize specific counseling needs with particular reference to compliance. · be capable of researching, presenting and assessing a topic of relevance to pharmacy practice. · have an understanding of the role of the pharmacist in reproductive health · be able to identify, address and refer possible cases of drug abuse · be capable to doing a complete physical examination of a patient, including the performance and interpretation of screening tests.

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PHA403 Pharmacy 403 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: ALL B.Pharm III modules] [Co-requisites: PH411 and PHA421, PHA414 and PHA424] Main Content: · PBL-Pharmacotherapy · Clinical sessions · Reflective practice Main Outcomes: · Develop skills in problem-based learning · Skills development in rational pharmacotheraphy, good dispensing and manufacturing practices and drug supply management · Understand the primary care management of common chronic diseases. PHA405 Pharmacy 405 (15 credits) [Pre-requisites: ALL B.Pharm. III modules] Main Content: · Research methods - Introduction - Structure of a research proposal - Aspects of basic research · Pharmaco-epidemiology (Pharmacology) · New drug design (Pharmaceutical Practice) - Introduction to modern drug design - Structure elucidation - Pharmacogenomics · Clinical trials (Pharmaceutics) · Pharmaco-economics (Pharmacy Practice) · Practical work - Research project Main Outcomes. Upon successful completion of this module, the learner will: · have a broad understanding of research methods and the principles involved in the research · be able to plan and conduct a research project · be able to write up the results of a research project and perform an oral presentation on the research project · have a broad understanding of pharmaco-epidemiology · appreciate the value of pharmaceutical biotechnology in the generation of new approaches to the design and development of drugs, the production of novel therapeutic agents. · be able to interpret spectra obtained from Mass spectroscopy and NMR to deduce the chemical structure of organic compounds · have a broad understanding of pharmacogenomics · have an understanding of the need for and the appropriate procedures involved in clinical trials · have a broad understanding of pharmaco-economics and the various cost ratios used in pharmacoeconomics.

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DEGREE COURSE: BSc (Physical Science) The department runs two major streams: the main stream Physics program with modules PHY111 and PHY121 and 1. 2. the Principle of Physics with modules PHY116 and PHY126(not in list of Compulsory Modules below). The modules PHY112, PHY113, PHY103, PHY106, PHY133, PHY118 and PHY100 are service modules for students from other programmes. Continuous Assessment Breakdown 1st Year % of Final Mark: PHYSICS PHY111,PHY121 PHY116 PHY118 PHY133 PHY106 PHY113,PHY112 PHY126 PHY100 PHY103 Final Test 40 40 40 90 40 Tutorials 15 15 10 15 Tests 30 30 30 30 Assignments & Tasks 15 15 Practicals 15 15 15 Breakdown of Learning hours : 1st Year PHYICS PHY111 PHY112 PHY121 PHY116 PHY100 PHY113 PHY126 PHY118 PHY133 PHY103 42 42 42 21 14 14 14 9 29 42 150 14 14 14 6 74 150 7 7 3 62 100 7

Contact with Lecturer/Tutor Tutorials Assignments & Tasks Evaluation Self Study Practicals Total Learning hrs

PHY106 42 14

9 43 42 150

3 26 50

9 43 42 150

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 2nd Year % of Final Mark: PHYSICS PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 PHY227 Final Test 40 40 50 30 Tests 20 30 20 25 Tutorials and Assignments 15 10 15 15 Practicals 20 20 15 20 Communications 5 Project and Presentation 10 Breakdown of Learning Hours: 2nd Year PHYSICS PHY212 PHY222 PHY217 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 56 42 42 Tutorials discussed 14 14 Assign Tasks 42 14 14 Tests 6 6 6 Self Study 57 68 68 Practicals 24 56 56 Computational 15 Project & Presentation Total Learning Hours 200 200 200 118

PHY227 56 14 6 52 56 16 200

Continuous Assessment Breakdown 3rd Year % of Final Mark: PHYSICS PHY312 PHY322 PHY317 PHY327 Tests 25 30 25 20 Assignments 15 15 15 Tutorials and Assignments 15 Lab Reports 20 15 Final Examination 40 40 30 50 Practicals 20 Practical Report 15 Project and Presentation 10

Breakdown of Learning Hours: 3rd Year PHYSICS PHY312 PHY322 PHY317 Contact with Lecturer/Tutor 56 56 42 Tutorials Assignments & Tasks 60 30 28 Tests and Exams 10 12 6 Self Study 118 146 126 Practicals 56 56 70 Total learning hours 300 300 300

PHY327 42 14 14 6 168 56 300

SYLLABUS PHYSICAL SCIENCES 116,126 118 111,121 108 112,113,133 106, 103 151, 152 Lectures per week 3 3 Tutorials per week 1 1 Practicals per week 1 Practical components The practical component of each 1st and 2nd year separate practical modules (* practical modules). MODULE: 212,222 217,227 312,323 317, 327

3 1 2x3hours

3 1 2x3hours

module is compulsory. In the 3rd year, there are two

FIRST YEAR MODULES

EVALUATION: All modules on the 1st year level are evaluated continuously with a final mark calculated using marks obtained for practicals, tests, essays, tutorials and assignments. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS MODULES: Principles of Physics modules are aimed at life science students, students taking the Environmental and Water Science degree, students not following mathematical modules in the second or third year and students from other faculties. 119

PHY106 Physics for Physiotherapy 106 (15 credits) Main Content: · Linear and non-linear motion including acceleration, free fall and projectile motion. · Momentum, impulse and collisions. · Work, power, potential and kinetic energy, conservation of energy and applications. · Rotational inertia, torque, centre of mass and angular momentum. · Electrostatics and current electricity including lightning, electric shielding, the Van de Graaff Generator, electrical circuits and safety. · Magnetism including permanent magnets, electromagnets and applications. Electromagnetic Induction, Faraday's law, generators and transformers. Main Outcomes: Be able to, or have: · a knowledge and understanding of basic ideas relating to elementary mechanics. · understand the role of elementary mechanics in everyday life. · a knowledge and understanding of basic ideas relating to electricity and magnetism. · understand natural phenomena and various technologies by applying the basic concepts of electricity and magnetism. · work in a laboratory environment and record, represent and interpret the data and deliver a public presentation. PHY116 Physics 116 (N) (15 credits) [Prohibited Combination: PHY113, PHY118, PHY111] Main Content: · Ideas and terminology of science as well as the impact of science on our world using a conceptual exploration platform, focussing on the atomic nature of matter. · The nature of the atom, Atomic spectra, the Bohr model of the atom and basic concepts of quantum mechanics. · Types of radiation, radioactive decay, decay schemes and C-14 dating. · Nuclear Fission, nuclear reactors and fusion. Concepts of temperature and heat, specific heat and thermal expansion. · Heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation and applications. · Linear and non-linear motion including acceleration, free fall and projectile motion Newton's three laws of motion. · Momentum, impulse and collisions. · Work, power, potential and kinetic energy, conservation of energy and applications. · Rotational inertia, torque, centre of mass and angular momentum. Main Outcomes: Be able to, or have: · understand and apply the scientific approach to problem solving. · understand various technologies by applying the basic ideas of modern physics and thermodynamics · a knowledge and understanding of basic ideas relating to elementary mechanics. · understanding the role of elementary mechanics in everyday life. · be able to work in a laboratory environment and record, represent and interpret data. PHY126 Physics 126 (N) (15 credits) [Prohibited Combination: PHY121] Main Content: · Description of wave motion, standing waves, Doppler effect, radar and shock waves. · The origin and nature of sound, reflection and refraction of sound, forced vibrations, natural frequency, resonance, interference, pitch and loudness. Ultrasound applications and compact discs. · Electromagnetic waves transparent and opaque media, selective absorption and transmission, natural phenomena (e.g. why the sky is blue). · Reflection, refraction, diffraction, interference and polarization. · Electrostatics and current electricity including lightning, electric shielding, the Van de Graaf Generator, electrical circuits and safety. 120

· Magnetism including permanent magnets, electromagnets and applications. · Electromagnetic Induction, Faraday's law, generators and transformers. Main Outcomes: · Have knowledge and understanding of basic ideas relating to wave phenomena, electricity and magnetism. · Be able to understanding natural phenomena and various technologies by applying the basic concepts of vibrations, waves, electricity and magnetism. · Be able to work in a laboratory environment and record, represent and interpret data and deliver a public presentation. MAIN STREAM MODULES PHY111 Physics 111 (15 credits) [Co-requisites: MAM111, MAM121; Prohibited Combination: PHY113, PHY118, PHY116] Main Content: · Introduction to vectors. · Kinematics: Motion in one dimension and in a plane. · Dynamics: Newton's laws of motion and their applications. Application of Newton's laws: Translational equilibrium, circular motion, gravitational forces and fields, satellite motion. · Work and energy. · Impulse and momentum. · Rotational Equilibrium Main Outcomes: · Have knowledge and understanding of introductory mechanics of kinematics, dynamics and applications · Be able to apply mechanics theory in everyday life situations · Be able to work in a laboratory environment and record, represent and interpret data. PHY121 Physics 121 (15 credits) [Co-requisites: MAM111, MAM121; Prohibited Combination: PHY126] Main Content: · Simple harmonic motion: Energetics of SHM, simple pendulum, damped oscillations, forced oscillations and resonance. Mechanical waves. Basic wave properties, sinusoidal travelling waves, speed of a wave, energy in wave motion, reflection of waves, interference, standing waves and resonance. · Sound: sound waves, intensity and intensity levels, beats, Doppler effect. · Geometrical optics: ray optics, reflection and refraction, image formation by mirrors and lenses. · Electrostatics: point electrical charges, electric field, electric flux, Gauss' law · Electric potential, Electric currents and Resistance, DC circuits · Capacitors and dielectrics. · Magnetic field and forces, motion of charged particle in a B-field. · Electromagnetic induction, inductance, AC circuits. Main Outcomes: · Have knowledge and understanding of introductory vibrations and waves theory and applications in sound · Have knowledge and understanding of geometrical optics and applications of it in everyday day life · Be able to work in a laboratory environment and record, represent and interpret data.

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FIRST YEAR PHYSICS PHY103 Physics 103 (OH) (5 credits) Main Content: · Atoms, Elements and Molecules. · Electromagnetic waves. · The X-ray Machine; Production of X-rays. · Interaction Processes of X-rays. · Dosimetry. · Radiation Protection Main Outcomes: Be able to, or have: · understand basic radiation physics principles as applied to oral hygienists · establish a foundation from which to view and understand interaction processes between hard radiation and matter, specifically human tissue · an awareness of the dangers of X-rays and how to protect oneself and patients from exposure. PHY112 INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS FOR PHARMACIST (15 credits) [Prohibited Combination: PHY111, PHY116] Main Content: · An introductory appreciation of science as a way of knowing. · An introduction to vectors: representation, adding, subtracting, scalar product, vector product · Equilibrium of a rigid body: Newton's Laws, first condition of equilibrium, friction, second condition of equilibrium (moment of a force / torque). · Elasticity: stress, strain and Young's modulus. · Hydrostatics: pressure in a fluid, buoyancy, flotation, Pascal's principle, Archimedes' principle, Bernoulli's principle. · X-rays: description, creation, and safety. · Electricity: Coulomb's law, electric field, electrical potential energy, capacitors and dielectrics, simple circuits. · Relevant applications to pharmacy will be discussed. Main Outcomes: · Have an ability to sensibly discuss in conceptual terms fundamentals of introductory mechanics, elasticity, hydrostatics, X-rays and electricity. · Have an ability to solve both qualitative and quantitative problems in relation to everyday life with special reference to the context of dentistry · Have an ability to work in a physics laboratory environment that draws upon fundamentals in recording, representing and interpreting data. PHY113 Physics for Dentistry 113 (15 credits) [Prohibited Combination: PHY111, PHY116] Main Content: · An introductory appreciation of science as a way of knowing. · An introduction to vectors: representation, adding, subtracting, scalar product, vector product. · Equilibrium of a rigid body: Newton's Laws, first condition of equilibrium, friction, second condition of equilibrium (moment of a force / torque). · Elasticity: stress, strain and Young's modulus. · Hydrostatics: pressure in a fluid, buoyancy, flotation, Pascal's principle, Archimedes' principle, Bernoulli's principle. · X-rays: description, creation, and safety. · Electricity: Coulomb's law, electric field, electrical potential energy, capacitors and dielectrics, simple circuits. · Relevant applications to dentistry will be discussed. 122

Main Outcomes: · Have an ability to sensibly discuss in conceptual terms fundamentals of introductory mechanics, elasticity, hydrostatics, X-rays and electricity. · Have an ability to solve both qualitative and quantitative problems in relation to everyday life with special reference to the context of dentistry · Have an ability to work in a physics laboratory environment that draws upon fundamentals in recording, representing and interpreting data. PHY100 Health Physics Foundation 100 (10 credits) [Prohibited Combinations: PHY111, PHY113, PHY114, PHY116, PHY118] Main Content: · The Language of Physics: Units and Unit Conversions · Design of an Experiment: Measurements · Forces: Acceleration · Basic Math Skills · Heat and temperature · The Atomic Model Main Outcomes: Be able to: · Use introductory basic physics principles as for non-physicists · Use introductory basic physics principles to describe nature and everyday situations · Apply the necessary thought processes needed to solve problems when dealing with physics phenomena PHY118 Physics for CHS (15 credits) [Prohibited Combination: PHY114, PHY116] Main Content: · The Nature of Matter and Radioactivity. · The Language of Physics; Measurements; Forces. · Work, Energy, Power and Machines. · Pressure; States of Matter; Gases. · Heat; Electrostatics and Electricity. · Electromagnetic Radiation. · Light and Sound Main Outcomes: Student should be able to: · understand introductory basic physics principles as for non-physicists · establish a foundation from which to view and understand nature and everyday situations show a connected framework of knowledge and thought that can lead to a better understanding of political and social issues that depend on scientific data. PHY133 Radiation Physics (10 credits) [Pre-requisite: PHY113] Main Content: · Structure of matter: the atom, atomic energy levels, electromagnetic radiation, production of x-rays · The x-ray tube: the anode, cathode, transformers, voltage rectification, basic x-ray circuit. · Physics of x-ray production: Bremsstrahlung, characteristic x-rays, x-ray energy spectrum, operating characteristics. · Interaction of radiation with matter: ionisation, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, pair production. · Production of x-ray images: image formation and contrast. · Factors affecting the quality of x-ray images: radiographic contrast, scattered radiation and contrast, radiographic receptors. · Measurement of absorbed dose: absorbed dose, dose measurements · Radiation protection: patient exposure and protection, personnel exposure and protection. 123

Main Outcomes: · Understand the interaction of radiation with matter. · Understand the instrumentation used to produce x-rays · Knowledgeable and understand the factors affecting the quality of x-rays · knowledgeable and understand the factors affecting the quality of x-ray images · knowledgeable and understand the biological effects and measurement of radiation.

SECOND YEAR MODULES ASSESSMENT: All 2nd year modules are evaluated continuously with a final mark calculated using marks obtained for practicals, tests, essays, tutorials and assignments. PHY212 Physics 212 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY111, PHY121; Co-requisite: MAM211] Main Content: · Temperature and ideal gases ; heat flow and First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, heat engine, entropy. · Wave physics, including interference and diffraction. · Basic modern physics, including relativity, wave-particle duality, photo-electric effect, blackbody radiation, line spectra, foundations of modern quantum mechanics. · Basic computational physics. · Laboratory experiments. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module, students will be able to: · Use crucial concepts to solve problems in modern physics, interference diffraction and thermodynamics · Demonstrate practical laboratory skills · Implement simple numerical computational algorithms to solve physics problems on the computer. · Demonstrate writing and presentation skills · Explain the progression and nature of science in relation to modern physics. PHY222 Physics 222 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY111, PHY121] Main Content: · Newton's equation of motion, Conservation of energy and conservative forces. Velocity dependent non-conservative damping forces. Conservative systems in 3-D. Central force motion. Dynamics of many-body systems. Dynamics of rigid bodies. Non-inertial reference frames. · Electrostatics: The electrostatic field, Divergence and Curl of electrostatic fields, Electric Potential, work and energy in electrostatics, Conductors. · Magnetostatics: The Lorenz Force, Bio-Savart Law, Divergence and Curl of magnetostatic Fields, Vector Potential. · Electrodynamics: The emf, Faraday's law, Maxwell's Equations. · Electromagnetic waves: The Wave equation. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module students will be able to: · Solve problems in Classical Mechanics and Electrodynamics. · Utilize mathematical and computer skills in problem solving. · Interpret and represent the basic subject matter, with emphasis on the unity of electric and magnetic phenomena. · Do experimental work related to topics in Classical Mechanism and Electrodynamics. · Write and interpret practical reports. 124

PHY217 Physics 217 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY116, PHY126 or PHY111, PHY121 or per arrangement with the department] Main Content: · The scientific method, technology and development of astronomical ideas; the night sky; space travel and the solar system; stellar evolution; galaxies; evidence for the Big Bang and cosmology; Current research questions and SA contributions to Astronomy; Communicating basic astronomical ideas; tourism, the media and science education. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module students will be able to explain basic ideas in Astronomy to a wide audience. PHY227 Physics 227 (20 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY116, PHY126 or PHY111, PHY121] Main Content: · Introduction to Environmental Science, Environmental Physics, Environment and technology, · Traffic and transport, Environment and Industry, Atmospheric Physics, Water in the Environment. · The Energy Future, Electricity Generation, Fossil (coal, liquid, gas), Nuclear, Hydrogen economy, variety of hydro-energy. · Experimental laboratory and computational applications. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module, students will be: · Aware of environmental issues · Knowledgeable on environmental physics and applications. · Able to do public presentations. · Able to do laboratory work on environmental physics · Knowledgeable about energy sources · Explain and represent environmental issues around energy supply · Able to do experimental work related to energy issues. THIRD YEAR MODULES PHY312 Physics 312 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY212 and PHY222 and MAM211] Main Content: Quantum Physics: Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics: Operators, eigen-states. Schrödinger equation. Free particle, wave packet. One-dimensional problems: infinite square well, harmonic oscillator. Angular Momentum, orbital and spin quantum numbers. Hydrogen atom, quantum numbers and electron clouds. Building of the Periodic Table of elements Nuclear Physics: Bulk nuclear properties, nucleon structure, nuclear structure models, nuclear decay and excitation, nuclear reactions, applied nuclear physics, social impact of nuclear physics, particle physics, unification theories, and structure of Universe. Laboratory component: This component provides students with the practical skills to execute, record and analyse data in especially nuclear and quantum physics experiments. Scientific report writing and presentation skills are developed further. Non-linear least squares, distributions in physics and other elements of data analysis are studied. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module student can: · Solve the Schrödinger equation for simple potentials and the Hydrogen atom. · Use the Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics to describe quantum systems. · Calculate properties of nuclei using nuclear models. · Be able to interpret scientific data. · Write scientific reports. · Perform simple nuclear experiments. On completion of the module student can: 125

· · · · · ·

Solve the Schrödinger equation for simple potentials and the Hydrogen atom. Use the Mathematical structure of quantum mechanics to describe quantum systems. Calculate properties of nuclei using nuclear models. Be able to interpret scientific data. Write scientific reports. Perform simple nuclear experiments.

PHY322 Physics 322 (30 credits) [Pre-requisite: PHY212, PHY222, PHY312 and Mathematics 241 or equivalent] Main Content: Crystal structures, X-ray diffraction, Defects in crystals: vacancies, impurities, dislocations and grain boundaries. Boltzmann, Maxwell and Planck distributions. Phonons in crystals, Debye theory of the lattice specific heat. Electrons in metals: conduction electrons, electrical conductivity, motion in a magnetic field. Free electron model: Fermi-Dirac statistics, Fermi energy. Electrons in semiconductors: energy bands, intrinsic and doped semiconductors, mobility, Hall effect, p-n junctions. Practical component provides students with the skills to acquire and analyse data in solid state physics experiments, to apply the computational methods and to hone the report writing and presentation skills. Main Outcomes: At the end of this module students will be able to: · Integrate and find coherence from the experimental results using the Solid state theory · Explain thermal and electronic properties of crystals · Demonstrate how the theory should be used to solve problems · Solve the problems numerically using computer programs PHY317 Physics 317 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: PHY227] Main Content: Renewable fuels and electricity generation, Design of solar cells, Standard silicon solar cell technology incl. Crystalline, Polycrystalline, Thin film amorphous PV systems and design, Wind energy, Wave and Tidal energy. Overview of energy in SA, energy technology in SA. Fossil, nuclear and renewable energy sources. International energy supply and demand. Future scenarios. Practical: applications of renewable energies in the laboratories and in practice, Site visits of industrial applications. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module students will be able to: · Explain the concepts of energy sources · Discuss and explain renewable energy sources · Do standard evaluations for applications of renewable energy sources · Know about energy issues in SA · Discuss international issues on energy supply and demand · Explain the practical applications of renewable energy sources · Do standard PV system sizing PHY327 Physics 327 (30 credits) [Pre-requisites: MAT105 and PHY217 and PHY212] Main Content: Analysing astronomical spectra and photometry; Concepts in general relativity applied to cosmology and black holes; Astrophysical fluids; Nucleosynthesis; Technology and science of SA's astronomical facilities; Communicating advanced astronomical ideas: tourism, the media and science education. Main Outcomes: On completion of the module students will be able to: · Explain the physics and mathematics of important ideas in astronomy · Operate a telescope · Analyse data from telescopes · Use computational techniques to model data and simulate astronomical objects · Explain advanced astronomical ideas to a wide audience 126

MODULE: ENGLISH FOR EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (EED)

MODULE Lectures per week Tutorials per week

117 / 127 2 1

Evaluation: Continuous evaluation will be used in all modules EED117: English for Educational Development 117 1st semester module OR EED127: English for Educational Development 127 2nd semester module (15 credits) (15 credits)

CONTENTS (SAME FOR BOTH MODULES) The module components include introduction to elements of composition, critical analysis, aspects of narrative, graphic literacy, negotiating knowledge and meaning, and independent research. Students write autobiographies, scientific reports and argumentative essays. They learn to explore how scientific knowledge is constructed and distributed and become familiar with concepts of observation, generalization, experimentation, the hypothesis, falsification and paradigm shifts. The module material is based on a selection of a variety of scientific texts exploring a number of different themes. (Aids, Genetically Modified Food and Cloning etc)

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PROGRAMME: SCIENCE FOUNDATION

MODULE SFN 011 (no UWC credits, Matric value addition only) Accessing Science Text Reading comprehension Robinson's 12 questions: techniques for identifying and distinguishing main ideas from supporting ideas and examples. Concept mapping as an information organizing tool Summary writing The Nature of Science Scientific Literacy Science concepts, processes, ideas and their development Case studies about the history of science Science and society The ethics of doing science MODULE 2 SFN 012 (no UWC credits, Matric value addition only) Scientific communication with special reference to: The genre of scientific writing: Reports, essays, posters. Literature search and Oral presentation. Scientific Investigations Science investigative processes Experimentation and variables Project: Conducting an investigation Formulating question Collecting, sorting and analyzing data (tables and graphs) The role of evidence in a scientific investigation Report writing in poster format

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