Read NAVFAC DM 26-6 Mooring Design Physical & Empirical Data text version

This document downloaded from

vulcanhammer.net

since 1997, your source for engineering information for the deep foundation and marine construction industries, and the historical site for Vulcan Iron Works Inc. Use subject to the "fine print" to the right.

All of the information, data and computer software ("information") presented on this web site is for general information only. While every effort will be made to insure its accuracy, this information should not be used or relied on for any specific application without independent, competent professional examination and verification of its accuracy, suitability and applicability by a licensed professional. Anyone making use of this information does so at his or her own risk and assumes any and all liability resulting from such use. The entire risk as to quality or usability of the information contained within is with the reader. In no event will this web page or webmaster be held liable, nor does this web page or its webmaster provide insurance against liability, for any damages including lost profits, lost savings or any other incidental or consequential damages arising from the use or inability to use the information contained within. This site is not an official site of Prentice-Hall, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Vulcan Foundation Equipment or Vulcan Iron Works Inc. (Tennessee Corporation). All references to sources of equipment, parts, service or repairs do not constitute an endorsement.

Don't forget to visit our companion site http://www.vulcanhammer.org

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ CCB Application Notes: ³ ³ ³ ³ 1. Character(s) preceded & followed by these symbols (À Ù) or (Ú ¿) ³ ³ are super- or subscripted, respectively. ³ ³ EXAMPLES: 42mÀ3Ù = 42 cubic meters ³ ³ COÚ2¿ = carbon dioxide ³ ³ ³ ³ 2. All degree symbols have been replaced with the word deg. ³ ³ ³ ³ 3. All plus or minus symbols have been replaced with the symbol +/-. ³ ³ ³ ³ 4. All table note letters and numbers have been enclosed in square ³ ³ brackets in both the table and below the table. ³ ³ ³ ³ 5. Whenever possible, mathematical symbols have been replaced with ³ ³ their proper name and enclosed in square brackets. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Naval Facilities Engineering Command 200 Stovall Street Alexandria, Virginia 22332-2300

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE

ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Mooring Design Physical & Empirical Data

Vessel & Ship Characteristics, Mooring Lines & Chain Buoys, Anchors & Riser Type Mooring Systems

DESIGN MANUAL 26.6 APRIL 1986

ABSTRACT This manual presents mooring design physical and empirical data, such as vessel and ship characteristics, mooring lines and chains buoys, anchors, and riser type mooring systems.

FOREWORD This design manual is one of a series developed from an evaluation of facilities in the shore establishment, from surveys of the availability of new materials and construction methods, and from selection of the best design practices of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, other Government agencies, and the private sector. This manual uses, to the maximum extent feasible, national professional society, association and institute standards in accordance with NAVFACENGCOM policy. Deviations from these criteria should not be made without prior approval of NAVFACENGCOM Headquarters (Code 04). Design cannot remain static any more than can the naval functions it serves or the technologies it uses. Accordingly, recommendations for improvement are encouraged from within the Navy and from the private sector and should be furnished to Commanding Officer, Chesapeake Division (Code 406), Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374. As the design manuals are revised, they are being restructured. A chapter, or a combination of chapters, will be issued as a separate design manual for ready reference to specific criteria. This publication is certified as an official publication of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and has been reviewed and approved in accordance with the SECNAVINST 5600.16.

J. P. Jones, Jr. Rear Admiral, CEC, U. S. Navy Commander Naval Facilities Engineering Command

HARBOR AND COASTAL FACILITY DESIGN MANUALS Superseded DM No. 26.1 26.2 26.3 26.4 26.5 26.6 Chapters in DM-26 1 2 3 & 4 5 6 7 Harbors Coastal Protection Coastal Sedimentation and Dredging Fixed Moorings Fleet Moorings Mooring Design Physical and Empirical Data Title

TABLE OF CONTENTS MOORING DESIGN PHYSICAL & EMPIRICAL DATA Page Section 1. INTRODUCTION 1. 2. 3. Section 2. Scope Cancellations Related Criteria 26.6-1 26.6-1 26.6-1 26.6-1 26.6-2 26.6-2 26.6-6 26.6-6 26.6-58 26.6-62 26.6-65 26.6-65 26.6-65 26.6-79 26.6-126 26.6-153 26.6-161 26.6-163 26.6-163 26.6-163 26.6-166 26.6-179 26.6-186 26.6-186 26.6-186 26.6-186 26.6-187 26.6-223

WIND AND CURRENT DATA 1. Wind and Current Data

Section 3.

VESSEL CHARACTERISTICS 1. 2. 3. Vessel Characteristics Floating Drydock Characteristics Tankers and Barge Tanker Service Craft Characteristics

Section 4.

COMMERCIAL MOORING SYSTEM COMPONENTS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Availability of Components Mooring Rope Chain and Fittings Anchors Buoys Sinkers

Section 5.

STANDARD RISER-TYPE MOORING SYSTEMS 1. 2. 3. 4. Mooring System Selection Anchor Selection Classes of Moorings Without Sinkers Classes of Moorings With Sinkers

Section 6.

STANDARD MOORING SYSTEM COMPONENTS 1. 2. 3. 4. General Notes Markings Tolerances Substitutions

Section 7.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION BUOYS 1. 2. 3.

Buoy Components 26.6-223 U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Data 26.6-223 Moorings for Standard Aids-to-Navigation Buoys 26.6-223 26.6-242 26.6-243

REFERENCES BIBLIOGRAPHY

LIST OF TABLES Table 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Title Wind and Current Data Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft Appendix: Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels Anchor Chain Characteristics of Floating Drydocks Manifold Locations - Tanker Vessels and Barge Tanker Service Craft Weight and Breaking Strength of Natural and Synthetic Fiber Ropes Weight and Breaking Strength of Composite Synthetic Fiber Ropes Weight and Breaking Strength of Kevlar 29 Synthetic Fiber Cables Comparison of Physical Characteristics - Natural and Synthetic Fiber Ropes Weight and Breaking Strength of Wire Rope for Marine Service A.B.S. Tolerances, Markings, and General Notes Chain, A.B.S. Stud Link Chain, Oil Rig Quality and Extra Strength Stud Link Chain, Standard Di-Lok Chain, U.S. Navy Di-Lok Chain, Super Strength Di-Lok Chain, U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Type Fitting Details, Enlarged Links Fitting Details, End Links Fitting Details, End Links - U.S. Navy Type Fitting Details, End Links and Rings Fitting Details, End Links and Rings Fitting Details, Detachable Chain Connecting Links Fitting Details, Detachable Chain Connecting Links "Kenter" Type Fitting Details, Detachable Chain Connecting Links Fitting Details, Detachable Chain and Anchor Connecting Links Fitting Details, Detachable Anchor Connecting Links Fitting Details, Round and Screw Pin Chain Shackles Fitting Details, Chain Shackles - "D" Type Fitting Details, End Shackles Fitting Details, Round Pin Anchor and End Shackles Fitting Details, Round and Screw Pin Anchor Shackles Fitting Details, Round Pin Anchor Shackles Fitting Details, Extra Heavy Duty Round Pin Anchor Shackles Fitting Details, Anchor Shackles - "D" Type Fitting Details, Swivels Fitting Details, Swivels Fitting Details, Swivel Shackles Fitting Details, Swivel Shackles Page 26.6-3 26.6-8 26.6-56 26.6-59 26.6-63 26.6-66 26.6-69 26.6-72 26.6-73 26.6-77 26.6-80 26.6-83 26.6-85 26.6-86 26.6-87 26.6-88 26.6-89 26.6-90 26.6-91 26.6-92 26.6-93 26.6-94 26.6-95 26.6-97 26.6-99 26.6-100 26.6-101 26.6-102 26.6-103 26.6-105 26.6-107 26.6-108 26.6-109 26.6-110 26.6-111 26.6-113 26.6-115 26.6-116 26.6-117

LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Table 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. Title Fitting Details, Regular and Jaw One End Swivels Fitting Details, Chain Stoppers - Devil's Claw Type Fitting Details, Chain Stoppers - Pelican Hook Type Fitting Details, Chain Stoppers - Ulster Type Fitting Details, Quick Release Hook Baldt Stockless Anchors U.S. Navy Standard Stockless Anchors U.S. Navy Lightweight Type Anchors (Lwt) U.S. Navy STATO Mooring Anchors Danforth Anchors High Holding Power Stock Anchors - Type 1 (Off drill II Type) High Holding Power Stock Anchors - Type 2 (G.S. Type) Moorfast Anchors Boss Mooring Anchors Snug Stowing Anchors A C-14 Anchors Deepsy Type Anchors Flipper Delta Anchors Delta Triple Anchors Stevin Anchors Stevfix Anchors Stevfix Anchors with Mud Adaptor Stevmud Anchors Stevdig Anchors Hook Anchors Hook Anchors with Auxiliary Shank Fluke Mark-2 Anchors TS Anchors Cable or Chain Depressors Chaseable Cable or Chain Depressor Chaser for Anchor Retrieval Spherical Marker or Mooring Buoy Spherical Marker or Mooring Buoys Spherical Marker or Mooring Buoys Tension Bar Mooring Buoys Tension Bar Mooring Buoys Hawsepipe and Tension Bar Mooring Buoys Hawsepipe and Tension Bar Mooring Buoys Concrete Sinkers Holding Power to Weight Ratios of Various Anchors Moorings Without Sinkers, Bills of Materials Moorings Without Sinkers, Chain Set Assembly for Basic Depth Moorings Without Sinkers, Lengths of Ground Chain Required for Various Water Depths Moorings Without Sinkers, Chain Set Assemblies for Various Water Depths Moorings Without Sinkers, Bills of Materials Page 26.6-121 26.6-122 26.6-123 26.6-124 26.6-125 26.6-127 26.6-128 26.6-129 26.6-130 26.6-131 26.6-132 26.6-133 26.6-134 26.6-135 26.6-136 26.6-137 26.6-138 26.6-139 26.6-140 26.6-141 26.6-142 26.6-143 26.6-144 26.6-145 26.6-146 26.6-147 26.6-148 26.6-149 26.6-150 26.6-151 26.6-152 26.6-154 26.6-155 26.6-156 26.6-157 26.6-158 26.6-159 26.6-160 26.6-162 26.6-165 26.6-169a 26.6-170 26.6-171 26.6-172 26.6-174

LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Table 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111 112. 113. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. Title Moorings Without Sinkers, Chain Set Assembly for Basic Depth Moorings Without Sinkers, Maximum Mooring Depths with Various Buoys Moorings Without Sinkers, Lengths of Ground Chain Required for Various Water Depths Moorings Without Sinkers, Chain Set Assemblies for Various Water Depths Moorings With Sinkers, Bills of Materials Moorings With Sinkers, Chain Set Assembly for Basic Depth Moorings With Sinkers, Maximum Mooring Depths with Various Buoys Moorings With Sinkers, Lengths of Ground Chain Required for Various Water Depths Moorings With Sinkers, Chain Set Assemblies for Various Water Depths Chain and Fitting Details, Permissible Tolerances Chain, Common A-Link Chain, Common A-Link and Riser Fitting Details, Joining Links Fitting Details, Joining Links Fitting Details, Joining Links Fitting Details, Joining Links Fitting Details, Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links (SET) Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links (SET) Fitting Details, Anchor Joining Links (SET) Fitting Details, End Links Fitting Details, Type F Bending Shackles Fitting Details, Sinker Shackles Fitting Details, Ground Rings Fitting Details, Swivels Fitting Details, Rubbing Castings Standard Stockless Anchors Standard Stockless Anchors with Stabilizers NAVSHIP Lightweight Anchors NAVFAC STATO Anchors Concrete Sinkers 1962-Type Lighted and Unlighted Buoys 1962-Type Unlighted Steel and Plastic Buoys Bills of Materials Information for Other Than Basic Depth Chain for Buoy Bridles Page 26.6-175 26.6-176 26.6-177 26.6-178 26.6-181 26.6-182 26.6-183 26.6-184 26.6-185 26.6-188 26.6-189 26.6-190 26.6-191 26.6-192 26.6-193 26.6-194 26.6-195 26.6-196 26.6-197 26.6-198 26.6-199 26.6-200 26.6-201 26.6-202 26.6-203 26.6-204 26.6-205 26.6-206 26.6-207 26.6-208 26.6-209 26.6-210 26.6-211 26.6-212 26.6-213 26.6-214 26.6-225 26.6-231 26.6-238 26.6-239 26.6-241

LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Title Free-Swinging, Riser-Type Mooring Classes AAA and BBB (Proposed) Free-Swinging, Riser-Type Mooring Classes AA, BB, and CC Free-Swinging, Riser-Type Mooring Class DD Free-Swinging, Riser-Type Mooring Classes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G Free-Swinging, Riser-Type Mooring A, B, C, D, and E Fitting Details, 4-lnch D-Shackle Fitting Details, Spiders Fitting Details, Release Hook for Standard Marker or Mooring Buoy Tension Bar Mooring Buoy Hawsepipe Mooring Buoy Tension Bar Mooring Buoy Buoy Mooring System Components Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Moorings for Navigation Buoys Without Sinkers Without Sinkers Without Sinkers Without Sinkers With Sinkers - Classes Page 26.6-167 26.6-168 26.6-169 26.6-173 26.6-180 26.6-215 26.6-216 26.6-217 26.6-218 26.6-219 26.6-220 26.6-221 26.6-224 26.6-997 26.6-998 26.6-229 26.6-230 26.6-232 26.6-233 26.6-234 26.6-235 26.6-236 26.6-237

Mooring Buoy

MOORING DESIGN PHYSICAL & EMPIRICAL DATA SECTION 1. INTRODUCTION 1. Scope. This manual presents naval vessel and ship characteristics, dimensions and ship characteristics, dimensions and strengths of mooring hardware components, and riser-type mooring systems for quick reference. 2. Cancellations. This publication of physical and empirical data for mooring design, NAVFAC DM-26.6, cancels and supersedes Chapter 7 of NAVFAC DM-26, Harbor and Coastal Facilities of July 1968, Changes of December 1968. 3. Related Criteria. For criteria related to mooring design but appearing elsewhere in the Design Manual series, see the following sources: Subject Harbor layouts & mooring buoy locations Fixed moorings Fleet moorings Allowable stresses in steel Timber for rubbing surfaces Rubber fender units Aids to navigation Ship motions (terms) Anchor behavior Source DM-26.1 DM-26.4 DM-26.5 DM-2.3 DM-2.5 & 25.6 DM-25.1 DM-26.1 DM-25.1 DM-26.5

SECTION 2. WIND AND CURRENT DATA 1. Wind and Current Data. Table 1 presents the magnitudes of maximum wind and current speeds at Naval installations around the world. The data are presented only as a guide; up-to-date information, as well as prevailing directions, should be obtained directly from the installation under consideration. a. The tabulated wind speeds were recorded at an elevation of 33 feet above the water surface. See footnote (1) of the table. b. The tabulated current speeds were recorded at the water surface. See footnote (2) of the table.

26.6-2

SECTION 3. VESSEL CHARACTERISTICS 1. Vessel Characteristics. Table 2 is a comprehensive listing of principal data for vessels in the Naval fleet at the time of publication. For each vessel or class of vessels, the data are presented in groups of four consecutive pages. Characteristics of floating drydocks are presented separately as Table 3. a. For purposes of calculating wind and current forces on moored vessels, the table contains data pertaining to vessel length, draft (four stages), displacement, beam, and broadside and frontal wind presentment areas. b. The following is a list of footnotes which apply to Table 2: (1) Vessel characteristics were obtained from the following sources: inquiries to the vessel's assigned base; the Booklet of General Plans for each class of vessel; the Naval Vessel Register/Ships Data Book, Volumres I and II, April 1980 Edition; the previous edition of NAVFAC DM-26, Chapter 7, Table 7-4; Technical Report 7096-1, 1971; and Jane's Fighting Ships, 1978-1979 Edition. When data sources conflicted, the order of preference for data veracity and inclusion in the table was the order in which the data sources are listed above. (2) Data from inquiry to vessel's assigned base. (3) Vessels in class were established from the hull prototype number. Two or more hull prototype numbers possessing the same or nearly the same dimensions and other characteristics were combined in the same class. (4) Ordinarily, extreme breadth is the maximum width of a vessel. It is included only to allow the calculation of berthing dimension requirements. The waterline breadth must be used to calculate mooring loads. For submarines, the value given is the maximum diameter or width of the hull structure. This value is not necessarily the maximum width which may occur at the horizontal stabilizer planes and is so noted under the column entitled comments. Canted aircraft carrier flight decks may not be dimensionally symmetrical about the longitudinal centerline of the vessel, making the extreme breadth value for aircraft carriers unsuitable for determining berthing camel width at piers and wharves with gantry crane service. (5) Maximum navigational draft is the minimum depth of water required to prevent grounding of a vessel due to appendages projecting below the vessel's base line or keel. Such appendages may be sonar domes, propellers rudders, hydrofoils, vertical submarine control planes, etc. Many vessels also possess a decided trim to the bow or stern in fully loaded condition or, in the case of submarines, a trim to the stern in surfaced condition. The fully loaded, 1/3 stores/cargo/ballast, and light draft values are the average midship values of drafts measured at the forward and aft perpendiculars for each loading condition. (6) One long ton equals 2240 pounds. (7) Displacements of vessels within the same class may vary considerably. The fully loaded displacement values are the maximum displacements for all vessels within the class, whereas the light draft displacements are the minimum values for all vessels within the class.

(8) Unless otherwise noted in the comment column, broadside and frontal wind areas were calculated from the vessel's port or starboard profile and the maximum vessel cross sections indicated in the booklet of general plans for each class of vessel. The profiles and sections were measured by planimeter and the areas calculated utilizing the fully loaded and light draft waterline values to establish the maximum change in wind presentment areas. A factor of 10 percent of the fully loaded broadside and frontal square foot wind areas was added to these values to compensate for handrails, minor masts and appurtenances, airplanes, etc., that could not be traced for planimetering purposes. (9) The primary effect of vessel characteristics is on the magnitudes of the forces as they relate to the presentment areas for wind and current. The following paragraphs highlight some of these vessel characteristic influences. One of the principal characteristics affecting wind forces on vessels is the shape and type of superstructure. In this manual, single-hulled vessels are classed according to two categories -- "normal vessel" and "hull-dominated vessel". These two categories were determined from analyses of wind force coefficients which showed that the ratio between hull area and superstructure area has a great effect on the longitudinal wind force. The separation effects of the superstructure are very significant in determining the longitudinal wind force for certain ships. However, on vessels with little or no superstructure, the drag forces on the hull dominate. "Special vessels" are those which cannot be characterized as belonging to either of the other two categories.

Table 2. Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AD 14,15,17-19 Destroyer Tender ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ AD 24,26,36 Same as Above ³ ³ AD 37,38 Same as Above ³ ³ AD 41-44 Same as Above ³ ³ AE 21-25 Ammunition Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ AE 26-29,32-35 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ AF 58 Store Ship ³ ³ AFS 1-7 Combat Store Ship ³ ³ AG 153,154 Miscellaneous ³ ³ AG 164 Same as Above ³ ³ AGDS 2 Auxiliary Deep Submer³ ³ gence Support Ship ³ ³ AGER 2 Environmental Research ³ ³ AGF 3 Miscell. Command Ship ³ ³ AGM 8 Missile Range Instru³ ³ mentation ship ³ ³ AGM 9,10 Same as Above ³ ³ AGM 19,20 Same as Above ³ ³ AGM 22 Same as Above ³ ³ AGM 23 Same as Above ³ ³ AGOR 7,12,13 Oceanographic Research ³ ³ AGOR 11 Same as Above ³ ³ AGOR 16 Same as Above ³ ³ AGOS 1-3 Ocean Surveillance Ship ³ ³ AGS 21,22 Surveying Ship ³ ³ AGS 26,27,33,34,38 Same as Above ³ ³ AGS 29,32 Same as Above ³ ³ AGSS 555 Auxiliary Submarine ³ ³ ³ ³ AGSS 569 Same as Above ³ ³ AH 17 Hospital Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ AK 237,240,242,254,274 Cargo Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ AK 255,267 Same as Above ³ ³ AK 271 Same as Above ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-8

Table 2. Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 531.0 520.0 73.0 73.0 See Comments 26.0 18.4 14.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 492.0 465.0 70.0 70.0 See Comments 27.0 19.4 15.6 ³ ³ 645.0 620.0 85.0 85.0 30.0 27.0 22.7 20.5 ³ ³ 643.0 620.0 85.0 85.0 See Comments 22.1 19.7 16.0 ³ ³ 511.0 492.0 72.0 72.0 See Comments 29.0 22.1 18.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ 564.0 540.0 81.0 81.0 See Comments 28.0 20.1 16.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 502.0 486.0 72.0 72.0 27.3 (2) 26.5 (2) 19.5 16.0 ³ ³ 581.0 554.0 79.0 79.0 28.0 28.0 20.2 16.2 ³ ³ 564.0 537.0 76.0 76.0 28.0 27.0 23.9 22.3 ³ ³ 455.0 437.0 66.0 66.0 24.3 (2) 21.8 (2) 17.3 15.1 ³ ³ 466.0 448.0 74.0 72.0 24.1 22.6 (2) 21.1 20.3 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ 177.0 171.0 32.0 32.0 10.0 10.0 8.0 7.0 ³ ³ 522.0 500.0 100.0 84.0 23.0 23.0 19.1 17.2 ³ ³ 455.0 445.0 62.0 62.0 -28.5 (2) 20.6 16.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ 520.0 502.0 72.0 72.0 -26.3 (2) 23.4 22.0 ³ ³ 595.0 575.0 75.0 75.0 30.5 (2) 27.1 (2) 19.5 15.7 ³ ³ 455.0 445.0 62.0 62.0 27.0 23.5 (2) 19.6 17.7 ³ ³ 564.0 528.0 76.0 76.0 28.0 27.0 --³ ³ 209.0 196.0 40.0 39.0 20.0 (2) 16.3 (2) 14.4 13.5 ³ ³ 266.0 247.0 52.0 51.0 20.8 (2) 18.0 (2) 16.6 15.9 ³ ³ 246.0 218.0 75.0 75.0 22.9 (2) 20.1 (2) 19.4 17.6 ³ ³ --------³ ³ 455.0 445.0 62.0 62.0 28.2 (2) 25.0 (2) 18.7 15.6 ³ ³ 285.0 267.0 48.0 48.0 18.8 (2) 16.0 (2) 14.3 13.5 ³ ³ 394.0 362.0 54.0 54.0 16.0 15.0 13.3 12.4 ³ ³ 165.0 159.0 18.0 16.0 17.9 (2) 15.6 (2) 14.8 14.4 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ 205.0 187.0 27.0 25.0 22.0 19.0 16.6 15.4 ³ ³ 519.0 496.0 72.0 72.0 26.0 26.0 22.3 20.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ 455.0 445.0 62.0 62.0 29.0 28.5 (2) 15.9 9.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ 520.0 506.0 72.0 72.0 33.0 32.8 (2) 20.5 14.4 ³ ³ 266.0 235.0 52.0 51.0 -19.0 12.9 9.8 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-9

Table 2. Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³AD 14,15,17-19 67.0 18,400 12,290 9,240 ³ ³ ³ ³AD 24,26,36 58.0 16,740 11,450 8,800 ³ ³AD 37,38 89.0 20,500 15,900 13,600 ³ ³AD 41-44 95.0 19,740 16,870 13,220 ³ ³AE 21-25 61.0 17,450 12,420 9,910 ³ ³ ³ ³AE 26-29,32-35 71.5 19,670 12,860 9,450 ³ ³ ³ ³AF 58 56.0 (2) 15,500 (2) 10,800 8,450 (2)³ ³AFS 1-7 67.0 (2) 18,660 12,330 9,170 (2)³ ³AG 153, 154 67.0 17,960 15,450 14,200 ³ ³AG 164 47.0 (2) 11,150 (2) 8,620 7,350 (2)³ ³AGDS 2 61.0 (2) 12,420 11,400 10,890 (2)³ ³ ³ ³AGER 2 9.3 945 720 610 ³ ³AGF 3 85.0 13,900 9,970 8,000 ³ ³AGM 8 49.0 (2) 15,200 (2) 10,590 8,280 (2)³ ³ ³ ³AGM 9, 10 60.0 (2) 17,120 (2) 15,040 14,000 (2)³ ³AGM 19, 20 80.0 (2) 24,710 (2) 17,420 13,770 (2)³ ³AGM 22 48.0 12,170 9,660 8,850 (2)³ ³AGM 23 63.0 -16,080 12,980 ³ ³AGOR 7, 12, 13 12.0 (2) 1,640 (2) 1,370 1,230 (2)³ ³AGOR 11 40.0 (2) 3,510 (2) 2,840 2,510 (2)³ ³AGOR 16 18.0 (2) 3,420 3,050 2,870 ³ ³AGOS 1-3 ----³ ³AGS 21, 22 48.0 (2) 13,050 (2) 9,420 7,610 (2)³ ³AGS 26, 27, 33, 34, 38 21.0 (2) 2,830 2,410 2,200 (2)³ ³AGS 29,32 33.0 3,670 2,980 2,640 ³ ³AGSS 555 3.9 860 820 800 ³ ³ ³ ³AGSS 569 7.0 1,540 1,340 1,240 ³ ³AH 17 60.0 15,400 12,730 11,400 ³ ³ ³ ³AK 237, 240, 242, 254, 274 47.0 (2) 15,200 8,080 4,520 ³ ³ ³ ³AK 255, 267 61.0 (2) 22,050 (2) 13,070 8,580 (2)³ ³AK 271 17.0 3,890 2,640 2,020 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-10

Table 2. Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³26,770 30,730 32,700 4,140 4,690 4,970 AD-14,19,26.0'; AD-15,28.0'; ³ AD-17,18,29.0'; N.V. ³23,890 27,430 29,190 3,810 4,340 4,610 AD-24,29.0';AD-26,36,28.0';N.V. ³48,050 50,870 52,280 7,590 7,960 8,140 N.V. ³44,080 45,640 47,870 6,600 6,920 7,080 AD-41,24.0';AD-42,23.0';N.V. ³18,950 22,300 24,000 4,150 4,600 4,870 AE-21,23,25,29.0';AE-22, 34.0'; ³ AE-24, 32.0';N.V. ³30,750 34,950 37,000 6,900 7,500 7,850 AE-35, 28.0';AE-28,29, 30.0'; ³ AE-32,33, 30.0';AE-26,27,34, ³ 31.0';N.V. ³20,400 23,700 25,350 3,750 4,250 4,500 Former MA-36;N.V. ³28,350 32,450 34,500 5,750 6,400 6,700 N.V. ³21,400 23,050 23,900 4,750 5,000 5,100 Former YAG-56 & 57; N.V. ³18,800 23,670 26,100 5,200 5,450 5,650 Former AK-239; N.V. ³19,650 20,300 20,650 4,800 4,900 4,950 Former AKD-1; N.V. ³ ³ 2,800 3,150 3,350 830 890 920 Former AKL-44;N.V. ³29,970 31,900 32,870 6,830 7,160 7,320 Former LPD-3;N.V. ³16,150 19,600 21,300 4,150 4,650 4,850 Former MCV-686;N.V. ³ ³34,500 34,850 35,000 5,000 5,250 5,350 Former AP-139 & 145;N.V. ³29,250 33,650 35,800 5,200 5,750 6,050 Former MC-1274 & 1280;N.V. ³21,200 22,850 23,700 3,800 4,050 4,150 Former APA-205;N.V. ³ ------Former AG-154; N.V. ³ 4,750 5,100 5,300 1,020 1,090 1,130 N.V. ³ 7,900 8,200 8,350 2,200 2,250 2,300 Former AK-272;N.V. ³ 9,450 9,800 10,000 4,220 4,300 4,350 Catamaran; S.V. ³ ------Under construction ³13,900 16,650 18,000 4,150 4,550 4,800 Former MCV-694 & 682;N.V. ³ 9,900 10,350 10,550 2,600 2,680 2,720 N.V. ³17,100 17,700 18,000 3,500 3,600 3,650 N.V. ³ 1,010 1,130 1,190 60 66 70 25.5' Breadth at Stern ³ Planes; H.D. ³ 1,710 2,160 2,380 220 290 320 H.D. ³25,540 27,390 28,320 4,500 4,770 4,900 Wind Areas Developed from ³ previous edition of DM-26; ³ Former MC-748; N.V. ³12,400 17,800 20,750 2,950 3,750 4,150 AK-237,240,242,254 Former ³ MCV-18,162,743 & 547;AK-274 ³ Former AS-170;N.V. ³16,700 22,800 25,840 5,050 5,900 6,350 Former MC-735 & 753;N.V. ³ 7,180 8,660 9,340 2,170 2,490 2,650 Former MA-47;N.V. ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Table 2 (a). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AK 277 Cargo Ship ³ ³ AK 280-283 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ AKR 7 Vehicle Cargo Ship ³ ³ AKR 9 Same as Above ³ ³ AO 57,62 Oiler ³ ³ AO 51,98,99 Oiler ³ ³ AO 105-109 Oiler ³ ³ ³ ³ AO 143-148 Oiler ³ ³ ³ ³ AO 177-180,186 Oiler ³ ³ AOE 1-4 Fast Combat Support Ship ³ ³ AOG 58 Gasoline Tanker ³ ³ ³ ³ AOG 77-79 Same as Above ³ ³ AOG 81,82 Same as Above ³ ³ AOR 1-7 Replenishment Oiler ³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 50,67,73,75,76,78,134 Transport Oiler ³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 149,151,152 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 165 Same as Above ³ ³ AOT 168-176 Same as Above ³ ³ AOT 181 Same as Above ³ ³ AOT 182-185 Transport Oiler ³ ³ AP 110,117,119 Transport ³ ³ AP 122,123,125-127 Same as Above ³ ³ AP 197,198 Same as Above ³ ³ APL 2,4,5,15,18,19,29,31,32,34,42,43,50, Barracks Craft NSP ³ ³ 54,57,58 ³ ³ AR 5-8 Repair Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ ARC 2,6 Cable Repairing Ship ³ ³ ARC 3 Same as Above ³ ³ Same as Above ³ ³ ARL 24 Landing Craft Repair Ship³ ³ ARS 6,8,21,34,38-43 Salvage Ship ³ ³ AS 50-53 Salvage Ship ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-12

Table 2 (a). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 478.0 456.0 66.0 66.0 30.0 30.0 (2) 17.8 11.7 ³ ³ 459.0 450.0 63.0 63.0 28.5 28.5 18.8 14.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 499.0 484.0 78.0 78.0 27.1 27.1 (2) 18.3 13.9 ³ ³ 540.0 520.0 83.0 83.0 29.1 29.1 (2) 19.5 14.7 ³ ³ 553.0 544.0 75.0 75.0 34.0 32.0 18.5 11.8 ³ ³ 644.0 616.0 75.0 75.0 39.0 38.0 23.6 16.4 ³ ³ 644-664 636.0 75.0 75.0 35.8 35.8 (2) 18.9 10.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ 655.0 642.0 86.0 86.0 36.7 (2) 33.6 (2) 19.5 12.5 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ 592.0 568.0 88.0 88.0 -32.4 19.0 12.3 ³ ³ 796.0 770.0 107.0 107.0 41.0 41.0 25.9 18.4 ³ ³ 311.0 292.0 49.0 49.0 16.0 16.0 10.6 7.9 ³ ³ ³ ³ 325 0 315.0 48.0 48.0 19.0 19.0 11.4 7.6 ³ ³ 302.0 295.0 61.0 61.0 22.2 (2) 22.2 (2) 13.4 9.0 ³ ³ 659.0 640.0 96.0 96.0 36.5 (2) 36.5 (2) 22.8 16.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 524.0 510.0 68.0 68.0 30.0 30.0 16.2 9.3 ³ ³ ³ ³ 620.0 600.0 84.0 84.0 33.6 33.6 (2) 17.0 8.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ 615.0 605.0 80.0 80.0 36.0 36.0 (2) 19.3 11.0 ³ ³ 587.0 572 0 84.0 84.0 34.5 34.5 (2) 16.2 7.1 ³ ³ 620.0 600 0 84.0 84.0 33.7 33.7 (2) 16.8 8.3 ³ ³ 672.0 650.0 89.0 89.0 36.2 36.2 (2) 17.2 7.7 ³ ³ 623.0 590.0 76.0 76.0 26.0 26.0 20.1 17.2 ³ ³ 609.0 590.0 76.0 76.0 29.1 (2) 29.1 (2) 20.2 15.8 ³ ³ 534.0 512.0 73.0 73.0 27.0 27.0 21.1 18.2 ³ ³ 261.0 260.0 49.0 49.0 11.0 10.0 7.6 5.9 ³ ³ ³ ³ 530.0 520.0 73.0 73.0 26.0 24.0 17.4 14.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 374.0 340.0 47.0 47.0 29.4 (2) 25.1 (2) 18.4 15.0 ³ ³ 439.0 402.0 58.0 58.0 18.6 (2) 16.0 (2) 12.3 10.5 ³ ³ --------³ ³ 328.0 316.0 50.0 50.0 14.0 14.0 10.5 8.7 ³ ³ 214.0 207.0 43.0 43.0 15.1 (2) 14.3 12.4 11.5 (2)³ ³ 255.0 240.0 51.0 50.4 17.8 26.0 19.9 16.8 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-13

Table 2 (a). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AK 277 50.0 (2) 16,730 9,400 5,740 (2)³ ³ AK 280-283 48.0 (2) 15,200 (2) 9,610 6,820 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ AKR 7 64.0 (2) 18,290 (2) 11,550 8,180 (2)³ ³ AKR 9 72.0 (2) 21,580 (2) 13,290 9,150 (2)³ ³ AO 57,62 74.0 25,450 13,460 7,470 ³ ³ AO 51,98,99 92.0 34,750 18,820 10,850 ³ ³ AO 105-109 86.0 (2) 35,650 (2) 18,180 9,450 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ AO 143-148 96.4 36,660 (2) 20,050 11,750 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ AO 177-180,186 84.0 27,500 13,990 7,240 ³ ³ AOE 1-4 128.0 (2) 53,600 30,450 18,870 (2)³ ³ AOG 58 27.0 4,440 2,680 1,800 ³ ³ ³ ³ AOG 77-79 29.0 6,050 3,420 2,100 ³ ³ AOG 81,82 29.0 (2) 6,970 (2) 3,900 2,370 (2)³ ³ AOR 1-7 102.5 (2) 37,700 20,900 12,500 ³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 50,67,73,75,76,78,134 67.0 21,880 10,790 5,250 ³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 149,151,152 90.0 (2) 34,760 (2) 16,840 7,880 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ AOT 165 81.0 (2) 32,700 (2) 16,500 8,400 (2)³ ³ AOT 168-176 85.0 (2) 34,500 (2) 15,900 6,600 (2)³ ³ AOT 181 90.0 (2) 34,800 (2) 16,490 7,330 (2)³ ³ AOT 182-185 109.0 (2) 45,880 (2) 21,030 8,600 (2)³ ³ AP 110,117,119 77.0 (2) 20,750 (2) 15,320 12,600 ³ ³ AP 122,123,125-127 74.0 (2) 22,570 14,720 10,800 ³ ³ AP 197,198 61.0 17,630 13,360 11,220 ³ ³ APL 2,4,5,15,18,19,29,31, 26.0 2,580 1,730 1,300 ³ ³ 32,34,42,43,50,54,57,58 ³ ³ AR 5-8 66.0 17,200 11,950 9,320 ³ ³ ³ ³ ARC 2,6 29.0 (2) 7,810 (2) 5,470 4,300 (2)³ ³ ARC 3 42.0 (2) 7,040 (2) 5,200 4,280 (2)³ ³ ARC 7 ----³ ³ ARL 24 33.0 4,330 2,920 2,220 ³ ³ ARS 6,8,21,34,38-43 14.3 (2) 1,970 (2) 1,640 1,470 (2)³ ³ AS 50-53 22.9 3,100 2,800 2,500 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-14

Table 2 (a). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³16,600 22,200 24,950 3,950 4,750 5,150 Former MC-2918;N.V. ³12,100 16,300 18,400 2,750 3,350 3,650 Former MCV-174,526,106,& ³ AKA-92;N.V. ³23,200 27,300 29,350 5,000 5,700 6,050 Former LSV-7;N.V. ³25,050 30,000 32,500 5,400 6,200 6,600 Former LSV-9;N.V. ³17,050 24,150 27,700 3,900 4,900 5,400 Former MC-723 & 728;N.V. ³22,000 30,900 35,300 4,900 5,930 6,480 Former MC-2521 & 717;N.V. ³17,650 28,350 33,700 3,850 5,150 6,750 Former MC-2701-2704 & AOR-109; ³ N.V. ³21,850 30,850 35,350 5,050 6,300 6,900 Nav. Draft 40.0' for AO-146 ³ & 148;N.V. ³27,100 34,630 37,990 5,670 6,870 7,530 N.V. ³36,650 48,180 54,600 6,400 8,000 8,850 N.V. ³ 7,350 8,900 9,700 1,800 2,070 2,200 Assigned to U.S. Air Force; ³ Wind areas developed from ³ previous edition of DM-26;N.V. ³ 6,900 9,250 10,450 2,000 2,350 2,550 Former MC-2640,2639 & 2647;N.V. ³ 7,800 10,300 11,550 2,400 2,950 3,200 Former MA-44 & 45;N.V. ³29,050 37,550 41,750 7,250 8,600 9,250 Nav. Draft AOR-6 only 39.0'; ³ N.V. ³14,350 21,100 24,450 3,850 4,750 5,250 All Former AO of same number; ³ Nav. Draft AOT-50 only 33.0'; ³ N.V. ³17,350 27,300 32,300 4,400 5,800 6,500 Former MA-38,40,41 & AO-149, ³ 151,152;N.V. ³15,700 25,650 30,620 4,300 5,600 6,300 Former MA-53 & AO-165;N.V. ³14,050 24,700 30,050 5,300 6,800 7,600 Former AO-168-176;N.V. ³15,650 25,850 30,950 5,650 7,050 7,770 Former AO-181;N.V. ³15,800 28,200 34,400 5,000 6,650 7,500 Former AO-182-185;N.V. ³35,050 38,500 40,200 5,850 6,300 6,500 Former MC-688,675,677;N.V. ³27,800 32,900 35,450 5,050 5,750 6,100 Former MC-680,681,683-685;N.V. ³26,450 29,400 30,900 5,500 5,950 6,150 Former MC-2915 & 2916;N.V. ³10,550 11,450 11,900 2,200 2,350 2,450 APL-15,18,19 only Former YF³ 609,629,630;H.D. ³27,080 30,420 32,090 5,050 5,530 5,770 AR-8 Former ARH-1;Nav. Draft ³ for AR-7 only 28.0';N.V. ³11,300 14,750 16,450 2,150 2,600 2,800 Former MC-2557 & 2558;N.V. ³16,300 17,800 18,550 3,600 3,800 3,900 Former AKA-47;N.V. ³ Under Construction ³10,550 11,650 12,200 1,600 1,750 1,850 Former LST-963;N.V. ³ 5,450 5,800 6,000 1,650 1,700 1,750 ARS-34 Former BARS-4;N.V. ³ 6,480 6,820 7,100 2,335 2,404 6,200 N.V. ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Table 2 (b). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AS 11,12,15-18 Submarine Tender ³ ³ AS 19 Submarine Tender ³ ³ AS 31,32 Same as Above ³ ³ AS 33,34 Same as Above ³ ³ AS 36,37 Same as Above ³ ³ AS 39-41 Submarine Tender ³ ³ ASR 9,13-15 Submarine Rescue Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ ASR 21,22 Same as Above ³ ³ ATA 181,193,213 Auxiliary Ocean Tug ³ ³ ³ ³ ATF 76,85,91,105,110,113,149,158-160 & 162 Fleet Ocean Tug ³ ³ ³ ³ ATF 166-172 Same as Above ³ ³ ATS 1-3 Salvage & Rescue Tug ³ ³ AVM 1 Guided Missile Ship ³ ³ AVT 16 Auxiliary Aircraft ³ ³ Transport ³ ³ BB 61-64 Battleship ³ ³ CA 134,139 Heavy Cruiser ³ ³ CG 10,11 Guided Missile Cruiser ³ ³ CG 16-24 Guided Missile Cruiser ³ ³ ³ ³ CG 26-34 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ CG 47 48 Same as Above ³ ³ CGN 9 Guided Missile Cruiser ³ ³ Nuclear ³ ³ CGN 25 Same as Above ³ ³ CGN 35 Same as Above ³ ³ CGN 36,37 Same as Above ³ ³ CGN 38-41 Same as Above ³ ³ CV 34 Aircraft Carrier ³ ³ CV 41,43 Same as Above ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-16

Table 2 (b). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 531.0 520.0 73.0 73.0 26.0 26.0 19.9 16.8 ³ ³ 574.0 564.0 73.0 73.0 26.0 26.0 21.5 19.2 ³ ³ 599.0 581.0 83.0 83.0 27.0 26.0 20.7 18.1 ³ ³ 644.0 620.0 85.0 85.0 30.0 28.0 26.9 26.3 ³ ³ 644.0 620.0 85.0 85.0 30.0 29.0 23.5 20.8 ³ ³ 644.0 620.0 85.0 85.0 30.0 26.0 24.8 23.0 ³ ³ 252.0 247.0 44.0 42.0 See Comments 17.0 15.1 14.2 ³ ³ ³ ³ 251.0 237.0 93.0 86.0 24.9 23.9 (2) 21.9 20.8 (2)³ ³ 143.0 127.0 34.0 34.0 15.0 14.0 12.3 11.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ 205.0 201.0 39.0 39.0 18.0 16.0 13.7 12.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ 283.0 264.0 50.0 50.0 18.0 17.0 14.9 13.9 ³ ³ 540.0 520.0 72.0 71.0 27.3 (2) 27.3 (2) 24.1 22.5 ³ ³ 910.0 828.0 189.0 103.0 31.0 30.0 25.3 23.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 888.0 860.0 109.0 108.0 38.0 37.0 31.7 29.1 ³ ³ 717.0 700.0 77.0 75.0 26.0 26.0 22.8 21.2 ³ ³ 675.0 664.0 71.0 69.0 30.0 26.0 21.7 19.6 ³ ³ 533.0 510.0 55.0 54.0 26.0 19.0 14.9 12.8 ³ ³ ³ ³ 547.0 524.0 55.0 54.0 See Comments 20.5 (2) 17.2 15.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ 721.0 690.0 73.0 72.0 31.0 25.0 23.7 23.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 565.0 540.0 58.0 57.0 26.0 21.0 20.2 19.8 ³ ³ 564.0 540.0 58.0 57.0 30.5 20.4 19.6 19.2 ³ ³ 596.0 570.0 61.0 60.0 31.0 21.0 19.4 18.6 ³ ³ 586.0 560.0 63.0 61.0 32.6 21.8 20.2 19.5 ³ ³ 911.0 831.0 107.0 103.0 33.0 32.0 27.3 24.9 ³ ³1001.0 914.0 See Comments 121.0 36.0 35.0 29.9 27.4 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-17

Table 2 (b). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AS 11,12,15-18 65.0 17,150 12,360 9,960 ³ ³ AS 19 75.0 20,300 16,230 14,190 ³ ³ ³ ³ AS 31,32 81.0 19,820 14,670 12,100 ³ ³ AS 33,34 96.0 21,530 20,230 19,580 ³ ³ AS 36,37 98.0 23,490 17,060 13,840 ³ ³ AS 39-41 98.0 23,000 16,890 13,840 ³ ³ ASR 9,13-15 16.0 2,320 1,970 1,790 ³ ³ ³ ³ ASR 21,22 23.0 (2) 4,910 4,370 4,100 (2)³ ³ ATA 181,193,213 8.0 860 690 610 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ATF 76,85,91,105,110,113,149, 12.0 1,730 1,400 1,240 ³ ³ 158-160 & 162 ³ ³ ATF 166-172 ----³ ³ ATS 1-3 24.0 3,060 2,470 2,170 ³ ³ AVM 1 64.0 14,480 12,040 10,820 (2)³ ³ AVT 16 146.0 42,110 33,890 29,780 ³ ³ ³ ³ BB 61-64 149.0 (2) 58,000 48,590 43,880 ³ ³ CA 134,139 94.0 21,470 17,820 16,000 ³ ³ CG 10,11 82.0 19,500 15,300 13,200 ³ ³ CG 16-24 47.5 8,750 (2) 6,020 4,650 ³ ³ ³ ³ CG 26-34 48.5 (2) 8,250 6,310 5,340 ³ ³ ³ ³ CG 47,48 ----³ ³ CGN 9 86.0 17,530 16,200 15,540 ³ ³ ³ ³ CGN 25 54.0 8,590 8,060 7,800 ³ ³ CGN 35 56.0 9,130 8,590 8,320 ³ ³ CGN 36,37 60.0 10,450 9,290 8,710 ³ ³ CGN 38-41 64.0 10,420 9,220 8,620 ³ ³ CV 34 147.0 45,110 36,720 32,520 ³ ³ CV 41-43 188.0 65,240 53,830 48,130 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-18

Table 2 (b). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³27,250 30,450 32,050 5,500 5,950 6,200 N.V. ³30,050 32,550 33,850 5,000 5,300 5,500 N.V. ³36,900 39,900 41,400 5,550 6,000 6,200 N.V. ³36,750 41,150 41,500 6,600 6,700 6,750 N.V. ³43,150 46,850 48,500 6,550 7,000 7,200 N.V. ³43,210 45,480 46,620 6,810 7,120 7,270 N.V. ³ 6,050 6,500 6,750 1,050 1,100 1,150 Nav. Draft ASR-9 & 13, 20.0'; ³ ASR-14,17.01;&ASR-15,23.01;N.V. ³ 8,800 9,300 9,550 4,400 4,500 4,550 Catamarans; S.V. ³ 2,670 2,890 3,000 780 840 870 Former ATR-108,120,140. Wind ³ areas developed from previous ³ edition of DM-26;N.V. ³ 4,200 4,650 4,850 920 1,010 1,050 All former AT of same number; ³ N.V. ³ ------Under Construction ³ 8,150 9,250 9,800 2,100 2,200 2,250 N.V. ³26,350 28,050 28,850 5,850 6,050 6,150 Former AV-11; N.V. ³61,150 64,800 66,700 9,200 9,700 9,950 Former CVT-16 & CVS-16; H.D. ³ ³36,750 41,250 43,550 6,850 7,450 7,750 N.V. ³28,850 31,100 32,250 3,650 3,900 4,000 N.V. ³38,800 41,650 43,050 6,500 6,800 6,950 Former CA-123,136 N.V. ³20,050 22,500 23,700 3,400 3,650 3,800 Former DLG-16-24;CG-16 & 17 ³ only Drafts 27.2'(1),20.2', ³ 15.4' & 13.01;N.V. ³19,850 21,600 22,500 3,450 3,650 3,750 Former DLG-26-34;Max.Nav. Draft ³ CG-27,27.5';CG-28,33&34,28.5'; ³ CG-29-32,29.5'&CG-26,30.5';N.V. ³ ------Under Construction ³36,100 36,900 37,350 7,200 7,250 7,300 Former CLGN-160;N.V. ³ ³20,900 21,350 21,550 3,230 3,280 3,300 Former DLGN-25;N.V. ³22,500 22,900 23,150 3,290 3,340 3,360 Former DLGN-35;N.V. ³26,050 27,000 27,450 3,700 3,800 3,850 Former DLGN-36 & 37;N.V. ³23,900 24,800 25,200 4,340 4,430 4,480 Former DLGN-38-41;N.V. ³59,350 63,200 65,150 8,300 8,800 9,050 Former CVA-34;H.D. ³64,550 69,150 71,400 8,700 9,350 9,650 Former CVA-41 & 43; Extreme ³ Breadth CV-41, 183'; CV-43, ³ 156';H.D. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes.

Table 2 (c). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ CV 59-62 Aircraft Carrier ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CV 63,64,66 Aircraft Carrier ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CV 67 Same as Above ³ ³ CVA 31 Attack Aircraft Carrier ³ ³ CVN 65 Aircraft Carrier Nuclear ³ ³ Propulsion ³ ³ CVN 68-71 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CVS 11,12,20,38 ASW Aircraft Carrier ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DD 743,763,784,785,817,821,822,825, Destroyer ³ ³ 827,842,862-864,866,871,876,880, ³ ³ 883,886 ³ ³ DD 931,942,944-946,948,950,951 Same as Above ³ ³ DD 933,937,938,940,941,943 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DD 963-992,997 Destroyer ³ ³ DDG 2-24 Guided Missile Destroyer ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DDG 31-34 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-20

Table 2 (c). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³1040.0 990.0 See Comments 130.0 -S e e C o m m e n t s ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³1048-1073 990.0 See Comments 130.0 See Comments 37.0 31.4 28.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³1073.0 990.0 252.0 130.0 37.0 37.0 31.7 29.1 ³ ³ 872.0 820.0 172.0 103.0 31.0 31.0 26.4 24.1 ³ ³1088.0 1040.0 248.0 133.0 39.0 38.0 34.1 32.2 ³ ³ ³ ³1088-1115 1056.0 See Comments 134.0 See Comments 38.0 33.5 31.2 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 889-899 820.0 172.0 103.0 31.0 31.0 26.3 24.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 391.0 383.0 41.0 40.0 19.0-22.0 15.0 12.7 11.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 418.0 407.0 45.0 44.0 21.0 16.0 13.7 12.5 ³ ³ 418.0 407.0 45.0 44.0 20.0 16.0 13.7 12.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ 564.0 529.0 55.0 55.0 30.0 21.0 18.8 17.7 ³ ³ 437.0 420.0 47.0 46.0 See Comments 16.0 13.4 12.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 418.0 407.0 45.0 44.0 See Comments 16.0 13.7 12.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-21

Table 2 (c). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ CV 59-62 230.0 81,150 66,400 59,020 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CV 63,64,66 230.0 81,770 66,320 58,600 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CV 67 230.0 80,940 66,430 59,180 ³ ³ CVA 31 146.0 43,110 35,000 30,940 ³ ³ CVN 65 252.0 90,950 79,320 73,500 ³ ³ ³ ³ CVN 68-71 252.0 91,490 77,780 70,920 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ CVS 11,12,20,38 146.0 41,900 33,700 29,600 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DD 743,763,784,785,817,821, 29.0 3,550 2,740 2,340 ³ ³ 822, 825,827,842,862-864, ³ ³ 866,871,876,880,883,886 ³ ³ DD 931,942,944-946,948,950,951 33.0 4,200 3,270 2,800 ³ ³ DD 933,937,938,940,941,943 33.0 4,140 3,250 2,800 ³ ³ ³ ³ DD 963-992,997 51.0 7,810 6,450 5,770 ³ ³ DDG 2-24 37.0 4,900 3,700 3,100 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DDG 31-34 33.0 4,200 3,310 2,860 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-22

Table 2 (c). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³73,850 79,100 81,750 13,500 14,200 14,550 Former CVA-59-62; Ext. Breadth: ³ CV-59 & 60, 253'; CV-62, 263' ³ & CV-61, 270'; Loaded Draft: ³ CV-60 & 62, 37.0'; CV-59, ³ 38.0'; & CV-61, 41.0'; 1/3 ³ Stores: CV-60&62,31.7';CV-59, ³ 32.7'; & CV-61, 35.7'; Light ³ Draft: CV-60&62, 29.0';CV-59, ³ 30.0'; & CV-61, 33.0';H.D. ³79,500 85,050 87,850 13,900 14,650 15,000 Former CVA-63,64,66; Ext. ³ Breadth: CV-66, 252'; CV-63 ³ 64, 282'; Max. Nav. Draft: ³ CV-63, 37.0'; CV-64, 40.0'; ³ & CV-66, 38.0';H.D. ³75,250 80,500 83,100 15,650 16,350 16,700 Former CVA-67;H.D. ³59,350 63,200 65,150 8,300 8,800 9,050 Former CV-31;H.D. ³79,000 83,050 85,050 16,950 17,450 17,750 Former CVAN-65;H.D. ³ ³79,450 84,150 86,550 14,750 15,350 15,650 Former CVAN-68 & 69; Ext. ³ Breadth: CVN-68, 257'; CVN-69, ³ 252'; & CVN-70,256.5; Max. Nav. ³ Draft: CVN-68,41';CVN-69, 39'; ³ & CVN-70,38.5 ; H.D. ³59,700 63,500 65,400 11,950 12,450 12,650 Former CVA-11,12,20,38; Water³ line Breadth: CV-12 & 20 only, ³ 101';H.D. ³ 8,800 9,650 10,100 1,250 1,350 1,400 DD-743,817,825,827,829,835,842, ³ 863,871,873,876,880,& 883 All ³ former DDR of same number;N.V. ³11,750 12,750 13,200 1,850 1,950 2,000 N.V. ³13,050 13,950 14,450 2,100 2,200 2,250 DD-933 only: overall lgth 424'; ³ Max. Nav. Draft, 22.0';N.V. ³24,100 25,250 25,850 4,250 4,350 4,400 N.V. ³14,750 15,900 16,450 2,900 3,000 3,100 All 21.0' except DDG-8,12,17,19, ³ 22.0';DDG-4,5,7,23.0';DDG-2,3, ³ 10,24.0'; DDG-6,20, 25.0';N.V. ³14,450 15,400 15,850 2,120 2,220 2,270 Former DD-936,932,949,947; Max. ³ Nav. Draft: 22.0' except ³ DDG-34, 23.0'; N.V. ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes.

Table 2 (d). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ DDG 37-46 Guided Missile Destroyer ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DDG 47 Same as Above ³ ³ DDG 993-996 Same as Above ³ ³ FF 1037,1038 Frigate ³ ³ FF 1040,1041,1043-1045,1047-1051 Frigate ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ FF 1052-1097 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ FF 1098 Same as Above ³ ³ FFG 1-6 Guided Missile Frigate ³ ³ FFG 7-49 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LCC 19,20 Amphibious Command Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LHA 1-5 Amphibious Assault Ship ³ ³ General Purpose ³ ³ LKA 112 Amphibious Cargo Ship ³ ³ LKA 113-117 Same as Above ³ ³ LPA 249 Amphibious Transport ³ ³ LPD 1-2 Amphibious Transport Dock ³ ³ ³ ³ LPD 4-15 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LPH 2,3,7,9-12 Amphibious Assault Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-24

Table 2 (d). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 513.0 490.0 See Comments 52.0 S e e C o m m e n t s ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 568.0 530.0 55.0 55.0 31.6 20.0 17.3 16.0 ³ ³ ----324 ---³ ³ 372.0 350.0 41.5 41.0 24.0 15.0 13.3 12.4 ³ ³ 415.0 390.0 44.0 44.0 See Comments 17.0 15.1 14.2 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 438.0 415.0 47.0 47.0 See Comments 16.5 (2) 14.0 12.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 416.0 394.0 44.0 43.0 24.0 17.0 (2) 15.3 14.4 ³ ³ 415.0 390.0 44.0 44.0 26.0 (2) 17.0 (2) 15.1 14.2 ³ ³ 445.0 408.0 47.0 38.0 24.9 14.4 13.3 12.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 620.0 580.0 See Comments 82.0 30.0 29.0 25.7 24.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 820.0 765.0 118.0 106.0 26.0 26.0 21.3 18.9 ³ ³ ³ ³ 564.0 536.0 76.0 76.0 28.0 27.0 20.6 17.4 ³ ³ 576.0 550.0 82.0 82.0 28.0 28.0 21.7 18.5 ³ ³ 564.0 537.0 76.0 76.0 28.0 26.0 18.9 15.4 ³ ³ 522.0 508.0 100.0 84.0 See Comments 23.0 18.7 16.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ 570.0 557.0 See Comments 84.0 See Comments 23.0 17.3 14.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 592-602 556.0 84.0 84.0 See Comments 28.0 22.0 19.0 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-25

Table 2 (d). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ DDG 37-46 43.0 6,120 4,800 4,150 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ DDG 47 48.5 8,910 7,350 6,570 ³ ³ DDG 993-996 ----³ ³ FF 1037,1038 24.0 2,730 2,220 1,970 ³ ³ FF 1040,1041,1043-1045, 28.5 (2) 3,580 2,940 2,620 ³ ³ 1047-1051 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ FF 1052-1097 32.5 4,330 3,340 2,850 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ FF 1098 29.0 (2) 3,660 3,060 2,760 ³ ³ FFG 1-6 28.5 3,600 2,950 2,630 ³ ³ FFG 7-49 30.0 3,590 3,180 2,980 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LCC 19,20 -18,650 13,950 11,600 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LHA 1-5 164.0 39,400 30,020 25,330 ³ ³ ³ ³ LKA 112 66.0 17,500 12,410 9,860 ³ ³ LKA 113-117 76.0 18,650 12,880 10,000 ³ ³ LPA 249 66.0 17,550 12,990 10,710 ³ ³ LPD 1-2 85.0 14,670 10,220 8,000 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LPD 4-15 85.0 17,240 11,480 8,600 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LPH 2,3,7,9-12 75.0 18,830 13,420 10,720 ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes.

Table 2 (d). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³19,950 21,200 21,800 2,650 2,750 2,850 Former DLG-6-15; Ext. Breadth: ³ 52.0' except DDG-37&46, 53.0'; ³ Max. Nav. Draft: All 25.0' ³ except DDG-37,27.0'; loaded ³ draft: All 18.01 except DDG-37, ³ 19.0'; 1/3 stores: All 15.5' ³ except DDG-37, 16.5'; light ³ draft: 14.2' except DDG-37, ³ 15.2';N.V. ³26,700 28,100 28,850 5,500 5,650 5,750 N.V. ³ ------Under Construction ³ 9,850 10,450 10,750 1,800 1,870 1,900 Former DE-1037,1038;N.V. ³11,950 12,700 13,050 2,100 2,200 2,250 Former DE of same number; Max. ³ Nav. draft: All 24.0' except ³ FF-1045,1047,1049, 25.0'; ³ FF-1041, 26.0';N.V. ³14,650 15,700 16,200 2,800 2,900 2,950 Former DE of same number; Max. ³ Nav. draft: All 26.5'(1) ³ except FF-1054, 27.5'(1);N.V. ³11,500 12,150 12,500 1,900 1,980 2,020 Former AGFF-1;N.V. ³12,500 13,200 13,600 2,100 2,200 2,250 Former DEG-1-6;N.V. ³15,290 15,730 15,970 2,200 2,230 2,240 Wind areas developed from ³ Jane's; FFG-7-10 only, Former ³ PF of same number;N.V. ³34,350 36,280 37,250 6,950 7,220 7,360 Former AGC-19,20; ext. ³ breadth: LCC-19, 108.0'; ³ LCC-20, 102.0';H.D. ³71,250 74,950 76,750 10,750 11,250 11,500 H.D. ³ ³ ³25,650 29,100 30,800 4,600 5,050 5,300 Former AKA-112;N.V. ³30,100 33,550 35,250 6,850 7,400 7,650 Former AKA-113-117;N.V. ³29,150 32,150 33,650 5,200 5,600 5,800 Former APA-248,249;N.V. ³27,600 29,800 30,850 7,750 8,100 8,300 Max. Nav. draft: LPD-1, 23.0'; ³ LPD-2, 25.0';N.V. ³31,100 34,000 35,450 7,700 8,100 8,350 Ext. breadth: LPD-12-14, 100'; ³ LPD-4, 105.0'; LPD-5-8,10,11, ³ 15,108.0'; LPD-9, 115.0'; Max. ³ Nav. draft: All 23.0'; except ³ LPD-9, 27.0'; LPD-6 29.0';N.V. ³36,920 40,260 41,920 5,970 6,480 6,730 Max. Nav. draft: All 30.0'; ³ except LPH-10, 28.0'; LPH-2,9, ³ 29.0'; LPH-3, 31.0';H.D. ³

ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-27

Table 2 (e). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ LSD 28-35 Dock Landing Ship ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ LSD 36-40 Same as Above ³ ³ LST 1173,1177,1178 Tank Landing Ship ³ ³ LST 1179-1198 Same as Above ³ ³ MSH Minesweeper Hunter ³ ³ MSO 427,428-431,433,437-443,446,448,449, Minesweeper Ocean Non³ ³ 455,456,464,488,489,490,492,509,511 magnetic ³ ³ ³ ³ PG 92,93,99,101 Patrol Combatant ³ ³ ³ ³ PHM 1-6 Patrol Combatant Missile ³ ³ Hydrofoil ³ ³ SS 565 Submarine ³ ³ SS 574 Same as Above ³ ³ SS 576 Same as Above ³ ³ SS 580-582 Same as Above ³ ³ SSAG 567 Auxiliary Submarine ³ ³ SSBN 598-602 Fleet Ballistic Missile ³ ³ Submarine Nuclear ³ ³ SSBN 608-611,618 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSBN 616,617,619,620,622-636, Same as Above ³ ³ 640-645,654-659 ³ ³ SSBN 726-733 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 571 Submarine Nuclear ³ ³ SSN 575 Same as Above ³ ³ SSN 578,579,583,584 Same as Above ³ ³ SSN 585 Same as Above ³ ³ SSN 586 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 587 Same as Above ³ ³ SSN 588,590-592 Same as Above ³ ³ SSN 594-596,603-607,612-615,621 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 597 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-28

Table 2 (e). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 510.0 500.0 See Comments 84.0 See Comments 19.0 14.7 12.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³553-562 548.0 84.0 84.0 20.0 20.0 15.9 13.9 ³ ³ 445.0 431.0 62.0 62.0 18.0 18.0 14.4 12.6 ³ ³ 565.0 507.0 70.0 70.0 See Comments 16.0 12.3 10.5 ³ ³ 189.0 177.2 39.0 39.0 13.5 8.8 8.4 8.1 ³ ³ 173.0 165.0 35.0 35.0 12.0-14.0 10.0-12.0 8.3-10.3 7.4-9.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 165.0 154.0 24.0 22.0 10.0 6.0 (2) 5.1 4.6 ³ ³SeeComments 118.0 29.0 25.0 24.0 8.0 7.3 7.0 ³ ³ 293.0 290.0 27.0 24.0 17.3 16.8 15.5 14.8 ³ ³ 334.0 332.0 30.0 25.0 19.0 18.3 (2) 17.0 16.3 ³ ³ 283.0 282.0 27.0 25.0 17.3 (2) 16.8 15.5 14.9 ³ ³ 219.0 209.0 29.0 27.0 25.1 (2) 20.6 18.3 17.1 ³ ³ 293.0 290.0 27.0 24.0 17.3 16.8 15.5 14.8 ³ ³ 382.0 348.0 33.0 25.0 29.0 27.5 25.1 23.9 ³ ³ ³ ³ 411.0 378.0 33.0 26.5 31.1 (2) 27.5 (2) 25.5 24.5 ³ ³ ³ ³ 421.0 395.0 33.0 25.0 32.0 27.3 25.2 24.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 559.3 500.0 42.0 30.0 36.3 35.4 (2) 31.9 30.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 324.0 320.0 28.0 23.0 25.9(22) 22.1 (2) 20.2 19.3 ³ ³ 376.0 370.0 28.0 22.0 23.8(2) 22.3 (2) 21.2 20.5 (2)³ ³ 263.0 260.0 25.0 20.0 21.4(2) 20.8 (2) 19.7 19.1 (2)³ ³ 249.0 232.0 32.0 28.0 28.2 25.1 (2) 23.8 23.1 (2)³ ³ 448.0 445.0 37.0 34.0 24.0 24.0 23.1 22.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ 350.0 350.0 26.0 24.0 21.0(2) 21.0 (2) 19-7 19.0 ³ ³ 249.0 230.0 32.0 25.0 27.7 25.2 24.0 23.4 (2)³ ³ 279-297 257-265 32.0 27.0 29.0 25.5 24.2 23.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ 273.0 262.0 23.0 19.0 21.0 19.4 15.7 13.9 ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-29

Table 2 (e). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³LSD 28-35 68.0 12,150 8,630 6,880 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³LSD 36-40 76.0 13,700 9,970 8,100 ³ ³LST 1173,1177,1178 55.0 7,100 4,740 3,560 ³ ³LST 1179-1198 57.0 8,520 6,010 4,750 ³ ³MSH 15.0 454 378 340 ³ ³MSO 427,428-431,433,437-443, 10.0 930 720 620 ³ ³ 446,448,449,455,456,464, ³ ³ 448,449,490,492,509,511 ³ ³PG 92,93,99,101 6.0 280 230 200 ³ ³ ³ ³PHM 1-6 6.5 210 180 160 ³ ³ ³ ³SS 565 12.4 (2) 2,030 1,840 1,740 ³ ³SS 574 16.0 (2) 2,940 (2) 2,690 2,560 (2)³ ³SS 576 12.4 (2) 2,030 (2) 1,840 1,740 (2)³ ³SS 580-582 10.1 (2) 2,150 (2) 1,880 1,740 (2)³ ³SSAG 567 12.4 2,030 1,840 1,740 ³ ³SSBN 598-602 14.0 6,030 5,620 5,420 ³ ³ ³ ³SSBN 608-611,618 17.5 (2) 6,950 (2) 6,530 6,320 (2)³ ³ ³ ³SSBN 616,617,619,620,622-636, 17.0 7,350 6,920 6,700 ³ ³ 640-645,654-659 ³ ³SSBN 726-733 32.1 (2) 16,740 (2) 15,390 14,710 (2)³ ³ ³ ³SSN 571 10.2 (2) 3,570 (2) 3,340 3,230 (2)³ ³SSN 575 16.1 4,400 (2) 4,160 4,040 (2)³ ³SSN 578,579,583,584 9.1 (2) 2,580 (2) 2,450 2,380 (2)³ ³SSN 585 9.0 (2) 3,070 (2) 2,920 2,850 (2)³ ³SSN 586 30.0 5,940 5,630 5,480 ³ ³ ³ ³SSN 587 -3,920 3,690 3,570 ³ ³SSN 588,590-592 9.6 (2) 3,080 2,940 2,870 ³ ³SSN 594-596,603-607,612-615,621 11.3 4,010 3,840 3,750 ³ ³ ³ ³SSN 597 7.0 2,610 2,300 2,150 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-30

Table 2 (e). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³21,150 23,350 24,400 5,600 5,950 6,150 Ext. Breadth: All 84.0'; ³ except LSD-28, 90.0'; Max. ³ Nav. draft: All 19.0'; ³ except LSD-28, 20.01;N.V. ³29,150 31,350 32,400 6,950 7,300 7,450 N.V. ³15,750 17,300 18,050 2,700 2,900 3,050 N.V. ³22,950 24,650 25,450 4,800 5,050 5,200 Max. Nav. draft: All 20.0'; ³ except LST-1198, 21.01;N.V. ³ 1,380 1,515 1,570 745 785 794 Max. Nav. draft is off-cushion, ³ over screws. ³ 4,100 4,400 4,550 1,250 1,310 1,340 All Former AM of same number; ³ N.V. ³ ³ 2,860 3,000 3,070 610 630 640 All Former PGM of same number; ³ N.V. ³ 2,320 2,400 2,440 900 920 930 Overall length 147.0' with ³ foils raised; N.V. ³ 3,800 4,180 4,380 290 320 340 H.D. ³ 4,350 4,800 5,020 410 450 470 Former LPSS-574;H.D. ³ 3,540 3,900 4,080 290 320 340 H.D. ³ 2,060 2,540 2,780 310 340 350 H.D. ³ 3,800 4,180 4,380 290 320 340 H.D. ³ 2,990 3,830 4,250 400 460 490 SSBN-598-600 Former SSGN-598³ 600;H.D. ³ 3,810 4,560 4,940 360 410 440 40.5' breadth at stern ³ planes; H.D. ³ 4,040 4,870 5,280 380 430 460 41.0' breadth at stern ³ planes; H.D. ³ 6,070 7,860 8,760 450 570 630 SSBN-726 only,former SSBN-1;H.D. ³ 57.4' breadth at stern planes ³ 3,290 3,850 4,130 310 350 370 H.D. ³ 4,490 4,920 5,130 280 310 320 H.D. ³ 2,170 2,420 2,540 200 220 230 H.D. ³ 1,960 2,250 2,390 250 280 300 H.D. ³ 6,940 7,380 7,580 680 720 730 Former SSRN-586-Areas Jane's; ³ H.D. ³ 4,740 5,210 5,440 380 410 430 Former SSGN-587-inactive; H.D. ³ 2,100 2,360 2,490 240 270 290 H.D. ³ 1,770 2,080 2,240 180 210 230 SSN-594 only, Former SSGN-594; ³ H.D. ³ 2,050 3,010 3,490 110 180 220 H.D. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Table 2 (f). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ SSN 637-639,646-653,660-670,672-684, Submarine Nuclear ³ ³ 686,687 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 671 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 685 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 688-722 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ IX 306-308,310 Unclassified Miscellaneous³ ³ ³ ³ IX 501 Same as Above ³ ³ IX 502-504 Same as Above ³ ³ IX 506,507 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ NR 1 Submersible Research ³ ³ Vehicle ³ ³ YAG 61 Miscellaneous Auxiliary ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 306,360,699,705,709,712,713,721,724, Open Lighter ³ ³ 725,728,752,754,756,757,760,764,769, ³ ³ 772,775,781,783,787,789,813,821,823³ ³ 826,828-833,972,979,980,1056,1058³ ³ 1060,1062,1065,1068-1071,1073-1077, ³ ³ 1080,1081,1084-1092,1107,1112,1116³ ³ 1121,1366-1368,1371-1373,1375-1383, ³ ³ 1385,1386,1394,1395,1399,1408-1411, ³ ³ 1419,1446 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 688,746,794,799,800,802-805,1406, Same as Above ³ ³ 1407,1413,1417 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 695 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 981,983,984 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 1027,1029 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 1273,1275 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 1321,1323,1324,1327,1328 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-32

Table 2 (f). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³289-303 273-283 32.0 25.0 See Comments 25.8 23.9 23.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 315.0 286.0 33.0 25.0 30.5 (2) 27.7 (2) 26.2 25.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ 365.0 340.0 32.0 25.0 30.9 (2) 26.4 (2) 25.2 24.6 (2) ³ ³ ³ ³ 361.0 342.0 33.0 32.1 30.5 27.2 23.3 21.3 ³ ³ ³ ³ 177.0 164.0 32.0 32.0 11.0 10.0 7.7 6.6 ³ ³ ³ ³ 250.0 226.0 66.0 51.0 13.8 11.0 9.3 8.4 ³ ³ 328.0 316.0 50.0 50.0 14.0 ---³ ³ 125.0 -36.0 -----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 136.0 128.0 16.0 16.0 15.1 (2) 11.1 (2) 10.5 10.2 ³ ³ ³ ³ 194.0 181.0 33.0 33.0 16.0 12.0 9.3 8.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 35.0 34.0 8.0 6.0 2.7 1.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 31.0 30.0 4.0 4.0 2.0 1.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 140.0 140.0 50.0 49.0 -6.0 --³ ³ 142.0 142.0 40.0 39.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 150.0 150.0 40.0 39.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 100.0 100.0 40.0 39.0 6.0 6.0 --³ ³ 125.0 125.0 34.0 33.0 6.0 6.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-33

Table 2 (f). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ SSN 637-639,646-653,660-670, 12.0 4,270 4,000 3,860 ³ ³ 672-684,686,687 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 671 12.5 (2) 5,290 (2) 5,060 4,950 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 685 16.4 (2) 5,780 (2) 5,540 5,420 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ SSN 688-722 17.0 6,930 6,120 5,720 ³ ³ ³ ³ IX 306-308,310 10.0 940 670 530 ³ ³ ³ ³ IX 501 14.0 1,280 990 850 ³ ³ IX 502-504 33.0 3,640 2,670 2,190 ³ ³ IX 506,507 ----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ NR 1 1.95 (2) 352 (2) 337 330 (2)³ ³ ³ ³ YAG 61 10.0 ---³ ³ ³ ³ YC 306,360,699,705,709,712, 9.5 680 310 120 ³ ³ 713,721,724,725,728,752, ³ ³ 754,756,757,760,764,769, ³ ³ 772,775,781,783,787,789, ³ ³ 813,821,823-826,828-833, ³ ³ 972,979,980,1056,1058³ ³ 1060,1062,1065,1068-1071, ³ ³ 1073-1077,1080,1081,1084³ ³ 1092,1107,1112,1116-1121, ³ ³ 1366-1368,1371-1373,1375³ ³ 1383,1385,1386,1394,1395, ³ ³ 1399,1408-1411,1419,1446 ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 688,746,794,799,800,8027.0 350 180 100 ³ ³ 805,1406,1407,1413,1417 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 695 -700 370 200 ³ ³ YC 981,983,984 -930 390 120 ³ ³ YC 1027,1029 -1,400 730 400 ³ ³ YC 1273,1275 -700 370 200 ³ ³ YC 1321,1323,1324,1327,1328 -690 360 190 ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ

Table 2 (f). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 2,580 3,090 3,340 200 250 270 41.0' Breadth at stern planes. ³ All 29.0' except SSN-661, ³ 30.0'; SSN-672-684 & 686,687, ³ 26.0';H.D. ³ 2,000 2,410 2,610 190 230 250 42.5' Breadth at puff blisters ³ on stabilizers; H.D. ³ 2,480 2,870 3,060 210 240 260 42.0' Breadth at stern ³ planes; H.D. ³ 2,800 4,120 4,780 220 330 390 40.0' Breadth at stern ³ planes; H.D. ³ 5,370 5,710 5,880 410 480 510 IX-306-308, Former FS-221, ³ WLI-299 & AKL-17;N.V. ³ 6,080 6,470 6,660 1,850 1,940 1,980 Former LSMR-501;N.V. ³ ------Former APB-39,40 & 37; N.V. ³ 1,530 --740 --Data & Wind Areas Developed ³ from Jane's (Photograph). ³ IX-506 former YFU-82 ³ IX-507 Former YFU-75. ³ 490 570 600 55 60 65 H.D. ³ ³ 3,460 3,900 4,120 840 920 970 Drafts Estimated from Ship's ³ Plans. Former IX-309;N.V. ³ YC-360 Former YFN-360, YC-709 ³ Former YFT-2, YC-1060 Former ³ YVC-1, YC-1117 Former YPK-9, ³ YC-1386 Former BC-167, YC³ 1384 Former YFNX-17, YC-1399 ³ Former YFN-937,YC-1408-1411 ³ Former U-31 1492-1495,YC-1419 ³ Former U-31 1490. ³ ³ ³ ------YC-794 Former YPK-8, YC-1406³ 1407 Former U-33 1522-1523, ³ YC-1413,1417 Former U-33 ³ 1517,1521. ³ ------³ ------³ ------³ ------³ ------All Former YCF-98,100,102,107, ³ 108 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Table 2 (g). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YC 1333,1334 Open Lighter ³ ³ YC 1351,1352,1360,1400-1401 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1389,1391 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 1430-1434,1435,1438-1440,1442-1445, Same as Above ³ ³ 1450,1458,1461,1464-1468 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1469-1497,1499,1500-1504 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1447-1449 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1451 Same as Above ³ ³ YC 1509-1515 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1523-1545 Open Lighter ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YCF 16 Car Float ³ ³ YCV 8-11,15,16 Aircraft Transportation ³ ³ Lighter ³ ³ YDT 10 Diving Tender ³ ³ YDT 14,15 Same as Above ³ ³ YDT 16 Same as Above ³ ³ YF 862,866,885 Covered Lighter ³ ³ YFB 83 Ferryboat or Launch ³ ³ YFB 87-91 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-36

Table 2 (g). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 112.0 108.0 53.0 48.0 6.0 6.0 --³ ³ 81.0 81.0 27.0 26.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 160.0 160.0 51.0 50.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ 120.0 120.0 33.0 33.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 32.0 32.0 8.0 6.0 2.7 1.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 130.0 130.0 30.0 30.0 6.0 6.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ --------³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 150.0 150.0 34.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ 200.0 180.0 65.0 65.0 8.0 7.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 81.0 74.0 27.0 26.0 3.0 3.0 --³ ³ 133.0 132.0 31.0 30.0 8.0 8.0(Est) 7.3(Est) 7.0(Est)³ ³ 261.0 260.0 48.0 48.0 ----³ ³ 133.0 132.0 31.0 30.0 10.0 9.0 --³ ³ 180.0 165.0 46.0 45.0 ----³ ³ 162.0 150.0 59.0 45.0 ----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-37

Table 2 (g). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YC 1333,1334 -850 420 210 ³ ³ YC 1351,1352,1360,1400-1401 -250 130 70 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1389,1391 -1,400 730 400 ³ ³ YC 1430-1434,1435,1438-1440, -690 320 140 ³ ³ 1442-1445,1450,1458,1461, ³ ³ 1464-1468 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1469-1497,1499,1500-1504 8.5 690 300 110 ³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1447-1449 -990 --³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1451 ----³ ³ YC 1509-1515 ----³ ³ ³ ³ YC 1523-1545 ----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YCF 16 -420 250 170 ³ ³ YCV 8-11,15,16 -2,480 1,150 480 ³ ³ ³ ³ YDT 10 -300 --³ ³ YDT 14,15 8.0 ---³ ³ YDT 16 ----³ ³ YF 862,866,885 8.0 650 320 160 ³ ³ YFB 83 ----³ ³ YFB 87-91 8.0 ---³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-38

Table 2 (g). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ------³ ³ ------YC-1351 Former SSS-30J, YC-1352 ³ Former SSS- J, YC-1400-1402 ³ Former YC-1A-3A. ³ ------YC-1391 Former BCL-1430. ³ ------YC-1435 Former YFN-1169;YC-1438, ³ 1439 Former BC-6677, 6678; ³ YC-1440, 1442-1445,1450,1460 ³ Former BC-6033,6201,6212,6559, ³ 6560,6138,6195; YC-1458,1461, ³ 1462,1464-1468 Former YFN-693, ³ 1226,1227,1229-1233. ³ 740 1,090 1,260 220 330 390 YC-1479 Former BCL-1103;YC-1500³ -1504 Former YFN-1244-1248;H.D. ³ ------YC-1447-1449 Former BC-247, ³ 2814,2820 ³ ------Former BC-6556 ³ ------YC-1509,1510 Former BC-6292, ³ 6554; YC-1511 Former YFN-925; ³ YC-1512-1515 Former YC-1-3,12. ³ ------YC-1528-1545 Former BC-6111, ³ 6113,6123,6285,6474,6579,6617, ³ 6675,6281,6505,6179,6182,6301, ³ 6140,6180,6131,6478 & 6568. ³ ------³ ------³ ³ ------Former YFNG-1 ³ 1,880 1,970 2,010 570 590 600 Former YF-294 & 336;N.V. ³ ------Former YFNB-43 ³ ------³ ------³ 2,920 --1,460 --Former LCU-1636,1638-1640. Wind ³ areas developed from Jane's ³ Photograph (Skewed); N.V. ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-39

Table 2 (h). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YFN 260,262,263,266,274,276,278,279,283, Covered Lighter NSP ³ ³ 284,299,305-308,640-642,644-652,654, ³ ³ 656-659,691,692,694,697,704,705,707, ³ ³ 717,792-798,800-803,806,814-816,818, ³ ³ 820,821,901,902,905-907,910-911,917, ³ ³ 934,941,945,946,949,952-956,958,959, ³ ³ 962-966,968,970,972,973,978-981,983, ³ ³ 984,988,991,992,1154-1156,1158,1159, ³ ³ 1163 ³ ³ ³ ³ YFN 272,311,313,362,364,367-372,375,413, Same as Above ³ ³ 414,540,1178,1180,1183,1187-1190,1195 ³ ³ ³ ³ YFN 1126,1128-1130 Same as Above ³ ³ YFN 1173-1177,1191,1194,1196-1200,1202Same as Above ³ ³ 1206,1208,1211-1214,1217-1223,1239³ ³ 1243,1250-1253 ³ ³ YFN 1237,1238 Covered Lighter ³ ³ YFNB 4-6,8,13,19,25,30-32,34-37,39,41,42 Large Covered Lighter ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFND 5,27,29 Drydock Companion Craft ³ ³ YFNX 4 Lighter Special Purpose ³ ³ YFNX 7 Same as Above ³ ³ YFNX 15 Same as Above ³ ³ YFNX 19 Same as Above ³ ³ YFNX 20 Same as Above ³ ³ YFNX 22-26,30-34 Lighter Special Purpose ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFP 3,11,12,14 Floating Power Barge ³ ³ ³ ³ YFR 888,890 Refrigerated Covered ³ ³ Lighter SP ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-40

Table 2 (h). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 35.0 34.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 31.0 30.0 ----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 126.0 117.0 34.0 34.0 6.0 6.0 --³ ³ 110.0 110.0 34.0 34.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 127.0 127.0 35.0 35.0 7.0 ---³ ³ 261.0 260.0 48.0 48.0 9.5 9.5 5.2 3.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 111.0 102.0 34.0 34.0 8.0 8.0 5.3 3.9 ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 35.0 34.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ --------³ ³ --------³ ³ 110.0 110.0 35.0 34.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 110.0 110.0 31.0 30.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³110-126 110-126 32-34 32-34 4.0-8.0 3.0-8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 32-34 32-34 7.0-8.0 7.0-8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 133.0 132.0 30.0 30.0 10.0 9.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-41

Table 2 (h). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YFN 260,262,263,266,274,276, -590 300 160 ³ ³ 278,279,283,284,299,305³ ³ 308,640-642,644-652,654, ³ ³ 656-659,691,692,694,697, ³ ³ 704,705,707,717,792-798, ³ ³ 800-803,806,814-816,818, ³ ³ 820,821,901,902,905-907, ³ ³ 910-911,917,934,941,945, ³ ³ 946,949,952-956,958,959, ³ ³ 962-966,968,970,972,973, ³ ³ 978-981,983,984,988,991, ³ ³ 992,1154-1156,1158,1159, ³ ³ 1163 ³ ³ YFN 272,311,313,362,364,367-360 190 110 ³ ³ 372,375,413,414,540,1178, ³ ³ 1180,1183,1187-1190,1195 ³ ³ YFN 1126,1128-1130 -720 390 220 ³ ³ YFN 1173-1177,1191,1194,1196-690 320 140 ³ ³ 1200,1202-1206,1208,1211³ ³ 1214,1217-1223,1239-1243, ³ ³ 1250-1253 ³ ³ YFN 1237,1238 ----³ ³ YFNB 4-6,8,13,19,25,30-32,3426.0 2,700 1,370 700 ³ ³ 37,39,41,42 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFND 5,27,29 8.6 590 310 170 ³ ³ YFNX 4 -670 340 170 ³ ³ YFNX 7 ----³ ³ YFNX 15 ----³ ³ YFNX 19 -370 200 120 ³ ³ YFNX 20 -670 340 170 ³ ³ YFNX 22-26,30-34 ----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFP 3,11,12,14 -690 320 140 ³ ³ ³ ³ YFR 888,890 -610 400 300 ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-42

Table 2 (h). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ------YFN-792 Former YC-792 ³ ³ ³ ³ ------YFN-540 Former YC-650,YFN-1195 ³ Former U-34 1526. ³ ³ ------Former YCF-73,86,87,88. ³ YFN-1173-1177 Former U-32 1504³ 1506,1497 & 1499; YFN-1191,1194 ³ Former U-32 1509 & 1498. ³ ³ 5,260 6,370 6,930 830 1,040 1,140 YFNB-4-6,8,13 Former YFN-617, ³ 621,622,718,727; YFNB-19 ³ Former YRBN-19; YFNB-25,30-32, ³ 34-37,39,41,42 Former YFN-749, ³ 899,900,1054,1056,1063-1066, ³ 1070;H.D. ³ 1,580 1,860 2,000 480 580 620 Former YFN-268,706,974;H.D. ³ ------³ ------³ ------Former YNG-22 ³ ------Former YC-1356 ³ ------³ ------YFNX-22 Former BC-6192; YFNX³ 23-26,30,31 Former YFN-289, ³ 1215,1224,1225,1186,1249; ³ YFNX-32 Former YRBM-7; YFNX³ 33,34 Former YFN-1192,1209. ³ ------YFP-3 Former YC-1114; YFP-11, ³ 12 Former YFN-1207,1216 ³ ------³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-43

Table 2 (i). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YFRN 385,412,997,1235,1256,1257 Refrigerated Covered ³ ³ Lighter SP ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFRT 287,418,451,520,522,523 Covered Lighter SP ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YFU 50 Harbor Utility Craft ³ ³ YFU 71-77,79,81,83 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YFU 91,94,97,98,100-102 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YGN 69,70,73 Garbage Lighter NSP ³ ³ ³ ³ YGN 80-83 Same as Above ³ ³ YHLC 1,2 Salvage Lift Craft, Heavy ³ ³ YNG 11,17 Gate Craft ³ ³ YO 47 Fuel Oil Barge SP ³ ³ YO 106,129,171,174,194,200,202,203,220, Same as Above ³ ³ 223-225,228,230,241,257,264 ³ ³ YO 153 Same as Above ³ ³ YOG 58,68,78,79,87,88,93,196 Gasoline Barge SP ³ ³ YOGN 8-10,26 GasolIne Barge NSP ³ ³ YOGN 110,111,113-115,122-125 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YON 1,2 Fuel Oil Barge NSP ³ ³ YON 80,81,84-88 Same as Above ³ ³ YON 90,91,96-98,100-102,235 Same as Above ³ ³ YON 239 Same as Above ³ ³ YON 255,256 Same as Above ³ ³ YON 258,260-262,265,269,271-275,280-295 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YON 305,306 Same as Above ³ ³ YOS 8,10-12,15-17,20 Oil Storage Barge ³ ³ YOS 21,23,24,28,33 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YOS 34 Fuel Oil Barge NSP ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-44

Table 2 (i). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³150-153 150-152 35.0 34.0 7.0-10.0 7.0-10.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 133.0 132.0 30.0 30.0 9.0 9.0 6.6 5.4 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 119.0 105.0 35.0 34.0 6.0 4.0 --³ ³ 125.0 -36.0 ---³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ ³ ³ 120.0 112.0 35.0 34.0 9.0 9.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 124.0 124.0 35.0 35.0 ----³ ³ -³ ³ 110.0 100.0 34.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ 235.0 227.0 37.0 37.0 15.0 15.0 9.4 6.6 ³ ³ 174.0 170.0 33.0 32.0 13.0 13.0 7.7 5.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ 156.0 150.0 30.0 30.0 12.0 12.0 7.9 5.9 ³ ³ 174.0 170.0 33.0 32.0 13.0 13.0 7.7 5.1 ³ ³ 165.0 165.0 35.0 35.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ 165.0 165.0 42.0 42.0 8.0 8.0 4.1 2.2 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 87.0 86.0 28.0 27.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 174.0 173.0 40.0 39.0 8.0 8.0 3.3 1.0 ³ ³ 165.0 165.0 35.0 35.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ 100.0 81.0 40.0 40.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 120.0 -33.0 -----³ ³ 165.0 -40.0 40.0 8.0 8.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ 80.0 80.0 34.0 32.0 5.0 5.0 --³ ³ 110.0 110.0 34.0 34.0 9.0 9.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-45

Table 2 (i). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³YFRN 385,412,997,1235,1256, -690-860 340-520 170-350 ³ ³ 1257 ³ ³ ³ ³YFRT 287,418,451,520,522,523 8.0 650 420 300 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³YFU 50 -360 230 160 ³ ³YFU 71-77,79,81,83 -380 270 220 ³ ³ ³ ³YFU 91,94,97,98,100-102 ----³ ³ ³ ³YGN 69,70,73 -500 290 180 ³ ³ ³ ³YGN 80-83 -860 490 310 ³ ³YHLC 1,2 ³ ³YNG 11,17 -230 150 110 ³ ³YO 47 17.0 2,660 1,520 950 ³ ³YO 106,129,171,174,194,200, 10.0 1,390 760 440 ³ ³ 202,203,220,223-225,228, ³ ³ 230,241,257,264 ³ ³YO 153 10.0 1,100 610 370 ³ ³YOG 58,68,78,79,87,88,93,196 10.0 1,390 760 440 ³ ³YOGN 8-10,26 -1,270 570 220 ³ ³YOGN 110,111,113-115,122-125 16.0 1,360 610 240 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³YON 1,2 -400 250 170 ³ ³YON 80,81,84-88 15.0 1,460 620 200 ³ ³YON 90,91,96-98,100-102,235 -1,270 570 220 ³ ³YON 239 -1,040 460 170 ³ ³YON 255,256 -760 370 180 ³ ³YON 258,260-262,265,269, -1,500 680 270 ³ ³ 271-275,280-295 ³ ³ ³ ³YON 305,306 ----³ ³YOS 8,10-12,15-17,20 -290 140 70 ³ ³YOS 21,23,24,28,33 -690 320 140 ³ ³ ³ ³YOS 34 ----³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-46

Table 2 (i). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ------YFRN-385,412,997 Former YF-385, ³ 412,997; YFRN-1235 Former BR³ 6435; YFRN-1256,1257 Former ³ BRM-6234, 6238. ³ 1,820 2,140 2,300 610 680 720 YFRT-287,418,523 Former YF-287, ³ 418,852;YFRT-522 Former T-441; ³ H.D. ³ ------Former LCU-1486 ³ 1,530 --740 --Areas Developed from Jane's ³ Photo ³ ------Former LCU-1608,1488,1611,1615, ³ 1610,1612,1642 ³ ------YGN-69 Former YC-1338; YGN-70 ³ Former YD-1 ³ ------³ ------³ ------³ 3,730 5,000 5,630 1,070 1,270 1,380 N.V. ³ 2,520 3,380 3,820 610 780 860 YO-241,257,264 Former YOG-5,72, ³ 105;N.V. ³ ------³ ³ 2,520 3,380 3,820 610 780 860 YOG-196 Former YO-196;N.V. ³ ------³ ------YOGN-110,111,113-115 Former U³ 30 1472,1473,1475,1479,1468 ³ YOGN-122 Former BG-8452;YOGN³ 123 Former YON-252; YOGN-124 ³ Former BG-6383; YOGN-125 For³ mer YWN-154 ³ ------YON-2 Former BK-4111 ³ ------³ ³ ------YON-235 Former YW-73 ³ ------³ ³ ------Former BG-6224,6225 ³ ------YON-265 Former YOGN-11; YON-268 ³ Former BK-1188; YON-290 Former ³ BG-6457. ³ ------Former BG-6223 & 6228 ³ ------³ ³ ------YOS-28 Former YC-707; YOS-33

³ Former YSR-46. ³ ------Former OB-6228 ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-47

Table 2 (j). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YP 654-672 Patrol Craft ³ ³ ³ ³ YP 673-675 Same as Above ³ ³ YPD 32,37,41,42,45,46 Floating Pile Driver ³ ³ ³ ³ YR 9 Floating Workshop ³ ³ YR 24-27,29,35,36,38,44,46,59,60,63Same as Above ³ ³ 65,67,68,70,73,76-78 ³ ³ YR 50 Same as Above ³ ³ YR 83,84,85 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YRB 1,2 Repair & Berthing Barge ³ ³ YRB 22,25 Same as Above ³ ³ YRBM 1-6,8,9,11-15 Repair, Berthing, and ³ ³ Messing Barge NSP ³ ³ YRBM 20 Same as Above ³ ³ YRBM 23-30 Same as Above ³ ³ YRBM 31-36 Same as Above ³ ³ YRDH 1,6,7 Floating Drydock Work³ ³ shop Hull ³ ³ YRDH 2 Same as Above ³ ³ YRDM 1,2,5,7 Floating Drydock Work³ ³ shop Machinery ³ ³ YRR 1 Radiological Repair Barge ³ ³ YRR 2,5-14 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YRR 3 Same as Above ³ ³ YRR 4 Same as Above ³ ³ YRST 1,2 Salvage Craft Tender NSP ³ ³ YRST 3,6 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ YRST 5 Same as Above ³ ³ YSD 15,39,53,63,74,77 Seaplane Wrecking Derrick ³ ³ YSR 4,6,7 Sludge Removal Barge ³ ³ YSR 11,17-20,23,27-29 Same as Above ³ ³ YSR 25,26 Sludge Removal Barge ³ ³ YSR 30-33,37,38-40,45 Same as Above ³ ³ YTB 752,753,756-759,762-771,774-836 Large Harbor Tug ³ ³ ³ ³ YTB 760,761 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-48

Table 2 (j). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 81.0 77.0 18.0 17.0 5.0 5.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 104-111 104-110 31-46 31-46 8.0 7.0 6.3 6.0(Est)³ ³ --------³ ³ 261.0 260.0 48.0 48.0 9.0 9.0 --³ ³ 153.0 150.0 36.0 34.0 6.0 6.0 4.9 4.3 ³ ³ ³ ³ 153.0 150.0 43.0 42.0 6.0 6.0 4.5 3.7 ³ ³ 111.0 110.0 31.0 31.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 111.0 98.0 30.0 30.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ 110.0 110.0 34.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³110-112 92.0 36.0 34.0 4.0 4.0 3.3 3.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ 261.0 260.0 48.0 48.0 9.0 9.0 --³ ³ 146.0 146.0 46.0 46.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ --------³ ³ 150.0 --34.0 6.0 6.0 4.7 4.0 ³ ³ ³ ³ --------³ ³ 150.0 --34.0 6.0 6.0 4.5 3.8 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 150.0 150.0 43.0 42.0 7.0 7.0 5.5 4.7 ³ ³150-153 150.0 36.0 34.0 6.0 6.0 4.5 3.7 ³ ³ ³ ³ 110.0 110.0 35.0 34.0 8.0 6.0 3.0 1.5 ³ ³ 150.0 150.0 32.0 32.0 4.0 4.0 --³ ³ 261.0 260.0 48.0 48.0 9.0 9.0 --³ ³ 110.0 100.0 35.0 34.0 4.0-6.0 4.0-6.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 124.0 -61.0 -4.0 4.0 --³ ³ 104.0 100.0 31.0 30.0 4.0 4.0 3.7 3.6 ³ ³ 95.0 94.0 31.0 30.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 80.0 69.0 32.0 32.0 5.0 5.0 3.1 2.2 ³ ³ 94.0 94.0 30.0 30.0 7.0 7.0 --³ ³ 110.0 102.0 34.0 34.0 9.0 7.0 3.1 1.2 ³ ³101-109 100-107 29-31 25-31 14.0-16.0 13.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ 85.0 82.0 24.0 23.0 11.0 11.0 --³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes.

Table 2 (j). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YP 654-672 -67 59 55 ³ ³ ³ ³ YP 673-675 ----³ ³ YPD 32,37,41,42,45,46 12.0 590-680 270-590 110-540 ³ ³ ³ ³ YR 9 -2,700 1,370 700 ³ ³ YR 24-27,29,35,36,38,44,46, 11.0 760 610 530 ³ ³ 59,60,63-65,67,68,70,73, ³ ³ 76-78 ³ ³ YR 50 14.0 990 730 600 ³ ³ YR 83,84,85 -250 180 140 ³ ³ ³ ³ YRB 1,2 ---170 ³ ³ YRB 22,25 -290 --³ ³ YRBM 1-6,8,9,11-15 7.0 310 260 230 ³ ³ ³ ³ YRBM 20 -2,700 1,370 700 ³ ³ YRBM 23-30 -590 530 500 ³ ³ YRBM 31-36 ----³ ³ YRDH 1,6,7 11.2 750 540 480 ³ ³ ³ ³ YRDH 2 ----³ ³ YRDM 1,2,5,7 11.1 750 560 460 ³ ³ ³ ³ YRR 1 14.0 990 730 600 ³ ³ YRR 2,5-14 11.0 760 560 460 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YRR 3 8.0 590 300 160 ³ ³ YRR 4 -700 440 310 ³ ³ YRST 1,2 -2,700 1,370 700 ³ ³ YRST 3,6 -230-670 150-340 110-170 ³ ³ ³ ³ YRST 5 ---500 ³ ³ YSD 15,39,53,63,74,77 6.0 270 250 240 ³ ³ YSR 4,6,7 -300 150 80 ³ ³ YSR 11,17-20,23,27-29 6.0 360 230 160 ³ ³ YSR 25,26 -530 --³ ³ YSR 30-33,37,38-40,45 8.0 790 420 230 ³ ³ YTB 752,753,756-759,762-771, -410 320 270 ³ ³ 774-836 ³ ³ YTB 760,761 ----³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes.

Table 2 (j). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1,160 --290 --Wind Areas Developed from ³ Jane's Photograph; N.V. ³ ------³ 2,350 2,420 2,460 1,890 1,920 1,940 YPD-32,45 Former YC-820,1498; ³ YPD-46 Former YFNB-35;N.V. ³ ------Former YFNB-9 ³ 3,700 3,870 3,950 880 920 940 H.D. ³ ³ ------³ ------YR-83 Former YRL-5; YR-84,85 ³ Former FMS-6,782. ³ ------YRB-1 Former YFN-258 ³ ------Former YC-1079 & YFN-298 ³ 3,240 3,300 3,330 970 990 1,000 H.D. ³ ³ ------Former YFNB-26 ³ ------³ ------Under Construction ³ ------YRDH-1 Former YR-55 ³ ³ ------Former YR-56 ³ ------YRDM-1 & 2 Former YR-52 & 53 ³ ³ ------Former YR-49 ³ ------YRR-2,6-10 Former YR-74,30-32, ³ 47,79;YRR-5,13,14 Former YRDM-8 ³ 3,4; YRR-11,12 Former YRDH-3,4. ³ ------Former YFN-333 ³ ------Former YFN-685 ³ ------Former YDT-11,12 ³ ------YRST-3 Former YDT-13; YRST-6 ³ Former YFNX-10. ³ ------Former YFNX-13 ³ ------³ ------³ ------³ ------³ ³ 1,300 1,650 1,820 390 520 590 YSR-45 Former BC-6090;N.V. ³ 1,790 --560 --Areas Developed from Jane's ³ Photograph (Very Skewed); N.V. ³ ------ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ

Table 2 (k). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ VESSEL ³ ³ DESIG³ ³ NATION VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TYPE OF VESSEL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ ³ ³ YTL 422,434,438,439,550,583,588,591, Small Harbor Tug ³ ³ 594,602 ³ ³ YTM 146,149,151,176,178,180,189,252,265, Medium Harbor Tug ³ ³ 268,359,364,366,380-383,391-395,397³ ³ 400,403-406,413,415,417,496,521-524, ³ ³ 526,527,534,536,542-549,701-702,704 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YTM 748,768,770,776,777,779 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YTM 760,761 Same as Above ³ ³ YW 83,86,98,101,108,113,119,123,126-128 Water Barge SP ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YWN 70,71,78,79,82 Water Barge NSP ³ ³ YWN 147 Same as Above ³ ³ YWN 156 Same as Above ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-52

Table 2 (k). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ LENGTHS IN FEET BREADTHS IN FEET (4) DRAFTS IN FEET (5) ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ AT AT 1/3 ³ ³ LOADED LOADED STORES/ ³ ³ WATERWATERMAXIMUM FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³OVERALL LINE EXTREME LINE NAVIGATIONAL LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 66.0 62.0 18.0 17.0 8.0 6.0 --³ ³ ³ ³100-102 89-96 24-28 24-25 10.0-11.0 ---³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³101-107 96.0 27-28 25.0 12.0 12.0 --³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 85.0 82.0 24.0 23.0 ----³ ³ 174.0 170.0 33.0 32.0 13.0 13.0 7.7 5.1 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 165.0 165.0 35.0 35.0 8.0 ---³ ³ 86.0 86.0 20.0 -7.0 ---³ ³ 120.0 33.0 -----³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-53

Table 2 (k). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ DISPLACEMENT IN LONG TONS (7) ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ PER IN. 1/3 ³ ³ IMMERSION STORES/ ³ ³ IN LONG FULLY CARGO/ ³ ³CLASS VESSELS IN CLASS (3) TONS (6) LOADED BALLAST LIGHT ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ YTL 422,434,438,439,550,583, -80 73 70 ³ ³ 588,591,594,602 ³ ³ YTM 146,149,151,176,178,180, 4.0 300-340 240-290 210-260 ³ ³ 189,252,265,268,359,364, ³ ³ 366,380-383,391-395,397³ ³ 400,403-406,413,415,417, ³ ³ 496,521-524,526,527,534, ³ ³ 536,542-549,701-702,704 ³ ³ YTM 748,768,770,776,777,779 -350-390 290-330 260-300 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ YTM 760,761 -210 180 160 ³ ³ YW 83,86,98,101,108,113,119, 10.0 1,390 760 440 ³ ³ 123,126-128 ³ ³ YWN 70,71,78,79,82 -1,270 570 220 ³ ³ YWN 147 -250 130 70 ³ ³ YWN 156 -760 370 170 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-54

Table 2 (k). Characteristics of Auxiliary and Combatant Vessels and Service Craft (1) (Continued) ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ BROADSIDE WIND AREAS (8) FRONTAL WIND AREAS (8) ³ IN SQUARE FEET IN SQUARE FEET COMMENTS (9) ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ 1/3 1/3 ³ STORES/ STORES/ N.V. - NORMAL VESSEL ³FULLY CARGO/ FULLY CARGO/ H.D. - HULL DOMINATED ³LOADED BALLAST LIGHT LOADED BALLAST LIGHT S.V. - SPECIAL VESSEL ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ------YTL-422,431,434,435,438,439 ³ Former YT of same number ³2,630 --860 --All YTB of same number. Wind ³ Areas developed from Jane's ³ Photograph (Slightly Skewed) ³ ³ ³ ³ ------YTM-748 Former LT-2078; ³ YTM-768,770,776,777,779 Former ³ YTB-502,507,513,514,516 ³ ------Former YTB-772 & 773 ³2,520 3,380 3,820 610 780 860 N.V. ³ ³ ------³ ------Former BG-3640 ³ ------Former BG-6089 ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ See introduction to table for footnotes. 26.6-55

26.6-57

2. Floating Drydock Characteristics. Table 3 presents data that distinguishes the various type of floating drydocks on the basis of their physical and functional attributes. As was done for ships, drydocks with similar characteristics are grouped together into one class. Distinctions between drydocks and between the vacant and occupied states of a given drydock can occur in the following categories: a. Type of construction. Hoe a drydock is fabricated or assembled is a major distinguishing characteristic. The types include one-piece construction, multi piece construction, and multiple pontoon sections. b. Construction material. The materials used to fabricate the majority of the structural components of drydocks include steel, concrete, timber, and combinations of these materials. c. Drydocked vessel. Each drydock has physical restrictions on the maximum vessel size it can accommodate. Footnote 3 explains the rationale for selecting the vessel and listing its designation in the table. d. Service state. A drydock manifests different presentment areas when it is occupied, vacant, and submerged. For presentment areas of occupied drydocks (maximum-sized vessel on the blocks), the areas were calculated to include the areas of the drydock's structure plus the areas of components of the vessel on blocks which protrude outside the profile of the drydock. e. Type of wind load response. Categorizing a drydock as a "hulldominated" or "normal" vessel is a function of the ship on the blocks. Generally, when there is no ship in the drydock, it behaves much like a hulldominated vessel; but when a ship's superstructure protrudes outside of the profile of the drydock, the effect is such that the drydock responds as a "normal" vessel. (See footnote (2) of Table 3).

26.6-60

26.6-61

3. Tankers and Barge Tanker Service Craft Characteristics. Table 4 presents the principal dimensions and locations of manifolds of tankers and service craft used to transport liquid cargoes in bulk form. Depending on the vessel, the manifold connections can be made only on the port side, only on the starboard side, or on both sides. Some vessels have multiple manifold locations along the length of the deck. Some of these multiple manifold connections can be made on both sides and some on only the port or starboard sides. A connection that is limited to only one side of the vessel is indicated in the table by asterisks.

Service Craft (Continued)]

SECTION 4. COMMERCIAL MOORING SYSTEM COMPONENTS 1. Availability of Components. This section presents strength and dimensional data for an assortment of commercially available mooring ropes, chains, chain fittings, anchors, buoys, and sinkers. At the bottom of some tables, there is a footnote listing the name of the components suppliers who furnished the data for publication. The names and locations of these suppliers are contained in the acknowledgements at the front of this volume. Often, there are many suppliers of the same component because it is fabricated to a standard established by such organizations as the U.S. Navy or the American Bureau of Shipping. For additional information on materials used, construction, features, limitations, applications, and other technical data, refer to the manufacturer. The availability of any particular component and the accuracy of the data should be verified prior to selection. 2. Mooring Rope. Rope used to moor vessels is of several types -- synthetic fiber, natural fiber, and wire. At times, these materials are spliced together or are used in combination throughout the length of the rope. For example, a nylon tail may be attached to the end of a Wire rope to facilitate wrapping around a mooring fitting. An example of combinations of materials is wire rope which can be manufactured with either a fiber core or a steel core. For further details of mooring rope construction, refer to manufacturers' catalogs. The dimensions, weight, and breaking strength of ropes used in moorings are presented in Tables 5 through 9. Additionally, comparisons of various properties of fiber ropes are presented.

Note: Section 4 is included for information purposes and does not imply an endorsement of any particular supplier's component, nor does it preclude the use of other suitable materials.

26.6-66

26.6-67

Ropes (Continued)] 26.6-68

Ropes] 26.6-69

Ropes (Continued)] 26.6-70

26.6-71

26.6-72

26.6-77

26.6-78

3. Chain and Fittings. The following tables present dimensional, weight, and strength data for a variety of chains which can be used in mooring systems. For some types of chain, several grades are available. These grades are associated with different strength and durability characteristics of the steel used in fabrication. The strengths of the fittings for a the particular size (diameter) of chain generally should equal or exceed the strength of the highest grade of chain size under consideration. Table 10 describes the tolerances, markings, and general notes which apply to commercially available chain and fittings. Supplemental information for standard mooring system components is presented at the beginning of Section 6. The preferred chains for mooring systems are Navy Common A-Link Chains (see Section 6) and A.B.S. Stud Link Chain.

Table 10. A.B.S. Tolerances, Markings, and General Notes (Continued) GENERAL NOTES a) Chain, anchor, and fitting manufacture, materials, and testing requirements shall conform to the applicable sections and requirements of the American Bureau of Shipping's Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels, latest edition for ABS Grades 1, 2, and 3 above. All markings shall be raised letters or figures of a size permitted by the space available but not to exceed 3/4 of an inch in height or by 1/8 inch raised relief.

b)

[1]

Developed from the American Bureau of Shipping Rules For Building and Classing Steel Vessels, Section 43.

26.6-83

26.6-84

26.6-85

26.6-86

26.6-87

26.6-88

26.6-89

26.6-92

26.6-95

26.6-96

26.6-97

26.6-99

26.6-100

26.6-102

26.6-108

26.6-109

26.6-110

26.6-115

26.6-116

26.6-121

26.6-122

26.6-123

26.6-124

26.6-125

4. Anchors. The following tables furnish weight (in air), dimensional, and proof load test data of anchors as published by various manufacturers, The manufacturers are headquartered in both the U.S. and abroad. Foreign manufacturers may have licensees in the U.S. who distribute, or fabricate and distribute, the anchors domestically. The designer of a mooring system should be aware of the limitations of the lifting capacity of available installation equipment so that the dry weight of the anchor does not exceed this capacity. Most of the anchors are furnished with shackles to which a chain can be connected. For anchors which are not provided with shackles, refer to the previous part of this section to select a shackle with a suitable bolt diameter, jaw opening, and strength. Anchor selection is discussed in Part 2 of Section 5. For each of the anchor types listed, there is a relationship between the dry weight of the anchor and its holding power in different types of sea bottoms. These holding power-to-weight ratios are summarized in Table 78. For factors of safety for anchors, see DM-26.5.

26.6-130

26.6-135

26.6-138

26.6-140

26.6-141

26.6-142

26.6-143

26.6-144

26.6-145

26.6-146

Table 64.

Hook Anchors with Auxiliary Shank Fluke[1]

ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ (Future Manual Change) ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ [1] This table is included for informational purposes. Use of this type anchor is NOT authorized until holding power retios have been established by the Civil Engineering Laboratory.

26.6-147

26.6-148

26.6-150

26.6-151

5. Buoys. The following tables present dimensions and characteristics of a variety of foam-filled buoys. These buoys can be used as marker and mooring buoys. There are two types of buoys described herein -- tension bar types and hawsepipe types. The tension bar type has a structural member (i.e., the tension bar) which passes through the body of the buoy. The anchor line is connected to one end and is always submerged when no lifting load is applied. Mooring lines are attached to the other end of the tension bar which becomes oriented in a near-vertical manner due to the weight of the anchor line. For the hawsepipe type, the tension bar is replaced by a hawsepipe (chain tube) which allows passage of the anchor chain through the buoy.

26.6-154

26.6-155

26.6-156

26.6-157

26.6-158

26.6-159

26.6-160

6. Sinkers. There are very few organizations which fabricate concrete sinkers. Their simplicity of design and construction makes them very easy to fabricate. The main concerns are (a) provision of a suitable connection which is securely embedded in the sinker and (b) use of a durable concrete mix which provides the required weight. Besides concrete, cast iron can be used as a construction material. Cast iron is more homogeneous, hence it is more durable. Cast iron sinkers, used more often than concrete sinkers as substitutes for anchors, act through gravity rather than through embedment and pull-out resistance in the soil.

26.6-162

SECTION 5. STANDARD RISER-TYPE MOORING SYSTEMS 1. Mooring System Selection. The selection of a standard riser-type mooring to secure an expected range of vessels at a specific site is based on the "maximum mooring line load" of each vessel. The maximum of these loads is the required minimum holding power of the class of mooring that should be selected. It should be remembered that a mooring may be used by a variety of vessels. Hence, the loads it will have to sustain will vary for each vessel even if environmental conditions remain constant. Selection of the proper riser-type mooring is accomplished in two steps: STEP 1: The "design mooring line load" is used to select the class of mooring which has components and geometry capable of sustaining this load. Select the appropriate type and number of anchors based on: type of bottom class of mooring.

STEP 2:

2. Anchor Selection. The selection of an anchor which would be suitable for the selected class of mooring requires a certain amount of engineering judgment. Consideration, should first be given to the types of anchors which may be used at a given site. Some sites are not ideally suited to the use and installation of sediment anchors. In some locations, the sea bottom may dictate the use of stake piles (see DM-7), gravity weights, or propellant embedment anchors to achieve the rated holding power. Also, for twin ground leg moorings in which anchors are not dragged when set, accurate placement is critical so as not to cause the entire mooring load to go only into one of the two ground legs. The sizing of the selected anchor types to provide the necessary holding power also requires considerable judgment. This is due to the lack of information and consistently reliable test data concerning anchor behavior. It is also due to the concept of measuring anchor efficiency merely as the ratio of the anchor's in-service holding power and its weight. However, at the present time, this is the most convenient and universally accepted means of evaluating different types of anchors under similar conditions and comparing their performance in relation to one another. The determination of an anchor's in-service holding power is a function of many of the following parameters and their interaction: the nature of the soil and kinematic behavior of the anchor in it, weight and geometry of the anchor, opening of the flukes, penetration of the flukes, burial depth of the anchor, stability of the anchor during dragging, additional holding capacity afforded by buried chain of the ground leg, and nature and direction of the applied load.

Table 78 lists the holding power-to-anchor weight ratios for an assortment of anchor types and bottom conditions. These recommended ratios were established based on anchor field tests performed by the Civil Engineering Laboratory, Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, California. The engineer should anticipate considerable scatter in test results because test conditions cannot be controlled in a nonhomogeneous medium such as soil. To date, an insufficient sampling of test results has been obtained to permit the establishment of a holding power-to-weight ratio which would be representative of a 90 percent probability (assuming a normal distribution for test data) that an anchor will achieve a minimum holding power. DM-26.5 presents additional information about anchors. IMPORTANT: When anchors are selected for a specific class of mooring, their required holding power should be the rated capacity of the selected mooring class, not the design mooring load of the moored vessel. In this way, the entire system will have a balanced design and the anchors will not cause the mooring's capacity to be less than its nominal value. This concept assumes that the design mooring load will be less than the rated capacity of the class of mooring (this is the proper practice).

Table 78. Holding Power to Weight Ratios of Various Anchors[1] ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ HOLDING POWER AND TYPE OF BOTTOM ³ ³ ³ ³ ANCHOR[2] SAND MUD/SILT HARD/DENSE SOIL ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ U.S. Navy Stock1ess 4.5[3] 3[3] -³ ³ U.S. Navy Lightweight 10 3 -³ ³ U.S. Navy Stato[4] 20[5] 15[5] 15[5] ³ ³ Danforth 10 3 -³ ³ Stock Anchor Type[1] 13.5 9 -³ ³ (Off drill II) ³ ³ Moorfast 10 7 -³ ³ Boss 20 15 15[5] ³ ³ Flipper Delta 15 12 15 ³ ³ Stevin 17 12[6] 15 ³ ³ Stevfix 20 -20 ³ ³ Stevmud -19 -³ ³ Hook -18 10 ³ ³ Mark-2 (Cast) 20 --³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ [1] The anchor holding power ratios are intended for use with conventional anchor weights up to 30,000 lbs only; heavier conventional anchors may possess lower holding power to weight ratios. The holding power ratios represent values established by field tests performed by the Civil Engineering Laboratory, Naval Construction Battallon Center, Port Hueneme, California, and are based on efficiencies achieved during maximum permissible drag of 50 feet. Higher holding power ratios may be achieved by some anchors during longer drags. The holding power ratios do not apply where anomalous seafloor conditions exist; erratic or unsatisfactory anchor performance is experienced under conditions such as layered seafloors (soft sediment over stiff/dense sediment or vice versa), gravely (glaciated) seafloors, thin sediment layer above rock, and unconsolidated clays with cohesion to pressure ratios less than 0.15. For weight ranges and dimensional characteristics of anchors and appurtenances, see Tables in Sections 4 and 6. The flukes should be restricted to a 35 deg angle opening in sand and fixed fully open in mud. Values indicated are for fabricated (welded) anchors only. They should not be applied to cast anchors. Only with fluke angle reduced to 32 degrees and with stabillizers lengthened by 35%. In very soft bottoms this anchor should be installed without the retrieving wire rope pendant attached to the corner eye opening in one of the flukes. This pendant may cause a dissymmetric strain leading to anchor instability and overturning resulting in a major loss of holding power.

[2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

3. Classes of Moorings Without Sinkers. The tables and illustrations which follow describe the configurations and components of standard riser-type moorings of the following classes: Class ÄÄÄÄÄ AAA BBB AA BB CC DD A B C D E F G Previous Class ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ None None A-A B-B C-C D-D A B C D E F G Holding Power (lbs) ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ 500,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 175,000 150,000 125,000 100,000 75,000 50,000 25,000 5,000 Number of Ground Legs ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ 3 (twin chain) 3 (twin chain) 3 (twin chain) 3 (twin chain) 3 (twin chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) Type of Chain Throughout ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ A.B.S. Grade 3 Stud Link A.B.S. Grade 2 Stud Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link

The factor of safety against chain failure in all of these moorings is approximately 4. If U.S. Navy Common A-Link chain is not available, A.B.S. Grade 2 Stud Link chain is an acceptable substitute over all or part of a mooring. However, the dimensions of the fittings should always be checked to ensure the proper fit. A new type of chain, comparable to A.B.S. Grade 3 stud link chain and designated U.S. Navy FM3 stud link chain, has been designed to accept sacrificial anodes for cathodic protection to provide extra longevity to moorings.

Classes AAA and BBB (Proposed)] 26.6-167

Classes AA, BB, AND CC] 26.6-168

26.6-170

Table 81. Moorings Without Sinkers Lengths of Ground Chain Required for Various Water Depths[1] ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ Class ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄ(Proposed)ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ Depth of ³ ³ Water (ft) AAA[2] BBB[2] AA BB CC DD ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ Basic 7 6 4-1/2 4-1/2 4-1/2 4-1/2 ³ ³ Basic to 50 7 6 4-1/2 4-1/2 4-1/2 4-1/2 ³ ³ 50 to 60 7-1/2 6-1/2 5 5 5 5 ³ ³ 60 to 70 8 7 5 5-1/2 5-1/2 5 ³ ³ 70 to 80 8-1/2 7 5-1/2 5-1/2 5-1/2 5-1/2 ³ ³ 80 to 90 9 7-1/2 6 6 6 6 ³ ³ 90 to 100 9-1/2 8 6[3] 6-1/2 6-1/2 6 ³ ³ 100 to 115 10 8 -6-1/2 6-1/2 6-1/2 ³ ³ 115 to 130 10 8-1/2 -7[3] 7[3] 7 ³ ³ 130 to 145 10-1/2[3] 9[3] ---7 ³ ³ 145 to 160 -----7-1/2 ³ ³ 160 to 175 -----8 ³ ³ 175 to 190 -----8[3] ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ [1] Lengths are 90 ft. shorts. Depth of water is taken at mean high water from a firm botton at anchor locations. [2] Includes an extra shot of chain to accomodate any temporary load increases due to dynamic forces. [3] Freeboard limit of 2 ft. reached at this water depth for buoy size indicated in Table 79.

26.6-171

Classes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G]

26.6-177

26.6-178

4. Classes of Moorings With Sinkers. The tables and illustrations which follow describe configurations and components of riser-type moorings with sinkers in the following class designations: Class ÄÄÄÄÄ A B C D E Previous Class ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ A B C D E Holding Power (lbs) ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ 150,000 125,000 100,000 75,000 50,000 Number of Ground Legs ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) 3 (single chain) Type of Chain Throughout ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link U.S. Navy Common A-Link

The factor of safety against chain failure in all of these moorings is approximately 4. If U.S. Navy Common A-Link chain is not available, A.B.S. Grade 2 Stud Link chain is an acceptable substitute over all or part of a mooring. However, the dimensions of the fittings should always be checked to ensure the proper fit.

26.6-184

26.6-185

SECTION 6. STANDARD MOORING SYSTEM COMPONENTS 1. General Notes. The following notes apply to the tables and figures in this Section: a. All joining links and the small end of anchor joining links shall have a trial joining with their designated A-links, using A-links of minimum width and length and maximum wire diameter. b. Manufacturer's details of chain and fittings shall be subject to the approval of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Headquarters. c. All items are to be subject to proof and break test loads as noted.

d. All chain and appendages to be cast, welded, or forged steel of size indicated. e. f. SET or (SET) means "small end type." CSK means "countersunk."

g. All chain and fittings shall conform to the current issue of Military Specification MIL-C-18295, "Chain and Fittings for Fleet Moorings." 2. Markings.

a. Studs of alternate A-links joining links, anchor joining links (SET), anchor joining links, and sides of shackles and swivels shall be marked on one side with manufacturer's initials or trademark, size of chain, and letters YD. b. Sinker shackles, ground rings, spiders, and F-shackles with lugs shall be marked on one side with manufacturer's initials or trademark and on the opposite side with the stock number. c. End links shall be marked on one side with manufacturer's initials or trademark and largest corresponding chain size, and on the opposite side with the stock number. d. All markings shall be raised letters or figures of size permitted by the space available but not to exceed 3/4 in. in height by 1/8 in. in relief. The space selected for markings shall be points that carry a minimum of stress and have a minimum of wear. 3. Tolerances. The tolerances listed in Table 95 apply to the components of this section: a. Tolerance of spider wire diameter at each end +/- 1/16 in.

b. For permissible tolerance of length and width of anchor joining links (SET), anchor joining links, and end links, use wire diameter D. c. Tolerance of dimension F for anchor joining links (SET) and anchor joining links shall be +/- 1/8 in. Tolerance for other dimensions are according to the table providing they do not increase the tolerance of dimension F.

d. The overall length of six A-links, measuring from every third link, shall not exceed 3/8 in. more nor 1/8 in. less per inch of wire diameter than the nominal length. e. Wire diameters shall be taken as half the sum of two measurements at right angles to each other. 4. Substitutions. This Section is included to enable use of components presently in inventory until such stock is depleted. If a standard component listed in this Section is not available, an equivalent A.B.S. Grade 2 commercial component may be substituted in the mooring assembly. These commercial components must satisfy A.B.S. markings and tolerances requirements (see Table 10) and the general notes on the preceding page, The strength and dimensions of all commercial substitutions must always be checked to ensure compatibility with the adjacent components in the mooring.

Table 93. Chain and Fitting Details - Permissible Tolerances[1] ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ WIRE DIAMETER WIDTH LENGTH[2] ³ ³ WIRE DIAMETER PLUS OR MINUS PLUS OR MINUS PLUS OR MINUS ³ ³ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ 3/4 - 1-1/8 1/64 3/64 1/16 ³ ³ 1-3/16 - 1-3/8 1/32 5/64 7/64 ³ ³ 1-3/16 - 1-5/8 1/32 3/32 1/8 ³ ³ 1-11/16 - 1-7/8 1/32 7/64 9/64 ³ ³ 1-15/16 - 2-1/8 3/64 1/8 5/32 ³ ³ 2-3/16 - 2-3/8 3/64 9/64 11/64 ³ ³ 2-7/16 - 2-7/8 3/64 5/32 3/16 ³ ³ 2-15/16 - 3-3/8 1/16 11/64 13/64 ³ ³ 3-7/16 - 3-7/8 1/16 3/16 7/32 ³ ³ 4 - 4-3/8 1/16 13/64 15/64 ³ ³ 4-1/2 - 4-7/8 1/16 7/32 1/4 ³ ³ 5 - 5-3/8 5/64 15/64 17/64 ³ ³ 5-1/2 - 5-7/8 5/64 1/4 9/32 ³ ³ 6 - 6-5/8 5/64 1/4 9/32 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ [1] All dimensions in inches. Also, see introduction to this section. [2] Outside diameter for ground rings.

26.6-189

26.6-190

26.6-191

26.6-192

26.6-193

26.6-194

26.6-195

26.6-196

26.6-197

26.6-198

26.6-199

26.6-200

26.6-201

26.6-202

26.6-203

26.6-204

26.6-207

26.6-208

26.6-209

26.6-210

26.6-211

26.6-212

26.6-213

26.6-214

26.6-215

26.6-217

26.6-218

26.6-219

26.6-220

26.6-221

THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY BLANK

SECTION 7. AIDS TO NAVIGATION BUOYS 1. Buoy Components. The assembly of an aids to navigation buoy consists of an assortment of components. These components differ slightly with each type of buoy. For example, some buoys have a bridle as a component in their mooring system, whereas others may not require one. Figure 13 identifies the components of a typical aids to navigation buoy mooring system. The U.S Coast Guard COMDTINST M16511.1, dated 22 Dec. 1978, was issued to provide technical data and methodology to select the buoy mooring chain length and sinker size; given the environmental conditions of windspeed, wave height and period, current, water depth, and bottom type. The chain length is selected to give the minimum watch circle radius for the given conditions. 2. U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Data. Table 120 lists the principal features of standard U.S. Coast Guard lighted and unlighted aids to navigation buoys. Sample illustrations of their configurations and components are shown in Figures 14 through 17, inclusive. The U.S. Coast Guard also maintains standard unlighted steel and plastic buoys which are smaller than the previously described buoys. These are commonly of the "nun" (N) or "can" (C) type. They are listed in Table 121, and are illustrated in Figures 18, 19, and 20. 3. Moorings for Standard Aids to Navigation Coast Guard-type buoys for use in its coastal 23 illustrate the features of specific buoys. bills of materials for these buoys and detail components required for various water depths. Buoys. The U.S. Navy has adopted facilities. Figures 21, 22, and Tables 122 and 123 present the the quantities of mooring system

26.6-238

Table 124. Chain for Buoy Bridles[1] ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ Assembly No. Buoy 2 lengths of 1 length of ³ ³ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ ³ ³ ³ ³ 5026 8 x 26 BE 7'-6" (18 links) 75'-0" ³ ³ 5028 6 x 20 E 6'-0" (18 links) 78'-0" ³ ³ 5280 7 x 17 E 7'-6" (22 links) 75'-0" ³ ³ 5352 9 x 32 WE 9'-0" (18 links) 72'-0" ³ ³ 5353 9 x 20 B 7'-6" (18 links) 75'-0" ³ ³ 5354 9 x 20 G 7'-6" (18 links) 75'-0" ³ ³ 5363 5 x 11 E 6'-0" (24 links) 78'-0" ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ [1] Stud link chain listed under Bill of Materials to be cut into three lengths in accordance with above table. The two equal lengths are attached to the buoy and the remaining length leads to the sinker.

26.6-241

REFERENCES Jane's Fighting Ships, Moore, John E., Franklin Watts, Inc., New York, NY 1978. NAVFAC Documents, Department of Defense activities may obtain copies of Design Manuals and P-Publications from the Commanding Officer, Naval Publications and Forms Center, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19120; Department of Defense activities must use the Military Standard Requisitioning and Issue Procedure (MILSTRIP), using the stock control number obtained from NAVSUP Publication 2002. Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels, American Bureau of Shipping, 65 Broadway, New York, NY. Commercial organizations may procure Design Manuals and P-Publications from the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20420. Military/Federal and NAVFAC Guide Specifications are available to all parties, free of charge, from the Commanding Officer, Naval Publications and Form Center, 5801 Tabor Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19120, Telephone: Autovon (DOD only): 442-3321, Commercial: (215) 697-3321. United States Coast Guard Documents, available from U. S. Coast Guard, Washington, DC 20590. COMDTINST M16511.1, Buoy Mooring Selection Guide for Chain Moorings; CG-193, Aids to Marine Navigation of the U.S.; CG-222, Aids to Marine Navigation Manual.

BIBLIOGRAPHY A Re-analysis of the Original Test Data for the Taylor Standard Series, Gertler, M., David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD. Big Tankers and Their Reception, Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses, Brussels, Belgium. Design and Construction of Ports and Marine Structures, Quinn, A. De F., McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, NY. Forces on Ships Moored in Protected Waters, Altman, R., Hydronautics, Inc., Laurel, MD. Guidelines and Recommendations for the Safe Mooring of Large Ships at Piers and Sea Islands, Oil Companies International Marine Forum, London, England. Port Engineering, Bruun, P., Gulf Publishing Co., Houston, TX. Principles of Naval Architecture, Comstock, J. P. (ed.), Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, New York, NY. Preliminary Mooring Data for DD 692 Class (Jan. - Feb. 1946), David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD. Preliminary Mooring Data for CVE 55 Class (Mar. - July 1946), David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD. Preliminary Mooring Data for DD 692 Class (Jan. - June 1946), David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD. Preliminary Mooring Data for SS 212 Class (May - July 1946), David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD. Proceedings of the Princeton University Conference on Berthing and Cargo Handling in Exposed Places, Princeton, NJ. Report of Working Group I, International Commission for the Reception of Large Ships, Annex to Bulletin No. 32, Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses, Brussels, Belgium. Report of Working Group IV, International Commission for the Reception of Large Ships, Annex to Bulletin No. 35, Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses, Brussels, Belgium. Research Investigation for the Improvement of Ship Mooring Methods, British Ship Research Association, Wallsend, Northcumberland, England.

Ships Motions in Shallow Water, Tuck, E. O., Journal of Ship Research, Vol. 14, No. 4. Theory of Seakeeping, Korvin-Kroukovsky, B. V., Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, New York, NY. The Speed and Power of Ships, Taylor, D. W., U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Wind Effects on Structures, An Introduction to Wind Engineering, Simiu, E. and Scanlan, R. H., John Wiley and Sons, New York, NY.

Information

NAVFAC DM 26-6 Mooring Design Physical & Empirical Data

261 pages

Find more like this

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

579239