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Markings

The Gospel According to Matthew

by Chapter 1 8 15 22 2 9 16 23 3 10 17 24 4 11 18 25 5 12 19 26 6 13 20 27 7 14 21 28

Matthew 1

General Reference:

Frederick Buechner, "Joseph the Husband of Mary," Peculiar Treasures, p. 80

Verses 1-17

Verses 18-25

Matthew 1:1-17

(Luke 3:23-28) General References

Barbara Lundblad, "Preaching on `Irregularities'," Parish Practice Notebook (Winter 2002), p. 1-3 (filed with Other's Sermons) And we must stumble over the women. Their presence is so odd. There is no prededent for this, really, in all of the Old Testament ... (p. 1) And then the wife of Uriah. Isn't that sad? They can't even say her name. But the narrator knew what he was doing. He wanted us to remember, generation after generation, that Bathsheba, who is not named, was always Uriah's wife. ... She was the wife of Uriah the Hittite who shall always be remembered in these genealogies of generations as far more righteous than the king. And so Uriah should be there, named in the genealogy. (p. 2) All these women who were strangers outside the chosen people--women who were, in some ways, at least to others, a scandal. Women who didn't seem to know their proper place. ... They were women who went beyond tradition and family. And then Uriah the Hittite. What a foolish family tree, and all of it leading up to Joseph who had nothing to do with it. Except he went beyond all nomrs of righteousness to take Mary as his wife. He went beyond all norms of righteousness to graft this child, who seemed illegitimate, into his family tree so that this Child of heaven, this Child of the Holy Spirit would also be a child of earth. (p. 3)

Matthew 1:18-25

(Luke 2:1-7) Greek Cross References:

18 21 23 25 Luke 1:27 Luke 1:31 Isaiah 7:14 Luke 2:21

General References

W. H. Auden, "The Temptation of Saint Joseph," Divine Inspiration, p. 17 John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 78-84 Sheila Klassen-Wiebe, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 392-395 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 96 f. Morton Smith, quoted in The Gospel According to Jesus by Stephen Mitchell, p. 81

Verse References

20 20 21-23 21 23 23 23 23 25 Logos, Scripture Art Cover Art: New Testament Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 92-95 Communication Resources, Sca7, "Givename" John Donne, Sermons on the Psalms and Gospels, p. 178 Geza Vermes, The Changing Faces of Jesus, p. 228 Communication Resources, Sca6, "Holly" Cover Art: New Testament Communication Resources, Sca2004, "ChristM"

Matthew 1:18-25

Notes

Stephen Mitchell Joseph's forgiveness of Mary, in what could be called the essential Christmas legend, is such a profound symbol, and such a perfect embodiment of the gospel according to Jesus, that it constitutes an undoing, a redoing, a regeneration of the male myth of Adam and Eve ... If we focus our attention on Joseph, as Matthew does, and make this a legend of salvation, then Joseph becomes the second Adam. He is given a second chance, as we all are, constantly, a chance to reenact a life drama that we have wretchedly botched at least once before, and to do it right this time. Whether Mary is pregnant by another man or by the Holy Spirit, in Joseph's eyes she has been seduced, as Eve was, and no external angel will ever tell him differently. His first reaction is to retreat into his woundedness and blame her, and hence be cast out of Eden. When he refuses to be seduced himself by the poison of the Accuser, when he can finally let go of the offense and of his offended self, and forgive Mary with all his heart, he finds that he is again standing in Eden, the garden of delight, the kingdom of God. Morton Smith But Matthew [often takes] Old Testament verses out of context to make them prophecies of gospel stories. In such cases the starting point was commonly the story; the editor's problem was to find a text that could be forced to fit it. Therefore, we can be almost certain that the story of the virgin birth was also given to him by tradition, not invented from the text he twisted to suit it. If so, where did the tradition come from? Why was the story invented? ... Perhaps also because the irregularity of his birth had to be explained. Geza Vermes The Mishnah, the oldest of the rabbinic codes, defines a virgin as a female who "has never seen blood even though she is married" (mNiddah 1:4). ... ... In fact, rabbis seriously debated whether bloodstains found after the wedding night in the nuptial bed of a minor, i.e., a "virgin in respect of menstruation," marked her first period or the consummation of the marriage. So the idea of conceiving on the first physical opportunity and thus becoming a "virgin mother" was not a mere flight of fancy of the overimaginative rabbinic mind. ... virginity and virgin birth were much more elastic notions in Jewish antiquity than Christian tradition allows.

Matthew 1

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament Sca7, "givename"

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 1

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Holly" Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 1

Notes

Sca2004, "ChristM"

Matthew 2

General Reference

Frederick Buechner, Peculiar Treasures, "Herod the Great," p. 50; "Joseph the Husband of Mary," p. 80; "Wise Men," p. 172

Verses 1-12

Verses 13-15

Verses 16-18

Verses 19-23

Matthew 2:1-12

Greek Cross References:

1-2 2 6 11 12 Isaiah 60:2-3 Jeremiah 3:5; Zechariah 9:9; Luke 1:73 Micah 5:2 Psalm 72:10-11; Isaiah 60:6; Song of Songs 3:6 1Kings 13:9-10; Matthew 2:22; Acts 10:22; Hebrews 11:7

Sermon

General References

Verse References

Matthew 2:1-12

General References

Frederick Buechner, The Magnificent Defeat, "Journey in Search of a Soul," p. 51-56, "The Birth," p. 68-71 Jan Brueghel, "Adoration of the Kings," Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 112 f. Gladys May Casely-Hayford, "Nativity," Divine Inspiration, p. 43 D. Mark Davis, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (October 2003), p. 420-422 John Donne, "Epiphany," The Book of Uncommon Prayer, p. 49 T. S. Eliot, "Journey of the Magi," The Complete Poems, p. 68 f. Andrew Greeley, When Life Hurts, p. 106-108 Khalil Hawi, "The Magi in Europe," Divine Inspiration, p. 44 Thomas Merton, "Carol," Selected Poetry, p. 39 Jaroslav Pelikan, The Illustrated Jesus through the Centuries, p. 242-243 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 142 Donald Senior, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 395-398 Mick Stevens, "Cartoon," The New Yorker (September 14, 1998), p. 66 W. B. Yeats, "The Magi," Selected Poems and Plays, p. 49 Anonymous, quoted by Ann Landers Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 108-111 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 110-113 Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: New Testament"

Verse References

Matthew 2:1-12

Notes

John Donne The whole life of Christ was a continual Passion; others die martyrs but Christ was born a martyr. He found Golgotha even in Behtlehem, where he was born; for to his tenderness then the straws were almost as sharp as the thorns after, and the manger as uneasy at first as his cross at last. His birth and his death were but one continual act, and his Christmas Day and his Good Friday are but the evening and morning of one and the same day. And as even his birth is his death, so every action and passage that manifests Christ to us is his birth, for epiphany is manifestation. Mick Stevens Three executive types seated on sofa across from woman in chair with man standing next to her and baby visible through doorway in the next room: "We've travelled the world looking for our next C.E.O., as was foretold in our corporate legends. We think your little Tim might be that C.E.O." W. B. Yeats And all their eyes still fixed hoping to find once more Being by Calvary's turbulence unsatisfied The uncontrollable mystery on the bestial floor. Anonymous Do you know what would have happened if there had been Three Wise Women instead of Three Wise Men? They would have asked directions, arrived on time, helped deliver the baby, cleaned the stable, made a casserone, brought practical gifts, and there would be peace on Earth.

Matthew 2:1-12

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 2:1-12

Verse References:

1-2 3 3 9-10 9 9 10 10 11 11 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 22 Edward Schillebeeckx, "All Jerusalem was Afraid," God Among Us, p. 13-19 J. R. Veneroso, M.M., "Tumult in Jerusalem," Maryknoll (December 2000), p 8 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 200 Communication Resources, Sca2004, "Nativ14" Communication Resources, Sca7, "3Kings" Desmond Tutu, "Feast for Epiphany," Hope and Suffering, p. 145-148 Walt Whitman, "Eidolons," Leaves of Grass, p. 35 Joys ceaseless exercises exaltations. Communication Resources, Epiphany.tif(SCA3) Scripture Cover Art, p. 19 Communication Resources, Crowns.tif(SCA4) Scripture Cover Art, p. 36

Matthew 2:1-12

Notes

J. R. Veneroso As if the birth of the Messiah wasn't upsetting news enough, we had to hear it from foreigners and pagans, no less. Are we not the Chosen of God? Do we not have the one, true faith? And do we not possess the totality of truth? Then who are these "wise ones" from the East? And what could they possibly know or teach us?

Matthew 2

Notes

Sca2004, "Nativ14"

Matthew 2

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca7, "3Kings"

Communication Resources, "Epiphany,"(SCA3)

Communication Resources, "Crowns,"(SCA4)

Matthew 2:1-12

Sermon ­ January 6, 2002

I had this thought, What if these gifts were given to Jesus, not because the wise men thought he needed them, but because they realized that they needed to get rid of them? We usually think that there were three wise men, each giving one gift. But the original tradition imagines this story with twelve wisemen. And each of these wise men had a treasure chest, kind of like a doctors black bag, or maybe a magician's bag of tricks. And when they saw Jesus each wise man reached into his bag and each gave him some gold and some frankincense and some myrrh. So I wondered what it was about meeting Jesus that might cause these men to feel like they no longer needed gold or frakincense or myrrh in their treasure chests. Why would these three elements no longer be needed or useful in their ministry of healing and service. I started thinking about this and came up with some tentative answers. But what I realy needed to know before I persued this was whether or not the original text could allow these gifts to be things the wise men gave up for their own good as opposed to giving to Jesus for his good. So I went back to my Greek New Testament and discovered something very interesting: There are six different words in Greek that get translated into the English as "gift." Each or these words has a consistant nuance. I was reminded of an example they used in seminary about an Eskimo language which had seven different words for snow. Each was different and each meant something different which we, here in California have no ability or need to distinguish. I'm only going to tell you about three of these, three nouns that are derived from a single verb, to give. (When the verb is used the meaning is apparent because of the subject and the object of the verb but the noun need something else to distinguish it.) The first word (µ,) means a gift that one person gives to another person. "If your son asks for a fish woud you give his a snake? If you who are evil know how to give good gifts to you children how much more will your heavenly Father give good things to those who ask." The second word () is a gift which God gives to people The third word () is a gift which people give to God, often called an offering or a sacrifice. The bible is clear that we don't give gifts to God because God needs them but because we need to give them. When we sacrifice, we give up something we thought we needed because we believe god when he says it will be better for us without it. The word used for gift in the story of the wise men is this last word, it is an offering which these men make to God because they have met Jesus and they realize that they don't need them any more and will be better off without them.

Matthew 2:1-12

Sermon, p. 2

Why don't they need gold and frankincense and myrrh any more? Because healing people and serving them and loving them is best done without money. You don't need money to serve. Because Jesus opens up a direct route to the father the men don't need frakincense to help people pray and worship God. Because of the resurrection which we have with Jesus we know that bodies no longer need to be preserved with myrrh in order to be ready for another life. Here we have in compacted form what happens when people meet Jesus. They let go of their money, their religious rituals and defenses, and their hedges against death. These might be good after-Christmas gifts for us to offer to Jesus. If, of course, we have met him.

Matthew 2:13-15

Greek Cross References: 13-15

15 Genesis 46:1-4 Hosea 11:1

General References

Dan Damon, "Joseph Son of an Ancient King," "New Year Dawns on Our Darkness," Faith Will Sing, p. 12, 17 Rubén Darío, "Christmas Sonnet," Divine Inspiration, p. 49 Thomas Merton, "The Flight to Egypt," Selected Poetry, p. 4 Joseph Freiherr von Eichendorff, "The Flight of the Holy Family,"Divine Inspiration, p. 48

Verse References

13 13 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 30 Logos, Scripture Art

Matthew 2:13-15

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 2:16-18

Greek Cross References: General References

William Griffin, "Holy Innocents," Stories for the Christian Year, p. 25-31 Erik Axel Karlfeldt, "Black Yule," Divine Inspiration, p. 53 Madeleine L'Engle, "Rachel Weeping," The Irrational Season, p. 28-38 Robert Lowell, "The Holy Innocents," Divine Inspiration, p. 55 Joost van den Vondel, "Christmas Night," Divine Inspiration, p. 51 18 Jeremiah 31:15

Verse References

16 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 21

Matthew 2:19-23

Cross References:

20 23 Exodus 4:19 Mark 1:24; Luke 2:39; John 1:45

Matthew 3

General References

Frederick Buechner, "John the Baptist," Peculiar Treasures, p. 69-71

Verses 1-12

Verses 13-17

Matthew 3:1-12

(Mark 1:1-8; Luke 3:1-9, 15-17; John :19-28) Greek Cross References:

2 3 4 7 9 10 Matthew 4:17; Mark 1:15 Isaiah 40:3 2 Kings 1:8 Matthew 12:34, 23:33 John 8:33 Matthew 7:19

General References

Walter J. Burghardt, S.J., "Shopping for Christ," Lovely in Eyes Not His, p. 5-10

Verse References

1-2 11-12 Communication Resources, Sca2004, "Repent1" John Dominic Crossan, "John's Message," The Historical Jesus, p. 234 f.

Matthew 3:1-12

Notes

Sca2004, "Repent1"

Matthew 3:13-17

(Mark 1:9-11; Luke 3:21-22) Greek Cross References:

14 16 17 Luke 1:43 Isaiah 11:2 Genesis 22:2; Psalm 2:7; Isaiah 42:1; Matthew 12:18, 17:5; Luke 9:35

General References

Curtis Freeman, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 1993), p. 285-289 Comunication Resources, "Scripture Art"

Verse References

13-15 13-15 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 25 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 324 The more superior one person is to another whom he loves, the more he will feel tempted, humanly speaking, to draw the other up to himself. Divinely speaking, however, the more he will feel moved to come down to him. This is the logic of love. Strange that people have not seen this in Christianity.

Matthew 3:13-17

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 4

Verses 1-11

Verses 12-17 Verses 23-25

Verses 18-22

Matthew 4:1-11

(Mark 1:12-13; Luke 4:1-13) Greek Cross References:

1 2 3 4 6 7 9 10 Hebrews 2:18, 4:15 Amos 8:11 John 6:31 Deuteronomy 8:3; Matthew 6:33 Psalm 91:11-12; John 7:4 Exodus 17:7; Deuteronomy 6:16 John 6:15 Deuteronomy 6:13

General References

Verse References

Matthew 4:1-11

General References

Walter J. Burghardt, S.J., "Where Sin Increased, Grace Abounded All the More," Lovely in Eyes Not His, p. 19-25 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 370 f Juana Inés de la Cruz, from The Divine Narcissus, Divine Inspiration, p. 88 Verna J. Dozier, Equipping the Saints, p. 9-13 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 181 f. Andrew Greeley, "Resisting Temptation," When Life Hurts, p. 169-172 Thomas R. Haney, Today' Spirituality , p. 88 & 138 s Richard L. Jeske, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1984), p. 407 Nikos Kazantzakis, The Enduring Legacy (from The Last Temptation of Christ), p. 324-335 C. Norman Kraus, The Community of the Spirit, p. 150, 151 Madeleine L' ngle, The Irrational Season, p. 168 f. E Bertil Malmberg, "Christ Meets Lucifer," Divine Inspiration, p. 84 John L. McKenzie, "Temptation I: In the Desert," The Civilization of Christianity, p. 24-34 Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu, p. 110 Parker Palmer, The Courage to Teach, p. 182 Jaroslav Pelikan, The Illustrated Jesus through the Centuries, p. 210 György Ronay, "Stones and Bread," Divine Inspiration, p. 91 Christina Rossetti, "The Three Enemies," Goblin Market and Other Poems, p. 41 f. William Stafford, "Poetry," Even in Quiet Places, p. 25 William Stafford, "Easter Morning," & "An Introduction to Some Poems," The Way It Is, p. 6, 132 Lamar Williamson, "Expository Article," Interpretation (January 1984), p. 51-55 Walter Wink, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1983), p. 392-397 Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 150-153

Verse References

Matthew 4:1-11

Notes

Thomas R. Haney I guess that' why people s stand in rosary lines waiting like latter-day Veronicas to grasp at the veiled image of a God who finally threw himself off the temple pinnacle. Somehow a God as unpretentious as the bread we eat or as available as communion lines isn' any more marvelous than t a carpenter who refuses to bake bread out of desert stones. (p. 138) Richard L. Jeske In John 6­7 there is the exact reproduction of the synoptic temptation story within the context of Jesus'daily ministry: It is demanded of Jesus that he make bread in the wilderness (6:31), that he become their king (6:15), and that he go to the Temple and perform a spectacular miracle, to "show himself to the world" (7:4). The world will make peace with Jesus but on its own terms, a demand which the synoptic temptation story depicts as demonic. C. Norman Kraus In the story of Jesus'temptations (Matt. 4:1 -11) we are told that Satan offered him three popular ways to be a successful revolutionary leader ... (p. 150) Then Satan offered to give the world to Jesus if he would fall at Satan' feet and worship. This s was the temptation to build an empire rooted in the use of force and "worldly" power. (p. 151) Madeleine L' ngle E Since he did not fall for any of the temptations Satan offered him he had nohubris and so he is not a tragic hero. With the tragic hero there is always the question of what might have been, how the tragedy could have been averted. If Oedipus had not killed the old man at the crossroads; if Faust had not heeded the temptation of knowledge and youth; if Macbeth had not listened to the witches and lusted for the crown. ... With Jesus the might-have-been was answered when the Spirit led him into the desert to be tempted. There is an inevitability to his life, but it is not tragic in vitability because his will e remained free.

Matthew 4:1-11

Notes, p. 2

Thomas Merton I fasted in order to set my heart at rest. After three days fasting I had forgotten gain or success. After five days I had forgotten praise or criticism. After seven days I had forgotten my body With all its limbs. Parker Palmer The alternative rewards offered by a movement may seem fragile compared to the raises, promotions, and status that organizations bestow on loyalists. So they are. Integrity, as the cynics say, does not put bread on the table. But people who are drawn into a movement generally find that stockpiling bread is not the major issue in their lives, not because they have all the bread they want, but because they have a more basic hunger. They understand that human beings do not live by bread alone. William Stafford Sometimes commanders take us over, and they try to impose their whole universe, how to succeed by daily calculation: I can' eat that bread. t William Stafford, "Easter Morning" Maybe someone comes to the door and says, "Repent," and you say, "Come on in," and it' s Jesus. That' when all you ever did, or said, s or even thought, suddenly wakes up again and sings out, "I' still here," and you know it' true. m s You just shiver alive and are left standing there suddenly brought to account: saved. Except, maybe that someone says, "I' got a deal ve for you." And you listen, because that' how s you' e trained --they told you, "Always hear both sides." r So then the slick voice can sell you anything, even Hell, which is what you' e getting by listening. r Well, what should you do? I' say always go to d the door; yes, but keep the screen locked. Then, while you hold the Bible in one hand, lean forward and say carefully, "Jesus?" (p. 6)

Matthew 4:1-11

Notes, p. 3

William Stafford, "An Introduction to Some Poems" The authentic is a line from one thing along to the next; it interests us. Strangely, it relates to what works, but it is not quite the same. It never swerves for revenge, Or profit, or fame: it holds together something more than the world, this line. And we are your wavery efforts at following it. Are you coming? Good: now it is time. (p. 132)

Matthew 4:1-11

Verse References

1-4 3-6 3-4 4 4 4 4 5-7 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 201 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 52 55 Marc David, Nourishing Wisdom, p. 1 f. Michel Boutier, Prayers for My Village, p. 18 Walter Brueggemann, "The Prophetic Word of God and History," Interpretation (July 1994), p. 239-251 Communication Resources, "Bread.tif ," (SCA2) Scripture Cover Art, p. 4 Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: NT" J. Barrie Shepherd, "Pinnacle," The Moveable Feast, p. 39

Matthew 4:1-11

Notes

Marc David [Jewish story of the name of God in the mouth of the scarecrow. Townspeople wanted scarecrow to do their work for them and quit teaching.] Michel Boutier I come to seek for my village Lord the nourishment of Your word and Your benediction. Walter Brueggemann ... the rhetorical-political process that makes human life possible, that lets God be present and effective among us. (p. 248) J. Barrie Shepherd There is a towering deep within these forty days that finds one ... you are teetering across the edge of everything, a palm leaf in your face, a shout, "Hosanna?" trembling in your eager longing ears. The more you suffer, don't you see, the more you feel entitled to a reckoning and to your final triumph over all the kingdoms of the world. Beware!

Matthew 4:1-11

Notes

"Bread.tif ," (SCA2) Scripture Cover Art, p. 4 Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: NT"

Matthew 4:12-17

(Mark 1:14-15; Luke 4:14-15) Greek Cross References:

12 13 15-16 17 Matthew 14:3; Mark 6:17; Luke 3:19-20 John 2:12 Isaiah 9:1-2 Matthew 3:2

Matthew 4:18-22

(Mark 1:16-20; Luke 5:1-11) Greek Sermon General References

John Dominic Crossan, "Fishing for Humans," The Historical Jesus, p. 407-410 Wu Li, "Song of the Fisherman," Divine Inspiration, p. 96

Verse References

18-20 19 C. Neal Strait, "Something for the Yuppies to Consider," Best Sermons I, p. 23 Communication Resources, Sca7, "Fisher"

Matthew 4:18-22

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca7, "Fisher"

Matthew 4:18-22

Sermon ­ January 27, 2002

What happened that Peter and Andrew up and left their boat, and nets, and family when Jesus said, "Come and follow me"? Two answers, Jesus magnetic personality, or some sort of prior encounter between Jesus and these two. Maybe the answer is hidden in the story itself, in that little line "And I will make you fishermen of men." Jesus is offering them a mission in life which is bigger than fishing. He is offering them a meaning and purpose for their lives. We all hunger for that, at least I do. I can see how this would be inviting. And Jesus offers himself as an example of this sort of life. He is fishing for men even as he promises to make them fishermen of men. He obviously has a vision bigger than theirs, he is already involved in that vision and has plans for how that vision can be realized. He is offering them an opportunity to participate. If they take him up they become an example of his success and a downpayment on their future success. I think that if I were in the shoes of these two fishermen I might have taken Jesus up on the offer -- except for one thing: I don't like to fish. Teenager, at beach and on backpacking trips, for the company and for the food. After married because Nancy's father was a fisherman. But I don't like fishing and would never choose to do so on my own. Now if Jesus had found me in Capernaum in my garden and said, "Follow me and I will make you a gardener of people," I pretty sure I would have taken him up on it. And I think that that is what Jesus would have done if he had found me in a garden. I think Jesus used the example of fishermen with Peter and Andrew because they were already fishermen. The loves and desires and abilities which Peter and Andrew had were given them by God to be used in a special way in the kingdom of God. So I think that Jesus might say to Nancy and Shirley, "Come and follow me and I will make you healers of souls." That you might use your compassion and skills to heal the whole person, body, mind, spirit, relationships. And to Dawain, "I will make you a welder of relationships, between people and between people and God." And Evan and Frances, "I will make you hostesses in the house of God" And Karen and Con, "I will make you teachers of life." And Irv, "I will make you work to keep the cogs of the church working smoothly." And Velma, "I will make you a greeter in the Kingdom of God." I tend to think that Jesus sees people for who we are, with our own unique gifts from God. I think he saw Peter and Andrew that way and I think he sees us that way. I don't think that when he told Peter and Andrew that they would be fishermen of men, he meant that all Christians would have to become like them and become fishermen of men.

Matthew 4:18-22

Sermon, p. 2

I pray that I, as your pastor, and our session, and our whole church can be more aware of each what each person would like to add to our mission as a congregation. That each of us can find ways to use our deepest and most rewarding talents and desires to further the kingdom of God. I trust that they are there and I pray that together we can find them.

Matthew 4:23-25

(Luke 6:17-19) Greek Cross References:

23 Mathew 9:35; Mark 1:39

Matthew 5-7

The Sermon on the Mount Chapter 5

General References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 2 Lisa Sowle Cahill, "The Ethical Implications of the Sermon on the Mount,"Interpretation (April 1987), p. 144-156 Robert A. Guelich, "Interpreting the Sermon on the Mount," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 117-130 Stanley Hauerwas, "Living the Proclaimed Reign of God," Interpretation (April 1993), p. 152-158 Stanley Hauerwas and William Willimon, Resident Aliens, p. 69-89 Garrison Keillor, Leaving Home, p. 226 Jack Dean Kingsbury, "The Place, Structure, and Meaning of the Sermon on the Mount," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 131-143 Richard Lischer, "The Sermon on the Mount as Radical Pastoral Care," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 157-169 Kathleen Norris, "Mysteries of the Incarnation: II. Imperatives," Little Girls in Church, p. 62 John Howard Yoder, The Jewish-Christian Schism Revisited, p. 140

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Story Art

Matthew 5-7

Notes

Eberhard Arnold These highlights of the Sermon on the mount make it very clear that it is not a new law ... instead, it is the revelation of God' real power in human life. s Garrison Keillor As the Lord would have said in the Sermon on the Mount if he had had time, "Blessed are those who arrive early wait to be seated and sit where they are told." The ushers at that service would have been called Mounties, and they' have passed out bulletins, ("Peter and Andrew went fishing d last week and caught so many that their nets almost broke--way to go guys!") in addition to loaf and fish distribution. Kathleen Norris Look at the birds Consider the lilies Drink ye all of it Ask Seek Knock Enter by the narrow gate Do not be anxious Judge not; do not give dogs what is holy Go: be it done for you Do not be afraid Maiden, arise Young man, I say, arise Stretch out your hand Stand up, be still Rise, let us be going ... Love Forgive Remember me John Howard Yoder ... the ethic of truth -telling which needs no oath, or enemy lovewhich needs no sword, of jubilee sharing which needs no treasures,is a Jewish ethic. There is nothing platonic, nothing gnostic, nothing Persian about it. The ethic of the Sermon on the Mount is nothing but Jewish.

Matthew 5

Verses 1-12 Verses 21-26 Verses 13-16 Verses 27-30 Verses 17-20 Verses 31-32

Verses 33-37

Verses 38-48

Matthew 5:1-12

(Luke 6:20-23) Greek Cross References:

2 3-11 3-11 3-5 Ephesians 6:19 Psalm 1:1, 32:1-2, 94:12, 106:3; Proverbs 14:21; Isaiah 61:1-3 Luke 1:46-55, 6:20-26; Galatians 5:22-23; James 3:17-18 2 Corinthians 6:10

General References

Verse References

Matthew 5:1-12

General References

John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 58, 63, 90, 123, 154, 155, 160, 166 Neil Douglas-Klotz, Prayers of the Cosmos, p. 43-76 Margaret Gibson, "House of Stone and Song," Pushcart Prize XXVII, p. 157 Andrew Greeley, When Life Hurts, p. 87-90 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 157 f. Madeleine L'Engle, The Irrational Season, p. 93 & Ted Loder, "I Want So to Belong," Guerrillas of Grace, p. 72 John L. McKenzie, The Civilization of Christianity, p. 77 ff. John P. Meier, "Expository Article," Interpretation (July 1990), p. 281-285 Jürgen Moltmann, The Passion for Life, p. 94 Oswald Mbuyoseni Mtshali, "An Old Man in Church," Divine Inspiration, p. 289 Rainer Maria Rilke, "III,28," Book of Hours, p. 145 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 58 Taufiq Sayigh, "The Sermon on the Mount," Divine Inspiration, p. 285 Sister Rebecca Shinas, O.P., "I Am A Singer," I Am a Singer of His Songs (side one) César Vallejo, "Stumble Between Two Stars," Divine Inspiration, p. 287 Jean Vanier, Sharing the Darkness (Sheila Cassity), p. xi. Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 132-135

Verse References

Matthew 5:1-12

Notes

Margaret Gibson It takes a quiet eye to see, a single heart to love. Blessed are the single ones ... for you shall find the Kingdom. You came from it, you shall go there again. Andrew Greeley The Beatitudes are an empirical description of loving behavior. (p. 88) The saint is not a man or woman who breaks no laws and bends no regulations, the saint is a person consumed by joy. (p. 89 f.) Madeleine L'Engle The problem with all that is promised the Christian, and it's all spelled out very clearly in the Beatitudes, is that it's too good to be believed. (p. 93) "Lion and Lamb," p. 56-86 John P. Meier In the end then the beatitudes are the autobiography of Jesus, a perfect self-portrait by the Master. Jesus the meek teacher of wisdom and meek king of the universe, Jesus crucified and risen is the only fully happy man who ever lived. We disciples slowly learn his path to happiness as we walk his way of wisdom, his way of the cross. Jürgen Moltmann From the cross and under the cross the church will understand itself as the people of the Beatitudes. In poverty with Jesus they are happy, and in happiness with Jesus they become poor. In endurance with him they are comforted and in this comforting they can go on enduring. In the gentleness of his self-offering they possess the earth, and in this certainty they will prepare the way for a friendly world. In his Spirit they will hunger for righteousness and will therefore be persecuted. Amid their hunger and persecutions they will have their fill. Oscar Romero ... we know that we only preach the subversive witness of the Beatitudes which have turned everything upside down to proclaim, blessed the poor, blessed the thirsting for justice, blessed the suffering. Jean Vanier ... journey in and to the beatitudes.

Matthew 5:1-12

Notes, p. 2

Ted Loder O God, I want so to belong; teach me to accept. I want to be close; teach me to reach out. I want a place where I am welcome; teach me to open my arms. I want mercy; teach me to forgive. I want beauty; teach me honesty I want peace; show me the eye of the storm. I want truth; show me the way to question my unquestionable convictions. I want joy; show me the way of deeper commitment. I want life; show me how to die. Rainer Maria Rilke There's also this to see: They will live on, they will increase, no longer pawns of time. They will grow like the sweet wild berries the forest ripens as its treasure. Then blessed are those who never turned away and blessed are those who stood quietly in the rain. Theirs shall be the harvest; for them the fruits. They will outlast the pomp and power of lawmakers, whose meanings will crumble. When all else is exhausted and bled of purpose, they will lift their hands, that have survived.

Matthew 5:1-12

Verse References

1-4 3-6 5-8 5-7 8-12 John Wesley, "Sermon On The Mount -- I," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 225-240 Denise Levertov, "The Wealth of the Distitute," The Freeing of the Dust, p. 114 David Francis, Weavings (November/December 1996), p. 43 John Wesley, "Sermon On The Mount -- II," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 241-256 John Wesley, "Sermon On The Mount -- III," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 257-273

Verse 3

Verse 4

Verse 5

Verse 6

Verse 7

Verse 8 Verses 10-12

Verse 9

Matthew 5:1-12

Notes

Denise Levertov How gray and hard the brown feet of the wretched of the earth. How confidently the crippled from birth push themselves through the streets, deep in their lives. How seemed with lines of fate the hands of women who sit at streetcorners offering seeds and flowers. How lively their conversation together. How much of death they know. I am tired of `the fine art of unhappiness.' David Francis It is noteworthy that those hungry for God are not just `satisfied' in our prosaic modern sense of that word; the measure is pressed down and flowing over, an there is to be a complete and glorious fulfillment of their desire, far more than they had asked or dreamt of. So also with the pure in heart, it is not just that God then comes to them, so that they may see Him. Rather, their eyes are opened so that they can see One who has been there all the time. We are given what we most need: not a new theophany, but sight to see--to see One who is.

Matthew 5:3

Greek Cross References:

3 3 3 Psalm 40:17, 86:1, 119:71-72, 149:4; Proverbs 14:21, 19:17 Isaiah 29:19, 57:15, 66:1-2 Mark 10:14; 2 Cor. 6:10; Phil. 2:1-11, 4:12; James 2:5; Thomas 54

Verse References

J. Heinrich Arnold, Discipleship, p. 252 J. S. Bach, The Bach Album, p. #3 Wendell Berry, The Hidden Wound, p. 68 f. Horace Bushnell, Sermons, p. 162 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 74f,79,270-274 John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 166 Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, p. 15 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 116 f. Stanley Hauerwas and William Willimon, Resident Aliens, p. 90 f. Issa, A Few Flies and I, p. 38 Sydney Lea, "Road Agent," Odd Angles of Heaven, p. 178 Stephen Mitchell, "Francis," Parables and Portraits, p. 60 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 111 Mary Oliver, "Roses," White Pine, p. 23 Mark Allan Powell, "Review of "God with UsInterpretation (January 1997), p. 91 Rainer Maria Rilke, "III,16," Book of Hours, p. 140 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 126, 136 & 171 William Carlos Williams, "The Poor," The Hidden Wound, p. 69 f Weavings (January/February 2000), "Poverty of Spirit" Newsletter Newsleter, Cover Art/New Testament/Matt 05x03 Newsletter Newsleter, Cover Art/New Testament/Matt 05x03A

Matthew 5:3

Notes

J. Heinrich Arnold The Holy Spirit is like water, which seeks its lowest place. He comes only to the broken and humble heart. J. S. Bach Let what the wide world values leave my soul in peace. Heaven constantly dwells with him who in poverty can be rich. Wendell Berry But there is another interest, with a considerable tradition in American literature, that has received less attention, and which is at least equally important: that is an interest in the lives of the poor, not insofar as they are poor, but insofar as, being poor, they have made their lives, often with considerable success, outside the social pretenses and economic obsession of the mainstream of society. ... I have in mind two poems I want to quote to illustrate what I am saying. Neither one, I think, attempts to romanticize poverty--the facts remain as they are--but both come of an excited sense of the realness of reality, the poor reality, that lies beyond the tightly focused interests and the staid adornments of the consciously successful. In both there is, as if suddenly, an uprising of the old truth that it can be profoundly liberating to be free of the claims of money. [The Poor by William Carlos Williams and Salutation by Ezra Pound] Horace Bushnell Conscious there of powers not broken down or crushed into servility, but of wills invigorated rather by submission, with what sense of inborn dignity and strength shall we sing--Thy gentleness hath made us great. All the littleness of our sin is now quite gone ... greatest of all in our conscious affinity with God and the Lamb. John Dominic Crossan ... theoretical dispassion of the stoic Seneca (I have, but do not care) and the practical dispossession of the Cynic Demetrius (I do not have but do not care) ... In terms of possessions, Stoics sought to have as if they had not, Cynics to have not as if they had. (p. 74 f.) Next is freedom. This comes from a physical poverty that renders one impervious both to desire and loss, but especially from a spiritual poverty that renders one oblivious both to attack and assault. (p. 79) John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed "Blessed are the destitute."

Matthew 5:3

Notes, p. 2

Annie Dillard There are lots of things to see, unwrapped gifts and free surprises. The world is fairly studded and strewn with pennies cast broadside from a generous hand. ... But if you cultivate a healthy poverty and simplicity, so that finding a penny will literally make your day, then, since the world is in fact planted in pennies, you have with your poverty bought a lifetime of days. It is that simple. What you see is what you get. (p. 15) Stanley Hauerwas and William Willimon Martin Luther comments that this is the first Beatitude because, even if one feels spiritually rich at the beginning of the sermon, one will feel terribly poor and needy by the end. Issa A beautiful kite Rose from The beggar's hovel. Sydney Lea But someone should bless the poor in school. Everyone better not turn out bright. Stephen Mitchell Blessed are the poor in spirit who realize that they have no more than what is their own. They stand tiptoe in the bright kingdom of the moment like children looking down from the bedroom window waying hello goodbye. Mary Oliver After a while I got up, as from the dead--it was that wonderful to be, at last, entirely poor, and happy. I found some weeds I could eat. I found some whild washed boards, could they not make a simple house? ... Oh Jesus, poor boy, when was it you saw, clearly and irrevocably, just where you were headed?

Matthew 5:3

Notes, p. 3

Rainer Maria Rilke We are not poor. We are just without riches, Oscar Romero The person who feels the emptiness of hunger for God is the opposite of the self-sufficient person In this sense rich means the proud. Rich means even the poor who have no property but who think they need nothing, not even God. This is the wealth that is abominable to God's eyes what the humble but forceful virgin speaks of He sent away empty-handed the rich"-- those who thin they have everything-- "And filled with good things the hungry"-- those who have need of God. (p. 126) No one can celebrate a genuine Christmas without being truly poor. The self-sufficient, the proud, those who, because they have everything, look down on others, those who have no need even of God -- for them there will be no Christmas. Only the poor, the hungry, those who need someone to come on their behalf, will have that someone. That someone is God, Emmanuel, God-with-us. Without poverty of spirit there can be no abundance of God. (p. 136) ... a true spirit of poverty which makes the rich feel they are close brothers and sisters of the poor and makes the poor feel they are equal givers and not inferior to the rich. (p. 171)

Matthew 5:3

Notes, p. 4

William Carlos Williams It's the anarchy of poverty delights me, the old yellow wooden house indented among the new brick tenements Or a cast iron balcony with panels showing oak branches in full leaf. It fits the dress of the children reflecting every stage and custom of necessity-- chimneys, roofs, fences of wood and metal in an unfenced age and enclosing next to nothing at all: the old man in a sweater and soft black hat who sweeps the sidewalk-- his own ten feet of it-- in a wind that fitfully turning his corner has overwhelmed the entire city Weavings (January/February 2000), "Poverty of Spirit" Judy Cannato, "The Poverty of Provisionality," p. 6-12 Kristen Johnson Ingram, "Poverty is Where the Blind Fish Live," p. 13-18 Douglas Burton-Christie, "Into the Empty Places," p. 19-28 Percy C. Ainsworth, "The Kingdom for the Poor," p. 29-34 Richard H. Luecke, "Poverty and the Reign of God," p. 35-43

Matthew 5:3

Notes

Cover Art/New Testament/Matt 05x03 Cover Art/New Testament/Matt 05x03A

Matthew 5:4

Greek Cross References:

4 4 Job 5:11; Psalm 119:28; Isaiah 53:3, 61:2-3 John 16:20-22; 2 Corinthians 1:7; Revelation 7:16-17

Verse References

Wendell Berry, Collected Poems, p. 167 Wendell Berry, Entries, p. 54 Michel Boutier, Prayers for My Village, p. 45 Di Brandt, "a poem for a guy who's," [Poetry Binder], p. 15 Sheila Cassidy, "The Sorrowful," The Beatitudes in Modern Life, p. 51-67 David Citino, "The Pastor's Creed," Odd Angles of Heaven, p. 58 Richard Foster, "Chapter 4: The Prayer of Tears," Prayer, p. 37-46 Robert Frost, The Poetry of Robert Frost, p. 256 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 86 f. Havergal, Joy and Strength, p. 30 Mary Oliver, "The Murderer's House," New and Selected Poems, p. 248 Rainer Maria Rilke, Selected Poetry, p. 237 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 155 Christina Rossetti, "What Would I Give," Goblin Market and Other Poems, p. 53 Richard Wilbur, "The Pardon," New and Collected Poems, p. 285 "Cover Art: New Testament," Newsletter Newsletter

Matthew 5:4

Notes

Wendell Berry In her sorrow she renews life in her grief she prepares the return of joy Wendell Berry Many will go in blame against the world Hating it for their pain and they will go Alone across the dry bright lifeless days And thus alone into the dark. Others In grief and loss will see more certainly What they have loved and will belong to it And to each other as in happiness They never did--hearing though the whole world Go dry the hidden raincrow of their hope. Michel Boutier You know how heavy crying and pain are for me. I withdraw prudently from trouble so as not to be rattled Grant me Lord on the contrary to give myself over to suffering and to tears. Di Brandt why do we hide grief from ourselves, & each other, pretending pleasure Sheila Cassidy The consolation of those that mourn--they know that God is somehow in their pain and darkness, that they do not walk alone. (p. 63) David Citino This life of desperation soon must end. Thus we must learn to rejoice, to mourn. Robert Frost That though she grieves her grief is secret: Those friends know nothing of her grief to make it shameful.

Matthew 5:4

Notes, p. 2

Havergal, That sorrow which can bee seen is the lightest form really, however apparently heavy. Then there is that which is not seen, secret sorrows which yet can be put into words and can be told to near friends as well as be poured out to God; but there are sorrows beyond these such as are never told and cannot be put into words and may only be wordlessly laid before God: these are the deepest. Now comes the supply for each: "I have seen" that which is patent and external; "I have heard their cry" which is the expression of this and of as much of the internal as is expressible; but this would not go deep enough, so God adds, "I know their sorrows" down to the very depths of all those which no eye sees or ear ever heard. (Exodus 3:7) Mary Oliver This is our failure that in all the world Only the stricken have learned how to grieve. Rainer Maria Rilke Only in the realm of Praising should Lament walk ... Joy knows and Longing has accepted-- only Lament still learns; ... Oscar Romero Those who shun suffering will remain alone. Christina Rossetti What would I give for tears, not smiles but scalding tears, To wash the black mark clean, and to thaw the frost of years, To wash the stain ingrain and to make me clean again. Richard Wilbur ... I dreamt the past was never past redeeming: But whether this was false of honest dreaming I beg death's pardon now. And mourn the dead. (p. 285)

Matthew 5:4

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 5:5

Greek Cross References:

5 5 Psalm 25:12-13, 37:7-16; Isaiah 29:19-24, 60:21 2 Corinthians 6:10; 1 Peter 3:4

Verse References

Wendell Berry, Collected Poems, p. 182 f. Wendell Berry, The Hidden Wound, p. 84 Sheila Cassidy, "The Sorrowful," The Beatitudes in Modern Life, p. 66 Emily Dickenson, "XXXVI," Collected Poems, p. 87 Annie Dillard, For the Time Being, p. 19 Robert Frost, "Build Soil," The Poetry of Robert Frost, p. 322 Václav Havel, "Speech delivered to joint meeting of U.S. Congress," The Courage to Teach (March 5, 1990), p. 20 Jaskushitsu, "Kanso (Patient Old Man)," a Quiet Room, p. 72 John of the Cross, "The Ascent of Mount Carmel," Selected Writings, p. 78 Lao-Tzu, quoted in Wayne Muller, Sabbath, p. 82 Larry Lewis, "Anastasia and Sandman," American Poetry Review (November 1996), p. 21 Mary Oliver, "Daisies," Why I Wake Early, p. 65 Rainer Maria Rilke, "III,15," Book of Hours, p. 139 Gary Snyder, Minutes of the Lead Pencil Club, p. 201 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Hymn of the Universe, p. 152 Richard Wilbur, "A Summer Morning," New and Collected Poems, p. 188 Newsletter Newsleter, Scripture Art/New Testament/Matt 05x05

Matthew 5:5

Notes

Wendell Berry A man who does not ask too much becomes the promise of his land ... This union makes him small a part of what he would keep. Wendell Berry Without the economic pressures of ownership, often or even usually doing work which required a minimum of attention, his mind could be free. And it is only in such freedom that the mind becomes intimate with a place, filling itself and delighting in details. In this way the worker and the field he works in become one. Sheila Cassidy ... the experience of being stripped of all one's support systems has two profound effects. ...the second is that it teaches one to understand as gift many things hitherto taken for granted. There is a very real sense in which the poor have the earth for their heritage for when one is stripped of freedom, health, good food, possessions, one rediscovers what a monk friend of mine calls "the essential giveness of things." Emily Dickenson I lost a world the other day Has anybody found? You'll know it by the row of stars Around it forehead bound. A rich man might not notice it; Yet to my frugal eye Of more esteem than ducats. Oh find it sir for me! Annie Dillard When a person arrives in the world as a baby, says one Midrash, "his hands are clenched as though to say, `Everything is mine. I will inherit it all.' When he departs from the world, his hands are open, as though to say, `I have acquired nothing from the world.'" Robert Frost Let those possess the land, and only those, Who love it with a love so strong and stupid That they may be abused and taken advantage of And made fun of by business, law, and art; They still hang on.

Matthew 5:5

Notes, p. 2

Václav Havel ... the salvation of this human world lies nowhere else than in the human heart, in the human power to reflect, in human meekness and in human responsibility. Without a global revolution in ... human consciousness, nothing will change for the better, and the catastrophe toward which this world is headed ... will be unavoidable. Jakushitsu When simple joys in daily life are not seen as slight Lanterns and pillars smile their bright smile Who understands this meaning first clarified some thousand years ago? John of the Cross To come to the possession you have not you must go by a way in which you possess not. Lao-Tzu Be content with what you have; rejoice in the way things are. When you realize there is nothing lacking, the whole world belongs to you Larry Lewis Stalin had a deep understanding of the kulakis, Their sense of marginalization and belief in the land. Mary Oliver ... it is heaven itself to take what is given, to see what is plain ... Rainer Maria Rilke with almond oil, amber, and sandalwood. Those were riches that made life vast and voluptuous. Now the days of riches are gone and no one can call them back for us. But we can let ourselves be poor again.

Matthew 5:5

Notes, p. 3

Gary Snyder This living flowing land is all there is forever. We are it it sings through us we could live on this Earth without clothes or tools! Pierre Teilhard de Chardin If you judge me worthy Lord God I would show to those whose lives are dull and drab the limitless horizons opening out to humble and hidden efforts. Richard Wilbur Her young employers, having got in late From seeing friends in town And scraped the right front fender on the gate, Will not, the cook expects, be coming down. She makes a quiet breakfast for herself. The coffee-pot is bright, The jelly where it should be on the shelf. She breaks an egg into the morning light, Then, with the bread-knife lifted, stands and hears The sweet efficient sounds Of thrush and catbird, and the snip of shears Where, in the terraced backward of the grounds, A gardener works before the heat of day, He straightens for a view Of the big house ascending stony-gray Out of his beds mosaic with the dew. His young employers having got in late, He and cook alone Receive the morning on their old estate, Possessing what the owners can but own.

Matthew 5:5

Notes

"Scripture Art: New Testament"

Matthew 5:6

Greek Cross References:

6 6 6 Leviticus 26:33-36; Psalm 106:3; Proverbs 2:1-5, 8:17, 22:11 Isaiah 55:1-7, 58:6-11; Amos 8:11; Zephaniah 2:3 Mark 14:7; Luke 1:53; John 4:14, 6:51; Rev. 7:16; Thomas 69

Verse References

Dom Helder Camara, The Desert is Fertile, p. 9 Richard Foster, Prayer, p. 31 Denise Levertov, Footprints, p. 47 Stephen Mitchell, "Introduction," The Book of Job, p. xvii & xxvii f. Blaise Pascal, quoted by Malcolm Muggeridge in A Third Testament, p. 40 Mother Theresa, quoted by Malcolm Muggeridge in Confessions of a 20th Cent. Pilgrim, p. 139 Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: NT"

Matthew 5:6

Notes

Dom Helder Camara We bless you Father for the thirst you put in us for the boldness you inspire for the fire alight in us that is you in us you the just. Richard Foster Theresa [of Avila] adds something that sounds to us quite strange. She writes, "Along this path of prayer, self knowledge, and the thought of one's sins is the bread with which all palates must be fed ..." We must not deny or ignore the depth of our evil for paradoxically our sinfulness becomes our bread. When in honesty we accept the evil that is in us as part of the truth about ourselves and offer that truth up to God, we are in a mysterious way nourished. Even the truth about our shadow side sets us free (John 8:32). [Especially the truth about our shadow side.] Denise Levertov Nothing I see fails to give pleasure no thirst for righteousness dries my throat I am silent and happy and troubled only by my own happiness.

Matthew 5:6

Notes, p.2

Stephen Mitchell The Book of Job is the great poem of moral outrage. It gives voice to every accusation against God, and its blasphemy is cathartic. How liberating it feels not to be a good, patient little God-fearer, scuffling from one's hole in the wall to squeak out a dutiful hymn of praise. ... It is this passionate insistence that carries him into the eye of the whirlwind. "Blessed are those who hunger and thirst after righteousness," as another Jewish teacher said, "for they shall be filled." (p. xvii) A man who hungers and thirsts after justice is not satisfied with a menu. It is not enough for him to hope or believe or know that there is absolute justice in the universe: he must taste and see it. It is not enough that there may be justice someday in the golden haze of the future: it must be now; must always have been now. (p. xxvii f.) Blaise Pascal We do not grow tired of eating and sleeping day after day, because hunger and fatigue return; without them, we should be bored. It would be the same without hunger for spiritual things; we should be bored. Hunger for justice is the eighth beatitide. Mother Theresa Christ is longing to be your Food. Surrounded with fullness of living Food you allow yourself to starve.

Matthew 5:6

Notes, p. 3

Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: NT"

Matthew 5:7

Greek Cross References:

7 7 Proverbs 14:21, 19:17 Acts 2:44-45; 20:35; James 2:13

Verse References

Augustine, "Love of Our Ememies (8, 4-10)," Love One Another, My Friends, p. 81 Bruce Beasley, "Miserere," Spirituals, p. 41 Robert Frost, "A Masque of Mercy," The Poetry of Robert Frost, p. 509 Mary Oliver, "Indonesia," New and Selected Poems, p. 80 Gary Snyder, No Nature, p. 115

Matthew 5:7

Notes

Augustine ... the love you have for a fortunate person, to w hom you have nothing you can give, is fuller and truer love; it' purer and far more sincere. If you do good to some wretched person, you may s want to exalt yourself and have the object of your good deed under obligation to you. Say there is someone in need, and you share what you have. Because you' e the giver you feel superior to the r one who receives your gift. You should want to be equal, so that you may both be subject to the One to whom nothing can be given. Bruce Beasley Be merciful. The cross-shaped leaves already budding for another wasteful season, Robert Frost The rich in seeing nothing but injustice In their impoverishment by revolution Are right. But ' was intentional injustice. t It was their justice being mercy-crossed. The revolution Keeper' bringing on s Is nothing but an outbreak of mass mercy, Too long pent up in rigorous convention-- A holy imp8ulse towards redistribution. Mary Oliver And the pickers balanced on the hot hillsides ... in that world of leaves no poor man has ever picked his way out of. ... don' ask t if we were determined to live at last with merciful hearts.

Matthew 5:7

Notes, p. 2

Gary Snyder the pine tree is perfect ... Back there no big houses only a little farm shack crows cawing back and forth over the valley of grass-bamboo and small pine If I had a peaceful heart it would look like this. the train down in the city was once a snowy hill

Matthew 5:8

Greek Cross References:

8 8 8 Psalm 24:3-6, 73:1 & 28, 86:6 & 11, 101:1-8, 119:113 Matthew 6:22; Hebrews 12:14; James 2:13; I John 3:2-3 Revelation 22:3-4

Verse References

Percy C. Ainsworth, "The Vision of the Clean Heart," Weavings (November/December 1996), p. 28-33 Anton Checkov, If You Want to Write, p. 126 François Fénelon, quoted in Plough Reader (Winter 2001), p. 20 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 8, 214 Heraclitus, Fragments, p. 73 Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, p. 38 Søren Kierkegaard, quoted by Richard Foster in Prayers from the Heart, p. 53 Michael Lerner, Jewish Renewal, p. 113 f. C. S. Lewis, quoted by Ann Hoch Cowdery, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 1994), p. 284 Ted Loder, Guerrillas of Grace, p. 20 Charles McGrath, "Loose Canon," The New Yorker (September 26, 1994), p. 105 Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu, p. 112 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 160 Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace, p. 299 Mary Oliver, "Dogfish," Dream Work, p. 5 Mary Oliver, "Daisies," Why I Wake Early, p. 65 William Stafford, Every War Has Two Losers, p. 49 Shunryu Suzuki, To Shine One Corner of the World, p. 6 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Hymn of the Universe, p. 64 & 124 "Purify My Heart," Cry of My Heart Your Word is Fire, p. 70 Newsletter Newsletter, "Cover Art"

Matthew 5:8

Notes

Anton Checkov Educated people in my opinion must satisfy the following conditions: ... 4. They are pure in heart and fear a lie as they fear fire. They do not lie, even in trifles. A lie is humiliating to the listener and it debases the speaker before his own eyes. ... and do not make up soul-to-soul conversation when they are not asked. Out of respect for other people's ears they are often silent. François Fénelon There are many people who are sincere without being simple; they are ever afraid of being seen for what they are not; they are always musing over their words and thoughts and thinking about what they have done, in fear of having done or said too much. These people are sincere, but they are not simple: they are not at ease with others, and other people are not at ease with them. There is nothing easy about them, nothing free, spontaneous, or natural. People who are imperfect, less regular, less masters of themselves, are more lovable. This is how men find them, and it is the same with God. Dag Hammarskjöld What you have to attempt--to be yourself. What you have to pray for--to become a mirror in which, according to the degree of purity of heart you have attained, the greatness of life will be reflected. (p. 8) Give us A pure heart That we may see Thee, A humble heart That we may hear Thee, A heart of love That we may serve Thee, A heart of faith That we may live Thee. (p. 214) Heraclitus Sound thinking is to listen well and choose one course of action. Thomas R. Kelly No man can look on God and live, live in his own faults, live in the shadow of the least self-deceit, live in harm toward his least creatures, wether man or bird or beast or creeping thing. ... The pure in heart shall see God? More, they who see God shall cry out to become pure in heart, even as He is pure, with all the energy of their souls.

Matthew 5:8

Notes, p. 2

Søren Kierkegaard Father in Heaven! What are we without You! What is all that we know, vast accumulation though it be, but a chipped fragment if we do not know You! What is all our striving, could it ever encompass a world, but a half-finished work if we do not know You: You the One, who is one thing and who is all! So may hou give to the intellect wisdom to comprehend that one thing; to the heart, sincerity to receive this understanding; to the will, purity that wills only one thing. In prosperity, may you grant perseverance to will one thing; amid distractions, collectedness to will one thing; in suffering, patience to will one thing. You that gives both the beginning and the completion, may You early, at the dawn of day, give to the young the resolution to will one thing. As the day wanes, may You give to the old a renewed remembrance of their first resolution, that the first may be like the last, the last like the first, in possession of a life that has willed only one thing. Michael Lerner Moses seems to be asking for a direct and unmediated experience of God--and this even the highest prophet cannot have. God offers to pass by Moses and show him that which is after God, God's back side, or more correctly, God's effects in the world. God invites Moses to gaze in the same direction in which God is gazing. This account of the mystical union provides us with one model of the loving relationship among God and beings who embody God's presence. Non-Jewish instances of mystical union often aim at fusion with the spirit of God, coming to know God's essence through looking into God's face. But Moses is told, No, that's not the way. The way to know God is to look out onto the world the way God looks out onto the world. Moses is to face the same way God faces, and to see God's effects in the world. C. S. Lewis Heaven offers nothing that a mercenary soul can desire. It is sare to tell the pure in heart that they shall see God, for only the pure in heart want to. There are rewards that do not sully motives.

Matthew 5:8

Notes, p. 3

Ted Loder and something in me is pure enough for an instant to see your kingdom in a glance, Charles McGrath [Harold Bloom] doesn't quite know what to make of a writer [like Shakespeare] who has no anxieties--who exists in an almost pure relation, not to other authors, but simply to the world. Thomas Merton So when the shoe fits The foot is forgotten When the belt fits the belly is forgotten When the heart is right "For" and "against" are forgotten Stephen Mitchell Seeing God means that they have died to self, since "no one can see God and live" (Exodus 33:20). Not that selfish concerns don't arixe for them; but they aren't attached to these concerns; they have no self for selfishness to stick to; hence they can be carried along in the clear current of what is. Kathleen Norris "I have seen your face, as one sees the face of God" (Gen. 33:10, Fox). This story says to me that if we have ever truly been forgiven, we have seen the face of God. If we've ever been on the redeiving end of an act of mercy that made a difference in our lives, we have seen the face of God. Mary Oliver Mostly, I want to be kind. And nobody, of course, is kind, or mean, for a simple reason. Mary Oliver ... it is heaven itself to take what is given, to see what is plain ...

Matthew 5:8

Notes, p. 4

William Stafford Intentions have side effects. Shunryu Suzuki One day I complained to Suzuki Roshi about the people I was working with. He listened intently. Finally, he said, "If you want to see virtue, you have to have a calm mind. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, ------ Purity does not lie in separation from, but in deeper penetration into the universe. It is to be found in the love of that unique boundless Essence which penetrates the inmost depths of all things and there, from within those depths, deeper than the mortal zone where individuals and multitudes struggle, works upon them and moulds them. Purity lies in chaste contact with that which is "the same in all." (p. 64 f.) To be pure of heart means to love God above all things, and at the same time to see him everywhere in all things. ... objects have lost their surface multiplicity: in each of them, according to the measure of its own particular qualities and possibilities, God may truly be laid hold on. The pure of heart is of its nature privileged to move within an immense and superior unity. What purity effects in the individual charity brings about within tye community of souls. (p. 124) Your Word is Fire The Psalmist says: (Ps. 102:1 [Heb]) "A prayer of a poor man"-- But the text may also read: A prayer to a poor man! Though the treasure houses of the king are full they are managed by the king's officials. Having nothing to do with all his treasures the king himself is like a poor man. One who comes in search of treasure will never see the King Only one who seeks no riches who prays as to a poor man can come before the King himself.

Matthew 5:8

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 5:9

Greek Cross References: Verse References

Wendell Berry, "Peaceableness toward Enemies," Sex Economy Freedom & Community, p. 69-92 xl. The essential point is the ancient one: that to be peaceable is by definition to be peaceable in time of conflict. Peaceableness is not the amity that exists between people who agree, nor is it the exhaustion of jubilation that follows war. It is not passive. It is the ability to act to resolve conflict without violence. If it is not a practical and practicable method, it is nothing. ... In the face of conflict the peaceable person may find several solutions, the violent person only one. (p. 86 f.) Fulton John Sheen, Lend Me Your Ears, p. 450 Peace is not a passive but an active virtue. Our Lord never said, "Blessed are the peaceful," but "Blessed are the peacemakers." The Beatitude rests only on those who make it out of trial, our of suffering, out of cruelty, even out of sin. Communication Resources, Sca7, "Child9" Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament 9 Isaiah 27:5

Matthew 5:9

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca7, "Child9" Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 5:10-12

Greek Cross References:

10 10-12 10-12 10-12 Thomas 68 2 Chronicles 36:16; Psalm 69:9, 103:6; Isaiah 51:7 Matthew 23:29-31 & 37; Luke 22:28-29; Acts 7:52; Romans 15:3 Philippians 2:18; 1 Thessalonians 2:15; James 5:10; 1 Peter 3:14, 4:14

General References

Carla De Sola, The Spirit Moves, p. 84 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 39 Socrates, "Address to Judges," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 341-344 W. B. Yeats, "To a Friend Whose Work Has Come to Nothing," Selected Poems and Plays, p. 40

Verse References

10 11 Newsletter Newsletter, "Cover Art: New Testament" Newsletter Newsletter, "Cover Art: New Testament"

Matthew 5:10-12

Notes

Thomas Merton Once there was a disciple of a Greek philosopher who was commanded by his Master for three years to give money to everyone who insulted him. When this period of trial was over the Master said to him: Now you can go to Athens and learn wisdom. When the disciple was entering Athens he met a certain wise man who sat at the gate insulting everybody who came and went. He also insulted the disciple who immediately burst out laughing. Why do you laugh when I insult you? said the wise man. Because, said the disciple, for three years I have been paying for this kind of thing and now you give it to me for nothing. Enter the city, said the wise man, it is all yours. Abbot John used to tell the above story saying: This is the door of God by which our fathers, rejoicing in many tribulations, enter the City of Heaven. W. B. Yeats That is most difficult. Now all the truth is out Be secret and take defeat From any brazen throat For how can you compete Being honour bred with one Who were it proved he lies Were neither shamed in own Nor in his neighbors' eyes? Bred to a harder thing Than Triumph turn away And like a laughing string Whereon mad fingers play Amid a place of stone Be secret and exult Because of all things known

Matthew 5:10-12

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 5:13-16

(Luke 14:34-35) Greek General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Visible Community," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 129-134 Walter J. Burghardt, S.J., "Not Hide Yourself from Your Own Flesh," Lovely in Eyes Not His, p. 86-91 Charles Colson, "This Is the Church's Hour," Best Sermons 2, p. 3-17 Edward Schillebeeckx, "The Light of the Body is the Eye," God Among Us, p. 56-58 John Wesley, "Sermon On The Mount -- IV," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 274-290

Verse 13

Verses 14-16

Matthew 5:13

Greek Cross References:

13 13 Leviticus 2:13; Numbers 18:19; 2 Chronicles 13:5; Psalm 82:6 Mark 9:49-50; Luke 14:34-35

Verse References

13 13 13 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 111, 164 Paul S. Minear, "The Salt of the Earth," Interpretation (January 1997), p. 31-41 Walker Percy, The Message in the Bottle, p. 141 Whitehead ... pronounced that generality is the salt of religion just as it is the salt of science. ... We might then be content here to agree to disagree about what salt is and whether or not in becoming general it loses its savor. Communication Resources, "Salt.tif ," (SCA3) Scripture Cover Art, p. 27

13

Matthew 5:13-16

Verse References

Communication Resources, "Salt.tif ," (SCA3)

Matthew 5:14-16

Greek Cross References:

14-16 14-16 16 Leviticus 10:3; Psalm 82:6; Isaiah 49:3-7, 58:10, 60:1-3, 62:1-2 Mark 4:21; Luke 11:33; John 3:21; 1 Peter 2:12; Thomas 32-33 John 15:8

General References

Verse References

Matthew 5:14-16

General References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 173 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 53, 75, 153, 157 Rita Dove, "Old Folk's Home Jerusalem," Grace Notes, p. 73 Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, p. 29 Madeleine L'Engle, "Epiphany," The Irrational Season, p. 39 Denise Levertov, "Passage," Oblique Prayers, p. 87 Nelson Mandela, "1994 Inaugural Speech," Maryknoll, p. 6 ff. Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 89 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 202 Franz Wright, "Resurrection: Elegy," The Beforelife, p. 46 Communication Resources, "Light.tif ," (SCA2) Scripture Cover Art

Verse References

Matthew 5:14-16

Notes

Eberhard Arnold The center for the new people is the new hearth of the new church; around it their communal dwelling place arises. around the radiating fire of the Holy spirit their spiritual temple is built up as a tangible house of God. This is the city on the hill whose light beams out into all lands. This place of worship burns in spirit; it shines in truth. Rita Dove Valley settlements put on their lights like armor; ... Thomas R. Kelly There is an indelicacy in too-ready speech. Paul felt it unlawful to speak of the things of the third heaven. But there is also a false reticence, as if these things were one's own work and one's own possession, about which we should modestly keep quiet, whereas they are wholly God's amazing work ... Madeleine L'Engle Unclench your fists Hold out your hands Take mine. Let us hold each other. This is his Glory Manifest. Denise Levertov Wind from the compass points, sun at meridian, these are forms the spirit enters, breath, ruach, light that is witness and by which we witness. Franz Wright In San Francisco John Logan said, light is the shadow of God

Matthew 5:14-16

Notes, p. 2

Nelson Mandela Our deepest fear is, not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light and not our darkness, that frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I, to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented and fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There's nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are born to make manifest the glory of god that is within us. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others. Oscar Romero The church is a lamp that has to give light and therefore it must involve itself in tangible reality and thus be able to enlighten pilgrims who walk on this earth.

Matthew 5:14-16

Notes

Communication Resources, "Light.tif " Newsletter Newsleter, Cover Art

Matthew 5:14-16

Verse References

14 16 16 16 16 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 36, 148 Mohandas Gandhi, The Essential Gandhi, p. 166 Every good deed is its own advertisement. Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament, "Matt 05x16" Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament, "Matt 05x16A" Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 130-133

Matthew 5:16

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament, "Matt 05x16A

Matthew 5:17-20

Greek Cross References: 17-20

17 18 19 20 Matthew 23:24 Romans 3:31 Psalm 93:1; Isaiah 40:8 Exodus18:22&26; Ezra 7:10; Luke 7:28, 22:26; James 2:10 Matthew 23:2-3; Luke 7:28, 11:42

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Righteousness of Christ," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 135-141 Thomas R. Haney, Today' Spirituality , p. 100 & 102 s Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew' Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. s 371-373 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- V," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 291-308 Paul W. Walaskay, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (October 2002), p. 417-420

Verse References

17 17 17 17 17 Frederick C. Holmgren, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (January 1997), p. 64 Lenski, The Interpretation of Matthew, p. 205-206 R. C. Lewontin, "Women Versus the Biologists," New York Review of Books (April 7, 1994), p. 35 Carol Bechtel Reynolds, "Life After Grace: Preaching from the Book of Numbers," Interpretation (July 1997), p. 278 John Howard Yoder, The Jewish­Christian Schism Revisited, p. 97

Matthew 5:17-20

Notes

Klyne Snodgrass (4) The law is completely valid as far as Matthew presents Jesus'teaching. (5) The law reveals God' purpose when interpreted by a specific hermeneutical key. s Both options four and five, it seems to me, express Matthew' understanding. s Frederick Holmgren God's desire finds expression in the ministry of Jesus who speaks often of the rule of God. Norbert Lohfink points out that Jesus nowhere states clearly what the content of this rule is ... That was not necessary, declares Lohfink, because it was already established in the Old Testament and underscored in Judaism: The rule of God takes place when human society, grasped by God's saving action in the exodus, embraces the divine teaching (the Torah) whose e mphasis on righteousness and mercy creates shalom. Jesus himself declared that he did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it--to carry it forward. Lenski The verb "to fulfill" suggests the image of a vessel which is filled to the top. The vessel here referred to is the written Word, the Law and the Prophets ... When Jesus is through working, the whole Old Testament will be fulfilled ... The Old Testament is already complete ... It needs no addition and should suffer no subtraction. The vessel needs no enlargement or alteration: all it awaits is to be filled full by what Jesus says and does. R. C. Lewontin As is so often the case, the most radical attack on an institution is the demand that it live up to its own myth. It is not an attempt to overthrow it but an attempt to cleanse and perfect it. "Think not that I have come to destroy the law or the prophets. I have not come to destroy but to fulfill." [Matthew 5:17] Carol Bechtel Reynolds To adapt a phrase from Jesus, the daughters of Zelophehad come not to abolish the law but to fulfill it. Technically, they ask Moses to bend the rules, but with the result that the original intention of the law is honored rather rather than compromised. [Numbers 27] John Howard Yoder What Paul sees happening in Christ and in the Christian Church, like what Jesus had said in Matthew, is the fulfilment and not the abolition of the meaning of Torah as covenant of grace. `Fulfilment' is a permanently open border between what went before and what comes next.

Matthew 5:21-26

Cross References:

21-26 21-22 22 23-26 23-24 25-26 Leviticus 19:17; 1 John 3:15 Leviticus 24:11; Job 31:30 Sirach 22:14; James 4:11 Isaiah 1:12-20 Amos 2:8 Proverbs 6:1-5; Matthew 18:34; Luke 12:57-59

General References

Wendell Berry, Sex Economy Freedom & Community, p. 139 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Brother," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 142-146 Ann Fairbairn, Five Smooth Stones, p. 696, 697 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 100 & 102 Thich Nhat Hanh, Peace is Every Step, p. 56-59 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 30 Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew's Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 374 f.

Verse References

Matthew 5:21-26

Notes

Wendell Berry The superstition of the anger of our current sexual politics, as of other kinds of anger, is that somewhere along the trajectory of any quarrel a tribunal will be reached that will hear all complaints and find for the plaintiff; the verdict will be that the defendant is entirely wrong, the plaintiff entirely right and entirely righteous. This, of course, is not going to happen. Ann Fairbairn God is something more than an exterior force. (Murfee? p. 696) This--this thing of the spirit you call God--and I thoroughly understand your differentiation between the exterior entity some people worship and the interior presence--cannot occupy the human soul at the same time that it is occupied by hatred. (p. 697) Thomas Merton One of the brethren questioned Abbot Isidore the elder of Scete saying, Why is it that the demons are so grievously afraid of you? The elder replied: From the moment I became a monk I have striven to prevent anger from rising from my lips.

Matthew 5:21-26

Verse References

21-22 21-22 22 22 23-26 23-24 23-24 23-24 23-24 23 23 25-26 25-26 25-26 Jacopone da Todi, "The Impatience Which Makes Us Lose All We Have Won," Divine Inspiration, p. 291 Gouverneur Morris, "National Greatness," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 40 J. Heinrich Arnold, Discipleship, p. 51 Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace, p. 315 Walter Brueggemann, Finally Comes the Poet, p. 33-34, (cf. 22-32) Daniel Antwi, Interpretation (January 1991), p. 20 f. Robert Coles, The Call of Service, p. 82 f. John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 134, 168 John Shea, "The Phone Call," The Spirit Master, p. 209 Helmut Thielicke, Faith: The Great Adventure, p. 24 me John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 174 f. Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 32 f 142 f Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 66

Matthew 5:21-26

Notes

Gouverneur Morris Foreign powers will then know that to withhold a due respect and deference is dangerous, that wrongs may be forgiven but that insults will be avenged. J. Heinrich Arnold God will judge all forms of lovelessness, but especially contempt -- the act of making someone believe he is a fool. Kathleen Norris But to say, "You fool," is to negate God's presence in a creature God has made. It is to invite God's absence, which is my definition of hell. Robert Coles "I was in the car, and I was ready to go, and then I said to myself, Hey, stop a minute. What's more important--to go to church and sit there and fume and ask Jesus to feel sorry for you and to condemn your husband or to skip church and go back inside and sit with him and hope he'll really break down and cry and cry, so all that disappointment in him will come out, ... Helmut Thielicke I even have the freedom to close the Bible from which I derive my deification, put away my hymn and prayer books and even stop going to church in order to become reconciled to the brother with whom I am at odds. me Incident with worship in the park. Tom forgot to pick up key at city hall. Called Glee who called Ad DiGregori early Sunday morning, who came down to bring Tom the key (which Tom didn't need anymore because Ward had a key). So Tom never showed to pick up the special requested key. Glee: "Called in a favor." But then the favor became bigger when Tom didn't show. Now Glee owes Ad, and Tom really owes Glee. (debt and anger all mixed up) John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed That is exactly how the peasantry of the ancient world thought about human justice: stay away from the courts or you will remain embroiled until your last penny is taken from you in useless bribes. If you do not find distributive justice here below, you yearn fro a God who will administer it fairly and equitably.

Matthew 5:27-30

Cross References:

28-30 30 Job 31:1 & 7 & 22 Deuteronomy 25:11-12

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "Woman," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 147-150 Cicero, "Against Catiline," Lend Me Your Ears (63 BC), p. 222 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 100 & 102 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 165 Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew's Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 374 f.

Verse References

27-29 27-28 29-30 30 Robert Flynn, "Genesis, Jeremiah, & Gospels," Communion, p. 203 ff. Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 78 f. Dallas Willard, "Jesus the Logician," The Best Christian Writing 2000, p. 270 f. Denise Levertov, "Intrusion," Footprints, p. 8

Matthew 5:27-30

Notes

Cicero From what licentiousness have your eyes, from what atrocity have your hands, from what iniquity has your whole body ever abstained? Stephen Mitchell Jesus' point here is that selfish and harmful actions begin in selfish and harmful thoughts. Anyone who is serious about living in the light will have a passionate desire to correct his mistakes at the root.

Matthew 5:27-30

Notes

Robert Flynn Any man who reduces a woman to a sex object, a thing for his pleasure, is guilty of adultery. Her worth is not restricted or equal to her usefulness to a man. She has worth to herself. Understand that resolved one of my adolescent mysteries. I had lusted after my female classmates when they were not around, I had devised strategems for their seduction when I was alone, but when I was with one of them, I was a courtly as Robert E. Lee. I desired them, but I desired them as women to be loved, not things to be used of possessed. At least, that's my memory. (p. 204) To look upon a woman and seek to use her person for your pleasure is to commit adultery in your heart. To look upon your country and to lust after its privileges to reserve them to yourself is to commit sedition in your heart. To look upon your religion and to lust after its power to force conformity to your will is to commit blasphemy. (p. 205) Dallas Willard One must keep the context in mind. Jesus is exhibiting the righteousness that goes beyond "the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees." This latter was a righteousness that took as its goal to not do anything wrong. If not doing anything wrong is the goal, that could be achieved by dismembering yourself and making actions impossible. What you cannot do you certainly will not do. Remove your eye, your hand, etc., therefore, and you will roll into heaven a mutilated stump. ... He reduces their principle--that righteousness lies in not doing anything wrong--to the absurd, in the hope that they will forsake their principle and see and enter the righteousness that is "beyond the righteousness of the scribes and the Pharisees"--beyond, where compassion or love and not sacrifice is the fundamental thing. Denise Levertov After I had cut of my hands and grown new ones something my former hands had longed for came and asked to be rocked. After my plucked out eyes had withered and new ones grown something my former eyes had wept for came asking to be pitied.

Matthew 5:31-32

(Mark 10:11-12; Luke 16:18) Cross References:

31-32 31-32 Deuteronomy 24:1-4 Matthew 19:9; Mark 10:11-12; Luke 16:18; 1 Corinthians 7:10-11

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "Woman," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 147-150 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 100 & 102 Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew's Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 374 f.

Matthew 5:33-37

Cross References: 33-37

33-37 35 37 Leviticus 19:12; Numbers 30:2; Deuteronomy 23:21; Isaiah 48:1 -2 Jeremiah 23:33-40; Matthew 23:16-22; James 5:12 Psalm 48:2; Isaiah 66:1; Acts 7:49 Luke 21:14

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "Truthfulness," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 151-155 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 135, 168 Thomas R. Haney, Today' Spirituality , p. 100 & 102 s Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, quoted in Bookshelf: quotations Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew' Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 374 f. s Hasidic Saying, The Newsletter Newsletter (July 1997), p. 5

Verse References

37 David H. C. Read, "Uncomplicated Christians," I Am Persuaded, p. 10-17

Matthew 5:33-37

Notes

Victor Hugo It is the essence of truth that it is never excessive. Why should it exaggerate? There is that which should be destroyed and that which should be simply illuminated and studied. How great is the force of benevolent and searching examination! We must not resort to the flame where only light is required. Hasidic Saying He who adds to truth decreases it.

Matthew 5:38-48

General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 53 Yusaf Iman, "Love Your Enemies," The Black Poets, p. 293 f. Albert Schweitzer, A Place for Revelation, p. 40-42 Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew's Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 374 f.

Verses 38-42

Verses 43-48

Matthew 5:38-42

(Luke 6:29-30) Cross References:

38 39-42 39 40-42 42 Exodus 21:24; Leviticus 24:20; Deuteronomy 19:21 Proverbs 24:29; Romans 12:17; 1 Corinthians 6:7; 1 Peter 2:19, 3:9 Psalm 3:7, 141:5; Isaiah 50:6; Lamentations 3:30 Deuteronomy 24:10-13 Deuteronomy 15:8

General References

John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 113, 164 Annie Dillard, For the Time Being, p. 139 W. Paul Jones, "Courage as the Heart of Faith," Weavings (May/June 1997) Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 383 George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, Philosophy in the Flesh, p. 296 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 168

Verse References

Matthew 5:38-42

Notes

Annie Dillard "How can evil exist in a world created by God, the Benefident One? It can exist, because entrapped deep inside the force of evil there is a spark of goodness. This spark is the source of life of the evil tendency. ... Now, it is the specific mission of the Jew to free the entrapped holy sparks from the grip of the forces of evil by means of Torah study and prayer. Once the holy sparks are released, evil, having lost its life-giving core, will cease to exist." So wrote Rabbi Yehuda Aryeh Lieb Alter of Ger, in nineteenth-century Poland. it was the Baal Shem Tov who taught this vital idea. W. Paul Jones Gift wrap your coat for others when they steal your sweater. Søren Kierkegaard Force ought never be used; this is the mind of Christ. Instead you ought to endure injustice, witnessing also to the truth until the other party cannot hold out in doing wrong and voluntarily gives up doing it. Suffering can have a paralyzing effect. Just as a hypnotist puts his subject to sleep, and one limb after another loses its vitality, so suffering endurance paralyzes injustice. No evil can ultimately hold out against it. George Lakoff and Mark Johnson By Moral Accounting, either harming you further or accepting something good from you would incur an even greater debt: By turning the other cheek, you make me even more morally indebted to you. If I have a conscience, I should feel even more guilty. Turning the other cheek involves a rejection of retribution and revenge and the acceptance of basic goodness--and when it works, it works via this mechanism of Moral Accounting. Stephen Mitchell The career of Gandhi is the best commentary on this verse. As in the previous commandments, Jesus is asking for a deeper level of righteousness here. Not only are we to compensate our neighbor when we injur him; we are to compensate him when he injures us. Not only are we to pay him what is fair; we are to give him what is more than fair: good in return for evil, love in return for hatred. This attitude is admirable if it comes from true non-attachment, as in the following story about the Zen poet Ryokan: Ryokan lived in a small hut at the foot of a mountain. One evening a thief broke in, only to find that there was nothing in the hut worth stealing. When Ryokan returned, he found the thief and said, "You've probably come a long way, and you shouldn't return empty-handed. Please take my clothes as a gift." Shamefaced, the thief took the clothes and left. Ryokan sat down naked and looked up at the sky. "Poor fellow," he said, "I wish I could give him this beautiful moon."

Matthew 5:38-42

Verse References

38-39 "Reflections on the Death Penalty," The Plough (April 1995), p. 14 f. [by Coretta Scott King, Clarence Darrow, John Bright (English Quaker), Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Andrei Sakharov, Bhagavad Gita, Talmud] Simon Armitage, "Sympathy," Poetry Daily (September 10, 2008) John Dominic Crossan, In Parables, p. 82 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 161 Madeleine L'Engle, The Irrational Season, p. 172 Albert Schweitzer, A Place for Revelation, p. 45-52 John Shea, The Spirit Master, p. 84 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 97, 161 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 276 Dan Gerber, "Bodhisattva," Poetry Daily (May 4, 2007) Thomas G. Long, "Biblical Preaching Today: Choices and Forms," On Our Minds (September 1998), p. 3-4 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 60 David Sipress, "Cartoon," The New Yorker (January 10, 200), p. 34

38 39 39 39 39 39 42 42 42 42 42 42

Matthew 5:38-42

Notes

Simon Armitage After the verdict, the murdered man's twin was suddenly there on the courthouse steps. He said nothing, just calmly unbuttoned his jacket and shirt, revealing a vest. In red, it read Matthew, 5:38. Then he re-buttoned his suit and he went. * Well, I 'unted 'im down to a council estate on t'side on an 'ill. Burnt out Vauxall Nova for a garden shed, one dead cooker on t'lawn, that kinda thing. It's dark. So I gets t'car jack out of t'boot and jemmies t'window casin'-- wood were rotten, putty gone to shot--and slides in. Dog-leg stairs. Dog-piss carpet. Dog-ends all over t'shop. 'E's sat on 'is bed doin' X-Box with 'is thumbs. Looks up and sees me lollin' in t'door 'ole. Sees t'gun. I stands there a minute, clockin' 'im. You know t'sort: Mettallica T-shirt, trainers, camouflage shorts, number-four cropped curly 'air and pony-tail, tatts on 'is forearms. Cackin' 'imself, I could tell. "What?" 'e's at it. "What?" Then, "Don't, man. Don't be a cunt." I lifts t'barrel level with 'is face, and I pulls. But it weren't lead shot what peppered 'is stupid 'ead-- I'd emptied t' cartridge at 'ome, and loaded up with ashes instead. Me bruvver's. What they'd givved us to take 'ome in a brass urn. Then I turns and walks, leaves 'im with a powdered face and white frightened 'air like what those 'igh court judges wear. I got three year.

Matthew 5:38-42

Notes

John Dominic Crossan There are very many ways in which an aphorism starting with "if any one strikes you on the right cheek" might have been finished: kill him, strike him, ignore him, forgive him, even love him. But when it is ended with "turn to him the other also" in Matt. 5:39, one is no longer giving helpful moral admonition or even radical pacifistic advice. One is deliberately overthrowing ethics in the sense in which Heidegger spoke of the necessity of overthrowing metaphysics. The aphorism brings ethics also under the radical challenge of the Kingdom. It intends us to experience how the logic of ethics is undermined by the mystery of God and that, if one can accept it, is the most crucial moral experience of all. Søren Kierkegaard Meekness is perhaps the Christian's most distinguishing mark. "If anyone strikes you on the right cheek, turn to him the other also" (Mt. 5:39). Not to strike back is not, in itself, meekness. Nor is it meekness to merely put up with being wronged and accept it for what it is. But it is meekness to turn the left cheek. Pride also bears the wrong, but as it lifts itself above the wrong ­ usually in self-righteous judgment ­ it actually makes the wrong seem greater than it is. Patience also bears the wrong, but it does not make the wrong less than it is. Only meekness makes the wrong less, only meekness lightens the load. It takes the wrong into itself, be it injury, insult, or whatever, and in this way lessens it. Madeleine L'Engle I cannot turn the other cheek it takes all the strength I have to keep from hitting back John Shea The double commandment of love, toward God and neighbor, motivated Jesus' life. This love energy suffused an other-centered life of service. But this service was not a service of servility. It was sustained attention to the liberation of people from whatever forces oppressed them. One set of powerful oppressive forces which people seldom reflect on is the violence of society which they have internalized. Our own violence is the sin closest to home. It was preciesly this violence, unleashed and at full fury, that was directed at Jesus. To resist it would be to multiply it. To receive it in his own person as an act of love would be to bear it away. The violent may bear the Kingdom away; but the loving bear the violence away. "He took away the sin of the world" is an experiential truth before it is a theological conviction.

Matthew 5:38-42

Notes

Dan Gerber When the young man on State Street approached as if to ask directions, saying, "Can you help me out a little here?" and I, though I already knew, said, "Help you out how, exactly?" "A dollar or two if you can," he said, and I took a deep breath, holding in what I might've held out, hearing When someone asks, you give what you can, from my bank of training in the ways of compassion, and though I didn't want to, opened my wallet, and with the munificence of a toad, pulled out a five and bought him off. Thomas G. Long The text has brought me into an experiential relationship wih my neighbor, but also into a t dilema: I feel two ways about the situation. On the one hand, fair is fair. ... On the other hand, I now see my neighbor as a vulnerable human being, shivering in the cold night. ... Yes, we humans being could argue economic realities all day long, but finally, when the neighbor cries out, God does not thunder economic rules but turns a compassionate ear and responds to protect and save the neighbor. [article filed under Exodus 22:26-27] Thomas Merton Abbot Agatho frequently admonished his disciple saying: Never acquire for yourself anything that you might hesitate to give to your brother if he asked you for it, for thus you would be found a transgressor of God' command. If anyone asks, give to him and if anyone wants to borrow from s you, do not turn away from him. David Sipress [Two men in suits walking past a beggar with hat in hand] "Here I was, all this time, worrying that maybe I' a selfish person, and now it turns out I' e been suffering from compassion fatigue." m v

Matthew 5:43-48

(Luke 6:27-28, 32-36) Greek Cross References:

43-48 43-48 43 44-45 44 45 48 Exodus 23:4-5; Leviticus 19:18; 1 Samuel 24:19; Proverbs 25:21-22 Luke 6:27-28, 32-36 Leviticus 19:17-18; Psalm 45:7; Isaiah 61:8; Amos 5:15 Psalm 72:6-7 Exodus 23:4-5; Luke 23:34 2 Samuel 23:4; Psalm 72:5-6; Isaiah 55:10-11; Hosea 6:3 Leviticus 19:2; Matthew 19:21; 1 Peter 1:15-17

General References

Verse References

Matthew 5:43-48

General References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 122 Augustine, "Love of Our Enemies (8, 4-10)," Love One Another, My Friends, p. 82 f. Wendell Berry, "Property, Patriotism, and National Defense," Home Economics, p. 111 Wendell Berry, "Peaceableness toward Enemies," Sex Economy Freedom & Community, p. 69-92 Wendell Berry, "1995 ­ V," A Timbered Choir, p. 192 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Enemy--the Extraordinary," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 162-171 Bonnie Bowman, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 170-173 Sheila Cassidy, Sharing the Darkness, p. 45 Cid Corman, "Untitled," nothing doing, p. 114 Jaskushitsu, "Kanso (Patient Old Man)," a Quiet Room, p. 72 Jane Kenyon, "Insomnia at the Solstice," Otherwise, p. 205 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 100 Denise Levertov, "This Day," Oblique Prayers, p. 80 [me] Martin Luther, "The Freedom of a Christian," Three Treatises, p. 304 William F. May, "[from A CATALOGUE OF SINS p. 96]:," Weavings (September/October 1995), p. 37 f. Yehiel Mikhal of Zlotchov, quoted by Stephen Mitchell in The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 171 Donald Miller, Blue Like Jazz, p. 47 Stephen Mitchell, "Introduction," The Book of Job, p. xxiv Mary Oliver, "Am I Not Among the Early Risers," West Wind, p. 7 f. Parker Palmer, J.The Courage to Teach, p. 171 John Shea, The Spirit Master, p. 84 William Stafford, "For the Unknown Enemy," An Oregon Message, p. 46 J. R. Veneroso, M.M. "O gentle God of vengence," Maryknoll (September 1999), p. 18-20 Jim Wallis, quoted by Johann Christoph Arnold in Seeking Peace, p. 107 Richard Wilbur, "For the Student Strikers," New and Collected Poems, p. 73 William H. Willimon, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (January 2003), p. 61-63 Walter Wink, "My Enemy, My Destiny," Weavings (March/April 2006), p. 11-22 John Howard Yoder, The Jewish-Christian Schism Revisited, p. 69 f

Verse References

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes

Eberhard Arnold Except for my friends, my enemies are closest to me. It is with them that I have to come to terms most frequently in my thoughts and actions, but most of all, in my emotio s ... I must n concern myself with them in the most intensive way. Since I cannot avoid doing this the question is in what spirit this intensive occupation will be the strongest and most fruitful. Augustine Show mercy, then as do people with merciful hearts, because even in loving your enemies you are loving your sisters and brothers. ... I ask you: Why should you love your enemies? Is it for the sake of good health in this life? What if that' not expedient? Do you want them to be rich? s What if they' be blinded by their riches? ... Desire for them rather that they share eternal life ll with you. Desire that they be your sisters and brothers. If this is what you desire when you love your enemies, that they be your sisters and brothers, then when you love them it' sisters and s brothers you are loving. It' not what they are that you love in them but what you would have them s be. ... It' as the craftsman looked on the tree from the forest that our Craftsman looked on us: s what he saw was not the raw material but the ediface he was going to make of it. ... It' not what s they are that you love in them but what you would have them be. So when you love your enemies, you are loving your sisters and brothers. Wendell Berry It may be that the only possibly effective defense against the ultimate weapon is no weapon at all. It may be that the presence of nuclear weapons in the world serves notice that the command to love one another is an absolute practical necessity, such as we never dreamed itto be before, and that our choice is not to win or lose, but to love our enemies or die. Wendell Berry But Christian prayers are made to or in the name of Jesus who loved, prayed for, and forgave his enemies and who instructed his followers to do lik ewise. (p. 84) Bonnie Bowman perfection--regained the entirety of your original endowment. Sheila Cassidy We must not hate, even when there is good reason, or we take the other' sin upon ourselves. s Cid Corman When America has made a black wall with all the names of those of the Vietnamese who died in that war life will have grown up.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 2

Wendell Berry To my granddaughters who visited the Holocaust Museum on the day of the burial of Yitzhak Rabin Now you know the worst we humans have to know about ourselves, and I am sorry, for I know that you will be afraid. To those of our bodies given without pity to be burned, I know there is no answer but loving one another, even our enemies, and this is hard. But remember: when a man of war becomes a man of peace, he gives a light, divine though it is also human. When a man of peace is killed by a man of war, he gives a light. You do not have to walk in darkness. If you will have the courage for love, you may walk in light. It will be the light of those who have suffered for peace. It will be your light. Jakushitsu On his face saliva remains like drops of rain Near his ears abusive language like thunder's roar

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 3

Jane Kenyon The thrush begins again its outpouring of silver to rich and poor alike, to the just and the unjust. Søren Kierkegaard Therefore he who in truth loves, loves his neighbor. And he who in truth loves his neighbor loves also his enemy. This is obvious; for the distinction of friend or enemy is a distinction in the object of love, but the object of love to your neighbor is always without distinction. Your neighbor is the absolutely unrecognizable distinction between one person and another; it is eternal equality before God ­ enemies, too, have this equality. Denise Levertov Perhaps, I thought, passing the duckpond, perhaps­seeing the brilliantly somber water deranged by lost feathers and bits of drowning bread­perhaps these imperfections (the ducklings practised their diving, stylized feet vigorously cycling among débris) are part of perfection, a pristine nuance? our eyes, our lives, too close to the canvas, enmeshed within the turning dance, see to it? [Me: the love of enemies is a confusing sort of perfection --to be perfect we must confuse our enemies and our friends. Perfection, in order to be complete, must include imperfections.] William F. May ... the command to love the enemy rests on the astonishing assertion that God himself has come as the enemy because he first loved men [and women], and come to them under this very form. For the Christian, this identification is unmistakable: Jesus is the enemy; he is the implacable foe. Stephen Mitchell ... in the sayings of the eighteenth -century Hasidic rabbi Yehiel Mikhal of Zlotchov: "Pray for your enemies that everything may be well with them. More than all other prayers, this is truly the service of God."

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 4

Donald Miller "[Jesus] didn't play favorites at all, which is miraculous in itself. That fact alone may have been the most supernatural thing He did. He didn't show partiality, which every human does." Stephen Mitchell These passages [Job 38-41 and Isaiah 45:7] may remind us of the radiant, large-hearted verse in which Jesus of Nazareth gives his reason for loving our enemies: "That you may be children of your father who is in heaven." Mary Oliver Above the modest house and the palace--the same darkness Above the evil man and the just, the same stars. Above the child who will recover and the child who will not recover, the same energies roll forward, from one tragedy to the next and from one foolishness to the next. I bow down. Parker Palmer Having recognized that the enemy is not simply "out there" but first and foremost "in here," in our personal collaboration with evil, Rosa Parks was able to act from love rather than hate--the love that wants to redeem the enemy that can be found in us as well as around us. John Shea [quoting Frans Josef van Beech in Christ Proclaimed] Loving one's enemy is suffering for him at his own hands. William Stafford This monument is for the unknown good in our enemies. Like a picture their life began to appear: they gathered at home in the evening and sang. Above their fields they saw a new sky. A holiday came and they carried the baby to the park for a party. Sunlight surrounded them. Here we glimpse what our minds long turned away from. the great mutual blindness darkened that sunlight in the park, and the sky that was new, and the holidays. This monument was that one afternoon we stood here letting a part of our minds escape. They came back, but different. Enemy: one day we glimpsed your life. This monument is for you.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 5

J. R. Veneroso, M.M. O Lord, no matter how much I pray I cannot forgive them. No matter how much I try I cannot bring myself to forgive you. You, the All-Powerful, the All-Knowing, the All-Merciful God. Where was your power and mercy when they did this? Do you know what it' like to have people insult you s and want you dead for just being who you are? Do you know how it feels being the object of scorn? Crucified God, Teach me to pray, "Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us." For only in living these words do I experience freedom and rebirth. You, Lord, have given me the key to unlock the prison of my memories in which my salvation lies. But Pride has rusted shut the door and Spite still stands guard. Help me to see, to understand, to accept that until I forgive, unless I renounce my urge to retaliate and let go of my grudge I have placed my happiness in the hands of my adversary. Therefore, O God of Justice, font of eternal Wisdom Grant that all my enemies may drown in the deepest ocean of your Mercy. Rain down upon their heads the unquenchable fire of your Love Bind them securely with the unbreakable bonds of your Compassion For only in this way will my wounded soul find Healing my heavy heart find Peace and my crushed spirit the lost Joy of my youth. Jim Wallis As long as we do not pray for our enemies, we continue to see only our own point of view ­ our own righteousness ­ and to ignore their perspective. Prayer breaks down the distinctions between us and them. To do violence to others, you must make them enemies. Prayer, on the other hand, makes enemies into friends. When we have brought our enemies into our hearts in prayer, it becomes difficult to maintain the hostility necessary for violence. In bringing them close to us, prayer even serves to protect our enemies. Thus prayer undermines th propaganda and policies designed to make us hate and fear e our enemies. By softening our hearts towards our adversaries, prayer can even become treasonous. Fervent prayer for our enemies is a great obstacle to war and the feelings that lead to war.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 6

Richard Wilbur Go talk with those who are rumored to be unlike you, And whom, it is said, you are so unlike. Stand on the stoops of their houses and tell them why You are out on strike. It is not yet time for the rock, the bullet, the blunt Slogan that fuddles the mind toward force. Let the new sound in our streets be the patient sound Of your discourse. Doors will be shut in your faces, I do not doubt. Yet here or there, it may be, there will start, Much as the lights blink on in a block at evening, Changes of heart. They are your houses; the people are not unlike you; Talk with them, then, and let it be done Even for the grey wife of your nightmare sheriff And the guardsman' son. s John Howard Yoder Secondly, the standard account says, Jesus'pacifism is a rejection of the Old Testament story, with its holy wars and righteous royalty. Thus the position Jesus is portrayed as taking was anti-Jewish. Three times in Matt. 5 his phrase, ` but I say to you ... 'identified ... within the old regime issues of violence and the treatment of enemies. Love of the enemy is frequently characterized as the point at which Jesus is most original over against ` he Jews' t . Thirdly, Jesus'pacifism is thought to be the product of mental moves, or moral insights, which we might call ` individualization'and ` interiorization' We think of his saying that angry thoughts . or language are as bad as killing, or lustful thoughts as bad as adultery. Jewish morality, it is held, was external and communitarian. Or others will say, Jesus was apocalyptic, impatient, expecting divine intervention in history, whereas ` he Jews' were more realistic about the world' t s regularities. This view has been held, not surprisingly, by Christian pacifist mi norities, who could use the ` I say to you'passages as an answer to others'arguments about wars having been morally but legitimate in the Old Testament. ... ... Jesus did not reject anything Jewish in calling for love of enemy ... ... The intent of he original Torah is broadened, or intensified, or interiorized by the t antitheses: never diverted or negated. There must then be, in the mind of the Jesus of Matthew, an original intent which we can discern as having been within the Torah itself, whic points toward the renunciation of violence h and the love of the enemy. Without having got that far, the Law and the Prophets must have been reaching, pointing toward that fulfillment.

Matthew 5:43-48

Verse References

43-45 43-45 43-44 44-45 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 44 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 45 47 48 48 48 48 48 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 208 f. Martin Luther King, Jr., "Love Your Enemies," Strength to Love, p. 47-55 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 108, 163 E. Glenn Hinson, "On Coping with Your Anger," Weavings (March/April 1994), p. 33-39 Wendell Berry, "Enemies," Entries, p. 38 Wendell Berry, Citizenship Papers, p. 20 Dante, "Canto 17," Paradiso, p. 159 Richard Foster, Prayer, p. 200, 224 Jan Johnson, "A Journey of Formation," Weavings (July/August 2007), p. 20 Abraham Lincoln, Try Giving Yourself Away Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, quoted in Daily Dig (April 2, 2003) M. C. Richards, The Crossing Point, p. 178 William Stafford, "Inheriting the Earth: Quail," My Name is William Tell, p. 11 John Howard Yoder, He Came Preaching Peace Hendrick Hertzberg, "Talk of the Town: Extra," The New Yorker (April 8, 2002), p. 31 Denise Levertov, "Six Variations," Jacob's Ladder, p. 19 Mary Oliver, "Wild Geese" and "Sunrise," Dream Work, p. 14 and p. 59 f. Pattiann Rogers, "As Even Ever," Song of the World Becoming, p. 25 William Safire, The First Dissident, p. 9 f. 69 Stephen Sandy, "A Common," The New Yorker (June 13, 1994), p. 76 Jerome M. Segal, Graceful Simplicity, p. 184 Shiki, quoted by R. H. Blyth in Haiku, Vol. 3, p. 717 Santoka Taneda, "120," Mountain Tasting, p. 62 Communication Resources, "Rainbow.tif ," (SCA3) Scripture Cover Art Crypto! Mary Oliver, "A Few Words," Blue Pastures, p. 93 [my translation: Your love must include all as your Heavenly Father's does.] Jane Kenyon, "We Let the Boat Drift," Otherwise, p. 135 Stephen Mitchell, Parables and Portraits, p. 47 Mary Oliver, "In Backwater Woods," White Pine, p. 32 Elie Wiesel, Somewhere a Master, p. 65

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes

Wendell Berry, Entries If you are not to become a monster you must care what they think. ... love for your enemy that is the way of liberty? ... You must not think of them again except as monsters like yourself pitiable because unforgiving. Wendell Berry, Citizenship Papers XVIII. In a time such as this, when we have been seriously and most cruelly hurt by those who hate us, and when we must consider ourselves to be gravely threatened by those same people, it is hard to speak of the ways of peace and to remember that Christ enjoined us to love our enemies, but this is no less necessary fro being difficult. Dante And yet I will not have thee hate thy neighbors; Thy life shall have a future far beyond The just chastisement of their perfidities. Richard Foster Another approach comes from the great preacher and pray-er, George Buttrick. He recommends that we begin with prayer for our enemies: "The first intercession is, `Bless So-and-so whom I foolishly regard as an enemy. Bless So-and-so whom I have wronged. Keep them in Thy favor. Banish my bitterness.'" (p. 200) Dietrick Bonhoeffer says that when we pray for our enemies "we are taking their distress and poverty, their guilt and perdition upon ourselves and pleading to god for them. We are doing vicariously for them what they cannot do for themselves." In Revensbruk Nazi concentration camp--... "And when they come to judgment let all the fruits that we have borne be their forgiveness." (p. 224) Abraham Lincoln Abraham Lincoln once said, "I destroy my enemy when I make him my friend." He could have added, "I master my difficulty when I make it my opportunity." It is always to our advantage when we turn a critic into a friend; when we keep our temper in spite of angry accusations made against us, allowing the accuser to cool off; when we learn to profit by our mistakes so that they pay dividends; when we remain humble when we are praised; when we believe the best in spite of the worst, and when we begin to live with the knowledge that God cares for us deeply. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we would find in each person's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 2

M. C. Richards Wars are waged to get rid of conflicts and differences. They will never end until we learn to respect conflict, to love the enemy. How do we do that? ... Peace is an ART of war. It is not a bland static condition in which everyone agrees to agree, it is a dynamic condition in which diversity and conflict are centered in the body of ourgrowth. Who is the enemy? We have two enemies: the one who wants to own us and enslave us and from whom we must gain our freedom, and the one who is separate from us and has no feeling for us. The enemy from whom we must separate and the enemy with whom we must oin. j William Stafford Others have burdens of their own: everyone does. When you stir at night you can feel your enemies pray--necessity holding their paws in its grip, and their own kind of pain in their eyes. John Howard Yoder Christians whose loyalty to the Prince of Peace puts them out of step with today's nationalistic world, because they are willing to love their nation's friends but not to hate their nation's enemies, are not unrealistic dreamers who think that by their objections they will e d all wars. On the n contrary, it is the soldiers who think they can put an end to wars by preparing for just one more. Christians love their enemies because God does so, and commands his followers to do so. That is the only reason, and that is enough. Hendrick Hertzberg The new Sun' gothic nameplate is an exact replica of the old one' , with the same s s colophon--an engraving of a sunrise flanked by the goddesses of Justice and Liberty over the slogan "It Shines for All." Denise Levertov Gold light in blind love does not distinguish one surface from another, the savor is the same to its tongue, the fluted cylinder of a new ashcan a dazzling silver, the smooth flesh of screaming children a quietness, it is all a jubilance, the light catches up the disordered street in its apron, broken fruitrinds shine in the gutter.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 3

Mary Oliver, "Wild Geese" Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine. Meanwhile the world goes on. Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles o the rain f are moving across the landscapes, over the prairies and the deep trees, the mountains and the rivers "Sunrise" ... I thought of China, and India and Europe, and I thought how the sun blazes for everyone just so joyfully as it rises under the lashes of my own eyes ... Pattiann Rogers And the sun gives equally to each its own shadow, thus establishing a model for justice, even to the blind dog a shadow, even to the earth. William Safire Drought and flood affect the wicked and the good alike; the divine power we see excercised with our own eyes ... appears to be random, senseless, devoid of moral meaning. (p. 10) Stephen Sandy Down the walk from the children who misbehave The generosity of the trees. These answer The shouting with shade ... Jerome M. Segal For Epicurus God does not intervene in the world. In operational terms, that is, in terms of reward and punishment, it is as though God does not exist.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 4

Shiki Millionaires Come and drink of this clear water, And bears. Santoka Taneda In happiness Or sadness, Weeds grow and grow.

Crypto! The rain it raineth on the just And also on the unjust fella, But chiefly on the just, because The unjust steals the just's umbrella. Mary Oliver I put my face close to the lily,, where it stands just above the grass, and give it a good greeting from the stem of my heart. Jane Kenyon Once we talked about the life to come. I took the Bible from the nightstand and offered John 14: "I go to prepare a place for you." "Fine. Good," he said. "But what about Matthew? ` ou, therefore, Y must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect.' And he wept. " Stephen Mitchell All of them have their place inside eternity. They are perfe t--that is to say real: a conclusion c not easy to realize. But all things excellent are as difficult as they are rare.

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes, p. 5

Mary Oliver, 8. THE GARDEN What I want to know, please, is what is possible, and what is not. If it is not, then I am for it. My heart is out of its flesh-phase ... A mossy house anyone with any sense would enter as soon as the soul begins to desire the impossible. I have never felt so young. Elie Wiesel How did the Besht put it? A small Tzaddik loves small sinners; it takes a great Tzaddik to love great sinners. That is a basic principle of Hasidic teaching: our love for our fellow man must resemble God's; it must aspire to be infinite. Jan Johnson But praying for difficult people confuses us--do I want this person to be blessed? ... In these cases we can borrow from the best, using ideas form the saints. For example, Jesus and the Apostle Paul used the following phrases: · · · · · · that [Christ] would be in them and they in [Christ] (John 17:23) that they may become completely one with others who love God (John 17:21,23) That they be strengthened in their inner being with power through Christ's Spirit(Eph. 3:16) That they be rooted and grounded in love (Eph. 3:17) That they know (interactively) the love of Christ that surpasses knowledge (Eph. 3:19) that they would overflow with God's love and be full of discernment (Phil. 1:9-10)

Matthew 5:43-48

Notes

Communication Resources, "Rainbow.tif ," (SCA3)

Matthew 6

Verses 1-18 Verses 19-24 Verses 25-34

Matthew 6:1-18

Greek Cross References: 1-18 Matthew 23:5-12; Mark12:38-40; Thomas 14 General References:

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 39 Wendell Berry, "Two Economies," Home Economics, p. 74 Wendell Berry, "The Gift of Good Land," The Gift of Good Land, p. 281 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 138 Denise Levertov, "Freedom," The Freeing of the Dust, p. 112 Rebecca Mead, "Rag Trade," The New Yorker (7/13/98), p. 25 f. Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 58 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- VI," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 309-326 Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 146-149

Verses 1-4

Verses 5-15

Verses 16-18

Matthew 6:1-18

General References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 39 ... germinating life is hidden life. Creation lives and works in quietness. like the harmony, soundless to us, of the cherubim and the galaxies in their eternal worship of God, so too the prayer of men is what is most hidden and chaste in the life that comes from God. The Father seeks life in what is hidden. Wendell Berry, "Two Economies," Home Economics, p. 74 When the virtues are rightly practiced within the Great Economy, we do not call them virtues; we call them good farming, good forestry, good carpentry, good husbandry, good weaving and sewing, good homemaking, good parenthood, good neighborhood, and so on. The general principles are submerged in the particularities of their engagement with the world. Lao Tzu saw the appearance of the virtues as such, in the abstract, as indicative of their loss: When people lost sight of the way to live Came codes of love and honesty ... When differences weakened family ties Came benevolent fathers and dutiful sons; And when lands were disrupted and misgoverned Came ministers commended as loyal. And these lines might be read as an elaboration of the warning against APPEARANCES of goodness at the beginning of the sixth chapter of Matthew. Wendell Berry, "The Gift of Good Land," The Gift of Good Land, p. 281 ... a willingness to devote oneself to work that perhaps only the eye of heaven will see in its full intricacy and excellence. Perhaps the real work, like real prayer and real charity, must be done in secret.

Matthew 6:1-18

General References, page 2

Dag Hammarskjöld The "men of the hour," the self-assured who strut about among us in the jingling harness of their success and importance, how can you let yourself be irritated by them. Let them enjoy their triumph--on the level to which it belongs. Denise Levertov, "Freedom" it has been already and will be; out-reaching, utterly. Blind to itself, flooded with otherness. Rebecca Mead When lawyers for Calvin Klein filed forty-odd pages of legal documents in Manhattan Federal Court two weeks ago, alleging that Ralph Lauren's soon-to-be-launched fragrance, Romance, would infringe upon the trademark of Calvin Klein's best-selling fragrance, Eternity, they provided a wealth of detail to support their claim. Ralph's bottle was weighty and rectangular with bevelled edges, had a silvery T-shaped stopper, and bore no logo, just like Calvin's; Ralph's advertising campaign was to feature a man and a woman canoodling in outdoor settings and was to be photographed by Bruce Weber, just like Calvin's; Ralph's marketing theme celebrates "true love," according to the court papers, just like Calvin's, which is concerned with "eternal love, commitment, and marriage." ... What the lawyers didn't seem to think was worth mentioning was whether the two perfumes smelled alike.

Matthew 6:1-4

Greek Cross References: 1-2

2-4 3 4 Luke 6:24-26 Luke 14:2-4 Thomas 62 Colossians 3:23-24

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Hidden Righteousness," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 172-179 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 53

Verse References

1 2 2-4 3 3 Blaise Pascal, "# 159," Pensées, p. 47 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 47 & 152 Chaim Potok, The Gift of Asher Lev, p. 228 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 54 f. Me

Matthew 6:1-4

Notes

Blaise Pascal Noble deeds are most estimable when hidden. When I see some of these in history, they please me greatly. But after all they have not been quite hidden, since they have been known; and though people have done what they could to hide them, the little publication of them spoils all, for what was best in them was the wish to hide them. Chaim Potok Hersheleh Kutin was a great artist. He did paintings for rich people. But he didn't live like a rich person. People didn't like him because he wouldn't give money to charity. Some people hated him. When he died no one cried for him. But the week he died the poor people of the town went to the butcher and the baker for their food for Shabbos--and they were very surprised. For years the butcher and the baker were giving the poor people meat and bread for free. Now they suddenly stopped. Because Hersheleh Kutin the artist was paying for it secretly and now he was dead. And the people were sorry they had said bad things about him. Dom Helder Camara Quite often when we do some trifling thing our right hand promptly tells the whole world about it: 'Look what I've done. Look what I've done!' Oh yes, giving is easy enough, I mean giving as a tree gives shade from our loftiness downwards. But how hard it is to give without humiliating as a brother only doing his duty sharing with brothers and sisters what in fact belongs to them too. Me Santa Clause is a means by which the left hand might not know what the left hand is doing.

Matthew 6:5-15

General References:

Philip Harner, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 173-178 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Hiddenness of Prayer," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 180-187 As a summing up, Jesus emphasizes once more that everything depends on forgiveness of sin of which the disciples may only partake within the fellowship of sinners. Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 57 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 203 f.

Verses 5-8

Verses 9-15

Matthew 6:5-8

Greek Cross References:

5 Isaiah 42:2; Matthew 23:5-7; Mark 11:25; Luke 6:26, 11:43, 18:10-14 6 Song of Songs 1:4 7 1 Kings 18:29; Ecclesiastes 5:1-2 8 Matthew 6:32; Luke 12:30

Verse References:

5-6 6 6 6 6 7 7-8 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 71 f. Wendell Berry, Life is a Miracle, p. 80 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 348 Andrew Murray, "Alone with God," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 23-27 Geza Vermes, The Changing Faces of Christ, p. 214 Robert Burns, "Epistle to the Rev. John M'Math," The Poetical Works of Robert Burns, p. 267 Andrew Murray, "The Certainty of the Answer to Prayer," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 33-37

Matthew 6:5-8

Notes

Wendell Berry This has to do, I think, with our rightful fear of being misunderstood or too simply understood, or of having our profoundest experience misvalued. This, surely, is one of the reasons for Christ's insistence on the privacy of prayer. It is a part of our deepest and most precious integrity that we should speak (if we wish) for ourselves. We do not want self-appointed spokesmen for our souls. Søren Kierkegaard It is unbelievable what a person of prayer can achieve if he would but close the doors behind him. Geza Vermes With the exception of the Lord's Prayer, which is meant for a group, [Jesus] is always depicted as a practitioner of individual prayer either in solitude or at least at some distance from other people. We see him praying in the desert (Mark 1:35; Luke 5:15), on a mountain (Mark 6:46; Matt. 14:23; Luke 6:12), and in a garden away from his disciples (Mark 14:35; Matt. 26:39; Luke 22:41). Robert Burns But I gae mad at their grimaces, Their sighin', cantin' grace-proud faces, Their three-mile prayers, an' hauf-mile graces,

Matthew 6:9-15

(Luke 11:2-4) Greek Cross References:

Psalm 79:9, Luke 11:2-4

General References

Verses 9-10 Verse 13

Verse 11

Verse 12

Verses 14-15

Matthew 6:9-15

General References

Roberta C. Bondi, "Your Kingdom Come, Your Will be Done," Weavings (March/April), p. 6-15 John Dominic Crossan, "The Lord's Prayer," The Historical Jesus, p. 293-295 Carla De Sola, The Spirit Moves, p. 34 Neil Douglas-Klotz, Prayers of the Cosmos, p. 1-41 Eugene La Verdiere, "The Lord's Prayer in Literary Context," Scripture and Prayer, p. 104-116 Andrew Murray, "The Model Prayer" (p. 28-32) & "The Infinite Fatherliness of God" (p. 38-43), The Believer's School of Prayer John Shea, An Experience Named Spirit, p. 206 & 226 ff. John Shea, "The Prayer of Jesus," An Experience Named Spirit, p. 226-232 Joe Wise, "Our Father, Our Mother," Pockets from Divine Inspiration Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 242-245

Matthew 6:9-15

General Notes

John Shea It is theologically possible to see the relationship between God and his people being tested by sin. Neither partner seeks a testing. Temptation is not to be played with; it is truly a threat to the relationship and could destroy it. But temptations and trials are inevitable. Sin is deeply embedded in the human condition and its principle work is to disturb the creator-creature relationship. This double sentiment of not wanting the test but knowing that it will arrive is succinctly expressed in the ending of Matthew's version of Our Father: "Subject us not to the trial, but deliver us from the evil one." (p. 206) Joe Wise Our Father, you are in heaven Our Mother, you call us home Our Brother, you are the first there Our Sister, your kingdom come. Our Father you are in my heart Our Mother I love your name Our Brother, you love us so much Our Sister we do the same. Forgive us all The things we do That break the chain Of hands with you Give us this day Our daily bread And hold us close Just like you said. from Divine Inspiration Dewitt Clinton, "In My Father's House," p. 298 Rubén Darío, "Paternoster to Pan," p. 293 René Depestre, "Agoué-Taroyo," p. 296 Hjalmar Flax, "Our Father," p. 297 D. H. Lawrence, "Lord's Prayer," p. 295 Charles Péguy, I Am Their Father, Says God," p. 300

Matthew 6:9-10

Greek Cross References:

9-10 9 10 Psalm 103:19-22, 114:2; Luke 2:14; John 17:4; Acts 8:12; Ephesians 1:10 Psalm 48:10, 103:1, 115:1-3; Isaiah 11:9, 29:23, 62:7; Ezekiel 36; Luke 1:49; John 15:8, 17:6 Numbers 27:14, Colossians 1:20

General References

Johann & Christoph Blumhardt, The Blumhardt Reader, p. 87 Annie Dillard, For the Time Being, p. 195 Anne Mow, from Two or Ninety-two, quoted in Daily Dig (October 10, 2003) Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament

Verse References

9 9 9 10 10 10 10 William Shakespeare, Guideposts Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 253 Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament (x2) Percy C. Ainsworth, Weavings (March/April 2001), p. 29 J. Heinrich Arnold, Discipleship, (quoted in THE PLOUGH, Summer/Autumn, 1994, p. 20) (note) Charles H. Bayer, "Reaching Into the Future," Best Sermons I, p. 230 C. Norman Kraus, The Community of the Spirit, p. 62

Matthew 6:9-10

Notes

Christoph Blumhardt God does not make it his business to see that his name is kept hallowed, that his kingdomcome, that his will be done-- unless these things are, at the same time, the request of man. Annie Dillard God needs man to disclose him, complete him, and fulfill him, Teilhard said. His friend Abbé Paul Grenet paraphrased his thinking about God: "His name is holy, but it is up to us to sanctify it; his reign is universal, but it is up to us to make him reign; his will is done, but it is up to us to accomplish it." "Little by little," the paleontologist himself said, "the work is being done." Anne Mow The first purpose of our lives must be, "Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done." This is never a passive statement of endurance or of mere agreement to submit to whatever happens. It is a positive statement of the will to reach out for that which will bring glory to God. William Shakespeare Let never day nor night unhallowed pass but still remember what the Lord hathe done. Eberhard Arnold May that which thou art, God, which the earth until now has only blasphemed, at last become that which alone is consecrated. Percy C. Ainsworth The commandment of Heaven always interprets the real and unseen possibilities of the situation. J. Heinrich Arnold, (quoted in The Plough, Summer/Autumn, 1994, p. 20) Our longing will be satisfied only wh the whole earth comes under the rulership of God, en not the rulership of force. It is important for us to decide whether we want only a nice church with Jesus as its king or the way of the cross. [Me: Is Jesus King of the Church or is he King of the Universe with the church as his XO] C. Norman Kraus Jesus did not promise to build his church on Peter, the superior apostle, but on Peter the confessor of messianic authority. ... Jesus gave the "keys of the kingdom of heaven" (16:19; 18:18) to this community of disciples who recognize his authority to inaugurate the rule of God "on earth as it is in heaven."

Matthew 6:9-10

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament Cover Art: New Testament

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:11

Greek Cross References: 11-12

11 Nehemiah 10:31 (Leviticus 25) Exodus 16:4; Isaiah 33:16, 62:8-9 John 4:13

Verse References

Wendell Berry, "Two Economies," Home Economics, p. 67 Martin Luther, "Luther's Small Catechism," Faith: The Great Adventure (Thielicke), p. 88 William Stafford, "Stray Moments," Even in Quiet Places, p. 5 Santoka Taneda, Mountain Tasting, p. 45 Thich Nhat Hanh, "Eating Mindfully," Peace is Every Step, p. 23-26 Your Word is Fire, p. 107 Communication Resources, Sca7, "Bread3" Communication Resources, Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:11

Notes

11 Wendell Berry, "Two Economies," Home Economics, p. 67 If we are to live well on and from our land, we must live by faith in the ceaselessness of these processes and by faith in our own willingness and ability to collaborate with them. Christ's prayer for "daily bread" is an affirmation of such faith, just as it is a repudiation of faith in "much goods laid up." 11 Martin Luther, "Luther's Small Catechism," Faith: The Great Adventure (Thielicke), p. 88 God gives us our daily bread without our asking, even to the wicked. But in this prayer we ask that he let us recognize and receive his gift with thanksgiving. 11 William Stafford, "Stray Moments," Even in Quiet Places, p. 5 We used to ask--remember? We said, "... our daily bread." And it came Now we want more, and security too: "You can't be too sure." And, "Why should we trust?--Who says?" And Old-Who doesn't speak any more. Santoka Taneda, Mountain Tasting, p. 45 Nothing left to eat; Today's sunrise. Your Word is Fire, p. 107 There was a king who planted a garden in which he took great pride. He hired a certain man to care for it: to plant, to trim, to cultivate the earth Now the gardener needed sustenance for himself and various supplies to tend the royal garden. Should he be ashamed to come before the king each day and seek that which he needs? It is for the king himself that he is working!

11

11

Matthew 6:11

Notes

Communication Resources, SCA 7 Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:12

Greek Cross References: 11-12

12 Nehemiah 10:31 (Leviticus 25) Leviticus 19:18

Verse References

Stephen C. Barton, "Living as Families in the Light of the New Testament," Interpretation (April 1998), p. 142 Wendell Berry, What Are People For? p. 53 David R. Hackett, What We Say and What We Mean (note) Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 156, 197 Abba Kovner, "Detached Verses," The New Yorker (January 21, 2002), p. 64 Martin Luther, "The Freedom of a Christian," Three Treatises, p. 304 (note) Shunryu Suzuki, To Shine One Corner of the World, p. 103 Simone Weil, from Waiting for God, quoted in Daily Dig (September 24, 2003) Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:12

Notes

Wendell Berry In his conversations with Richard Etulain there is a passage in which Mr. Stegner names several of his old students, speaks of their accomplishments, and then says, "I try not to take credit for any of that." In the mouths of some people that statement would not be trustworthy; in the mouths of some it would contradict itself. Coming from Mr. Stegner it is trustworthy, for in fact he has not been a taker of credit. The fellows have been left to their ways. They have come, benefited as they were able, and left free of obligation. David R. Hackett Christian charity does not seek to create grateful debtors, but to share unconditionally with the world. [Christian charity does not seek to create grateful debtors but to `create debt-free, powerful ministers of God's blessing.'] Dag Hammarskjöld "To forgive oneself"--? No, that doesn't work: we have to be forgiven. But we can only bleieve this is possible if we ourselves can forgive. (p. 156) Forgiveness breaks the chain of causality because he who "forgives" you--out of love--takes upon himself the consequences of what you have done. Forgiveness, therefore, always entails a sacrifice. The price you must pay for your own liberation through another's sacrifice is that you in turn must be willing to liberate in the same way, irrespective of the consequences to yourself. (p. 197) Abba Kovner Soon Soon you will pass from the darkened room to another world. Freed from debts and contacts. Martin Luther Behold from faith thus flow forth love and joy in the Lord, and from love a joyful, willing, and free mind that serves one's neighbor willingly and takes no account of gratitude or ingratitude, of praise or blame, of gain or loss. For a man does not serve that he may put men under obligations. [and neither does God of course]

Matthew 6:12

Notes, p. 2

Shunryu Suzuki In the early days there were no snacks in the kitchen at Tassajara, so sometimes I'd send cookies to a friend of mine there. I began to wonder why she didn't write to say how great I was. Then I thought, how selfish of me. I'm not being generous; there are strings attached. I just want something back. I told Suzuki Roshi about this, and he said, "It's all right for you to take care of her, but first you have to take care of yourself!" His voice rose as he said this, and then he got right in my face to say loudly, "Do you understand?" Simone Weil To remit debts is to renounce our own personality. It means renouncing everything that goes to make up our ego, without exception. It means knowing that in the ego there is nothing whatever, no psychological element, that external circumstances could not do away with. It means accepting that truth. It means being happy that things should be so. The words "Thy will be done" imply this acceptance, if we say them with all our soul. That is why we can say a few moments later: "We forgive our debtors."

Matthew 6:12

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:13

Greek Cross References:

13 1 Samuel 26:24; Psalm 31:15 Matthew 26:41; Mark 14:38; Luke 22:40 John 17:15; 2 Thessalonians 3:3; James 1:13

Verse References

Hayden Carruth, "A Summer with Tu Fu," Scrambled Eggs and Whiskey, p. 28 Richard Foster, Prayer, p. 188 f. Katherine Mosby, "Prime," The Book of Uncommon Prayer, p. 23 Kathleen Norris, "Thinking About Louise Bogan," Little Girls in Church, p. 23 Elie Wiesel, Somewhere a Master, p. 22 Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:13

Notes

Hayden Carruth Was it the way of your world too, old master, that everyone had to be a villain in someone else's life? It is the way of ours apparently. Such is the pressure of evil on our spirits now. Richard Foster ... the only time God tries us is when there is something in our hearts that needs revealing. ... Therefore the prayer, "lead us not into temptation," means this: Lord, may there be nothing in me that will force you to put me to the test in order to reveal what is in my heart." Katherine Mosby Save me from the doubts that swarm like maggots feeding on a wound Kathleen Norris Our prayer would read: give us this day our daily darkness, deliver us not from temptation. Elie Wiesel A student asked him [Pinhas of Koretz] "What am I to do? I am pursued by evil temptations." And he answered, "Are you sure? Are you sure it is not the other way around?"

Matthew 6:13

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:14-15

Greek Cross References: 14-15 General References

Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 116, 284 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 55 Matthew 18:35; Mark 11:25; Ephesians 4:32; Colossians 3:13

Verse References

14 Newsletter Newsletter, "Cover Art: New Testament"

Matthew 6:14-15

Notes

Søren Kierkegaard Jesus says, "Forgive, and you will also be forgiven" (Mt. 6:14). That is to say, forgiveness is forgiveness. Your forgiveness of another is your own forgiveness; the forgiveness you give is the forgiveness you receive. If you wholeheartedly forgive your enemy, you may dare hope for your own forgiveness, for it is one and the same. God forgives you neither more nor less than as you forgive your trespassers. It is an illusion to imagine that you have forgiveness while you are slack in forgiving others. No, there is not a more exact agreement between the sky above and its reflection in the sea below, than there is between forgiveness and forgiving. Is it not pure conceit to believe in your own forgiveness when you will not forgive others? For how in truth can you believe in forgiveness if your own life is a refutation of the existence of forgiveness?! (p. 116) Christ abandoned "an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth," and turned the relationship around. He introduced a different like-for-like: as you relate yourself to others, so God relates himself to you. Forgiveness is to forgive. (p. 284) Stephen Mitchell These ifs have only one side, like a Möbius strip. Jesus doesn't mean that if you do condemn, God will condemn you. He is pointing to a spiritual fact: when we condemn, we create a world of condemnation for ourselves, and we attract the condemnation of others; when we cling to an offense, we are clinging to precisely what separates us from our own fulfillment. Letting go means not only releasing the person who has wronged us, but releasing ourselves.

Matthew 16:14-15

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Matthew 6:16-18

Greek Cross References: 16 Isaiah 58:5, Luke 6:25

17 Psalm 23:5

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Hiddenness of the Devout Life," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 188-191 Richard Foster, Prayer, p. 226 Here I want to underscore fasting as a means of helping us to suffer joyfully. Prudentius, "A Hymn After Fasting," Divine Inspiration, p. 305 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- VII," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 327-345

Matthew 6:19-24

Greek General Reference:

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Simplicity of the Carefree Life," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 192-201 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- VIII," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 346-364 November 2, 1996

Verses 19-21

Verses 22-23

Verse 24

Matthew 6:19-21

(Luke 12:33-34) Cross References: 19-21 Job 22:24-27; Psalm 39:6&11, 119:11; Isaiah 33:6

21 Mark 10:21; Luke 6:45, 12:33-34; 1 Timothy 6:17-19; Hebrews 11:26; James 5:1-3; Thomas 76 John 12:26

General References

Wendell Berry, What Are People For? p. 99 John Dominic Crossan, "Kingdom and Riches," The Historical Jesus, p. 274-276 Madeleine L'Engle, The Irrational Season, p. 205 Barbara Kingsolver, "Small Wonder," Small Wonder, p. 20 Krishnamurti, The Newsletter Newsletter (October 1997), p. 5 Marion Soards, Interpretation (October 1990), p. 402

Verse References

19 20 20 21 21 Johnny Hart, B. C. (12/25/93) Newsletter Newsletter, Scripture Art Communication Resources, Sca6, "Treasure" John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 118 & 165 Issa, A Few Flies and I, p. 93

Matthew 6:19-21

Notes

Wendell Berry All creatures live by God's spirit portioned out to them and breathe His breath. To "lay up ... treasures in heaven," then cannot mean to be spiritual at the earth's expense or to despise or condemn the earth for the sake of heaven. It means exactly the opposite: do not desecrate or deprecate these gifts which take part with us in the being of God by turning them into worldly "treasure"; do not reduce life to money or to any other mere quantity. Madeleine L'Engle As long as we are unwilling to admit great areas of ourselves into our lives to conjoin sunside and nightside it is difficult for us not to put our trust in that which will rust and decay where thieves break in and steal. Barbara Kingsolver [My parents] reared me under the constant counsel to trust spiritual values ahead of material ones, and to look to the land for shelter. "A house can burn down," they said, "but a piece of land will always be there." ... I've internalized my parents' message in a way that is not precisely personal ... and have spent a lifetime learning to believe in things that can never burn down. I can invest my heart's desire and the work of my hands in things that will outlive me. Krishnamurti When our hearts are empty, we collect things. Marion Soards ... they were without possessions in which to invest their trust. Johnny Hart Follow the star and you shall see His gift of grace to you and me. Follow the star that followed the youth Who gave us love and taught us truth. Follow the star that follows the man Who takes us where none other can To where our hopes and treasures are. Follow, o follow, the star. Issa Children Sitting cheerfully Around the fire-- The only treasures of the house.

Matthew 6:20

Notes

Newsletter Newsletter, Scripture Art

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Treasure"

Matthew 6:22-23

(Luke 11:34-36) Cross References: 22-23 Job 31:16&19; Proverbs 21:4, 22:9, 29:18; Is. 1:5, 29:10; Jer. 13:16

22 Matthew 20:15; Luke 11:34-36; Thomas 24, 61 Psalm 119:113, Matthew 5:8

General References

Keith Beasley-Topliffe, "If Thine Eye Be Single," Weavings (May/June 1993), p. 39-43 e.e. cummings, Newsletter Newsletter (July 1999), p.5 Thomas R. Kelly, A Testament of Devotion, p. 94 Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write, p. 67

Verse References

22 Horace Bushnell, Sermons, p. 167 f.

Matthew 6:22-23

Notes

e.e. cummings The eyes of my eyes are opened. Thomas R. Kelly I said his outward life became simplified, and used the passive voice intentionally. He didn't have to struggle, and renounce, and strain to achieve simplicity. He yielded to the Center and his life became simple. it was synoptic. It had singleness of eye. "If thine eye be single thy whole body shall be full of light." His many selves were integrated into a single true self, whose whole aim was humbly walking in the presence and guidance and will of God. Brenda Ueland From this I could see (and tell her) that she had a simple open eye and noticed everything with quiet pleasure and put it down as she saw it. (note: She didn't try to be struck. It just quietly happened.) Horace Bushnell ... do the first thing first. Say nothing of investigation till you have made sure of being grounded everlastingly and with completely whole intent in the principle of right doing as a principle. ... For this is what Christ calls the single eye, and the whole body is inevitably full of light. How surely and how fast fly away the doubts even as fogs are burned away by the sun.

Matthew 6:24

(Luke 16:13) Cross References: 24 Verse References:

Wendell Berry, Life is a Miracle, p. 127 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 118 & 165 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 276 William Lloyd Garrison, Lend Me Your Ears (Safire), p. 571 J. B. Handelsman, "Cartoon," The New Yorker (April 10, 2000), p. 60 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 10 Neil Postman, Technopoly, p. 15 Paul H. Ray and Sherry Ruth Anderson, Cultural Creatives, p. 79 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 205 Dean Sullivan, Papal Bull, p. 77 & 80 Luke 16:13; Thomas 47

Matthew 6:24

Notes

Wendell Berry Neither of us [Wes Jackson and Wendell] believes that either art or science can be "neutral." Influence and consequence are inescapable. History continues. You cannot serve both God and Mammon, and you cannot work without serving one or the other. John Dominic Crossan "You buried your heart where you hid your treasure." (p. 118) I have translated the saying negatively. I understand it not just as stating the truism that treasures are treasured but as challenging us to ponder the conjunction between a treasure buried, and therefore safe, and a heart buried, and therefore dead. (p. 165) William Lloyd Garrison, Lend Me Your Ears (Safire), p. 571 I do not know how to espouse freedom and slavery together. I do not know how to worship God and Mammon at the same time. J. B. Handelsman [man kneeling by bedside with hands folded in prayer] "And now, if I may, I'd like to put You on hold for a moment while I have a few words with Mammon." Søren Kierkegaard No, a person must choose, for in this way God retains his honor while at the same time has a fatherly concern for human-kind. Though God has lowered himself to being that which can be chosen, yet each person must on his part choose. God is not mocked. Therefore the matter stands thus: If a person avoids choosing, this is the same as the presumption of choosing the world. Each person must choose between God and the world, God and mammon. This is the eternal, unchangeable condition of choice that can never be evaded ­ no, never in all eternity. No one can say, "God and world, they are not, after all, so absolutely different. One can combine them both in one choice." This is to refrain from choosing. When there is a choice between two, then to want to choose both is just to shrink from the choice "to one's own destruction" (Heb. 10:39). Neil Postman, Technopoly, p. 15 The paradox, the surprise, and the wonder are that the clock was invented by men who wanted to devote themselves more rigorously to God; it ended as the technology of greatest use to men who wished to devote themselves to the accumulation of money. In the eternal struggle between God and Mammon, the clock quite unpredictably favored the latter.

Matthew 6:24

Notes, p. 2

Paul H. Ray and Sherry Ruth Anderson The modern world worships a two-faced god: time-and-money. [Me: In quantity only, hours (kronov) and $, not seasons (kairov) and abundance (£wlH).] Dean Sullivan, Papal Bull, p. 77 & 80 MAMMON Material goods which the Church says you can't serve while serving God. This from a multi-million-dollar institution that doesn't pay taxes. (p. 77) MATERIALISM A sin American Catholics are preoccupied with-- according to the guy with his own city. (p. 80)

Matthew 6:25-34

(Luke 12:22-34) Greek Cross References: 25-34

25-31 26 27 28-30 29 30 33 33 34 Psalm 37, Luke 12:22-31, 10:41, 12:11; Philippians 4:6; 1 Peter 5:7 Thomas 36 Matthew 10:29 Psalm 39:5 Psalm 103:15; Isaiah 40:6-8 1 Kings 10:4-7 Matthew 8:26, 14:31, 16:8; James 4:14 Deuteronomy 8:3, Psalm 85:10-13 Matthew 4:4, 19:27-28; Mark 10:29-30; Luke 18:29-30; Hebrews 11:6 James 4:13-15

General References

Verse References

Matthew 6:25-34

General References

Louisa May Alcott, "Despondency," The Book of Uncommon Prayer, p. 4 f. Elodie Armstrong Wendell Berry, "Two Economies," Home Economics, p. 57 Wendell Berry, "1988 - II," A Timbered Choir, p. 98 Wendell Berry, Collected Poems, p. 69, 78, 79 Jill Bialosky, "Another Loss to Stop For," The New Yorker, p. 93 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Simplicity of the Carefree Life," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 192-201 Charles E. Carlston, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1987), p. 179-183 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 81 & 158 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 295 Carla De Sola, The Spirit Moves, p. 106 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 146-148 Mary Oliver, New and Selected Poems, p. 76 f. John Michael Talbot, No Longer Strangers Christina Rossetti, "Consider," Goblin Market and Other Poems, p. 61 Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write, p. 56 note John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- IX," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 365-380 Joy Wosu, "Worrywart," The New Yorker (2/24/97), p. 98

Matthew 6:25-33

General Notes

Wendell Berry, "Two Economies" If he [Wes Jackson] had a text in mind, it must have been the sixth chapter of Matthew, in which, after speaking of God's care for nature, the fowls of the air and the lilies of the field, Jesus says: "Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat? or What shall we drink? or Wherewithal shall we be clothed? ... But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you." There is an attitude that sees in this text a denial of the value of any economy of this world, but this attitude makes the text useless and meaningless to humans who must live in this world. These verses make usable sense only if we read them as a statement of considerable practical import about the real nature of worldly economy. If this passage meant for us to seek only the Kingdom of God, it would have the odd result of making good people not only feckless but also dependent upon bad people busy with quite other seekings. It says, rather, to seek the Kingdom of God first; that is, it gives an obvious necessary priority to the Great Economy over any little economy made within it. Louisa May Alcott, "Despondency," The Book of Uncommon Prayer, p. 4 f. Silent and sad, When all are glad, And the earth is dressed in flowers; When the gay birds sing Till the forests ring, As they rest in woodland bowers. Oh, why these tears, And these idle fears For what may come to-morrow? The birds find food From God so good, And the flowers know no sorrow If He clothes these And the leafy trees, Will He not cherish thee? Why doubt His care; It is everywhere, Though the way we may not see. (poem written at the age of eleven)

Matthew 6:25-33

General Notes, page 2

Elodie Armstrong (written 40 years ago by author who is now 90. She had MS for 40 years.) 1. Thou shalt not worry, for worry is the most unproductive of all human behaviors. 2. Thou shalt not be fearful. Most of the things we fear never come to pass. 3. Thou shalt not cross bridges before you get to them. No one has ever succeeded in accomplishing that. 4. Thou shalt face each problem as it comes. You can only handle one at a time anyway. 5. Thou shalt not take problems to bed with you. They make very poor bedfellows. 6. Thou shalt not borrow other people's problemsw. They can take better care of them than you can. 7. Thou shalt not try to relive yesterday. For good or ill, it is gone. Concentrate on what is happening in your life today. 8. Thou shalt count thy blessings. Never overlook the small ones, for a lot of small blessings add up to a big one. 9. Thou shalt be a good listener for only when you listen do you hear ideas different from your own. It's very hard to learn something new when you are talking. 10. Thou shalt not become bogged down by frustration. 90% is rooted in self-pity and it will only interfere with positive action. Wendell Berry, "1988 - II," A Timbered Choir, p. 98 It is the destruction of the world in our own lives that drives us half insane, and more than half. To destroy that which we were given in trust: how will we bear it? It is our own bodies that we give to be broken, our bodies existing before and after us in clod and cloud, worm and tree, that we, driving or driven, despise in our greed to live, our haste to die. To have lost, wantonly, the ancient forests, the vast grasslands is our madness, the presence in our very bodies of our grief.

Matthew 6:25-33

General Notes, page 3

Wendell Berry, Collected Poems from "The Peace of the Wild Things (p. 69) I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief.

from "Window Poems # 7" [speaking about birds] But they understand only what is free and he can give only as they will take. Thus they have enlightened him. He buys the seed to make it free. (p. 78)

from "Window Poems, #9" (p. 79) He imagines a necessary joy in things that must fly to eat (p. 79)

Jill Bialosky, "Another Loss to Stop For," The New Yorker, p. 93 Against such cold and murcurial mornings, watch the wind whirl one leaf across the landscape, then, in a breath, let it go. The color in the opaque sky seems almost not to exist. Put on a wool sweater. Wander in the leaves, underneath healthy elms. Hold your child in your arms. After the dishes are washed, a kiss still warm at your neck, put down your pen. Turn out the light. I know how difficult it is, always balancing and wieghing, it takes years and many transformations; and always another loss to stop for, to send you backwards. Why do you worry so, when none of us is spared?

Matthew 6:25-33

General Notes, page 4

Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write, p. 56 note There are many people you can see who consider worry a kind of duty. Back of this I think it is the subconscious feeling that Fate or God is mean or resentful or tetchy and that if we do not worry enough we will certainly catch it from Him. Joy Wosu, "Worrywart," The New Yorker (2/24/97), p. 98. [filed in "Poetry" folder.] Worrisome you You worry for your mother, your father, your sister, your brother, stepsister, stepbrother, stepmother, stepfather You worry for your husband, daughters, sons, stepsons, stepdaughters Now you're worrying for Tom Worry for you not Tom Tom worries for Tom as tomorrow worries for itself ... Wrinkles, gray hairs that dance their way through your skull Worry not you! Health's too precious to swim with worries

Matthew 6:25-34

Verse References

26-29 26-27 26 26 28-30 28-30 28-29 28 29-34 31-33 31-33 31-33 32-33 33 33 33 33 33 33 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 34 Frederick Buechner, "The Monkey-God," The Hungering Dark, p. 96-103 Denise Levertov, "Contrasting Gestures," Evening Train, p. 100 Basho, "Haiku," The Essential Haiku, p. 27 Louise Erdrich, "Saint Clare," Odd Angles of Heaven, p. 100 f. Robert A. Fink, "On Jesus Taking His Word on Immortality," Odd Angles of Heaven, p. 105 Mary Oliver, "Just as the Calendar Began to Say Summer," Long Life, p. 35 Lynn Ungar, quoted in Wayne Muller, Sabbath, p. 192 Emily Dickinson, "Letter"?, Earl Lectures (Kathleen Norris, 1/28/97) Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 111 Wendell Berry, "1982 VII," A Timbered Choir, p. 49 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 11 Malcolm Muggeridge, A Third Testament, p. 123 f. Wendell Berry, "Preserving Wildness," Home Economics, p. 145 Christoph Blumhardt, Thy Kingdom Come, p. 221 Clement of Alexandria, quoted in The Plough (Spring 2001), p. 24 Meister Eckhart, "German Sermon # 4," Meister Eckhart: Teacher and Preacher, p. 250 Søren Kierkegaard, "First the Kingdom of God," Provocations, p. 193-195 Ted Loder, Guerrillas of Grace, p. 122 William Stafford, "Sky," The Way It Is, p. 3 Wendell Berry, "When despair," quoted in Earth Prayers, p. 102 Wendell Berry, What Are People For?, p. 13 Joan Chittister, O.S.B. "The Monastic Vision," Wisdom Distilled from the Daily, p. 198 Thich Nhat Hanh, Peace is Every Step, p. 38 George Herbert, "The Discharge," The Selected Poetry of George Herbert, p. 203 f. Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 211 f. Denise Levertov, "Who Is at My Window?" O Taste and See, p. 50 William Stafford, "Ways to Live: Having It Be Tomorrow," The Way It Is, p. 39 quote found in Nancy Morgan's book, Try Giving Yourself Away generic quote

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes

Frederick Buechner I have sometimes wondered if perhaps it was the writers of the Gospels themselves who put into Jesus' mouth by way of explanation the words, "Consider the liles of the field,how they i grow; they neither toil not spin; yet I tell you, even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these." I have wondered if perhaps Jesus himself, when the incident actually took place, merely pointed to the lilies and said nothing at all. (p. 100) Denise Levertov Coots, heads bobbing, forever urging themselves fussily onward ... How strong their neck -muscles must be! One is put in mind of human philistines toiling and spinning through their lives anxiously complacent inpursuit of trivia. Basho Singing, flying, singing the cuckoo keeps busy. Louise Erdrich By morning the strands of the nest disappear into each other shaping an emptiness within me that I make lovely as immature birds make the air by defining the tunnelsand the spirals of the new substance. And then no longer hindered by the violence of their need they take to other trees, fling themselves deep into the world. Robert A. Fink Can we count the hairs of a head? Or clothe ourselves with lilies? Mary Oliver ... the way the flowers were dressed in nothing but light. Emily Dickinson "Consider the lilies" is the only commandment I ever obeyed.

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes, p. 2

Lynn Ungar Consider the lilies of the field, the blue banks of camas opening into acres of sky along the road. Would the longing to lie down and be washed by that beauty abate if you knew their usefulness, how the natives ground their bulbs for flour, how the settlers' hogs uprooted them, grunting in gleeful oblivion as the flowers fell? And you--what of your rushed and useful life? Imagine setting it all down-- papers, plans, appointments, everything-- leaving only a note: "Gone to the fields to be lovely. Be back when I'm through with blooming." Even now, unneeded and uneaten, the camas lilies gaze out above the grass from their tender blue eyes. Even in sleep you life will shine. Make no mistake. Of course your work will always matter. Yet Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Christoph Blumhardt ... we pillars wobble when the demand is made of us: "Give up your body and your life, your possessions and blood, for this cause of God. Do not seek your own interests; but consider, rather, that you will be last to receive the benefits, only when the others have received the blessing will you receive it."

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes, p. 3

Wendell Berry, "1982 VII" We join our work to Heaven's gift Our hope to what is left That field and woods at last agree In an economy Of widest worth High Heaven's Kingdom come on earth Imagine Paradise. O dust arise! Dag Hammarskjöld Your cravings as a human animal do not become a prayer just because it is God whom you ask to attend to them. Malcolm Muggeridge ... being part of one Creation, with one Creator, we must seek our happiness in the good of others, thereby realizing our own good and living like brothers in one human family. Wendell Berry, "Preserving Wildness" What is needed is not frivolous. Everything depends on our right relation to necessity--and therefore on our right definition of necessity. Clement of Alexandria Ask for what is great, and what is small will be given to you as well. Meister Eckhart Know that when you seek anything of your own, you will never find God because you do not seek God purely. You are seeking something along with God, and you are acting just as if you were to make a candle out of God in order to look for something with it. Once one finds the things one is looking for, one throws the candle away. ... If God were to turn away from creatures for an instant, they would turn to nothing. Once I said (and it is true), if someone were to have the whole world and God, he would not have more than if he had God alone. Ted Loder drive me deep into my longing for your kingdom, until I seek it first -- yet not first for myself but for the hungry and the sick and the poor of your children.

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes, p. 4

William Stafford, "Sky" Your word arches over the roof all day. I know it within my bowed head, where the other sky listens. You will bring me everything when the time comes. Wendell Berry Let tomorrow come tomorrow. Not by your will is the house carried through the night. Joan Chittister, O.S.B. When we learn to be where we are, we gain perspective on life. Yesterday loses its hold on us and tomorrow loses its allure. Thich Nhat Hanh By taking good care of the present moment we take good care of the future. Denise Levertov, "Who Is at My Window?" Who is at my window, who, who? It's the blind cuckoo, mulling the old song over. The old song is about fear, about tomorrow and next year. Timor mortis conturbat me, he sings What's the use? He brings me the image of when, a boat hull down, smudged on the darkening ocean. I want to move deeper into today; he keeps me from that work. Today and eternity are nothing to him. His wings spread at the window make it dark. Go from my window, go, go!

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes, p. 5

William Stafford, "Ways to Live: Having It Be Tomorrow" If you're in on that secret, a new land will come every time the sun goes climbing over it, and the welcome of children will remain every day new in your heart Those around you don't have it new, and they shake their heads turning grey every morning when the sun comes up. And you laugh. quote found in Nancy Morgan's book, Try Giving Yourself Away Why should we live with such hurry and waste of Life, we are determined to be starved before we are hungry. ? Your ship is equal to the load of today; but when you are carrying yesterday's worry and tomorrow's anxiety you must lighten your load or you will sink. Søren Kierkegaard Anxiety for the next day is commonly associated with anxiety for subsistence. This is a very superficial view. The next day­ it is the grappling-hook by which the prodigious hulk of anxiety gets a hold of the individual' light craft. If it succeeds, he is under the domination of that power. s The next day is the first link of the chain that fetters a person to that superfluous anxiet that is of y the evil one. The next day ­ it is strange indeed, for ordinarily when one is sentenced for life the sentence reads, "for life," but he who sentences himself to anxiety "for the next day," sentences himself for life. One who rows a boat t urns his back to the goal towards which he labors. So it is with the next day. When by the help of eternity one lives absorbed in today, he turns his back to the next day. The more he is absorbed in today, the more decisively he turns his back upon the nex day, so that t he does not see it at all. If he turns around, eternity is confused before his eyes, it becomes the next day. But if for the sake of laboring more effectually towards the goal (eternity) he turns his back, he does not see the next day at all. By the help of eternity he sees quite clearly today and its task. link to Provocations Wendell Berry I come into the peace of wild things who do not tax their lives with forethought of grief.

Matthew 6:25-34

Notes, p. 6

George Herbert

Busy enquiring heart, what wouldst thou know? Why dost thou pry, And turn, and leer, and with a licorous eye Look high and low; And in thy lookings stretch and grow? Hast thou not made thy counts, and summed up all? Did not thy heart Give up the whole, and with the whole depart? Let what will fall: That which is past who can recall? Thy life is God's, thy time to come is gone, And is his right. He is thy night at noon: he is at night Thy noon alone. The crop is his, for he hath sown. And well it was for thee, when this befell, That God did make Thy business his, and in thy life partake: For thou canst tell, If it be his once, all is well. Only the present is thy part and fee. And happy thou, If, though thou didst not beat thy future brow, Thou couldst well see What present things required of thee. They ask enough; why shoudst thou further go? Raise not the mud Of future depths, but drink the clear and good. Dig not for woe In times to come; for it will grow. Man and the present fit: if he provice, He breaks the square. For this hour is mine: if for the next I care, I grow wide, And do encroach upon death's side And death each hour environs and surrounds. He that would know And care for the future chances, cannot go Unto those grounds, But through a church-yard which them bounds. Things present shrink and die: but they that spend Their thoughts and sense On future grief, do not remove it thence, But it extend, And draw the bottom out an end. God chains the dog till night: wilt loose the chain, And wake thy sorrow? Wilt thou forestall it, and now grieve tomorrow, And then again Grieve over freshly all thy pain? Either grief will not come: or if it must, Do not forecast. And while it cometh, it is almost past. Away distrust: My God hath promised. He is just.

Matthew 7

General References

Kathleen Norris, "Mysteries of the Incarnation: II. Imperatives," Little Girls in Church, p. 62

Verses 1-12 Verses 21-23

Verses 13-14 Verses 24-27

Verses 15-20 Verses 28-29

Matthew 7

General References

Kathleen Norris Look at the birds Consider the lilies Drink ye all of it Ask Seek Knock Enter by the narrow gate Do not be anxious Judge not; do not give dogs what is holy Go: be it done for you Do not be afraid Maiden, arise Young man, I say, arise Stretch out your hand Stand up, be still Rise, let us be going ... Love Forgive Remember me William C. Martin If you try to work for justice you will become self-righteous Let go of your concepts of justice and righteousness will flow like a never failing stream.

Matthew 7:1-12

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Disciple and Unbelievers,"The Cost of Discipleship, p. 202-209 William C. Martin, The Art of Pastoring, p. 57 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- X," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 381-392

Verses 1-6

Verses 7-12

Matthew 7:1-6

Greek (Luke 6:37-42) General References

Robert Burns,"To a Louse," The Poetical Works of Robert Burns, p. 121 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 140 Denise Levertov, "Journeyings," The Freeing of the Dust, p. 5 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 40

Verses 1-2

Verses 3-5

Verse 6

Matthew 7:1-6

Notes

Robert Burns O wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us To see oursels as others see us! It wad frae mony a blunder free us An' foolish notion! What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us, An' e'en devotion! Dag Hammarskjöld Every hour Eye to eye With this love Which sees all But overlooks In patience, Which is justice, But does not condemn If our glances Mirror its own In humility. Denise Levertov Majestic insects buzz through the sky bearing us pompously from love to love, grief to grief, expansively, motes in the gaze of that unblinking eye. Thomas Merton A brother in Scete happened to commit a fault and the elders assembled and sent for Abbot Moses to join them. He, however, did not want to come. The priest sent him a message saying: Come, the community of the brethren is waiting for you. So he arose and started off. And taking with him a very old basket full of holes he filled it with sand and carried it behind him. The elders came out to meet him and said: What is this Father? The elder replied: My sins are running out behind me and I do not see them, and today I come to judge the sins of another! They, hearing this, said nothing to the brother but pardoned him.

Matthew 7:1-2

Greek Cross References:

1-2 1-2 1-2 2 Psalm 51:1; Isaiah 3:9-11 Mark 4:24; Luke 6:37-38; John 3:17-18, 12:47 Romans 2:1, 14:10; Galatians 6:7; James 2:13, 5:9 Ezekiel 7:27; Obadiah 15

General References

Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 140 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 116 f. Eric Pankey, "A Feast in Jerusalem," DoubleTake, p. 60 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 60 ff.

Verse References

1 1 1 1 2 Donald Hall, The Museum of Clear Ideas, p. 81 Abraham Lincoln, "Second Inaugural," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 441 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 63 Albert Schweitzer, A Place for Revelation, p. 34-44 Bruce D. Chilton, A Galilean Rabbi and His Bible, p. 123-125

Matthew 7:1-2

Notes

Dag Hammarskjöld Every hour Eye to eye With this love Which sees all But overlooks In patience, Which is justice, But does not condemn If our glances Mirror its own In humility Søren Kierkegaard Yes, to accuse another person before God is to accuse yourself, like-for-like. People so gladly deceive themselves, so gladly imagine that they can have, as it were, a private relationship with God. But if you complain of your enemies to God, he makes short work of it and opens a case against you, because before God you too are a guilty person. To complain against another is to complain against yourself. You think that God should take your side, that God and you together should turn against your enemy, against him who did you wrong. But this is a complete misunderstanding. God looks without discrimination upon all. Go ahead. If you intend to have God judge someone else, then you have made God your judge as well. God is, like-for-like, simultaneously your judge. If, however, you refuse to accuse someone before God he will be merciful towards you. Eric Pankey Given the evidence, We cannot help but judge, Although the Judge sits there And does not look to them Or the one we accuse, But into our eyes. Donald Hall Revenge as Comrade Zero takes pains to observe is reflexive. Abraham Lincoln It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God's assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men's faces, but let us judge not that we be not judged.

Matthew 7:1-2

Notes

Thomas Merton Abbot Joseph asked Abbot Pastor: Tell me how I can become a monk. The elder replied: If you want to have rest here in this life and also in the next in every conflict with another say: Who am I? And judge no one. Bruce Chilton In Matthew, this warning is given point with the parable of the splinter in one's brother's eye (vv. 3-5), while in Mark it is part of a series of sayings which calls for the attentive hearing and understanding of parables (vv. 22-25, cf. v. 13). The application of the saying therefore differs according to context, yet in both cases it is used without explanation, as if it would be readily taken in. (p. 123) At 27:8, the Hebrew text of Isaiah is difficult of interpretation ... but the Targum presents quite a free paraphrase at this point in order to convey a clear meaning: "In the measure you were measuring with they will measure you..." ... The use of the maxim in the Targum strengthens the case for the argument that it was current in the time and language circle of Jesus ... (p. 124)

Matthew 7:3-5

Greek Cross References: General References

Robert Coles, The Call of Service, p. 193 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 73, 157 Mohandas Gandhi, The Essential Gandhi, p. 136 Carl Jung, Lifting the Veil (Linda Shepherd), p. 117 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 173 Vincent Van Gogh, If You Want to Write, p. 21 3-5 Luke 6:41-42; Thomas 26

Matthew 7:3-5

Notes

Robert Coles "So I agree with you--the mirror first, before we start pounding the gavel!" Mohandas Gandhi We must first cast out the beam of untouchability from our own eyes before we attempt to remove the mote from that of our `masters'. Carl Jung We see colours but not wavelengths. This well known fact must nowhere be taken to heart more seriously than in psychology. the effect of the personal equation begins already in the act of observation. One sees what one can best see oneself. Thus, first and foremost, one sees the mote in one's brother's eye. No doubt the mote is there, but the beam sits in one's own eye--and may considerably hamper the act of seeing. Oscar Romero A church that only condemns, a church that sees sin only in others and does not look at the beam in its own eye, is not the authentic church of Christ. Vincent Van Gogh We take beautiful walks together. It is very beautiful here if one only has an open and simple eye without any beams in it. But if one has that, it is beautiful everywhere.

Matthew 7:6

Greek Cross References: Verse References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 212 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 364 Richard Foster, "Authoritative Prayer," Prayer, p. 232 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 49 6 Mark 7:27; Thomas 93

Matthew 7:6

Notes

Eberhard Arnold Do not judge men; love them. But you must not reveal what is holiest in your hearts to people who are not ready for it. Richard Foster When he told us not to cast our pearls before swine, for example, it was not to be mean but because he knew that swine cannot digest pearls; they do them no good. We, too, should have the good sense to refrain from giving people truth that they are not ready to receive, for it will do them no good.

Matthew 7:7-12

(Luke 11:9-13) Greek Cross References:

7-11 7-11 7-11 7-8 7 12 Psalm 103:8-14 Mark 11:24; Luke 11:9-13; John 15:7, 16:23-34 James 4:3; 1 John 3:22, 5:14 Isaiah 65:1; James 5:9; Revelation 3:19-20; Thomas 94 Deuteronomy 4:29; 2 Chronicles 15:2; Jeremiah 29:13 Luke 6:31

General References

Anna Akhmatova, "Knock With Your Little Fist," Divine Inspiration, p. 309 Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, p. 269 Al Hill, "Will You Give Them Stones?," Best Sermons 2, p. 345-349 Jane Kenyon, "Biscuit," Otherwise, p. 187 Albert Schweitzer, A Place for Revelation, p. 92 106 Elie Wiesel, Somewhere a Master, p. 58

Verse References

Matthew 7:7-12

Notes

Annie Dillard ... knock; seek; ask. But you must read the fine print. "Not as the world giveth, give I unto you." That's the catch. If you can catch it it will catch you up, aloft, up to any gap at all, and you'll come back, for you will come back, transformed in a way you may not have bargained for--dribbling and crazed. Jane Kenyon The dog has cleaned his bowl and his reward is a biscuit, which I put in his mouth like a priest offering the host. I can't bear that trusting face! He asks for bread, expects bread, and I in my power might have given him a stone. Albert Schweitzer So we must come out of ourselves, out of our vocations, our of our environments and also be useful in human fashion somewhere and somehow. Everyone can find that. He must merely seek, wait, and begin small ... So seek quietly and modestly where God can use you and do not become tired in waiting and seeking. For if the word of Jesus--"Whoever seeks will find"--is correct anywhere it is here. You will discover where you can serve and experience the blessedness of this service. (p. 92) "Ask ... seek ... knock ..." On the power of this saying we may turn to strangers when we need someone and ask whether one of them wants to be a neighbor to us in the matter we raise. (p. 106) Elie Wiesel Rebbe Wolfe: A boy your age must never be ashamed to ask, there is no shame in receiving. What others give you isn't theirs anyway. But that is not all. I also wanted to teach you that a boy your age must not rely too much on miracles. [good story to go with the quote]

Matthew 7:7-12

Verse References

7-8 7-8 7-8 7-8 7 9-11 10 11 11 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 32, 148 Rainer Maria Rilke, "II,15," Book of Hours, p. 115 Mother Theresa, Something Beautiful for God, p. 39 Evelyn Underhill, "Breathing the Air of Eternity,"Weavings (May/June 2002), p. 8-11 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 183 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 115, 165 Pattiann Rogers, "If a Son Asks," Song of the World Becoming, p. 201 f. H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 82 Communication Resources, "Father.tif ," (SCA3) Scripture Cover Art, p. 20

Verse 12

Matthew 7:7-12

Notes

Rainer Maria Rilke All who seek you test you. And those who find you bind you to image and gesture. I would rather sense you as the earth senses you. In my ripening ripens what you are. I need no tricks to prove you exist. Mother Theresa Prayer enlarges the heart until it is capable of containing God's gift of himself. Ask and seek and your heart will grow big enough to receive God as your own. Evelyn Underhill "Ask," "seek," and "knock;" there is something very definite about that. Those words represent three very real stages in the life of prayer corresponding to a steady growth and enrichment of the soul's encounter with God. (p. 9) But this is the real life at which all our education in prayer has been gently aiming, life lived in the atmosphere of God beyond entreaty and search. We leave those off when we are at home. Home--When we realize all that that image implies, don't prayers merely asking for help or comfort seem a bit mean and ungenerous? True, they are answered out of the boundless generosity of God, but our aim ought to lie beyond, in a life lived in Him ... All that matters is God, not ourselves. (p. 10) Stephen Mitchell Ask for what you need, not for what you want. What you need will be given to you anyway, but if you ask for it, the gift will go deeper. H. E. Fosdick ... Scripture tells us that God is more willing to give to us than fathers are to give to their children (Matt. 7:11). To some this seems mere sentiment, and exaggerated statement, made in a poetic hour. To others, who have cried in vain for things that appeared certainly good, it seems mockery. If God is willing to give, why doesn't He? What hinders Him? How can He be willing to give, when, omnipotent, He still withholds?

Matthew 7:7-12

Notes

Communication Resources, "Father.tif ," (SCA3)

Matthew 7:12

References

Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 182 188 f. Wendell Berry, "Preserving Wildness," Home Economics, p. 147 Wendell Berry, Standing by Words, p. 50 Wendell Berry, What Are People For?, p. 134 Wendell Berry, Citizenship Papers, p. 128 f. and 135 Stephen Covey, "Understanding the Individual," Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, p. 191 f. John Donne, "The Virtue of Praise," Classics of Western Spirituality, p. 207 Mohandas Gandhi, The Essential Gandhi, p. 203, 305 Stephen Jay Gould, "Above All, Do No Harm," The Lying Stones of Marrakech, p. 310 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 89 Madeleine L'Engle, Summer of the Great-Grandmother, p. 68 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. 70 Bezalel Narkiss, Hebrew Illumianted Manuscripts, p. 115 [Illustration of Hillel's dictum.] Parker Palmer, The Courage to Teach, p. 0 Parker Palmer, "All the Way Down," Weavings (September/October 1998), p. 38 M. C. Richards, The Crossing Point, p. 9 Brenda Ueland, If You Want to Write, p. 6 Simone Weil, quoted by Geoffrey Hill in Tenebrae, p. 7 Unknown

Matthew 7:12

Notes

Eberhard Arnold Strive to attain for all men whatever you struggle to get for yourself, whether for your nature ... or for the needs of your soul and spirit. ... This alone is the way of Jesus Christ. We must act according to these words. If anyone does not act in this way the structure of his life will topple in ruins. (p. 182) Whatever you expect for yourselves from the community, do the same for all others, including the many who are still to come in the future. (p. 188 f.) Wendell Berry, "Preserving Wilderness" Clearly, if we want to argue for the existence of the world as we know it, we will have to find some way of qualifying and supplementing this relentless criterion of "natural." Perhaps we can do so only by a reaffirmation of a lesser kind of naturalness--that of self-interest. Certainly human self-interest has much wickedness to answer for, and we are living in just fear of it; nevertheless, we must take care not to condemn it absolutely. After all, we value this passing work of nature that we call "the natural world," with its graceful plenty of animals and plants, precisely because WE need it and love it and want it for a home. We are creatures obviously subordinate to nature, dependent upon a wild world that we did not make. And yet we are joined to that larger nature by our own nature, a part of which is our self-interest. A common complaint nowadays is that humans think the world is "anthropocentric," or human-centered. ... ... We must acknowledge both the centrality and the limits of our self-interest. Wendell Berry, Standing by Words ... you cannot speak or act in your own best interest without espousing and serving a higher interest. It is not knowledge that enforces this realization, but the humbling awareness of the insufficiency of knowledge, of mystery. Wendell Berry, What Are People For? One cannot maintain one's "competitive edge" if one helps other people. The advantage of "early adoption" would disappear--it would not be thought of--in a community that put a proper value on mutual help. Such advantages would not be thought of by people intent on loving their neighbors as themselves. Wendell Berry, Citizenship Papers Long-term economists such as John Ikerd of the University of Missouri believe in applying "the Golden Rule across the generations--doing for future generations as we would have them do for us." (p. 128 f.) Thinking about the people upstream ought to cause further thinking about the people downstream. Such pondering on the facts of gravity and the fluidity of water shows us that the golden rule speaks to a condition of absolute interdependency and obligation. People who live on rivers--or, in fact, anywhere in a watershed--might rephrase the rule in this way: Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you. Rivers do not run upstream; we are not talking about economic reciprocity or a game of tit for tat. (p. 135)

Matthew 7:12

Notes, p. 2

Stephen Covey ... this principle of making what is important to the other person as important to you as the other person is to you. The Golden Rule says ... While on the surface that could mean to do for them what you would like to have done for you, I think the more essential meaning is to understand them deeply as individuals, the way you would want to be understood, and then to treat them in terms of that understanding. As one successful parent said about raising children, "Treat them the all the same by treating them differently." John Donne ... let us make that man according to our image, let us consider ourselves in him and make our case his and remember how lately he was as well as we and how soon we may be as ill as he, and then ... let us us with all the power we have, remove or slacken those calamities that lie upon them. Mohandas Gandhi For I did not want them to shoot me however much they disliked my methods. I wanted them to convince me of my error as I was trying to convince them of theirs. `Do unto others as you would that they should do unto you.' (p. 203) I am too conscious of the imperfections of the species to which I belong to be irritated against any member therof. My remedy is to deal with the wrong wherever I see it, not to hurt the wrongdoer, even as I would not like to be hurt for the wrong I continually do. (p. 305) Stephen Jay Gould ... some pretty scary potential misuese in the wrong hands, or in the decent hands of people who have not pondered the unintended consequences of good deeds. Dag Hammarskjöld Goodness is something so simple: always to live for others, never to seek one's own advantage. Madeleine L'Engle Do I have the right to make this decision? Perhaps not, but I make it because it is the decision I would want my children to make if I were in my mother's place. Thomas Merton Once one of the elders came to Scete and Abbot John the Dwarf was with them. And when they were dining one of the priests, a very great old man got up to give each one a little cup of water to drink and no one would take it from him except John the Dwarf. The others were surprised and afterwards they asked him: How is it that you, the least of all, have presumed to accept the services of this great old man? He replied: Well, when I get up to give people a drink of water I am happy if they all take it; and for that reason, on this occasion I took the drink that he might be rewarded and not feel sad because nobody accepted the cup from him. And at this all admired his discretion.

Matthew 7:12

Notes, p. 3

Parker Palmer, The Courage to Teach A subject-centered classroom is not one in which students are ignored. Such a classroom honors one of the most vital needs our students have: to be introduced to a world larger than their own experiences and egos ... Parker Palmer, "All the Way Down" ... my altitude ... had been achieved by my ethic, a distorted ethic that led me to live by images of who I ought to be, or what I ought to do, rather than by insight into my own reality, into what was true and possible and life-giving for me. For a long time, the "oughts" had been the driving force in my life--and when I failed to live up to those oughts, I saw myself as a weak and faithless person. I never stopped to ask, "How does such-and-such fit my God-given nature?" or "Is such-and-such truly my gift and call?" As a result, important parts of the life I was living were not mine to live, and thus were bound to fail. M. C. Richards Inner seeing: what are our needs? What do we need, what does each one of us deeply need, how can we find out? Just one, just one need, can we feel it and follow it? To be in touch with one simple need and to have the strength to follow it and not to program where it will lead, this is an art. To be led by our needs as materials to work with. Not to be overwhelmed by, but to respect, to listen to, and work with. Brenda Ueland But this joyful imaginative impassioned energy dies out of us very young. Why? Because we do not see that it is great and important. Because we let dry obligation take its place. And because we don't keep it alive in others by listening to them. ... the only way to love a person is ... by listening to them and seeing and believing in the god, in the poet, in them. For by doing this you keep the god and the poet alive, and make it flourish. Simone Weil What we love in other human beings is the hoped for satisfaction of our desire. We do not love their desire. If what we loved in them was their desire, then we should love them as ourself. Unknown There is no better exercise for the heart than reaching down and lifting up another.

Matthew 7:13-14

(Luke 13:24) Greek Cross References:

13-14 13-14 13 14 Deuteronomy 30:19; Jeremiah 21:8 Mark 10:24-25; Luke 13:23-24; John 6:66, 10:7, 14:6 Genesis 19:2; Psalm 18:19, 31:8; Proverbs 14:12; Jeremiah 6:16 Psalm 37:14

General References

Verse References

14 Jonathan Edwards, "Sermon Notes," Selections, p. 203-205

Matthew 7:13-14

General References

Wendell Berry, "1985 ­ V," & "1991 ­ IX [The Farm]," A Timbered Choir, p. 77, 135 Wendell Berry, Collected Poems, p. 209, 267 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Great Divide," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 210 f. Horace Bushnell, Sermons, p. 166-167 Jane Tyson Clement, "The Gate," The Secret Flower, p. 91 Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 14 Mary Oliver, "Crows," The New Yorker (September 25, 2000), p. 66-67 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 52 Christina Rossetti, "Up-Hill," Goblin Market and Other Poems, p. 39 William Stafford, "An Introduction to Some Poems," The Way It Is, p. 132 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 101 John Michael Talbot, "Few Be the Lovers," No Longer Strangers Alice Walker, A Poem Traveled Down My Arm, p. 52 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- XI," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 393-401

Matthew 7:13-14

Notes

Wendell Berry Why must the gate be narrow? Because you cannot pass beyond it burdened. To come into the woods you must leave behind the six days' world, all of it, all of its plans and hopes You must come without weapon or tool alone expecting nothing, remembering nothing into the ease of sight, the brotherhood of eye and leaf. Go by the narrow road Along the creek, a burrow Under shadowy trees Such as a mouse makes through Tall grass, so that you may Forget the wide road you Have left behind, and all That it has led to. (p. 135) Wendell Berry By Thy wide grace show me Thy narrow gate. (p. 209) I see the path again, a dark way going on through the light. (p. 267) Horace Bushnell For truth is something to be lived, else it might as well not be. And how shall a mind get on finding more truth save as it takes direction from what it gets; how make farther advances when it tramples what it has by neglect? You come upon the hither side of a vast intricate forest region and your problem is to find your way through it. Will you stand there ... speculating forty years expecting first to make out the way? No, there is no fit search after truth which does not first of all begin to live the truth it knows ... There is a way for disolving any and all doubts--a way that opens at a very small gate but widens wonderfully after you pass. ... do the first thing first. Say nothing of investigation till you have made sure of being grounded everlastingly and with completely whole intent in the principle of right doing as a principle. ... For this is what Christ calls the single eye, and the whole body is inevitably full of light. How surely and how fast fly away the doubts even as fogs are burned away by the sun.

(p. 77)

Matthew 7:13-14

Notes, p. 2

Oscar Romero The church's teaching power is likened to a popular democracy as though the number of those who speak were worth more than the rightness of what is said and it is forgotten that mediocrity will always be majority and the courage of authenticity, minority. Recall "the wide way" and "the narrow way" of the gospel. Christina Rossetti Does the road wind up-hill all the way? Yes, to the very end. Will the day's journey take the whole long day? From morn to night, my friend. But is there for the night a resting place? A roof for when the slow dark hours begin. May not the darkness hide it from my face? You cannot miss that inn. Shall I meet other wayfarers at night? Those who have gone before. Then must I knock, or call when just in sight? They will not keep you standing at that door. Shall I find comfort, travel-sore and weak? Of labour you shall find the sum. Will there be beds for me and all who seek? Yea, beds for all who come. William Stafford The authentic is a line from one thing along to the next; it interests us. Strangely, it relates to what works, but it is not quite the same. It never swerves for revenge, Or profit, or fame: it holds together something more than the world, this line. And we are your wavery efforts at following it. Are you coming? Good: now it is time.

Matthew 7:13-14

Notes, p. 3

John Michael Talbot For many willfully join at the Lord's table When beckoned there to feast or to dine But who among us will still be found faithful When we are beckoned to drink the chalice of his wine. Few be the lovers In this painting Few be the lovers Of the cross Alice Walker The straight path follows an endless curve. Jane Tyson Clement No one compels you, traveler; this road or that road, make your choice! Dust or mud, heat or cold, fellowship or solitude, foul weather or a fairer sky, the choice is yours as you go by. But here if you would take this path there is a gate whose latch is love, whose key is single and which swings upon the hinge of faithfulness, and none can mock, who seeks this way, the king we worship shamelessly. If you would enter, traveler, into this city fair and wide, it is forever and you leave all trappings of the self outside. Dag Hammarskjöld The Strait Road--to live for others in order to save one's soul. The Broad--to live for others in order to save one's self-esteem. Mary Oliver, "Crows" Complete Poem Should I have led a more simple life? Have my ambitions been worthy? Has the wind, for years, been talking to me as well? Somewhere, among all my thoughts, there is a narrow path. It's attractive, but who could follow it?

Matthew 7:15-20

(Luke 6:43-44) Greek Cross References:

15-20 15 16 17-18 Matthew 3:10, 12:33-35; Luke 6:43-44, 13:7; John 15:8; James 3:12 Ezekiel 22:27; Matthew 24:11&24; John 10:12; 1 John 4:1 Genesis 3:18; Thomas 45 Thomas 43

General References

Verse References

15 16 Jacopone da Todi, "The Need to Guard Oneself Against Wolves in Sheep's Clothing," Divine Inspiration, p. 311 George Herbert, "The Sacrifice," The Selected Poetry of George Herbert, p. 203-205

Matthew 7:15-20

General References

Wendell Berry, Home Economics, p. 20 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Great Divide," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 210 f. Gerald Manley Hopkins, "New Readings (I)," The Plough, p. 35 Malcolm X, Lend Me Your Ears, p. 617 Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 231-235 William Stafford, "Are You Mister William Stafford?" The Way It Is, p. 46 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- XII," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 402-412

Matthew 7:15-20

Notes

Wendell Berry The air is unfit to breathe, the water is unfit to drink, the soil is washing away, the cities are violent and the countryside neglected, all because we are intelligent, enterprising, industrious, and generous, concerned only to feed the hungry and to "make a better future for our children." Respect for nature causes us to doubt this, and our cultural tradition confirms and illuminates our doubt: No good thing is destroyed by goodness; good things are destroyed by wickedness. We may identify that insight as Biblical, but it is taken for granted by both the Greek and the Biblical lineages of our culture, from Homer and Moses to William Blake. Since the start of the industrial revolution, there have been voices urging that this inheritance may be safely replaced by intelligence, information, energy, and money. No idea, I believe, could be more dangerous. Gerald Manley Hopkins Although the letter said On thistles that men look not grapes to gather, I read the story rather How the soldiers platting thorns around Christ's head Grapes grew and drops of wine were shed. Though when the sower sowed, The wingèd fowls took part, part fell in thorn, And never turned to corn, Part found no root upon the flinty road-- Christ at all hazards fruit hath shewed. From wastes of rock He brings Food for five thousand: on thorns He shed Grains from His drooping Head; And would not have that legion of winged things Bear him to Heaven on easeful wings. Malcolm X Just because you're in this country doesn't make you an American ... No ... You've got to enjoy the fruits of Americanism. You haven't enjoyed these fruits. You've enjoyed the thorns. You've enjoyed the thistles. But you have not enjoyed the fruits, no sir. You have fought harder for the fruits than the white man has but you've enjoyed less. William Stafford "It's for the best," my mother said--"Nothing can ever be wrong for anyone truly good." George Herbert Then on my head a crown of thorns I wear For these are all the grapes Sion doth bear, Though I my vine planted and watered there:

Matthew 7:21-23

(Luke 13:25-27) Greek Cross References:

21-27 21-23 21 23 1 Corinthians 13 Psalm 6:8; Isaiah 66:5; Matthew 23:27-28, 25:12; Luke 13:27-27 Luke 6:46; 1 John 2:4-6 John 12:48; 1 John 3:4

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Great Divide," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 210 f. Isaac of Ninive, Soul Making, p. 82 Issa, quoted in Haiku, Vol. 4, Autumn-Winter, p. 1157 Thomas Merton, The Wisdom of the Desert, p. ? Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 231-235 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- XIII," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 413-424

Matthew 7:21-23

Notes

Isaac of Ninive He who is aware of his sins is greater than one who can raise the dead. Whoever can weep over himself for one hour is greater than the one who is able to teach the whole world; whoever recognizes the depths of his own frailty is greater than the one who sees visions of angels. Issa Those people who put all their strength into Other-Power, and relying completely on it, say, "Faith in Other-Power, faith in Other-Power," bound with the bonds of Self-Power, fall with a crash into the Hell of Self-Power. Thomas Merton Abbot Pastor said: If you have a chest full of chothing and leave it for a long time the clothing will rot inside it. It is the same with the thoughts in our heart. If we do not carry them out by physical action, after a long while they will spoil and turn bad.

Matthew 7:24-27

(Luke 6:47-49) Greek Cross References:

21-27 24-27 24-27 24-25 24 26 1 Corinthians 13 Isaiah 44:8, 55:10-11; Jeremiah 17:5-8 Luke 6:47-49; John 12:47; James 1:22-25 Matthew 11:2, 28:20 John 13:17 Job 4:19-21

General References

Verse References

24 Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art

Matthew 7:24-29

Notes

Newsletter Newsletter, Cover Art

Newsletter Newsleter, Scripture Art

Matthew 7:24-27

General References

Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 231-235 John Wesley, "Sermon on the Mount -- XIII," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 413-424 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Conclusion," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 218 George A. Buttrick, "Earnestness to Translate Hearing into Doing," The Parables of Jesus, p. 50-59 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 153 Martin Luther King, Jr., "I Have a Dream," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 497 Kathleen Norris [quoting her pastor in Lemon, SD], "Advice when preparing a lesson for PW on the Anti-Christ," Earl Lectures (January 30, 1997) Mary Oliver, "The Return," New and Selected Poems, p. 253 f. John Michael Talbot, "Unless the Lord Build the House," Hiding Place

Matthew 7:24-27

Notes

Martin Luther King, Jr. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksand of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Kathleen Norris [quoting her pastor in Lemon, SD] Each one of us acts like the anti-christ when we hear the word and do not do it. Mary Oliver And the mist fell And the webs clung And the rocks tumbled And the earth shook And the thread held.

Matthew 7:28-29

Greek Cross References:

28 28-29 Matthew 11:1, 13:53, 19:1, 26:1 Mark 1:22; Luke 4:32

General References

Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 394 "Authority" does not mean to be a king, but by a firm and conscious resolution to be willing to sacrifice everything, one's very life, for a cause. It means to articulate a cause in such a way that a person is at one with himself, needing nothing and fearing nothing. This infinite recklessness is authority. Those with authority always address themselves to the conscience, not to the understanding. True authority is present when the truth is the cause. The reason the Pharisees spoke without authority, although they were indeed authorized teachers, was precisely because their talk, like their lives, was in the power of endless finite

concerns.

Newsletter Newsletter, Scripture Art

Matthew 8

General References

Frederick Buechner, "Jesus," Peculiar Treasures, p. 61-64

Verses 1-4 Verses 18-22

Verses 5-13 Verses 23-27

Verses 14-17 Verses 28-34

Matthew 8:1-4

(Mark 1:40-45; Luke 5:12-16) Cross References: General References

John Dominic Crossan, "A Leper Cured," The Historical Jesus, p. 321-323 Newsletter Newsletter, Scripture Art: New Testament 4 Leviticus 14:1-32

Matthew 8:1-4

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 8:5-13

(Luke 7:1-10; John 4:43-54) Cross References:

11 12 Luke 13:29 Matthew 22:13, 25:30; Luke 13:28

General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 60 John Dominic Crossan, "Distant Boy Cured," The Historical Jesus, p. 326-328 Virginia Stem Owens, "Powerful Outsider," Looking for Jesus, p. 105-110 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 132

Matthew 8:14-17

(Mark 1:29-34; Luke 4:38-41) Cross References:

17 Isaiah 53:4

Matthew 8:18-22

(Luke 9:57-62) Cross References: 19-20

20 2 Samuel 7:6 Thomas 86

General References

F. Scott Spencer, "`Follow Me'Th e Imperious Call of Jesus in the Synoptic Gospels," Interpretation (April 2005), p. 148-152 Gerald Stern, "Odd Mercy," This Time, p. 243-245

Verse References

19-20 20 20 21-22 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 94, 160f. Loren Eiseley, The Star Thrower, p. 256 Karl Kirchwey, "He Considers the Birds of the Air," The New Yorker (March 3, 1994), p. 78 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 114, 164f.

Matthew 8:18-22

Notes

Gerald Stern ... I still freeze when I see a corpse, the spiteful dead imitating the living, still lying there with a hand between their thighs, or a paw lifted up against the light. Let the clogged-up neck bury the clogged-up neck, let the wristbone bury the wristbone. ... (p. 243) ... Let me be the father and bury myself. Follow me. ... ... The foxes have condominiums, the birds have silkweed but my poor son doesn't have a sofa, ... (p. 244) Loren Eiseley The mundus alter--this other intangible fiery world of dreams, fantasies, invention ... ... forget what bloody dream has so oppressed him. Karl Kirchwey We get up at six with him and build a fire. Against a choir of straight second-growth woods on a morning when the thermometer stands at zero he considers the birds of the air. They hop down and again hop down to the feeder beyond the window for the black sunflower seeds or the suet's white shoulder, a traffic of chickadees to which cardinals and pine grosbeaks add color. His man-in-the-moon face his eyes of cracked sapphire reflect necessity in that repeated motion. An infant gazes at some birds and for a moment it all balances there... He will have nowhere to lay his head no matter how he builds no matter how he watches where unnumbered small creatures have their being in the weather.

Matthew 8:23-27

(Mark 4:35-41; Luke 8:22-25) Verse References

25 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 119

Matthew 8:28-34

(Mark 5:1-20; Luke 8:26-39) General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 64 Czeslaw Milosz, "Readings," Divine Inspiration, p. 132 Richard Wilbur, "Matthew VII, 28 ff.," New and Collected Poems, p. 154 Rabbi, we Gadarenes Are not ascetics; we are fond of wealth and possessions. Love, as you call it, we obviate by means Of planned release of aggressions. We have deep faith in prosperity. Soon, it is hoped, we will reach our full potential. In the light of our gross product, the practice of charity Is palpably inessential. It is true that we go insane; That for no good reason we are possessed by devils; That we suffer, despite the amenities which obtain At all but the lowest levels. We shall not, however, resign Our trust in the high-heaped table and the full trough. If you cannot cure us without destroying our swine, We had rather you shoved off.

Matthew 9

Verses 1-8 Verses 18-26

Verses 9-13 Verses 27-31 Verses 35-38

Verses 14-17 Verses 32-34

Matthew 9:1-8

(Mark 2:1-12; Luke 5:17-26)

Matthew 9:9-13

(Mark 2:13-17; Luke 5:27-32) Cross References:

10-11 13 Luke 15:1-2 Hosea 6:6; Matthew 12:7

General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 66 Karen Fish, "Caravaggio's The Calling of St. Matthew," DoubleTake (March 1997), p. 24

Verse References

9 9 13 Frederick Buechner, "Follow Me," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 96-101 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 114 John Donne, Sermons on the Psalms and Gospels, p. 196

Matthew 9:9-13

Notes

Karen Fish At first glance, the stranger & his companion approaching the table of the tax collector & gamblers are not recognizable. The two strangers seem to be lost travelers come to ask a question. A wood table, coins strewn to indicate a past, the three roughneck acquaintances dressed ridiculously to the nines, buttoned & hooked in bright velvet and then our ordinary man, unlikely in every regard. Because the background is just a simple Roman tavern wall, stationed to this world by a window, the panes covered with oiled paper­we might call this believable, modern, realistic. Only a few ways to describe what actually happened­ Matthew touches his chest, indicating a confusion with this unlikely enlistment. His companions slouch, dumbfounded amid the flush & feathers & swords. There is the humble disbelief that all who are chosen share, that moment, when the world seems just a pile of hammers, hatchets, buckets of coins, one thinks plainly, how unlikely; absolved from all that is ordinary. It is a curfew that has been lifted.

Matthew 9:14-17

(Mark 2:18-22; Luke 5:33-39) Verse References

14-15 16-17 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 101, 162 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 85, 158f.

Matthew 9:18-26

(Mark 5:21-43; Luke 8:40-56)

Matthew 9:27-31

General References

Thomas Immoos, "Kyrie Eleison I," Divine Inspiration, p. 170

Verse References

29-30 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 84

Matthew 9:32-34

Cross References: General References

John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 109, 163 34 Matthew 10:25, 12:24; Mark 3:22; Luke 11:15

Matthew 9:35-38

Cross References:

35 37-38 Matthew 4:23; Mark 1:39; Luke 4:44 Luke 10:2

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Harvest," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 223-225 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 68

Verse References

37-38 Andrew Murray, "Prayer Provides Laborers," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 54-58

Matthew 10

General References

Donald Senior, Biblical Foundations for Mission, p. 250 f .

Verses 1-4 Verses 26-31

Verses 5-15 Verses 32-33 Verses 40-42

Verses 16-25 Verses 34-39

Matthew 10:1-4

(Mark 3:13-19; Luke 6:12-16) General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Apostles," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 226 f. John Dominic Crossan, "From Miracle to Table," The Historical Jesus, p. 332-348 Mission, Dress, Place, Commensality, Healing, Kingdom, Itinerancy

Matthew 10:5-15

(Mark 6:7-13; Luke 9:1-6) Cross References:

7-15 10 14 15 Luke 10:4-12 1 Corinthians 9:14; 1 Timothy 5:18 Acts 13:51 Genesis 19:24-28; Matthew 11:24

General References

John Dominic Crossan, "From Miracle to Table," The Historical Jesus, p. 332-348 Mission, Dress, Place, Commensality, Healing, Kingdom, Itinerancy

Verse References

5-6 7-10 11-14 Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Work," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 228-235 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 33, 148 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 46, 151f.

Matthew 10:16-25

(Mark 13:9-13; Luke 21:12-17) Cross References:

16 17-20 22 24 25 Romans 16:9; Thomas 39 Luke 12:11-12 Matthew 24:9, 24:13 Luke 6:40; John 13:16, 15:20 Matthew 9:34, 12:24; Mark 3:22; Luke 11:15

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Suffering of the Messengers," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 236-240

Verse References

Matthew 10:16-25

Verse References

16-20 16 16 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 70 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 54, 153 Adam Gopnik, "Carry That Weight," The New Yorker5/1/95, p. 82 It was this combination of lyrical nonchalance and uncanny musical richness that made them [The Beatles] matter. 16 16 Martin Luther King, Jr., "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart," Strength to Love, p. 9-16 Gary Snyder, No Nature, p. 250 gentle and innocent as wolves tricky as a prince. John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 348 Susan Garrett, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (April 1993), p. 166-169

24-25 24-25

Matthew 10:26-31

(Luke 12:2-7) Cross References: General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Decision," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 241-244 Susan Garrett, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (April 1993), p. 166-169 26 Mark 4:22; Luke 8:17

Verse References

26-27 29-31 29-31 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 50, 76, 152, 157 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 117, 165 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 53 f.

Matthew 10:32-33

(Luke 12:8-9) Cross References: General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Decision," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 241-244 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 248 Susan Garrett, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (April 1993), p. 166-169 33 2 Timothy 2:12

Matthew 10:34-39

(Luke 12:51-53, 14:26-27) Cross References:

34-36 35-36 37-38 38 39 Thomas 16 Micah 7:6 Thomas 55, 101 Matthew 16:24; Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23 Matthew 16:25; Mark 8:35; Luke 9:24, 17:33; John 12:25

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Decision," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 241-244

Verse References

Matthew 10:34-39

Verse References

34-37 John Dominic Crossan, "Against the Patriarchal Family," The Historical Jesus, p. 300 f. Jesus will tear the hierarchical or patriarchal family in two along the axis of domination and subordination. 34-36 34-36 37-42 37 38-39 38 38 39 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 69, 156 John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 165 Andrew Greeley, "A Challenging Invitation," (p. 178-183), "The Peril of Indecision," (p. 23-25), When Life Hurts John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 86, 159 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 353 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 144, 170 Nikolai Gumilyov, "The Progeny of Cain," Divine Inspiration, p. 321 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 64, 155

Matthew 10:40-42

(Mark 9:41) Greek Cross References: General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "The Fruit," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 245 f. Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 230-233 40 Mark 9:37; Luke 9:48, 10:16; John 13:20

Verse References

40 40 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 37, 149 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 348

Matthew 11

General Reference:

16-30 Cynthia A. Jarvis, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 1996), p. 284-288

Verses 1-19

Verses 20-24

Verses 25-30

Matthew 11:1-19

(Luke 7:18-35) Greek Cross References:

5 7-8 10 11 12-13 14 18 Isaiah 35:5-6, 61:1 Thomas 78 Malachi 3:1 Thomas 46 Luke 16:16 Malachi 4:5; Matthew 17:10-13; Mark 9:11-13 Mark 3:22

Verse References

Matthew 11:1-19

Verse References

2-6 2-6 2-6 2-11 2-11 7-15 7-11 16-30 16-19 16-19 16-19 16-19 16-19 19 Raymond Brown, John, Volume 1, p. 74 [note] Helmut Thielicke, "How Does One Cope with Unresolved Questions?" Faith: The Great Adventure, p.108-115 Helmut Thielicke, "When Nothing Makes Sense," How to Believe Again, p. 182-193 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 198 & 211 John L. McKenzie, The Civilization of Christianity, p. 151 f. John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 26-29, 146f. John Dominic Crossan, "Into the Desert," The Historical Jesus, p. 236-238 Cynthia A. Jarvis, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 1996), p. 284-288 George A. Buttrick, "Earnestness to Translate Hearing into Doing," The Parables of Jesus, p. 50-59 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 259 f. John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 153-156 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 127 f. John Shea, "A Prayer for New Music," The Hour of the Unexpected, p. 65 John Perceval, "Painting -- Christ Dining in Young and Jackson's," Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 146

Matthew 11:1-19

Notes

John Shea, "A Prayer for New Music" Jesus said we play dirges and do not mourn frantic rock and do not freak out. A new music must be heard which will drive us to dance in a world wrung into flatness. Tonight will we not all sleep with one ear in dream and one alert for the crackling of concrete and the blossoming of earth?

Raymond Brown Some have suggested that this scene in John is an adaptation of the Synoptic scene where John the Baptist sends his disciples to question Jesus (Mt xi 2; Luke vii 19). There are very few similarities between the two scenes. Luke 7:18-23 John (the Baptist) "Who are you?" (x2) Sent 2 disciples John, "Shall we look for another?" Jesus, "Tell them what you have seen and heard." In that hour ... Matthew 11:2-6 John Question Sent disciples Same Jesus answers. John 1:29-39 John Did not recognize. (x2) 2 disciples went to follow Jesus Jesus, "What do you seek?" Jesus, "Come and see." They came and saw ... ... and stayed with him.

Matthew 11:20-24

(Luke 10:13-15) Cross References:

21 23 24 Is. 23:1-18; Ez. 26:1­28:26; Joel 3:4-8; Amos 1:9-10; Zech. 9:2-4 Genesis 19:24-28; Isaiah 14:13-15 Matthew 10:15; Luke 10:12

Matthew 11:25-30

(Luke 10:21-22) Greek Cross References: General References

Andrew Greeley, "God's Love For Us," When Life Hurts, p. 26-28 J. Gerald Janzen, "The Yoke That Gives Rest," Interpretation (July 1987), p. 256-268 (Theology of Deuteronomy) John Shea, "Paint the Other Side," The Spirit Master, p. 225 28-30 Luke 14:21-23; Thomas 90

Verse References

Matthew 11:25-30

Verse References

25-26 25 28-30 28-30 28-30 28-30 28-30 28-30 28-30 28 28 29-30 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 71 185 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 19 f. Carla De Sola, The Spirit Moves, p. 108 Mohandas Gandhi, The Essential Gandhi, p. 257 Søren Kierkegaard, "The Invitation," Provocations, p. 154-158 Vassar Miller, "Paradox," Divine Inspiration, p. 324 Petrarch, "I Tire So Beneath This Ancient Load," Divine Inspiration, p. 323 Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 51:23-27, 6:24-30 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 234-237 Communication Resources, Sca7, "Rest" Communication Resources, Sca2004, "Save1" Fulton John Sheen, "The Cross and the Double Cross," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 448

Matthew 11:25-30

Notes

Dom Helder Camara Today missionaries know the Lord was here before they arrive ... I read a passage from the Gospel to a mixed group of educated people and poor people who don't know how to read or write. When I invite comments the most apt, the most vivid, the most penetrating ones come more often than not from the illiterates. Then I understand those words of Christ's: `I thank you Father, for hiding these truths from the powerful and learned and revealing them to mere children.' Mohandas Gandhi Satyagraha is a relentless search for truth and a determination to reach truth. I can only hope you will realize the import of what you are doing. And if you do your path will be easy--easy because you take delight in difficulties and you will laugh in hope when everybody is in despair. Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 51:23-27 Draw near to me, you who are untaught, and lodge in my school Why do you say you are lacking in these things, and why are your souls very thirsty? I opened my mouth and said, Get these things for yourself without money. Put your neck under the yoke, and let your souls receive instruction; it is to be found close by. See with your eyes that I have labored little and found for myself much rest. Sirach (Ecclesiasticus) 6:23-30 Listen, my son, and accept my judgment; do not reject my counsel. Put your feet into her fetters, and your neck into her collar. Put your shoulder under her and carry her, and do not fret under her bonds. Come to her with all your soul, and keep her ways with all your might. Search out and seek and she will become known to you; and when you get hold of her, do not let go. For at last you will find the rest she gives, and she will be changed into joy for you. Then her fetters will become for you a strong protection, and her collar a glorious robe. Her yoke is a golden ornament, and her bonds are like a cord of blue. You will wear her like a glorious robe, and put her on like a crown of gladness.

Matthew 11:25-30

Notes, p. 2

Fulton John Sheen, "The Cross and the Double Cross" Why do we live in fear--we who define freedom as the right to do whatever we pleased; we who have no altars in our churches, no discipline in our schools and no sacrifices in our lives? We fear because our false freedom and license and apostasy from God have caught up with us as they did the prodigal. We would not accept the yoke of Christ; so now we must tremble at the yoke of Caesar. We willed to be free from God; now we must face the danger of being enslaved to a citizen of a foreign country.

Matthew 11:25-30

Notes

Sca7, "Rest" Sca2004, "Save1"

Matthew 12

Verses 1-8 Verses 22-32

Verses 9-14 Verses 33-37

Verses 15-21 Verses 38-42

Verses 43-45

Verses 46-50

Matthew 12:1-8

(Mark 2:23-28; Luke 6:1-5) Cross References:

1 3-4 4 5 7 Deuteronomy 23:25 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Leviticus 24:9 Numbers 28:9-10 Hosea 6:6; Matthew 9:13

General References

Daniel Antwi, Interpretation (January 1991), p. 21 ff. Dallas Willard, "Jesus the Logician," The Best Christian Writing 2000, p. 266-268

Matthew 12:9-14

(Mark 3:1-6; Luke 6:6-11) Cross References:

11 Luke 14:5

Matthew 12:15-21

Cross References: Verse References

18 Communication Resources, Sca6, "Servant" 18-21 Isaiah 42:1-4

Matthew 12:18

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Servant"

Matthew 12:22-32

(Mark 3:20-30; Luke 11:14-23, 12:10) Greek Cross References:

24 30 Matthew 9:34, 10:25 Mark 9:40

Verse References

22-26 John Dominic Crossan, "Beelzebul Controversy," The Historical Jesus, p. 317-320 ... because it is obvious that the possessed are deviants, it becomes just as obvious that deviants must be possessed. There is thus a "symbiotic relationship" between "possession as protest" from the weak to the strong and accused possession, as control from the strong to the weak (577). Hence the illogical logic of the possessed exorcist. 27 Geza Vermes, Jesus the Jew, p. 64 Jesus asks in whose name the Pharisee exorcists operate. He himself was accused, no doubt because he never invoked any human source, of acting in the name of Beelzebub, the prince of demons. His disciples, and even one of their unaffiliated imitators, drove out spirits in their master's name. 29 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 79, 158

Matthew 12:33-37

(Luke 6:43-45) Cross References:

33 34 Matthew 7:20 Matthew 3:7, 15:18, 23:33; Luke 3:7

Verse References

36-37 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 208

Matthew 12:38-42

(Mark 8:11-12; Luke 11:29-32) Cross References:

39 40 41 42 Matthew 16:4 Jonah 1:17 Jonah 3:5 1 Kings 10:1-10; 2 Chronicles 9:1-12

General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 75 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables and the Temporality of the Kingdom," In Parables, p. 6 f. Robert Polito, "Matthew," Communion, p. 493-512

Verse References

39-40 John Dominic Crossan, "Request for Sign," The Historical Jesus, p. 251-253

Matthew 12:43-45

(Luke 11:24-26) General References

George A. Buttrick, "The Conditions of Discipleship," The Parables of Jesus, p. 72-81 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 77 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 155 f. C. G. Jung, The Undiscovered Self, p. 64 Robert Polito, "Matthew," Communion, p. 493-512 Rainer Maria Rilke, "The Angel," New Poems, p. 83 Fulton John Sheen, "The Cross and the Double Cross," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 449

Matthew 12:43-45

Notes

C. G. Jung ... the religious impulse rests on an instinctive basis and is therefore a specifically human function. You can take away a man's gods, but only to give him others in return. Rainer Maria Rilke Give his light hands nothing to hold of your burdens. Otherwise they'll come at night to you, to test you with a fiercer grip, and go like someone angry through your house and seize you as if they'd created you and break you out of your mold. Fulton John Sheen Like the empty house of the Gospel, the modern world swept itself clean of the Cross of Christ, but only to be possessed by the devils of the double cross. [Hitler, Mussolini, Stalin]

Matthew 12:46-50

(Mark 3:31-35; Luke 8:19-21) General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 79 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 99, 161f.

Matthew 13

Verses 1-23

Verses 24-43

Verses 44-50

Verses 51-52

Verses 53-58

Matthew 13:1-23

General References

Mark P. Achtemeier, "Expository Article," Interpretation (January 1990), p. 61-65 John R. Archer, "Seed Bearing Seed," Best Sermons I, p. 59 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 77

Verses 1-9

Verses 10-17

Verses 18-23

Matthew 13:1-9

(Mark 4:1-9; Luke 8:4-8) Greek Cross References: General References

John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Advent," In Parables, p. 39-44 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 31, 147 2 Luke 5:1-3

Verse References

3 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 238-241

Matthew 13:10-17

(Mark 4:10-12; Luke 8:9-10) Greek Cross References:

12 14-15 16-17 Matthew 25:29; Mark 4:25; Luke 8:18, 19:26; Thomas 41 Isaiah 6:9-10 Luke 10:23-24

General References

Mary Oliver, "The Moths," New and Selected Poems, p. 132 If you notice anything it leads you to notice more and more.

Verse References

12 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 57, 153f.

Matthew 13:18-23

(Mark 4:13-20; Luke 8:11-15) Greek

Matthew 13:24-43

General References

George A. Buttrick, "The Kingdom and the Perplexing Presence of Evil," The Parables of Jesus, p. 60-69 Thomas Conley, "Theodicy in the Library," Best Sermons 2, p. 135-142 Vassar Miller, "Self-Ordained," Divine Inspiration, p. 250 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 71

Verses 24-30

Verses 31-32

Verse 33

Verses 34-35

Verses 36-43

Matthew 13:24-30

Greek Cross References: General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 83 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 55, 153 John Dominic Crossan, "The Planted Weeds," The Historical Jesus, p. 279 f. Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 176 ff. David Rensberger, "The Folly of God in the Parables," Weavings (January/February 1996), p. 16-18 24-30 Isaiah 27:12, 65:8; Thomas 57

Verse References

30 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 242-245

Matthew 13:24-30

Notes

David Rensberger Douglas Oakman has studied the agricultural methods of the time, and points out that weeding out darnel was standard practice. This particular weed has the unfortunate attribute of bearing seeds that are toxic. Letting it grow together with the wheat risked ruining the harvest: any flour made from it would be tainted, and if the wheat was used for seed, it would only propagate the darnel. Darnel is not easy to distinguish from wheat and eradicate, but it can be done, and prudent and diligent farmers always tried to do so. Thus the inaction of the landowner is foolish by ancient agricultural standards. ... It is not easy to think of God being portrayed as a lazy or careless farmer. But Jesus evidently didn't mind upsetting people by means of his parables, and the whole thrust of his mission was one that undermined much of the conventional religious and social wisdom of his day. In order to justify his offering compassion to sinners, he told this parable, which protrays God as acting in a shockingly imprudent way. (p. 18 f.)

Matthew 13:31-32

(Mark 4:30-32; Luke 13:18-19) Greek General References

Frederick Buechner, "To Be a Saint," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 116-123 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 85 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 51, 153 John Dominic Crossan, "The Mustard Seed," The Historical Jesus, p. 276-279 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Advent," In Parables, p. 45-49 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 205

Matthew 13:33

(Luke 13:20-21) Greek Cross References: References

George A. Buttrick, "Similitudes of the Kingdom (I)," The Parables of Jesus, p. 14-25 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 98, 161 John Dominic Crossan, "The Leaven," The Historical Jesus, p. 279 f. Richard Q. Ford, "Body Language," Interpretation (July 2002), p. 295-306 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 116 ff. Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 246-249 33 Thomas 96

Matthew 13:34-35

(Mark 4:33-34) Greek Cross References: General References

Frederick Buechner, "To Be a Saint," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 116-123 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 205 35 Psalm 78:2

Matthew 13:36-43

Greek General References

Frederick Buechner, "To Be a Saint," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 116-123 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 205

Matthew 13:44-50

Greek Cross References:

44-46 44 45-46 Psalm 119:162 Thomas 109 Thomas 76

General References

George A. Buttrick, "Similitudes of the Kingdom (II)," The Parables of Jesus, p. 26-39 Andrew Greeley, "Searching for Treasure," When Life Hurts, p. 29-31

Verse References

Matthew 13:44-50

Verse References

44-46 44-46 44-46 44-45 44-45 44-45 44 44 45-46 45-46 45-46 45 47-48 47-48 John Dominic Crossan, "The Pearl" & "The Treasure," The Historical Jesus, p. 281 f. Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 156 ff. Communication Resources, Sca6, "Pearl" John Dominic Crossan, "Parables and the Temporality of the Kingdom," In Parables, p. 34-35 Mary Oliver, "Roses Late Summer," New and Selected Poems, p. 96 R. S. Thomas, "The Bright Field," Divine Inspiration, p. 229 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 107, 163 Ted Loder, Guerrillas of Grace, p. 84 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 93, 160 J. Barrie Shepherd, Seeing with the Soul, p. 95 "Matt 13x45-46," Scripture Art George Herbert, "The Pearl," Selected Poetry, p. 136 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 67, 155 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 176

Matthew 13:44-50

Notes

John Dominic Crossan The three key parables to be studied as paradigmatic references are: the Treasure in Matt. 13:44; the Pearl, in Matt. 13:45; and the Great Fish, in Gos. Thom. 81:28--82:3 ... We are confronted, for example in the Treasure parable, with a man whose normalcy of past- present-future is rudely but happily shattered. The future he had presumably planned and projected for himself is totally invalidated by the ADVENT of the Treasure which opens up new world and unforeseen possibilities. In the force of this advent he willingly REVERSES his entire past, quite rightly and wisely he sells "all that he has." ... One feels that the Paul who wrote of his conversion in Gal. 1:16-18 would absolutely understand such a temporality and would even find its structure mirrored geographically in his own sequence of place: Damascus-Arabia-Jerusalem. Mary Oliver If I had another life I would want to spend it all on some unstinting happiness. R. S. Thomas I have seen the sun break through to illuminate a small field for a while, and gone my way and forgotten it. But that was the pearl of great price, the one field that had the treasure in it. I realize now that I must give all that I have to possess it. Life is not hurrying on to a receding future, or hankering after an imagined past. It is the turning aside like Moses to the miracle of the lit bush, to a brightness that seemed as transitory as your youth once, but is the eternity that awaits you. John Dominic Crossan The Kingdom of God is like this Somebody found a treasure in somebody else's field, covered it up, sold everything, bought the field (But how is the Kingdom of God like that?)

Matthew 13:44-50

Notes, p. 2

Ted Loder help me unbury my talents for wonder and humor and gratitude, Barrie Shepherd [The pastor] spoke simply and passionately of the urgent need to seize the opportunity, to claim the pearl, the jewel of great price, that heavenly treasure for which it may be necessary to give up everything one owns. ... later that same day, ... we read the latest news, not published in the East, of thousands of East German families fleeing to western embassies in Budapest and Prague, abandoning all they owned in their eager quest for freedom.

Matthew 13:44-50

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Pearl"

"Matt 13x45-46," Scripture Art

Matthew 13:51-52

Greek General References

George A. Buttrick, "The Conflict of New and Old," The Parables of Jesus, p. 2-13 Andrew Greeley, "Searching for Treasure," When Life Hurts, p. 29-31 Stephen Mitchell, The Gospel According to Jesus, p. 144 Scholars who consider this verse to be a later addition explain "scribe" here as "Christian scribe." But it would be typical of Jesus that in spite of opposition from the scribes, he could state here that they too are capable of entering the kingdom of God. In his generosity toward his opponents, he is practicing his own precept of loving your enemies.

Matthew 13:53-58

(Mark 6:1-6; Luke 4:16-30) Greek Cross References: General References

John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 35, 148 57 John 4:44

Matthew 14

Verses 1-12

Verses 13-21 Verses 34-36

Verses 22-33

Matthew 14:1-12

(Mark 6:14-29; Luke 9:7-9) Cross References:

3-4 4 9 Luke 3:19-20 Leviticus 18:16, 20:21 Deuteronomy 6:4; Mark 10:18 & 21

Verse References

6-12 6-12 Gunnar Ekelov, "To the Art of the Impossible," Divine Inspiration, p. 202 Mikola Zerov, "Salome," Divine Inspiration, p. 201

Matthew 14:13-21

(Mark 6:30-44; Luke 9:10-17; John 6:1-14) General References

Joseph A. Grassi, "The Teacher and the Giver of Bread," Loaves and Fishes, p. 51-60 Charles A. Summers, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 2005), p. 298-299

Verse References

13-14 James McGinnis, "The Availability of Jesus,"Weavings (September/October 1997), p. 35-43

Matthew 14:22-33

(Mark 6:45-52; John 6:15-21) Cross References: General References

Andrew Greeley, "Paralyzed with Fear," When Life Hurts, p. 32-35 Denise Levertov, "Poetics of Faith," Sands of the Well, p. 110 Joan Sauro, C.S.J. "The Kingdom of God is Like a Circus," Weavings (November/December 1993), p. 25 f. Helmut Thielicke, "How Crises in Faith Arise," How to Believe Again, p. 64-76 Newsletter Newsleter, Scripture Art 33 Matthew 28:17

Verse References

Matthew 14:22-33

Verse References

22-27 22-27 22-27 22-23 25-31 28-32 29-31 Hans Benzmann, "Jesus Walks on the Water," Divine Inspiration, p. 150 Susan Griffen, "Miracle," Divine Inspiration, p. 152 José Garcia Villa, "Does a Mirror Forget," Divine Inspiration, p. 154 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 199 f. Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 209 Francisco de Medrano, "A Prayer to Saint Peter," Divine Inspiration, p. 156 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 254-257

Matthew 14:22-33

General References

Denise Levertov For example, as if forgetting to prepare them, He simply walks on water toward them, casually-- and impetuous Peter, empowered, jumps from the post and rushes on wave-tip to meet Him-- a few steps, anyway-- (till it occurs to him, `I can't, this is preposterous' and Jesus has to grab him, tumble his weight back over the gunwale). Sustaining those light and swift steps was more than Peter could manage. Still, years later, his toes and insteps, just before sleep, would remember their passage.

Matthew 14:22-33

Notes

Newsletter Newsleter, Scripture Art

Matthew 14:34-36

(Mark 6:53-56)

Matthew 15

Verses 1-20

Verses 21-28 Verses 32-39

Verses 29-31

Matthew 15:1-20

(Mark 7:1-23) Greek Cross References:

4 8-9 14 18 Exodus 20:12, 21:17; Leviticus 20:9; Deuteronomy 5:16 Isaiah 29:13 Luke 6:39; Thomas 34 Matthew 12:34

General References

Klyne Snodgrass, "Matthew's Understanding of the Law," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 375

Verse References

10-11 12-14 14 14-20 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 43, 150f. Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 209 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 77, 157 David C. Steinmetz, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1981), p. 172-176

Matthew 15:1-20

Notes

Klyne Snodgrass (4) The law is completely valid as far as Matthew presents Jesus' teaching. (5) The law reveals God's purpose when interpreted by a specific hermeneutical key. Both options four and five, it seems to me, express Matthew's understanding.

Matthew 15:21-28

(Mark 7:24-30) General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 89 John Dominic Crossan, "Distant Girl Cured," The Historical Jesus, p. 328 ... symbolic specification ... for vision of the Gentile mission. Joan Delaplane, "Draw Near," And Blessed is She, p. 151-157 Andrew Greeley, "We Won't Be Quitters," When Life Hurts, p. 36-39 John P. Meier, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1986), p. 397-402 Luther E. Smith, Jr., "Praying beyond the Boundaries of the Heart," Weavings (September/ October 1995), p. 33-35 David C. Steinmetz, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1981), p. 172-176 Helmut Thielicke, "What the Word `Faith' Means," How to Believe Again, p. 77-89 Mark C. Thompson, "Expository Article," Interpretation (July 1981), p. 279-284 James Treat, "The Canaanite Problem," California Nevada United Methodist Review (July 17, 1992), p. 2-3 [As Jesus had a Canaanite Problem so we have an Indian Problem]

Verse References

23 Phillips Brooks, "The Silence of Christ," The Light of the World, p. 124-139

Matthew 15:29-31

General References

David C. Steinmetz, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1981), p. 172-176

Matthew 15:32-39

(Mark 8:1-10) General References

Joseph A. Grassi, "The Teacher and the Giver of Bread," Loaves and Fishes, p. 51-60

Matthew 16

Verses 1-4

Verses 5-12 Verses 21-28

Verses 13-20

Matthew 16:1-4

(Mark 8:11-13; Luke 12:54-56) Cross References:

1 4 Matthew 12:38; Luke 11:16 Matthew 12:39; Luke 11:29

Verse References

2-3 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 59, 154

Matthew 16:5-12

(Mark 8:14-21) Cross References:

6 9 10 Luke 12:1 Matthew 14:17-21 Matthew 15:34-38

Matthew 16:13-20

(Mark 8:27-30; Luke 9:18-21) Cross References:

13-16 14 16 18-19 18 19 John 1:19-28 Matthew 14:1-2; Mark 6:14-15; Luke 9:7-8 John 6:68-69 Genesis 28:10-17 Luke 21:32 Leviticus 19:18; Isaiah 22:22; Matthew 18:18; John 20:23

General References

Verse References

Matthew 16:13-20

General References

Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 94 Juana Inéz de la Cruz, "Villancico for St. Peter," Divine Inspiration, p. 216 Richard Foster, "Radical Prayer," Prayer, p. 232 Parker Palmer, The Active Life, p. 117 M. Jack Suggs, "Expository Article," Interpretation (July 1985), p. 291-295 Helmut Thielicke, "The Point on which I Stand or Fall," How to Believe Again, p. 38-50 William Powell Tuck, "Who Is This Jesus Christ?," Best Sermons 2, p. 31-42 Zhang Xingyao, "How Wonderful Was Peter," Divine Inspiration, p. 215

Verse References

16-19 18-19 19 C. Norman Kraus, The Community of the Spirit, p. 62 Madeleine L'Engle, The Irrational Season, p. 98 Blaise Pascal, "# 869," Pensées, p. 260

Matthew 16:13-20

Notes

Richard Foster [Story of talk with God, vision of tree and rock] But then, as I examined the dacaying tree, the word of the Lord came to me saying, "This is my Church!" When I heard the words, tears came to my eyes. I had worked in churches all my life, and I knew it was so--the Church, while huge and with some vestiges of life remaining, was decaying. Then, for some reason unknown to me, I turned 180 degrees and looked back at Haystack Rock in the distance. The tide had come in by now, and the rock was completely surrounded by water, the waves savagely breaking against it. The divine word continued, "But this is what my church is going to be!" [same paradox, opposite direction--Peter the Rock, then Peter the agent of Satan] Parker Palmer Jesus needs to wrestle with the issue of his public reputation. ... Surely this exchange shows how Jesus had to keep struggling with the temptations posed by his growing reputation. C. Norman Kraus Jesus did not promise to build his church on Peter, the superior apostle, but on Peter the confessor of messianic authority. ... Jesus gave the "keys of the kingdom of heaven" (16:19; 18:18) to this community of disciples who recognize his authority to inaugurate the rule of God "on earth as it is in heaven." Madeleine L'Engle When the gates of hell are trampled down they suddenly become the welcoming door of heaven. Blaise Pascal God has not wanted to absolve without the church. As she has part in the offence, he desires her to have part in the pardon.

Matthew 16:21-28

(Mark 8:31--9:1; Luke 9:22-27) Cross References:

24 25 27 Matthew 10:38; Luke 14:27 Matthew 10:39; Luke 17:33; John 12:25 Psalm 62:12; Matthew 25:31; Romans 2:6

General References

James M. Efird, "Expository Article," Interpretation (July 1981), p. 284-289 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 38 Edward Schillebeeckx, "Christian `to the Death'," God Among Us, p. 199-203

Verse References

21-23 21-23 25 Richard Foster, "Radical Prayer," Prayer, p. 232 Helmut Thielicke, "The Point on which I Stand or Fall," How to Believe Again, p. 38-50 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 353

Matthew 17

Verses 1-13

Verses 14-21 Verses 24-27

Verses 22-23

Matthew 17:1-13

(Mark 9:2-13; Luke 9:28-36) Cross References:

1-5 5 5 10 12 2 Peter 1:17-18 Genesis 22:2; Deuteronomy 18:15; Psalm 2:7; Isaiah 42:1 Matthew 3:17, 12:18; Mark 1:11; Luke 3:22 Malachi 4:5 Matthew 11:14

General References

Andrew Greeley, "God's Transforming Love," When Life Hurts, p. 12-14

Verse References

1-8 5 Jaroslav Pelikan, The Illustrated Jesus through the Centuries, p. 68-69 Communication Resources, Sca6, "Mountain"

Matthew 17:1-13

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Mountain"

Matthew 17:14-21

(Mark 9:14-29; Luke 9:37-43) Cross References: Verse References

14-19 19-21 19 20 Andrew Greeley, "God's Transforming Love," When Life Hurts, p. 12-14 Andrew Murray, "The Cure of Unbelief," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 74-80 Martin Luther King, Jr., "The Answer to a Perplexing Question," Strength to Love, p. 127-137 Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Hymn of the Universe, p. 143 Jesus came to bring us ... also in a very real sense, a new physical power of acting upon our temporal world. ... many christians neglect this earthly aspect of the promises of the Master, or at least do not give themselves to it with that complete hardihood which he nevertheless never tires of asking of us, if only we have ears to hear him. ... If it is true that the development of the world can be influenced by our faith in Christ, then to let this power lie dorment within us would be unpardonable. 20 Matthew 21:21; Mark 11:23; 1 Corinthians 13:2; Thomas 48

Matthew 17:22-23

(Mark 9:30-32; Luke 9:43-45)

Matthew 17:24-27

Cross References: General References

Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 208-209 24 Exodus 30:13, 38:26

Matthew 18

Verses 1-5

Verses 6-9

Verses 10-14

Verses 15-20

Verses 21-35

Matthew 18:1-5

(Mark 9:33-37; Luke 9:46-48) Cross References:

1 3 Luke 22:24 Mark 10:15; Luke 18:17

General References

Frederick Buechner, "Becoming like Children," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 131-135 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 125, 166 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 348

Verse References

1 3 3 3 Henri Nouwen, Lifesigns, p. 18 f. John Dominic Crossan, "Kingdom and Children," The Historical Jesus, p. 266-269 Stephen Jay Gould, "The Without and Within of Smart Mice," I Have Landed, p. 235 Ted Loder, Guerrillas of Grace, p. 9

Matthew 18:1-5

Notes

Henri Nouwen A careful look at the gospels shows that Jesus seldom accepted the questions posed to him. He exposed them as coming from the house of fear. [list of questions including this verse] To none of these questions did Jesus give a direct answer. He gently put them aside as questions emerging from false worries. They were raised out of concern for prestige, influence, power, and control. They did not belong to the house of God. Therefore Jesus always transformed the question by his answer. He made the question new--and only then worthy of his response. Stephen Jay Gould This gene doesn't make a mouse "smart" all by its biochemical self. Rather, the gene's action allows adult mice to retain a neural openness for learning that young mice naturally possess but then lose in aging. Even if Tien's gene exists, and maintains the same basic function in humans (a realistic possibility), we will need an extensive regimen of learning to potentiate any benefit from its enhanced action. ... We call this regimen "education." Perhaps Jesus expressed a good biological insight when he stated (Matthew 18:3), "Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven." Ted Loder Thus, prayer can be playful because the imagination plays with possibilities, putting them together in different combinations before we begin to enact them. Since children are naturally adept at such play, perhaps that is one reason Jesus said, "Unless you turn and become as children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.

Matthew 18:6-9

(Mark 9:42-48; Luke 17:1-2) Cross References:

8 9 Matthew 5:30 Matthew 5:29

Verse References

7 7 Abraham Lincoln, "Second Inaugural," Lend Me Your Ears, p. 439 ff. Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 62

Matthew 18:10-14

(Luke 15:3-7) Greek Cross References: Verse References

12-14 12-14 12-14 12-14 12-14 12-13 13 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 103, 162 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 351 Juana Inéz de la Cruz, from The Divine Narcissus, Divine Inspiration, p. 237 Joachim Jeremias, Rediscovering the Parables, p. 29 f 105 f Hans-Ruedi Weber, "The Shepherd and the Sheep," Experiments with Bible Study, p. 129 David Rensberger, "The Folly of God in the Parables," Weavings (January/February 1996), p. 21-22 Jane M. Thibault, "Mourning Pages," Weavings (March/April 2000), p. 34 11 Luke 19:10

Matthew 18:10-14

Notes

Jane Thibault Day 21 -- Dear God, When you tell us to become like little children, do you mean as little as the infant, or as psychologically small as the fetus in the womb, neither of whom has a consciousness of you? But even the unborn child at least has the promise of the consciousness of you! I have the promise of the loss of my knowledge of you. Do not reject me now that I am forgetful, even if I forget you.

Matthew 18:15-20

Greek Cross References:

15-17 15-16 16 18 19 20 Galatians 6:1; Luke 17:3; James 5:19-20 Proverbs 25:8-10 Deuteronomy 19:15 Matthew 16:19; John 20:23 Thomas 48 Thomas 30

General References

Andrew Greeley, "Settling Our Quarrels," When Life Hurts, p. 40-42 Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace, p. 126 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 105 f.

Verse References

Matthew 18:15-20

Notes

Kathleen Norris When it is absolutely necessary to correct another, do so, they said. But do it quickly and simply, then let it go. Don't get entangled in the expectation of results.

Matthew 18:15-20

Verse References

15-17 15-17 18-19 19-20 19-20 20 20 Thomas Ward Jr., "Speaking the Truth in Love," Weavings (July/August 1988), p. 27-33 John Wesley, "The Cure of Evil-Speaking," Fifty-Three Sermons, p. 621-631 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 206 f. Andrew Murray, "The Power of United Prayer," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 86-90 Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 211 Flora Slosson Wuellner, "Gathered in that Name," Weavings (July/August 1990), p. 6-17 Communication Resources, Sca5, "Church"

Matthew 18:15-20

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca5, "Church"

Matthew 18:21-35

Greek Cross References:

21-22 22 34 Psalm 79:12; Daniel 9:24; Luke 17:3-4 Genesis 4:15, 4:24 Matthew 5:25-26

General References

Verse References

21-21 21-22 21-22 21 21 L. William Countryman, Forgiven and Forgiving, p. 117 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 124, 166 Desmond Tutu, "Contrition," An African Prayer Book, p. 38 Henri Nouwen, Lifesigns, p. 18 f. Albert Schweitzer, A Place for Revelation, p. 45-52

Matthew 18:21-35

General References

George A. Buttrick, "Forgiven and Forgiving," The Parables of Jesus, p. 92-103 Warren Carter, "Resisting and Imitating the Empire," Interpretation (July 2002), p. 262-268 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 78, 157f. John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 59 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Action," In Parables, p. 105-107 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 157 f. Andrew Greeley, "Being Truly Sorry," When Life Hurts, p. 43-46 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 121 Joachim Jeremias, "The Unmerciful Servant," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 164 ff. Ronald D. Sisk, "How to Forgive," Best Sermons I, p. 308 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 48 f.

Matthew 18:21-35

Notes

John Dominic Crossan The client of a power wielder thus becomes a powerful man and himself in turn attracts clients. ... they thought of patronage as we do of investment. Desmond Tutu A Jew had a particular besetting sin, and he used to confess it and God would forgive him. But no sooner had he been absolved than he would trip up and sin again. One day this happened and he rushed back to God and said, "I'm sorry, I've done it again." And God asked, "What have you done again?" For God suffers from amnesia when it comes to our sins. Henri Nouwen A careful look at the gospels shows that Jesus seldom accepted the questions posed to him. He exposed them as coming from the house of fear. [list of questions including this verse] To none of these questions did Jesus give a direct answer. He gently put them aside as questions emerging from false worries. They were raised out of concern for prestige, influence, power, and control. They did not belong to the house of God. Therefore Jesus always transformed the question by his answer. He made the question new--and only then worthy of his response. L. William Countryman It is as if Jesus said, "Just make a habit of it."

Matthew 19

Verses 1-12

Verses 13-15

Verses 16-30

Matthew 19:1-12

(Mark 10:1-12) Cross References:

4 5 7 9 Genesis 1:27, 5:2 Genesis 2:24 Deuteronomy 24:1-4; Matthew 5:31 Matthew 5:32; 1 Corinthians 7:10-11

Verse References

3-9 3-9 10-12 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 116 Mark Molldrem, "The Divorce Texts," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 46-48 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 138, 169

Matthew 19:13-15

(Mark 10:13-16; Luke 18:15-17) General References

Søren Kierkegaard, "Childish Orthodoxy," Provocations, p. 196-198 Giovanni Pascoli, "Jesus," Divine Inspiration, p. 213

Verse References

14 Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 19:13-15

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 19:16-30

(Mark 10:17-31; Luke 18:18-30) Cross References:

18 19 21 28 30 Exodus 20:13-16; Deuteronomy 5:17-20 Exodus 20:12; Leviticus 19:18; Deuteronomy 5:16 Matthew 5:48 Matthew 25:31; Luke 22:30 Matthew 20:16; Luke 13:30

General References

Bill McKibben, "Job and Matthew," Communion, p. 367-380 John Shea, The Spirit Master, p. 173

Verse References

22 23-26 30 Anthony Thorold, Joy and Strength, p. 123 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 127, 166 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 49, 152

Matthew 19:16-30

Notes

Anthony Thorold We too in our own way have often a quiet impression that we are keeping all the commandments sufficiently and inheriting eternal life. One day a tremendous duty opens before us and we are aghast at its hardness. What shall we do? What shall we answer? Is Christ deserving of everything from us or only of part? It is a tremendous test which all cannot stand.

Matthew 20

Verses 1-16

Verses 17-19 Verses 29-34

Verses 20-28

Matthew 20:1-16

Greek Cross References:

8 15 16 Leviticus 19:13; Deuteronomy 24:15 Matthew 6:23 Matthew 19:30; Mark 10:31; Luke 13:30

General References

Matthew 20:1-16

General References

George A. Buttrick, "God's Appraisals and Rewards," The Parables of Jesus, p. 158-165 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 121 L. William Countryman, Forgiven and Forgiving, p. 118 James W. Crawford, "An Incredible Payoff," Best Sermons I, p. 327 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Action," In Parables, p. 111-115 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 137, 168 John Dominic Crossan, "The Parables of Jesus," Interpretation, (July 2002), p. 251 John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 165 Andrew Greeley, "Can You Be Too Generous?," When Life Hurts, p. 47-50 Hippolytus of Rome, "Do You Honor God?" Divine Inspiration, p. 263 Joachim Jeremias, "The Good Employer," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 24 f 108 f Garrison Keillor, Leaving Home, p. 90 John Shea, The Spirit Master, p. 173 Paul Sherer, "Take That Thine Is," The Word God Sent, (filed with OTHER'S SERMONS) William Stafford, "For the Chair of Any Committee I'm On," Even in Quiet Places, p. 83 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 50 f.

Matthew 20:1-16

Notes

George A. Buttrick Is a man out of work because of the callousness of a society which will not seriously grapple with the curse of unemployment? That tragedy smites Jesus to the core! He could never have told this story if He had not been moved with pity as He saw men idle in the market place. (p. 161) "These last--" they murmur; and forget that the "scorching heat" is harder on the man who waits despairingly than on the laborer who toils in assurance of his livelihood! Idleness in appearance may not be idleness in motive. (p. 165) L. William Countryman Why are we religious folk so quick to judge? It comes down to the same business we have run into before. It's very nice of God to forgive us all, but we'd really rather have our individual excellence recognized instead. John Dominic Crossan But most of the parable is about the owner going out at 6 a.m., 12 noon, 3 p.m., and 5 p.m. and always finding daylaborers waiting for work. He does not have to hire all he can at dawn and pay them what they demand. He knows that there is such high unemployment that he controls the hiring even at harvest-time and even late in the day. And, of course, he can call them lazy when they are not hired. ... the parable's main content raises a question of systemic justice: is the situation of maximum unemployment normal or abnormal, right or wrong? Garrison Keillor Clarence checked out of Pastor Ingqvist's sermon early. It was about the parable of the laborers in the vineyard, the ones who came late getting the same wage as those who came early and stayed all day, a parable that suggests you need not listen carefully to the whole sermon from the beginning but can come in for maybe the last sentence or two and get the whole point. William Stafford In regard to budgets and wages: in all my lifetime I have been unable to rid myself of a tendency to favor equality.

Matthew 20:17-19

(Mark 10:32-34; Luke 18:31-34)

Matthew 20:20-28

(Mark 10:35-45) Cross References:

25-26 26-27 Luke 22:25-26 Matthew 23:11; Mark 9:35; Luke 22:26

General References

Virginia Stem Owens, "Climbing in the Kingdom," Looking for Jesus, p. 81-86 Helmut Thielicke, "Learning By Praying," Faith: The Great Adventure, p. 144-149

Verse References

24-28 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 123

Matthew 20:29-34

(Mark 10:46-52; Luke 18:35-43)

Matthew 21

Verses 1-11 Verses 23-27

Verses 12-17 Verses 28-32

Verses 18-22 Verses 33-46

Matthew 21:1-11

(Mark 11:1-11; Luke 19:28-38; John 12:12-19) Greek Cross References:

5 9 Zechariah 9:9 Psalm 118:25-26

General References

Paul Engle, "An Old Palestinian Donkey," The Enduring Legacy, p. 346 Clement of Alexandria, "Hymn to Christ the Saviour," Divine Inspiration, p. 355 Madeleine L'Engle, quoted in Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 168-171 Giambattista Marino, "Palm Sunday," Divine Inspiration, p. 358 Paul Meyer, "Expository Article," Interpretation (April 1986), p. 180-185 J. Barrie Shepherd, "Pinnacle," The Moveable Feast, p. 39 Wole Soyinka, "Easter," Divine Inspiration, p. 359 Theodulf of Orleans, "Gloria, Laus et Honor," Divine Inspiration, p. 357 Adam Zagajewski, "Palm Sunday," Divine Inspiration, p. 360

Verse References

10 Robert A. Penney, "The Question of All Ages," Best Sermons I, p. 36

Matthew 21:1-11

Notes

Madeleine L'Engle At first it appeared that [Jesus'] return to Jerusalem was a triumph rather than the beginning of the events that would lead to his death. People cut branches from the trees and strewed them in front of him. Others spread their cloaks on the road. And he was surrounded by cries of "Hosannah to the son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosannah in the Highest." How easily and how terribly "Hosannah!" changed to "Crucify him! Crucify him!" J. Barrie Shepherd There is a towering deep within these forty days that finds one ... you are teetering across the edge of everything, a palm leaf in your face, a shout, "Hosanna?" trembling in your eager longing ears. The more you suffer, don't you see, the more you feel entitled to a reckoning and to your final triumph over all the kingdoms of the world. Beware!

Matthew 21:12-17

(Mark 11:15-19; Luke 19:45-48; John 2:13-22) Cross References:

12-13 13 16 Zechariah 14:21 Isaiah 56:7; Jeremiah 7:11 Psalm 8:2

Verse References

12 Meister Eckhart, "German Sermons," Preacher and Teacher, p. 239-243

Matthew 21:18-22

(Mark 11:12-14, 20-24) Cross References:

21 Matthew 17:20; 1 Corinthians 13:2

Matthew 21:23-27

(Mark 11:27-33; Luke 20:1-8) General References

William Hardy, "Right There in Front of You," Evangelism Sunday Resources, 1996, p. 15-17, [Sermon]

Verse References

23 Henri Nouwen, Lifesigns, p. 18 f. A careful look at the gospels shows that Jesus seldom accepted the questions posed to him. He exposed them as coming from the house of fear. [list of questions including this verse] To none of these questions did Jesus give a direct answer. He gently put them aside as questions emerging from false worries. They were raised out of concern for prestige, influence, power, and control. They did not belong to the house of God. Therefore Jesus always transformed the question by his answer. He made the question new--and only then worthy of his response.

Matthew 21:28-32

Cross References: 28-31

32 Ezekiel 33:13-16 Luke 3:12, 7:29-30

General References

Verse References

31-32 31 31 31 31 John Dominic Crossan, "All Sins Forgiven," The Historical Jesus, p. 257-259 R. H. Blyth, Haiku, Vol. 1, p. 224 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 49 f. Geza Vermes, The Changing Faces of Jesus, p. 220 f. Morris West, A View from the Ridge, p. 149

Story Art

Matthew 21:28-32

General References

George A. Buttrick, "The Test of Deeds," The Parables of Jesus, p. 204-211 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 139, 169 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 127 Andrew Greeley, "Not Honoring a Promise," When Life Hurts, p. 51-53 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 49 William Hardy, "Right There in Front of You," Evangelism Sunday Resources, 1996, p. 15-17, [Sermon] Joachim Jeremias, "The Two Sons," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 65 f. Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 13-15 Madeleine L'Engle, "Love Letter," The Irrational Season, p. 172 Nancy Ore, "The Parable of the Wise Old Woman," Best Sermons 2, p. 410-417 Blaise Pascal, "# 896," Pensées, p. 265 Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 232 f. Helmut Thielicke, "Two Kinds of Christianity: Word and Deed," Faith: The Great Adventure, p. 11-17

Matthew 21:28-32

Notes

John Dominic Crossan "... the ordinary weapons of relatively powerless groups: foot dragging, dissimulation, desertion, false compliance, pilfering, feigned ignorance, slander, arson, sabotage and so on." quoting James Scott. [As peasants we are like the second son. But we are sons not servants so we must repent and act like the first son. (ME)] Søren Kierkegaard Beware! The "Yes" of promise keeping is sleep-inducing. An honest "No" possesses much more promise. It can stimulate; repentance may not be far away. He who says "No," becomes almost afraid of himself. But he who says "Yes, I will," is all too pleased with himself. The world is quite inclined ­ even eager ­ to make promises, for a promise appears very fine at the moment ­ it inspires! Yet for this very reason the eternal is suspicious of promises. (p. 14) Madeleine L'Engle I hate you God. Love, Madeleine ... I love you Madeleine. Hate, God. Blaise Pascal The servant knows not what his lord does for the master tells him only the acts and not the intention. And this is why he often obeys slavishly and defeats the intention. But Jesus Christ has told us the object. And you defeat the object. Robert Smith ... the final scene of the wedding banquet (ejection of the man without a wedding garment, 22:11-14) is the climax and the key to this whole sequence of parables. The real shocker in this scene is that it applies the warnings of all three parables to the Christian situation. R. H. Blyth The materiality of Zen comes out in the fact that the religious life is at its lowest ebb in church, where everything is arranged to incline the mind to some other place, Heaven or Hell, some other time, past or future. There is more religion in the public-house, on the battle-field. It is for this reason that Christ says, "the publicans and the harlots go into the Kingdom of God before you." Geza Vermes [Jesus] envisaged as the ultimate fulfillment of his dream the picture in which penitent tax collectors and harlots overtook the righteous in the race toward the Kingdom of God. Morris West tax farmers and public women

Matthew 21:33-46

(Mark 12:1-12; Luke 20:9-19) Cross References:

33 42 Isaiah 5:1-2 Psalm 118:22-23

General References

George A. Buttrick, "The Rejected Overtures of God," The Parables of Jesus, p. 212-221 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Action," In Parables, p. 86-96 Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 232 f.

Verse References

33-41 43 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 38, 149 George R. Hunsberger, "Is There Biblical Warrant for Evangelism?," Interpretation (April 1994), p. 138 ... there is a danger of presumption in so claiming to "possess" the reign of God that it becomes ours and not God's. On the other hand, there is the danger of pride in thinking ourselves to be securely "in". But it is by means of these very images that Jesus warns of these dangers: ...

Matthew 22

Verses 1-14

Verses 15-22

Verses 23-33

Verses 34-40

Verses 41-46

Matthew 22:1-14

(Luke 14:15-24) Cross References: General References

Warren Carter, "Resisting and Imitating the Empire," Interpretation (July 2002), p. 269-271 John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Reversal," In Parables, p. 70-73 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 51 Joachim Jeremias, "The Great Supper," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 33, 50, 55, 138 Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 232 f. Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 46 13 Matthew 8:12, 25:30; Luke 13:28

Verse References

10-14 11-14 11-14 11-14 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 60-61, 154f. George A. Buttrick, "Making Light of the Kingdom," The Parables of Jesus, p. 222-231 Joachim Jeremias, "The Guest Without a Wedding Garment," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 51 f., 148 f. C. Gordon Peerman III, "Discovering Forgiveness," Weavings (March/April 1992), p. 39

Matthew 22:1-14

Notes

Robert Smith ... the final scene of the wedding banquet (ejection of the man without a wedding garment, 22:11-14) is the climax and the key to this whole sequence of parables. The real shocker in this scene is that it applies the warnings of all three parables to the Christian situation. C. Gordon Peerman III ... the wedding garment is a symbol of the righteousness that comes only by way of forgiveness.

Matthew 22:15-22

(Mark 12:13-17; Luke 20:20-26) General References

Rita Nakashima Brock, And Blessed is She, p. 112-113 Dom Helder Camara, Through the Gospel, p. 130 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 60-61, 154f. Meister Eckhart, "Latin Sermons," Preacher and Teacher, p. 234-237 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 155 Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 50

Verse References

15-18 20 C. Gordon Peerman III, "Anger: An Instrument of Peace," Weavings (March/April 1994), p. 20 ff. Andrew Murray, "Prayer in Harmony with the Destiny of Man," The Believer's School of Prayer, p. 102-109

Matthew 22:15-22

Notes

Thomas R. Haney I've been thnking about that English ecclesiastic Wolsey. Remember the words Shakespeare put on his dying lips? "Had I but served my God with half the zeal I serv'd my king...

Matthew 22:23-33

(Mark 12:18-27; Luke 20:27-40) Cross References:

23 24 32 Acts 23:8 Deuteronomy 25:5 Exodus 3:6

Matthew 22:34-40

(Mark 12:28-34; Luke 10:25-28) Cross References:

37 39 Deuteronomy 6:5 Leviticus 19:18

General References

Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 67 Neil Douglas-Klotz, Prayers of the Cosmos, p. 78-82 Helmut Thielicke, "How Can I Keep from Being Torn up Inside?," How to Believe Again, p. 129-139

Verse References

37-40 Jacob Milgrom, "The Most Basic Law in the Bible," Bible Review (August 1995), p. 17 f. ... rendering the entire commandment "Love (the good) for your fellow as you (love the good for) yourself. ... Suppose you don't love yourslef asks Ben Azzai--how can you love someone else? A person may think his life is a failure ... What then should this person do? Let him remind himself, says Ben Azzai, that because he bears the likeness of God, he is of ultimate worth, that regardless of his present condition he has the divinely endowed potential for joy and fulfillment, and only then having learned to love himself, he will recover his self esteem and be capable of loving others.

Matthew 22:41-46

(Mark 12:35-37; Luke 20:41-44) Cross References:

44 Psalm 110:1

Matthew 23

Verses 1-36

Verses 37-39

Matthew 23:1-37

(Mark 12:38-40; Luke 11:37-52, 20:45-47) Cross References:

2-3 5 8-10 8 11 12 16-22 22 23-24 23 25-26 27-28 27 29-31 33 35 Matthew 5:20 Numbers 15:38; Deuteronomy 6:8; Matthew 6:1 Jeremiah 31:34 1 John 2:27 Matthew 20:26-27; Mark 9:35, 10:43-44; Luke 22:26 Luke 14:11, 18:14 Matthew 5:33-37 Isaiah 66:1; Matthew 5:34 Matthew 5:17-20 Leviticus 27:30 Mark 7:14-23; Thomas 89 Matthew 7:21-23 Acts 23:3 Matthew 5:11-12 Matthew 3:7, 12:34; Luke 3:7 Genesis 4:8; 2 Chronicles 24:20-21

Verse References

Matthew 23:1-37

Verse References

2 5-7 8-12 8-10 8 9 12 13-39 23-24 23-24 25-26 27 37 John Dominic Crossan, In Search of Paul, p. 51 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 110, 163f. Ivan Steiger, Ivan Steiger Sees the Bible, p. 214 Thomas G. Long, "Perpetual Students," Consider This (Fall 1999), p. 3 Oscar Romero, The Violence of Love, p. 96 Geza Vermes, The Changing Faces of Jesus, p. 257 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 131, 167 Walter Brueggemann, "Criticism and Pathos in Jesus of Nazareth,"The Prophetic Imagination, p. 90 f. Alexander Solzhenitsyn, quoted in The Plough (Spring 2002), p. 38 Richard Wilbur, "Violet and Jasper," New and Collected Poems, p. 350 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 95, 161 R. H. Blythe, Haiku, Vol. 4, Autumn-Winter, p. 1232 Bridget Meehan, Exploring the Feminine Face of God, p. 19

Matthew 23:1-37

Notes

Thomas G. Long But this is evidently the tack Jesus wants his ministers to take, to venture out into a world increasingly dominated by professionalization, information specialists, and the technological savvy wearing T-shirts that proclaim, "Don't Call Me Reverend ... I'm Just a Student." Geza Vermes The second grandson [of Honi the Circle-Drawer], Hanan the Hidden was so designated because of his self-effacing personality. In times of drought rabbis encouraged children to pull the fringes of his garments in the street and beg him, "Abba, Abba, give us rain!" He turned to God with the words, "Lord of the universe, do this for the sake of those who cannot distinguish the Father [Abba] who gives rain from the abba [he was no doubt known as Abba Hanan] who does not" (bTaanit 23b). Walter Brueggemann In the Matthean counterpart the grief over Jerusalem is preceded by a series of woes (Matt. 23:13-33), but woes serve the same purpose, announcing a grieving over death. Alexander Solzhenitsyn I must say that among educated people politics occupies far too great a proportion of time. All the periodicals, all the newspapers are saturated with politics, although many of the objects they are discussing are very transient and short term. Of course, everywhere in the world people do occupy themselves with higher themes, and not just writers, but they always have a narrow audience, sometimes even appear to be some strange group on the edge of things, peripheral. In truth, questions of higher spirit cannot even be compared to the sort of blinking frivolity or politics. The ultimate problems of life and death show up the colossal nature of this difference even more. Modern humankind is characterized precisely by the loss of the ability to answer the principal problems of life and death. People are prepared to stuff their heads with anything, and to talk of any subject, but only to block off the contemplation of this subject. This is the reason for the increasing pettiness of our society, the concentration on the small and irrelevant. Richard Wilbur Outside, the heirs of purity pick by, Pecked by petite damnations ... Rumors of plenty flutter these around Riot, mercy, and treasure haven here, In silly brains monastically kept,

Matthew 23:1-37

Notes, p. 2

R. H. Blyth The noises that must have mingled with it Died away: The sound of bowl-beating remains. Chora At first the sound of the bowl-beating outside was blended with noises of people passing, talking, working, but after a time these sounds died away and only the bowl-beating of the devotees was heard.

Matthew 23:37-39

(Luke 13:34-35) Cross References:

38 39 Jeremiah 22:5 Psalm 118:26

Verse References

37-39 Warren Carter, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (January 2000), p. 66-68

Matthew 24

General References

C. Freeman Sleeper, "Christ's Coming and Christian Living," Interpretation (April 1999), p. 133-138

Verses 1-2 Verses 29-31

Verses 3-14 Verses 32-35 Verses 45-51

Verses 15-28 Verses 36-44

Matthew 24:1-2

(Mark 13:1-2; Luke 21:5-6)

Matthew 24:3-14

(Mark 13:3-13; Luke 21:7-19) Cross References:

9 13 Matthew 10:22 Matthew 10:22

Matthew 24:15-28

(Mark 13:14-23; Luke 21:20-24) Cross References:

15 17-18 21 26-27 28 Daniel 9:27, 11:31, 12:11 Luke 17:31 Daniel 12:1; Revelation 7:14 Luke 17:23-24 Luke 17:37

Verse References

23-26 23-26 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 39, 149 John Dominic Crossan, "When and Where," The Historical Jesus, p. 282 f.

Matthew 24:29-31

(Mark 13:24-27; Luke 21:25-28) Cross References:

29 29 30 Isaiah 13:10, 34:4; Ezekiel 32:7; Joel 2:10, 2:31, 3:15 Revelation 6:12-13 Daniel 7:13; Zechariah 12:10-14; Revelation 1:7

Verse References

30 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 245, 378

Matthew 24:31-35

(Mark 13:28-31; Luke 21:29-33) Cross References: Verse References

35 Communication Resources, Sca7, "Mywords" 35 Psalm 119:89

Matthew 24:31-35

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca7, "Mywords"

Matthew 24:36-44

(Mark 13:32-37; Luke 17:26-30, 34-36) Cross References:

37 39 43-44 Genesis 6:5-8 Genesis 7:6-24 Luke 12:39-40

Verse References

42-44 43-44 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 80-83 Joachim Jeremias, "The Burglar," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 37 ff.

Matthew 24:45-51

(Luke 12:41-48) General References

John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Action," In Parables, p. 99 f. Joachim Jeremias, "The Servant Entrusted with Supervision," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 44 ff.

Matthew 25

General References

C. Freeman Sleeper, "Christ's Coming and Christian Living," Interpretation (April 1999), p. 133-138

Verses 1-13

Verses 14-30

Verses 31-46

Matthew 25:1-13

Cross References:

1 11-12 Luke 12:35 Luke 13:25

General References

George A. Buttrick, "Preparedness and Emergency," The Parables of Jesus, p. 232-239 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 54 Geoffrey Hill, "Lachrimae Amantis," Tenebrae, p. 21 Joachim Jeremias, "The Ten Maidens," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 39 f. & 136 f Methodius of Olympus, "The Virgins' Hymn to Christ," Divine Inspiration, p. 272 FrederickMoberg, "The Wise and Foolish Virgins," Parables, p. 22 f. Carlos Martínez Rivas, "The Wise Virgins," Divine Inspiration, p. 276 Miriam Therese Winter, "Paradoxology Part I: The Foolish and the Wise in the Church of the New Millennium," Earl Lectures (1/27/98) [note] Robert D. Young, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (October 2000), p. 419-422

Verse References

44 Communication Resources, Sca6, "Hourglas"

Matthew 25:1-13

Notes

Geoffrey Hill, "Lachrimae Amantis," Tenebrae, p. 21 What is there in my heart that you should sue so fiercely for its love? What kind of care brings you as though a stranger to my door through the long night and in the icy dew seeking the heart that will not harbour you, that keeps itself religiously secure? At this dark solstice filled with frost and fire your passion's ancient wounds must bleed anew. So many nights the angel of my house has fed such urgent comfort through a dream, whispered "your lord is coming, he is close" that I have drowsed half-faithful for a time bathed in pure tones of promise and remorse: "tomorrow I shall wake to welcome him." Miriam Therese Winter, "Paradoxology Part I: The Foolish and the Wise in the Church of the New Millennium," Earl Lectures (1/27/98) In order to get to the original story: a) Take off the beginning and the end (vs. 1 & 13) b) Remove "foolish" & "wise" adjectives c) vs. 9 ­ "There might not be enough." d) Amazing that the five were able to gather oil at midnight. e) Compare vs. 12 with "I know my own and my own know me." (John 10:14) f) Could this parable really be interpreted to mean: "Blessed are the stingy for they shall inherit the kingdom of heaven." --» This is a parable of reversal. It is about economics and about division within a community. [Me: Compare vs. 12 with "He came to his own and his own did not accept him." (John 1:11) --» Prophetic parable]

Matthew 25:1-13

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Hourglas"

Matthew 25:14-30

(Luke 19:11-27) Greek Cross References:

14-30 29 30 Jeremiah 8:13 Matthew 13:12; Mark 4:25; Luke 8:18; Thomas 41 Matthew 8:12, 22:13; Luke 13:28

General References

Verse References

23 John Donne, "In the Shadow of Thy Wings," Classics of Western Spirituality, p. 184

Matthew 25:14-30

General References

Alcuin, "Brief Is Our Life," Divine Inspiration, p. 279 Eberhard Arnold, Salt and Light, p. 253 f. Jorge Luis Borges, "Matthew XXV:30," Divine Inspiration, p. 282 Gayle Boss, "Hungry, Full," Weavings (July/August 2006), p. 6-14 E. Carson Brisson, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (July 2002), p. 307-310 George A. Buttrick, "Opportunity Fidelity and Reward," The Parables of Jesus, p. 240-251 John Dominic Crossan, The Essential Jesus, p. 72, 156f. John Dominic Crossan, "Parables of Action," In Parables, p. 100-103 Richard Q. Ford, "Body Language," Interpretation (July 2002), p. 301-303 Joachim Jeremias, "The Talents," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 45 ff. Dag Hammarskjöld, Markings, p. 44 Søren Kierkegaard, Provocations, p. 398 Frederick Moberg, "The Talents," Parables, p. 23-24 Edward Taylor, "Meditation Forty-Nine," Divine Inspiration, p. 280 Elton Trueblood, The Humor of Christ, p. 110-115 Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 70 "Advertisement," The New Yorker (September 2, 2002), p. 155

Matthew 25:14-30

Notes

Eberhard Arnold When he comes he will call them all to account to find whether they have used the powers entrusted to them to do the work in accordance with his will. When he returns he will hold a festive communal table ... uniting all those who were determined and able to administer the earth as he wanted it done and to permeate it with his spirit. Dag Hammarskjöld All men are alike--true in that the difference between those who received many talents and those who received few is presently erased without mercy. But untrue when it is a question of how they employ them: then, there still stands the frontier between life and death, as it has been drawn for all eternity. In the last analysis, however, true there also, because we are, all of us, at all times confronted with the possibility of taking the step across that frontier--in either direction. Søren Kierkegaard The servant in the gospel who hid his talent in the earth was wise and farsighted. Yet his master rejected him. Imagine a different scenario where a servant comes and says, "Lord, I wanted so much to gain something from the talent you entrusted me, so I took a risk ­ I suppose too much of a risk, because I have gained nothing and lost my one talent." Now, which servant will find forgiveness? Advertisement Right now, billions of dollars in personal assets are quietly gathering dust. We hate dust. No one can afford to have valuable assets sitting idle. Whether it is a significant amount of company stock, or a personal balance sheet that is not appropriately leveraged, we can help. At UBS, we have the resources to create highly customized liquidity solutions.

Matthew 25:31-46

Greek Cross References:

31-46 31 32 35-36 46 Job 31:16-23 Matthew 16:27; 19:28 Ezekiel 34:17 Ezekiel 34:4 Daniel 12:2

Sermon

General References

Verse References

Matthew 25:31-46

General References

Gayle Boss, "Hungry, Full," Weavings (July/August 2006), p. 6-14 Robert McAfee Brown, Unexpected News, p. 127-141 Frederick Buechner, "The Face in the Sky," The Hungering Dark, p. 14 Walter J.Burghardt, "The Other, the Others, and You," Best Sermons I, p. 193 George A. Buttrick, "The Judgment of the Kingdom," The Parables of Jesus, p. 252-261 Dorothy Day, "Room for Christ," Weavings (September/October 2003), p. 6-10 Emily Dickenson, "II," Collected Works, p. 97 Thom Gunn, "St Martin and the Beggar," Collected Poems, p. 66 f. Joachim Jeremias, "The Last Judgment," Rediscovering the Parables, p. 161 ff. James Weldon Johnson, "The Judgment Day," Imaging the Word, Vol. 3, p. 74 Alison Jolly, Lords and Lemurs, p. 158 f. Jane Kenyon, "Back from the City" & "Apple Dropping into Deep Early Snow," Otherwise, p. 61, 65 Michael Lerner, quoted by Paul Ray and Sherry Anderson in Cultural Creatives, p. 222 John P. Marquand, Jr. Cosmopolis, p. 126 Jurgen Moltmann, The Passion for Life, p. 104 Mother Theresa, Something Beautiful for God, p. 73, 78 f. Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace, p. 315 Henri Nouwen, from "Seeds of Hope," quoted in Daily Dig (September 14) John C. Purdy, "Love's Ring," The Presbyterian Writer (December 1997) Rainer Maria Rilke, "I,55" & "III,18," Book of Hours, p. 87, 141 Edward Schillebeeckx, "A Glass of Water for a Fellow Human Being," God Among Us, p. 59-62 Ronald J. Sider, Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger, p. 66 William Stafford, "If I Could Be Like Wallace Stevens," The Way It Is, p. 206 Vincent Tripi, paperweight for nothing, p. 11 Morris West, A View from the Ridge, p. 23 Michael E. Williams, "Gentle and Humble of Heart," Weavings (May/June 2000), p. 13 Brian Wren, "Here Am I," The Sound of Welcome, p. 3

Matthew 25:31-46

Verse References

31-40 31-33 34-40 34-40 35 40 40 Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 146 A. D. Hope, "A Bidding Grace," Divine Inspiration, p. 348 R. A. K. Mason, "On the Swag," Divine Inspiration, p. 351 Dale Recinella, Plough (July 1995), p. 18-23 Benedict, "ABRIDGED EDITION OF THE RULE OF ST. BENEDICT, 1980," Weavings (January/February 1994), p. 17 Susan L. Nelson, "Facing Evil: Evil' Many Faces," Interpretation (October 2003), p. 407-410 s Jean Vanier, Community and Growth, p. 34

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes

Frederick Buechner, "The Face in the Sky," The Hungering Dark, p. 14 For those who believe in God, it means, this birth, that God himself is never safe from us, and maybe that is the dark side of Christmas, the terror of the silence. He comes in such a way that we can always turn him down, as we could crack the baby's skull like an eggshell or nail him up when he gets too big for that. God comes to us in the hungry man we do not have to feed, comes to us in the lonely man we do not have to comfort, comes to us in all the desperate human need of people everywhere that we are always free to turn our backs upon. Walter J.Burghardt, "The Other, the Others, and You," Best Sermons I, p. 193 The Image of God, the presence of God, in each woman and man--a thrilling thought. The Other comes alive in the other. ... The Christ of Christians tells us that when we feed the hungry and welcome the stranger, when we clothe the naked and visit the sick and shackled, we do it to him. Thom Gunn, "St Martin and the Beggar," Collected Poems, p. 66 f. ... He took his soldier's cloak And cut it in two equal parts With a single stroke. ... Then casually before The table stood the beggar as If he had used the door. John P. Marquand, Jr. Cosmopolis, p. 126 Have you ever seen the old graveyard up there in Stockbridge? In one corner is the family's burial place; it's called Sedgwic Pie. ... In the center Judge Theodore Sedgwic, the first of the Stockbridge Sedgwicks ...is buried under his tombstone a high-rising obelisk, and his wife, Pamela, is beside him ... [All around them] are more modest stones but in layers from generation unto generation are all buried with their heads facing out and their feet pointing toward their ancestor.. The legend is that on Judgment Day, when they arise and face the Judge, they will have to see no one but Sedgwicks. Jurgen Moltmann, The Passion for Life, p. 104 According to this story the coming World Judge is already present in the world, hidden in the hungry, the thirsty, the alien, the naked, the sick, and the imprisoned. And through Jesus this fact becomes open and revealed. One can know it.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, page 2

Jane Kenyon, "Back from the City," Otherwise, p. 61 After three days and nights of rich food and late talk in overheated rooms, of walks between mounds of garbage and human forms bedded down for the night under rags, I come back to my dooryard, to my own wooden step. The last red leaves fall to the ground and frost has blackened the herbs and asters that grew beside the porch. The air is still and cool, and the withered grass lies flat in the field. A nuthatch spirals down the rough trunk of the tree. At the Cloisters I indulged in piety while gazing at a painted lindenwood Pietá-- Mary holding her pierced and desiccated son across her knees; but when a man stepped close under the tasseled awning of the hotel, asking for "a quarter for someone down on his luck," I quickly turned my back. Now I hear tiny bits of bark and moss break off under the bird's beak and claw, and fall onto already-fallen leaves. "Do you love me?" said Christ to his disciple. "Lord, you know that I love you." "Then feed my sheep." "Apple Dropping into Deep Early Snow," p. 65 A jay settled on a branch, making it sway. The one shriveled fruit that remained gave way to the deepening drift below. I happened to see it the moment it fell. Dusk is eager and comes early. A car creeps over the hill. Still in the dark I try to tell if I am numbered with the damned, who cry, outraged, LORD, WHEN DID WE SEE YOU?

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, page 3

John C. Purdy, "Love's Ring," The Presbyterian Writer (December 1997) Rudderless, rootless, bedeviled and lost, ragged, imprisoned and old, Waste-folk upon the poor scrap-pile are tossed, strangers shut out in the cold. "These are my sisters and brothers, friends; and they own a place in Love's ring. You who have reached out to them a kind hand, you have reached out to your King." Rainer Maria Rilke, Book of Hours, "I,55," p. 87 The poets have scattered you. A storm ripped through their stammering. I want to gather you up again in a vessel that makes you glad I wander in your winds and bring back everything I find. The blind man needed you as a cup. The servant concealed you. The homeless one held you out as I passed. You see, I like to look for things.

"III,18," p. 141 You are the poor one, you the destitute. You are the stone that has no resting place. You are the diseased one whom we fear to touch. Only the wind is yours. You are poor like the spring rain that gently caresses the city; like wishes muttered in a prison cell, without a world to hold them; and like the invalid, turning in his bed to ease the pain. Like flowers along the tracks, shuddering as the train roars by, and like the hand that covers our face when we cry--that poor Yours is the suffering of birds on freezing nights, of dogs who go hungry for days. Yours the long sad waiting of animals who are locked up and forgotten. You are the beggar who averts his face, the homeless person who has given up asking; you howl in the storm.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, page 4

William Stafford, "If I Could Be Like Wallace Stevens," The Way It Is, p. 206 "I'd rather know," they say "I'd rather slime along than be heroic." My pride would be to find out; I'd bow to see, play the fool, ask, beg, retreat like a wave-- Morris West, A View from the Ridge, p. 23 "And forgiveness? Who forgives me for what I have done?" "The dead man whom you bury, the sick man whom you succor, the old man whom you support, the homeless one whose loneliness you share." Brian Wren, "Here Am I," The Sound of Welcome, p. 3 Here am I, where underneath the bridges of our cities homeless people sleep. Here am I, where in decaying houses little children shiver, crying at the cold. Where are you? Here am I, with people in the line-up, anxious for a hand-out, aching for a job. Here am I, where pensioners and strikers sing and march together, wanting something new. Where are you? Here am I, where two or three are gathered, ready to be altered sharing wine and bread. Here am I, where those who hear the preaching change there way of living, find the way to life. Where are you? Dale Recinella, Plough (July 1995), p. 18-23 ... every moment I sat with my sick child I sat with Him ... But to fetch drinks for these kids on demand, without resentment, the Lord also had to show me. And then there's a towel-robed, soaking wet nine-year-old waiting in his room for clothes that are still in the dryer ... ... Little Mermaid lunchbox is at home on the kitchen counter ... ... and a boy with red and green hair and two nose rings at the front door to visit my daughter ... and my grounded teenage daughter who needs someone to play Pinocle with ... Benedict, "ABRIDGED EDITION OF THE RULE OF ST. BENEDICT, 1980," Weavings (January/February 1994), p. 17 All guests who present themselves are to be welcomed as Christ for he himself will say: "I was a stranger and you welcomed me." ... Proper honor must be shown to all. ... Once a guest has been announced the superior and the brothers are to meet him with all the courtesy of love. ... All humility should be shown in addressing a guest on arrival and departure. By a bow of the head or by a complete prostration of the body, Christ is to be adored because he is indeed welcomed in them. ... Great care and concern are to be shown in receiving poor people and pilgrims because in them most particularly is Christ received.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, page 5

Robert McAfee Brown, "Jesus Vision: A Task for the Nations," Unexpected News, p. 127-141 Giving food to the hungry or clothing to the naked is not a charitable handout but an exercise in simple justice--restoring to the poor what is rightfully theirs, what has been taken from them unjustly. (p. 134) Emily Dickenson, "Life," Collected Poems, p. 97-98 I bring an unaccustomed wine To lips long parching, next to mine, And summon them to drink. Crackling with feaver, they essay; I turn my brimming eyes away, And come next hour to look. The hands still hug the tardy glass; The lips I would have cooled, alas! Are so superfluous cold, I would as soon attempt to warm The bosoms where the frost has lain Ages beneath the mould. Some other thirsty there may be To whom this would have pointed me Had it remained to speak. And so I always bear the cup If haply, mine may be the drop Some pilgrim thirst to slake,­ If, haply, any say to me, "Unto the little, unto me," When I at last awake.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, page 6

Thomas R. Haney, "The Drawing," Today's Spirituality, p. 146-148 and the little child in the drawing pointing at them and saying, "Jesus, I love you." I wondered, too, what we adults mean when we pray, "Jesus, I love you." You see, Christ, after all, is ever bound to us as Head is to the Body and when we pray to him it's never in isolation but all members are present and our love should overflow the lines and boundaries of all human restrictions

I saw a drawing the other day done by a second grader, splashed in crayon with a multitude of colors which poured with careless joy over lines and boundaries, not yet inhibited by adult rules that so often cramp the creative spirit. It was a drawing of a little child pointing to a crucifix hanging on a boundless wall and underneath were the words scrawled in a rainbow of colors and in an architectural carnival of sizes "Jesus, I love you." I pondered the picture for quite some time and wondered about the way we educate our children. Certainly the drawing had all the validity of any belief we cherish and espouse. And yet I wondered if the teaching that had motivated the drawing did not in some way remove Christ into the past as a solitary historical figure. We continually sing our belief, "He is alove!" But, I wondered, have we internalized this belief -- is he really alive for us Head and Body? Is he alive for us in those he identifies with in any need, small or great? Perhaps the little second grader could also have been encouraged to draw a picture of another child heartbroken and crying and the original child in the drawing pointing to the crying child and saying, "Jesus, I love you." Or maybe a drawing of one of those vague groups of indistinguishable people, tattered and forlorn,

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, p. 7

Ronald J. Sider [Jesus] warned his followers in the strongest possible words that those who do not feed the hungry, clothe the naked and visit the prisoners will experience eternal damnation (Mt. 25:31-46). James Weldon Johnson, "The Judgment Day" And God will divide the sheep from the goats, The one on the right, the other on the left. And to them on the right God's a-going to say: Enter into my kingdom. Up and down the golden street, Feasting on the milk and honey Singing new songs of Zion, Chattering with the angels All around the Great White Throne. ... Alison Jolly ... she might have been a nun. ... But Fenistina was never ambitious, just good. Michael E. Williams One of the striking features of Jesus' parable of the final judgment is the unself-consciousness of both those who are to be rewarded and those who are to be punished. "When did we see you?" they both ask. The righteous expect no special treatment; they served the needs of anyone who came their way. The unrighteous plead that they would have helped if only they had known that they were serving Jesus. The problem faced by the desert monastics was how to maintain this unself-consciousness when they already saw Christ in each person they met. How could they keep self-interest and reward from being their primary motivation for doing good? The solution, they discovered, was to be honest about the self-interest that taints even the most altruistic behavior, then throw themselves on the mercy and grace of God. Once again the answer is humility. Michael Lerner ... the story that all life on earth is truly, breathtakingly, concretely connected right now, and that what we do to the mice of the field and the birds of the forest, we also ultimately do to ourselves and our families right now. ... I do not believe we can hide from this story much longer. It is among the great stories of our time. Kathleen Norris "Hell is other people" is one of Sartre's best-known lines. But we might also find in others a glimpse of heaven, and I believe that this is what the judgment story in Matthew 25 is all about.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, p. 8

Henri Nouwen Our lives as we live them seem like lives that anticipate questions that never will be asked. It seems as if we are getting ourselves ready for the question "How much did you earn during your lifetime?" or "How many friends did you make?" or " ow much progress did you make in your H career?" or "How much influence did you have on people?" or "How many conversions did you make?" Were any of these to be the question Christ will ask when he comes again in glory, many of us could approach the judgment day with great confidence. But nobody is going to hear any of these questions. The question we all are going to face is the question we are least prepared for. It is: "What have you done for the least of mine?" As long as there are strangers; hungry naked, and , sick people; prisoners, refugees, and slaves; people who are handicapped physically, mentally, or emotionally; people without work, a home, or a piece of land, there will be that haunting question from the throne of judgment: "What have you done for the least of mine?" Vincent Tripi Buddhas ... my smile keeps finding them Jean Vanier At the heart of the insecurity of the poor is a presence of Jesus.

Matthew 25:31-46

Notes, p. 8

Mother Theresa, Something Beautiful for God, p. 78 f. When I was hungry, you gave me to eat, When I was thirsty, you gave me to drink, Whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers, that you do unto me. Now enter the house of my Father. When I was homeless, you opened your doors, When I was naked, you gave me your coat, When I was weary, you helped me to find rest, When I was anxious, you calmed all my fears, When I was little, you taught me to read, When I was lonely, you gave me your love, When in a prison, you came to my cell, When on a sick bed, you cared for my needs, In a strange country, you make me at home, Seeking employment, you found me a job, Hurt in a battle, you bound up my wounds, Searching for kindness, you held out your hand, When I was Negro, or Chinese, or White, Mocked and insulted you carried my cross, When I was aged, you bothered to smile, When I was restless, you listened and cared, You saw me covered with spittle and blood, You knew my features, though grimy with sweat, When I was laughed at, you stood my my side, When I was happy, you shared in my joy.

Matthew 25:31-46

Sermon: November 15, 1998

What do the Stained Glass windows in the back of the church say to you? [feed the hungry, clothe the naked, shelter the stranger, visit the prisoner] (very little response) Two ways of reading this passage: 1) If you don't feed, clothe, visit then you will go to hell. (Sider) (Johnson) What's wrong with this? (Jesus forgives us; we are not judged by works) These are theological answers. But why did Jesus talk to us this way if that is what he is trying to say? Jesus doesn't need the disguise of the King and the surprise of the righteous and unrighteous to warn us. 2) Second interpretation focuses on the "King in Hiding" (Mother Theresa) (St. Benedict) Jesus is in the people we welcome The two methods of judgment pose an important question: Are you more concerned with pleasing God or with loving God? If your concern is to love God then you always have plenty of opportunities around you to love. (Mt. 5:6) (Haney) If you drew a picture titled "Jesus I Love You" , who would you draw in it?

Matthew 26

Verses 1-5 Verses 17-25 Verses 36-46

Verses 6-13 Verses 26-30 Verses 47-56 Verses 69-75

Verses 14-16 Verses 31-35 Verses 57-68

Matthew 26:1-5

(Mark 14:1-2; Luke 22:1-2; John 11:45-53) Cross References:

2 Exodus 12:1-27

Matthew 26:6-13

(Mark 14:3-9; John 12:1-8) Cross References:

7 11 Luke 7:37-38 Deuteronomy 15:11

Matthew 26:14-16

(Mark 14:10-11; Luke 22:3-6) Cross References: General References

Funso Avejina, "And So It Came to Pass..." Divine Inspiration, p. 371 Emmanuel Lacaba, "When a Cloud Shades the Sun," Divine Inspiration, p. 372 15 Zechariah 11:12

Matthew 26:17-25

(Mark 14:12-21; Luke 22:7-14, 21-23; John 13:21-30) Cross References: Verse References

17-20 Geraldine Stahl-Pollat and Bruce Chilton, Bible Review (August 1995), p. 45 f. Letter to Editor: Jesus chose not the Passover lamb--that ageless ante-type of himself--but simply the bread of their last meal along with the wine to be the symbol of his sacrifice ... not the offering first offered by blessed Abel, but the one offered by cursed Cain! Response: The fact that circles in dispute over many matters agreed that the Eucharist represented a meal in which Jesus spoke of wine and bread as blood and flesh shows that Jesus himself was the generative moment of eucharistic practice. Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 149 23 Psalm 41:9

21

Matthew 26:26-30

(Mark 14:22-26; Luke 22:15-20; 1 Corinthians 11:23-25) Greek Cross References: General References

Carlo Carretto, Love is for Living, p. 120-125 Bruce Chilton, "The Eucharist: Exploring its Origins," Bible Review (December 1994), p. 37-49 [Jesus is replacing the temple sacrifice with common bread and wine.] John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 365 f. Michael Dorris, "Nehemiah and Matthew," Communion, p. 343-356 Ronald S. James, "Communion and the Coming Kingdom," Weavings (January/February 1987) Bernhard Lang, "The Eucharist: A Sacrificial Formula Preserved," Bible Review (December 1994), p. 37-49 [Jesus is replacing the temple sacrifice with common bread and wine.] Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 172-175 28 Exodus 24:8; Jeremiah 31:31-34

Verse References

28 Newsletter Newsletter, "Scripture Art: New Testament"

Matthew 26:26-30

Notes

Scripture Art: New Testament

Matthew 26:31-35

(Mark 14:27-31; Luke 22:31-34; John 13:36-38) Greek Cross References:

31 32 Zechariah 13:7 Matthew 28:16

Matthew 26:36-46

(Mark 14:32-42; Luke 22:39-46) Greek Cross References: General References

H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 70 f. 41 Matthew 6:13; Luke 11:4

Verse References

38 39-42 39-42 39 41 Communication Resources, Sca5, "Maundy" Dietrich Bonhoeffer, "Discipleship and the Cross," The Cost of Discipleship, p. 95-104 H. E. Fosdick, The Meaning of Prayer, p. 184 f. Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 162 Robert C. Morris, "Paradoxical Security," Weavings (September/October 2006), p. 16-17

Matthew 26:36-46

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca5, "Maundy"

Matthew 26:47-56

(Mark 14:43-50; Luke 22:47-53; John 18:3-12) Cross References: General References

Judy Yates Siker, "Between Text and Sermon," Interpretation (October 2005), p. 386-89 55 Luke 19:47, 21:37

Verse References

52 Bruce D. Chilton, A Galilean Rabbi and His Bible, p. 98-101

Matthew 26:57-68

(Mark 14:53-65; Luke 22:54-55, 63-71; John 18:13-14, 19-24) Cross References:

61 64 65-66 67 John 2:19 Daniel 7:13 Leviticus 24:16 Isaiah 50:6

General References

Sarah N. Cleghorn, "Comrade Jesus," Divine Inspiration, p. 426 Jack Mapanje, "The Tale of a Dzeleka Prison Hard-Core Hero," Divine Inspiration, p. 428 Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16

General References

67 Jacques Roumain, "New Negro Sermon," Divine Inspiration, p. 431

Matthew 26:69-75

(Mark 14:66-72; Luke 22:56-62; John 18:15-18, 25-27) General References

Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16

Matthew 27

General References

[verses 11-34] Frank Matera, "Expository Article," Interpretation (January 1984), p. 55-59

Verses 1-2 Verses 15-26 Verses 45-56

Verses 3-10 Verses 27-31 Verses 57-61

Verses 11-14 Verses 32-44 Verses 62-66

Matthew 27:1-2

(Mark 15:1; Luke 23:1-2; John 18:28-32) General References

Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16

Matthew 27:3-10

(Acts 1:18-19) Cross References: General References

Turner Cassity, "Carpenters," Odd Angles of Heaven, p. 41 Judas who sops their silver his accuser errs To blame the unrewarded. They guard the branch he hangs from. Guilt occurs Where it can be afforded. Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16 9-10 Zechariah 11:12-13

Matthew 27:11-14

(Mark 15:2-5; Luke 23:3-5; John 18:33-38) General References

Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 45 Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16

Verse References

11 Henri Nouwen, Lifesigns, p. 18 f. A careful look at the gospels shows that Jesus seldom accepted the questions posed to him. He exposed them as coming from the house of fear. [list of questions including this verse] To none of these questions did Jesus give a direct answer. He gently put them aside as questions emerging from false worries. They were raised out of concern for prestige, influence, power, and control. They did not belong to the house of God. Therefore Jesus always transformed the question by his answer. He made the question new--and only then worthy of his response.

Matthew 27:15-26

(Mark 15:6-15; Luke 23:13-25; John 18:39-40, 19:1-16) Cross References: General References

Frederick Buechner, "Pilate," Peculiar Treasures, p. 137-139 John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed, Excavating Jesus, p. 265-267 Glen Charles Knecht, "The Principle of Substitution," Best Sermons 2, p. 143-153 Frank Matera, "The Trial of Jesus," Interpretation (January 1991), p. 5-16 24 Deuteronomy 21:6-9

Verse References

19 Thomas Merton, "Aubade--Harlem," Selected Poetry, p. 32

Matthew 27:15-26

Notes

John Dominic Crossan and Jonathan L. Reed Across those texts [Mark 15:6-8, Luke 23:13-18, John 18:38-40], across those levels of the third layer from Mark through John, there is a steady escalation. It moves, first, from "crowd" to "crowds" to "all the people" to "the Jews." It moves, second, from an understandable situation, in which they come to get Barabbas released and are therefore against any Pilate-proposed release of Jesus, to an ununderstandable one, in which they are against Jesus and therefore for the release of Barabbas. (p. 266)

Matthew 27:27-31

(Mark 15:16-20; John 19:2-3)

Matthew 27:32-44

(Mark 15:21-32; Luke 23:26-43; John 19:17-27) Cross References:

34 35 39 40 43 Psalm 69:21 Psalm 22:18 Psalm 22:7, 109:25 Matthew 26:61; John 2:19 Psalm 22:8

Verse References

33-37 33-37 33-37 33-37 33-37 33-37 38 38 Dante Alighieri, from the Divine Comedy, Divine Inspiration, p. 458 Fazil Hüsnü Daglarca, "Christ," Divine Inspiration, p. 456 Miguel de Guevara, "To Crucify the Son," Divine Inspiration, p. 452 Elizabeth Jennings, "Friday," Divine Inspiration, p. 455 Aileen Kelly, "Wonders Will Never Cease," Divine Inspiration, p. 454 Vladimir Lvov, "That Yellowed Body," Divine Inspiration, p. 453 Rubén Darío, "Knight," Divine Inspiration, p. 461 Wole Soyinka, "The Dreamer," Divine Inspiration, p. 462

Matthew 27:45-56

(Mark 15:33-41; Luke 23:44-49; John 19:28-30) Cross References:

46 48 51-54 51 55-56 Psalm 22:1 Psalm 69:21 Zechariah 14:4-5 Exodus 26:31-33 Luke 8:2-3

Verse References

51 51 51 52-53 54 James Keir Baxter, "Song for Holy Saturday," Divine Inspiration, p. 495 Hildegard of Bingen, "Antiphon for the Redeemer," Divine Inspiration, p. 494 Jabra Ibrahim Jabra, "A Stranger at the Fountain," Divine Inspiration, p. 496 John Dominic Crossan, The Historical Jesus, p. 388 f. Communication Resources, Sca7, "Cnturion"

Matthew 27:45-56

Notes

Communication Resources, Sca7, "Cnturion"

Matthew 27:57-61

(Mark 15:42-47; Luke 23:50-56; John 19:38-42) General References

Badr Shakir Al-Sayyab, "The Messiah after the Crucifixion," Divine Inspiration, p. 505 Charles Péguy, "God Speaks: Night, You are Holy," Divine Inspiration, p. 502

Verse References

59-60 Malcolm Muggeridge, Jesus: The Man Who Lives, p. 187

Matthew 27:62-66

Cross References: General References

Frederick Buechner, "The End of Life," The Magnificent Defeat, p. 74-81 Hans-Ruedi Weber, "Go Quickly and Tell!," Experiments with Bible Study, p. 204 Imaging the Word, Vol. 1, p. 187 63 Matthew 16:21, 17:23, 20:19

Matthew 28

General References

John Michael Talbot, "He Is Risen," Hans-Ruedi Weber, "Go Quickly and Tell!," Experiments with Bible Study, p. 204-211

Verses 1-10

Verses 11-15

Verses 16-20

Matthew 28:1-10

(Mark 16:1-8; Luke 24:1-12; John 20:1-10) Greek Cross References: General References

Percy C. Ainsworth, "Fear and Joy," Weavings (March/April 1999), p. 11-18 Cynthia Jarvis, "Expository Article," Interpretation (January 1988), p. 63-68 Paul Minear, "Expository Article," Interpretation (January 1984), p. 59-63 Dorothy Jean Weaver, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 398-402 Hans-Ruedi Weber, "Come and See!" Experiments with Bible Study, p. 197-203 Gillian Wegener, "Another Apocalyptic Sign," The Opposite of Clairvoyance, p. 69 7-10 Exodus 15:20-21 [Miriam]

Verse References

5-7 6 6 7 7 8-10 Imaging the Word, Vol. 2, p. 182-185 Communication Resources, Sca2004, "Risen12" Cover Art, "New Testament" Cover Art, "New Testament" Communication Resources, Sca6, "Risen1" Filippo Pananti, "Epigram VII," Divine Inspiration, p. 541

Matthew 28:1-10

Notes

Hans-Ruedi Weber The resurrection brings new space and new movement into our lives. In face, all the evangelists make an intimate link between Christ's resurrection and our participation. (p. 204) Percy C. Ainsworth The lesson of the graveyard has always been held to be the brevity of life. But the lesson of the grave in Joseph's garden--the empty grave by which we are standing this morning--is the brevity of death. Here we come to see that death is not a state--it is an event. It is something that happens in our life. (p. 18) Gillian Wegener, "Another Apocalyptic Sign" The sign reads Jesus Is Coming Quickly and I imagine Jesus coming on the run down the main street at rush hour. He's never learned to drive, so there he is with his robes flapping behind him, his feet beating the hot pavement, unsandaled and wounded. He wears no watch, but has somewhere to be and is already later than he'd like. See that little furrow of worry between his eyes? Drivers don't know what to make of him. He doesn't bother with sidewalks or bike paths, so there is some swerving in and out of traffic. Brake lights slam and flash. Someone honks. Most folks think he's jus another crazy, but they'll realize their mistake soon enough. After all, there must be a reason Jesus is coming quickly to this town, at this moment, charging across the intersection even before the light turns green.

Matthew 28:1-10

Notes

Sca2004, "Risen12"

Matthew 28:1-10

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament Cover Art: New Testament

Communication Resources, Sca6, "Risen1"

Matthew 28:11-15

Greek General References

Edwin Markham, "A Guard of the Sepulcher," Divine Inspiration, p. 543 Tákis Papatsónis, "In the Key of Resurrection," Divine Inspiration, p. 545

Matthew 28:16-20

(Mark 16:14-18; Luke 24:36-49; John 20:19-23; Acts 1:6-8) Greek Cross References:

16 17 18-20 18 19 20 20 Matthew 26:32; Mark 14:28 Matthew 14:33 Ezekiel 37:24-28 Psalm 93:1-2 John 4:1 Psalm 103:18; Ezekiel 36:27, 37:26-28, 48:35 Matthew 1:23, 7:24-25, 11:2; John 14:16

General References

Verse References

Matthew 28:16-20

General References

Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Ethics, p. 292-301, (used in sermon on 11/23/86) Cynthia M. Campbell, "Expository Article," Interpretation (October 1992), p. 402-405 [theological discussion of the Trinity] Thomas R. Haney, Today's Spirituality, p. 119 George R. Hunsberger, "Is There Biblical Warrant for Evangelism?," Interpretation (April 1994), p. 131-144 Donald Senior, Biblical Foundations for Mission, p. 251 Robert Smith, "Matthew's Message for Insiders," Interpretation (July 1992), p. 235-237 Samuel Terrien, "The Commission of the Eleven," The Elusive Presence, p. 429

Verse References

Matthew 28:16-20

Verse References

18-20 18-20 19 19 20 20 20 20 In Sou Jung, "Making Disciples," Evangelism Sunday Resources, 1996, p. 18-29 Sami Jerjous Said, "The Greatest Delegation," Evangelism Sunday Resources, 1996, p. 18-29 Cover Art: New Testament Scripture Art: New Testament Christoph Blumhardt, Thy Kingdom Come, p. 181 W. Graham Hardy, "Advent Has Three Tenses," Best Sermons 2, p. 189-195 Adrienne Rich, "Letters to a Young Poet," Midnight Salvage, p. 27 Rainer Maria Rilke, "I,53," Book of Hours, p. 86

Matthew 28:16-20

Notes

George R. Hunsberger The first problem has to do with the way we tend to use the great commission as a rationale for evangelism. We appeal to it within a structure of thought oriented toward command and obedience. (p. 132) ... a search for warrant opens a new way for grounding evangelism in the whole fabric of the New Testament, not just in a few command giving passages. (p. 137) Christoph Blumhardt The Savior's being with us has reference to the end of the world, not to its continuance. All the days of the disciples of Jesus are workdays looking forward to the consummation of the kingdom of God, with which event the present futile world will come to an end. Adrienne Rich Look: with all my fear I'm here with you, trying what it means, to stand fast; what it means to move Rainer Maria Rilke And God said to me, Go forth: For I am king of time. But to you I am only the shadowy one who knows with you your loneliness and sees through your eyes. He sees through my eyes in all the ages.

Matthew 28:16-20

Notes

Cover Art: New Testament

Scripture Art: New Testament

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