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Catalogue of

Skilled Trades

Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Table of Contents

Introduction

What is Apprenticeship? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Apprenticeship Program in Ontario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 T.Q.A.A. Trades list A.C.A. Trades list Choosing a Career

(Trades Qualification & Apprenticeship Act)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

(Apprenticeship & Certification Act) (High School Students Only)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Which Trade Should I Consider? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Interests & Skills Inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Construction

Brick and Stone Mason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Cement (Concrete) Finisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Cement Mason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Construction Boilermaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Construction Millwright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Drywall, Acoustic and Lathing Applicator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Drywall Finisher and Plasterer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Electrician: Construction & Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Electrician: Domestic & Rural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Floor Covering Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 General Carpenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Glazier and Metal Mechanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator, Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator,

Branch 1 Branch 2

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Hoisting Engineer: Tower Crane Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Ironworker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Lineworker: Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Lineworker: Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Painter and Decorator

Branch 1 ­ Commercial & Residential

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Plumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Roofer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Sheet Metal Worker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Steamfitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Industrial

Aircraft Maintenance Engineer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Draftsperson ­ Mechanical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Draftsperson ­ Plastic Mould Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Draftsperson ­ Tool & Die . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 General Machinist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Industrial Electrician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Industrial Mechanic Millwright . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Industrial Wood Worker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Locksmith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Machine Tool Builder & Integrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Mould Maker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Tool/Tooling Maker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Welder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Welding Machine Operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111

Motive

Alignment and Brakes Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Auto Body & Collision Damage Repairer, Auto Body Repairer,

Branch 2 Branch 1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

Automotive Painter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Automotive Service Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Farm Equipment Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Fuel & Electrical Systems Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Motorcycle Mechanic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Partsperson

(Automotive)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131

Small Engine Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Transmission Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Truck & Coach Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Truck Trailer Service Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139

Table of Contents Continued

Service

Agriculture ­ Fruit Grower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Appliance Service Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Arborist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Baker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Baker ­ Patissier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Child and Youth Worker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Cook ­ Assistant,

Branch 1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

Cook, Branch 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Early Childhood Educator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Electronic Service Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Hairstylist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Horse Groom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Horticultural Technician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Horticulturist Landscaper-Greenskeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165

Acknowledgments

Individual Trade Information: Salaries/Wages information provided by: Research and Writing: Copyright NOC - National Occupational Classification http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml Human Resources and Skills Canada www.labourmarketinformation.ca Alyson Nyiri, WWTAB The Waterloo Wellington Training and Adjustment Board (WWTAB), 2004. 180 Shearson Crescent, Unit 4, Cambridge, Ontario, N1T 1P4 Tel: 1 519 622-7122; Fax: 1 519 622-7260; E-mail: [email protected]

WWTAB is funded by HRSD and MTCU.

INTRODUCTION

Apprenticeship

What is Apprenticeship?

Apprenticeship is a means of acquiring skills for trades and other occupations through workplace-based apprenticeship programs. An Apprentice, as defined by the Apprenticeship and Certification Act, 1998, is an individual who has entered into a registered training agreement under which the individual is to receive workplace-based training in a trade, other occupation or skill set as part of any apprenticeship program approved by the Director of Apprenticeship. In other words, an apprenticeship provides you with the opportunity to get hands-on training in while you complete your schooling. You will spend about 90% of your apprenticeship in on-the-job-training under the supervision of a licensed journeyperson. The remaining 10% will be spent in classroom instruction offered by various colleges and other approved training organizations. When you have completed the terms of your apprenticeship agreement a written exam may be required, depending on the trade. Upon achieving a passing grade, the apprentice will be granted a Certificate of Qualification for the Province of Ontario (where applicable). Some trades are also part of the Red Seal Program allowing journeypersons to practice their trade in various provinces across Canada. (see http://www.red-seal.ca for complete listing of Red Seal Trades)

How Long Does Apprenticeship Take?

Depending on the trade, and on the student's background at the time of registration, an apprenticeship may last from two to five years. Each trade has a provincial standard that must be achieved in terms of skills, knowledge, and other criteria such as good work habits and punctuality, referred to as the "competencies". When the sponsor / employer and the Training Consultant feel that the apprentice has met the benchmark hours, passed the required schooling, and successfully achieved the competencies, an arrangement may be made to write the provincial qualifying exam, where required.

How Do I Get An Apprenticeship?

The purpose of this Catalogue is to provide information about entering an apprenticeship from high school (Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program, OYAP and Co-op), college or from work. To become an apprentice, you must find an employer who is willing to train you. Finding an employer willing to take on an apprentice takes hard work and persistence. Some employers do not advertise these positions and it will be up to you to contact a number of employers directly. For tips on how to prepare, visit the Skilled Trades web site and review the Steps to an Apprenticeship tip sheet at: http://skilledtrades.ca/html/job_seeker/st_job_seeker_steps.shtml Once an employer has accepted you for an apprenticeship, you or the employer must contact the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities to follow the steps required by the Ministry. The Apprenticeship Branch of the Ministry for the Waterloo Region and Wellington County can be contacted at 1-519-571-6009 and 1-800-265-6180 respectively.

5

Helpful Internet Resources

www.wwtab.com The Waterloo Wellington Training and Adjustment Board (WWTAB) is one of 21 local boards across Ontario which are independent not-for-profit organizations sponsored jointly by Human Resources & Skills Development and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. WWTAB works closely with secondary and post secondary institutions, as well as community agencies, private trainers, equity groups and employers to ensure that any employment/training issues which are identified are conveyed to both community and government to develop actions to resolve these issues at a local level. This catalogue is on the web site and can be accessed under "Skilled Trades". You will also find the Inventory of Programs and Services, an online library database, and WWTAB publications on labour market information. www.apprenticesearch.com Funded by Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and administered by Skills Canada ­ Ontario for the communities of: Cambridge, Elmira, Elora, Fergus, Guelph, Kitchener, Listowel, Mitchell, St. Jacob's, St. Mary's, Stratford and Waterloo. Apprenticesearch.com is a FREE on-line service that connects apprentices and employers. Apprentices are welcome to: · Register on-line · Post a personal skills profile · Initiate a live search for suitable job / training opportunities Employers can: · Register on-line · Post a vacancy (or vacancies) · Initiate a live search for suitable apprentices More Information: Contact Amy Ross at Skills Canada ­ Ontario via e-mail [email protected] or phone 519-749-9899 ext. 221. www.careermatterstvo.org CareerMATTERS is a part of the Independent Learning Centre site created by TV Ontario. On this site you will find: the entire Ontario English high school curriculum and a Student Planner that helps you track your progress toward your diploma, highlights of apprenticeship training, college, university and other post-secondary programs, 513 job descriptions, many with videos featuring real people out in the workforce, hundreds of links to outside resources, and an assessment quiz to help you recognize your talents and strengths. www.labourmarketinformation.ca Here you can search specific occupations by location. Detailed information, including wages, about each trade is available for the Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Guelph, Stratford and Listowel areas. www.skilledtrades.ca A comprehensive site where employers, job seekers, and educators can access information about skilled trades. Helpful information about specific trades, highlighting a new trade each week.

6

INTRODUCTION

http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml National Occupation Classification System. Here you will find all occupations in Canada classified by a specific numerical code with information about the competencies required for each occupation. www.jobfutures.ca (National) Many of the occupations from the NOC are analyzed with specific information about each occupation's job description, nature of work, main duties, related occupations, wages and salaries and employment prospects across Canada for the next 5 years. http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp Ontario Job Futures contains much of the same information as the national site but the employment prospects are keyed to Ontario. http://www.tradeability.ca Developed by Durham Region, this site is billed as that Region's "single point of access for information on the skilled trades." A comprehensive site with a skilled trades guide, speakers, bureaus and numerous links to resources. http://www.apprenticetrades.ca Put together by the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum, this site boasts a comprehensive inventory of information on apprenticeship across Canada.

Ontario's Apprenticeship Program

In Ontario, apprenticeship training and trade certification is legislated. Until January 2000, one legislation applied to all trades ­ the Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act (TQAA) 1964. In 1998 the Ontario government began reforms to the apprenticeship system. These reforms resulted in new legislation ­ the Apprenticeship and Certification Act (ACA) 1998. The new ACA legislation came into effect in January 2000 and applies to the Service, Motive Power, and Industrial sectors. The ACA represents 103 trades. The TQAA is still in effect and it continues to apply to all the construction trades, of which there are 32. Before we outline the specific differences between the TQAA and ACA trades, let's have a look at all 135 trades. In the table below, you will find a listing of all of the trades covered by the TQAA and the ACA. Beside each trade name, you will find an assigned NOC code and the Sector to which it belongs. With the NOC code you can visit the web sites mentioned above, plug in the specific number and pull up a detailed description of the trade. The Sector code tells you which area the trade belongs ­ C = Construction Sector, I = Industrial Sector, M = Motive Power Sector, and S = Service Sector. This is helpful because this Catalogue is broken down into those 4 sectors, allowing you to quickly flip to the relevant pages. In addition, you will see a column indicating whether the trade is C/V Compulsory or Voluntary (TQAA) or R/U Restricted or Unrestricted (ACA). See following pages for more information.

7

TQAA and Apprenticeship Act Trades Qualification

Important Point

While the TQAA and ACA lists are all-inclusive, this Catalogue provides detailed analysis of those trades in which there are registered apprentices in Waterloo Region and Wellington County. The number of journeypersons within each trade is not covered in this publication.

TRADE Brick and Stone Mason Cement (Concrete) Finisher Cement Mason Construction Boilermaker Construction Millwright Drywall, Acoustic and Lathing Applicator Drywall Finisher and Plasterer

NOC 7281 7282 7282 7262 7311 7284 7284 7241 7241 7295 7271 7292 7293 7371 7371 7371 7264 7244 7244 7294 7294 7251

SECTOR C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C

C/V V V V V V V V C C V V V V C C C V V V V V C V V C V V V C V C V

T.Q.A.A. Apprenticeships

In both the Compulsory Certified Trades and in Voluntary Certified Trades students may start Co-op without signing into apprenticeship and the employer does not have to pay the student during school hours. Students must be paid for any after- school hours. Co-op students may be paid while on the job, however, once they sign into the apprenticeship program they must be paid. They also receive Co-op credits towards their high school graduation diploma. (O.S.S.D.) Co-op students are monitored by their Co-op teacher and the employer and those in the apprenticeship program are also monitored by a Training Consultant.

Electrician: Construction & Maintenance Electrician: Domestic & Rural Floor Covering Installer General Carpenter Glazier and Metal Mechanic Heat and Frost Insulator Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator, Branch 1 Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator, Branch 2 Hoisting Engineer: Tower Crane Operator Ironworker Lineworker: Construction Lineworker: Power Painter and Decorator Branch 1 ­ Commercial & Residential Painter and Decorator Branch 2 ­ Industrial Painter & Decorator Plumber Precast Concrete Erector Precast Concrete Finisher Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic Reinforcing Rodworker Restoration Mason Roofer Sheet Metal Worker Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installer Steamfitter Terrazzo, Tile and Marble Setter

7282 7313 7264 7281 7291 7261 7252 7252 7283

C C C C C C C C C

8

INTRODUCTION

ACA and Certification Act Apprenticeship

TRADE Aboriginal Early Childhood Educator Agriculture ­ Dairy Herdsperson Agriculture ­ Fruit Grower Agriculture ­ Swine Herdsperson Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Alignment and Brakes Technician Appliance Service Technician Arborist Auto Body & Collision Damage Repairer, Branch 1 Auto Body Repairer, Branch 2 Automotive Glass Technician Automotive Electronic Accessory Technician Automotive Painter Automotive Service Technician Baker Baker ­ Patissier Bearings Mechanic Blacksmith Cabinetmaker Carperson (Railway) Child and Youth Worker Composite Structures Technician Construction Craft Worker Cook ­ Assistant, Branch 1 Cook, Branch 2 Draftsperson ­ Mechanical Draftsperson ­ Plastic Mould Design Draftsperson ­ Tool & Die Early Childhood Educator Early Childhood Educator ­ Inclusion Practices Educational Assistant Electric Motor Rewind Mechanic Electrical Control (Machine) Builder Electrician-Power house Operator (TTC) Electrician (Signal Maintenance) (TTC) NOC 4214 8253 8251 8253 7315 7315 7332 2225 7322 7322 7321 7321 7322 7321 6252 6252 7321 7266 7272 7314 4212 7315 7611 6242 6242 2253 2253 2253 4214 4214 4214 7333 9485 9485 9485 SECTOR S S S S I M S S M M M M M M S S I I I I S I C S S I I I S S S I I I I U/R U U U U U R U U R R U R U R U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U

Employers may, but do not have to, pay students on Co-op even if they are signed into the apprenticeship program. One exception to that is the hairstylist, where the apprentice must receive some form of remuneration. Students must be paid for any work done during afterschool hours. Co-op students are monitored by their Co-op teacher and the employer. Once signed into apprenticeship program, they are also monitored by the Training Consultant.

A.C.A. Apprenticeships

In Restricted Certified Trades Co-op students, who are not signed apprentices, may be assigned only certain tasks. "Restricted skills" specified by the M.T.C.U. may only be performed by registered apprentices or licensed journeypersons. Students do not have to be signed into apprenticeship to work in Co-op placements in either Restricted or Non-restricted Certified Trades.

9

ACA continued Apprenticeship and Certification Act

What is the Difference Between TQAA & ACA?

Because the TQAA and ACA are different pieces of legislation, each has specific terminology and models of training. The ACA emphasizes the completion of skill sets as prescribed by industry representatives of the particular trades. Accordingly, this new legislation is viewed as a competency-based model. By comparison the TQAA legislation is viewed as a time-based model.

TRADE Electronic Service Technician Elevating Devices Mechanic Facilities Mechanic Facilities Technician Farm Equipment Technician Fitter ­ Assembler (Motor Assembly) Fitter (Structural Steel/Plateworker) Fitter Welder Fuel & Electrical Systems Technician Gemsetter/Goldsmith General Machinist Hairstylist Heavy Duty Equipment Technician Heavy Equipment Operator: Dozer Heavy Equipment Operator: Excavator Heavy Equipment Operator: Tractor Loader Backhoe Horse Groom Horse Harness Maker Horticultural Technician Hydraulic/Pneumatic Mechanic Industrial Electrician Industrial Instrument Mechanic Industrial Mechanic Millwright Info. Tech. Support Analyst: Hardware Info. Tech Support Analyst: Help Desk Info. Tech Support Analyst: Network Locksmith Machine Tool Builder & Integrator Marine Engine Mechanic Micro Electronics Manufacturer Motive Power Machinist Motorcycle Mechanic Mould or Die Finisher Mould Maker

NOC 2242 7318 TBD TBD 7312 9486 7263 7263 7321 7344 7231 6271 7312 7421 7421 7421 8253 9452 2225 7312 7242 2243 7311 2282 2282 2282 7383 7316 7335 9483 7231 7334 7232 7232

SECTOR S I I I M I I I M S I S M C C C S S S I I I I S S S I I M S M M I I

U/R U U U U U U U U R U U R U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U R U U

10

INTRODUCTION

TRADE Native Clothing & Crafts Artisan Native Residential Construction Worker Network Cabling Specialist Optics Technician (Lens and Prism Maker) Packaging Machine Mechanic Partsperson Pattern Maker Pool & Hot Tub/Spa Service Technician Pool & Hot Tub/Spa Installer Powered Lift Truck Technician Precision Metal Fabricator Process Operator: Refinery, Chemical & Liquid Processes Pump Systems Installer Recreation Vehicle Technician Retail Meat Cutter Roll Grinder/Turner Saddlery Saw Filer/Fitter Ski Lift Mechanic Small Engine Technician Special Events Coordinator Surface Blaster Surface Mount Assembler Tire Wheel and Rim Mechanic Tool & Cutter Grinder Tool & Die Maker Tool & Gauge Inspector Tool/Tooling Maker Transmission Technician Truck & Coach Technician Truck Trailer Service Technician Water Well Driller Welder Wooden Boat Rebuilder/Repairer

NOC 7342 7611 7245 3414 7311 1472 7232 7441 7441 7334 7261 9232 7311 7383 6251 9511 9452 7383 7311 7335

SECTOR S C S I I S I S S M I I I M S I S I I M S

U/R U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U R R R U U U

7372 9483 7321 9511 7232 7231 7232 7321 7321 7321 7373 7265 7271

I I M I I I I M M M I I S

11

What & ACA? Difference is the Between TQAA

Because the TQAA and ACA are different pieces of legislation, each has specific terminology and models of training. The ACA emphasizes the completion of skill sets as prescribed by industry representatives of the particular trades. Accordingly, this new legislation is viewed as a competency-based model. By comparison the TQAA legislation is viewed as a time-based model.

Competency­based Model (ACA)

· · · · · · · · · · · · Governed by the Apprenticeship and Certification Act (ACA) since January 2000 Applies to all Industrial, Motive Power, and Service Trades Policies & Guidelines for specific trades or groups of trades are under review/development Apprenticeship contract is called a Training Agreement Sponsor refers to the trainer, who may or may not be the apprentice's employer Minimum age of 16 Completion of academic &training standards as outlined by affiliated Industry Committees Grade 12 minimum if no standard prescribed

Time-based Model (TQAA)

Governed by the Trades Qualification and Apprenticeship Act (TQAA) 1964 Applies to all Construction Trades Apprenticeship contract is called Contract of Apprenticeship Employer refers to the company who has entered into a contract of apprenticeship and has agreed to provide wages and training by a qualified trainer · Minimum age of 16

Are There Differences in Trade Designations?

In the trade listings table above, there is a column indicating whether the trade is Compulsory / Voluntary under the TQAA legislation and whether it is Restricted / Unrestricted under the ACA legislation. Compulsory Trades under the TQAA apply to those construction trades where only registered apprentices or licensed (certified) journeypersons may practice in that trade. Of the 32 trades under this legislation compulsory trades include: · · · · · Electrician (Construction & Maintenance and Domestic & Rural) Hoisting Engineer (Mobile Crane Operator, Branch 1&2, Tower Crane Operator) Plumber Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Mechanic Sheet Metal Worker

The remaining trades are Voluntary, meaning they do not require being a registered apprentice or licensed journeyperson in order to practice. Restricted Trades under the ACA, similar to the Compulsory Trades under the TQAA, refer to specific trades where only registered apprentices or licensed (certified) journeypersons may practice. Restricted trades include: · · · · · · · · · · · · Alignment & Brakes Technician Auto Body & Collision Damage Repairer, Branch 1 Auto Body Repairer, Branch 2 Automotive Electronic Accessory Technician Automotive Service Technician Fuel & Electrical Systems Technician Hairstylist Motorcycle Mechanic Transmission Technician Truck & Coach Technician Truck-Trailer Service Technician Water Meter Installer

12

INTRODUCTION

The remaining trades are Non-Restricted, meaning they do not require being a registered apprentice or licensed journeyperson in order to practice.

What Certificates are Issued?

Certificates Issued at the Completion of Apprenticeship Training include:

Certificate of Apprenticeship (College Diploma)

· Indicates that apprentice has successfully completed the in-school and on-the-job requirements · Under the ACA trades, it is issued when the above requirements are met · Under the TQAA trades, it is issued when the above requirements are met and the apprentice has passed the Government written exam

Certificate of Qualification

· Indicates that an apprentice has passed the Government exam (where applicable) · Under ACA and TQAA trades, it is issued when the exam is passed · This certificate is awarded for trades where no exam is indicated TQAA - High school OYAP/Co-op students, working in these trades during school hours, do not have to be signed as apprentices. Students working outside of school hours must be signed as apprentices. ACA - High School OYAP/Co-op students working in these trades during school hours do not have to be registered as apprentices but they can perform only certain specified skills. Students working outside of the school hours must be signed as apprentices.

T.Q.A.A. Apprenticeships

Apprentice must: · · · · · · Complete required number of on-the-job hours of training Receive endorsement of competency from the employer Complete in-school training, at a college or other training delivery agent Be minimum of 16 years old Have completed Grade 10 or equivalent, most employers want Grade 12 graduates Successfully complete a prescribed program monitored by the employer and an Apprenticeship Training Consultant · Pass the Certificate of Qualification exam

A.C.A. Apprenticeships

Apprentice must: · Complete required benchmark number of hours and all the competencies listed in the Apprentice Training Standards book, as part of the on- the-job training · Receive endorsement of competency from the employer · Complete in-school training · Be minimum 16 years old · Have completed Grade 12 or equivalent · Successfully complete a prescribed program monitored by the employer and an apprenticeship Training Consultant · Pass the Certificate of Qualification exam if required

13

Choosing A Career

High School Students

It is not too early to begin the process of choosing and preparing for the world of work while still in high school. In fact, the sooner you start planning the closer you will be to a rewarding career. Some people like to write, others like to speak, and still others like to create, build, repair and design. Your high school Guidance Counsellor can provide you with interest and skills inventories and questionnaires that can help you to identify your strengths and confirm your likes and interests. Experiencing a particular type of work first hand will allow you to explore specific occupations and determine which kind of trade you might enjoy. Cooperative Education (Co-op) provides such a first hand experience. If you enjoy the work in your Co-op placement, you may begin your career preparation by selecting an appropriate college or university program, or you may begin an apprenticeship program while still attending high school.

What is OYAP?

OYAP is the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program. Secondary Students who participate in this program may obtain apprenticeship hours and skills while at the same time earning credits towards an Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

How does it work?

This program is designed for students in Grades 11 and 12 but students in Grades 9 and 10 can begin the process by selecting recommended courses. To maximize the benefits of the program, students who are interested in OYAP should begin by taking Cooperative Education during their Grade 11/12 year.

Who qualifies?

Students, attending secondary school full-time, who are 16 years of age and who have completed the credit requirements for Grade 10 (or equivalent) may begin an OYAP program.

Who is an OYAP Student?

The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities defines an OYAP Student as a student who is taking Co-op placement in an apprenticeable trade.

Safety

As part of their in-school orientation, students must receive health and safety awareness instruction. It is the responsibility of the Co-op teacher and the Apprenticeship Training Consultant to ensure that students/apprentices are working in a safe and healthy environment. If there is any question of student safety or health risk, students must be removed from that workplace. It is the legal responsibility of employers in Ontario to provide a safe and healthy environment for all their employees and all reasonable precautions must be taken to protect workers from any harm. In addition, all employees, including OYAP students, must receive adequate workplace safety and hazardous materials training.

14

INTRODUCTION

Workplace Safety Insurance Board

Most employers are required by the Workplace Safety Insurance Board (WSIB) to pay premiums to the Board for coverage of their employees. It is the Board that compensates workers injured on the job. The Board provides compensation, medical aid, rehabilitation, and pensions depending on the needs of the injured workers. Since students participating in Co-op programs are involved in an educational program, school boards must ensure that all students in these programs are covered by the Workplace Safety Insurance Board. Until students receive an hourly wage by the employer, they are considered employees of the Ministry of Education who is responsible for paying the WSIB premiums. An honorarium is not considered a wage. Once students receive an hourly wage in OYAP, the employer must provide the coverage.

Where Can Students Find More Information & Guidance?

· · · · · · · · · · Technological Studies teacher Guidance Counsellor OYAP representative in your school Co-op Teacher Waterloo Wellington Training and Adjustment Board (WWTAB) at www.wwtab.com Apprenticeship Branch, Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities at www.edu.gov.on.ca Union representing the skilled trade of interest. Career Matters ­ www.careermatters.tvo.org Information about apprenticeships at www.apprenticesearch.com For apprenticeship programs at Conestoga College, contact Hans Zawada, Chair, School of Trades and Apprenticeship at 519-748-5220 (ext. 3370)

Teachers and Students May Contact:

Contact information is provided for each trade on the information sheets, specific to that trade.

15

Which Trade Should I Consider?

Interests & Skills Inventory

Different trades require different skills, qualities and aptitudes. There are many inventories or "tests" available to help you determine whether you possess the qualities required by a trade. Included in this catalogue are Interest Checklists and a Skills Inventories for the 4 Sectors ­ Construction, Industrial, Motive Power, and Service. These simple tools will help get you started. However, it is strongly recommended that you seek out the assistance of a trained Employment Counsellor at your local Employment Centre. The Interest Checklists and the Skills Inventories, included in this section of the Catalogue, have been developed for trades described in the National Occupational Classification (N.O.C.). In the N.O.C. classification system, each trade is given a number (referred to as NOC #) and it is grouped into a category with trades that require similar skills and qualities. Hence, Autobody Technician (NOC 7322) and Machinist (NOC 7231), and Plumber (NOC 7244) are placed into the same category, Trades and Construction (Construction Sector). Similarly, the Manufacturing category (Industrial Sector) includes trades such as Foundry Worker (NOC 9412), Locksmith (NOC 7383), and Tool Designer (NOC 2232). For more information about various trades and the N.O.C. classification visit http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml

16

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Construction Interests Inventory

I NTERESTS Check the things you like: S KILLS Check the things you can do and would like to be able to do: Q UALITIES Check below if you are: Patient Consistent in quality of work Able to work long hours Accountable for your actions Physically fit Adaptable to change Able to keep cool in critical situations Able to do physical labour Reliable Able to notice detail Someone with good hand-eye co-ordination Use electric and hand tools Apply knowledge of safety Operate heavy equipment Work independently Follow instructions - verbal or written Sketch plans and solutions Read equipment and regulations manuals Measure and estimate Think in three dimensions Prepare and submit invoices Apply technical and mechanical knowledge Use computer-assisted design programs Read blueprints and job specifications Working with your hands Learning new techniques Working with tools and machines Routine activity Building or constructing things Solving problems Working outside or in workshops Fixing and repairing things Physics Working alone

These are some of the interests, skills, and qualities that frequently apply to occupations in Construction Trades.

Instructions:

Complete the questions on the following pages by yourself. Think them over and answer honestly. You may discover a new career path along the way.

___ Total Checkmarks

17

Construction Interests Inventory Results

Note:

If you have checked many of the boxes in this category, review the list of trades in the Construction Sector you may wish to explore. If you have not checked many of the boxes in this category, you may wish to move on to another Interest Inventory checklist in a different category.

TRADE Brick and Stone Mason Cement (Concrete) Finisher Cement Mason Construction Boilermaker Construction Millwright Drywall, Acoustic and Lathing Applicator Drywall Finisher and Plasterer Electrician: Construction & Maintenance Electrician: Domestic & Rural Floor Covering Installer General Carpenter Glazier and Metal Mechanic Heat and Frost Insulator Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator, Branch 1 Hoisting Engineer: Mobile Crane Operator, Branch 2 Hoisting Engineer: Tower Crane Operator Ironworker Lineworker: Construction Lineworker: Power Painter and Decorator Branch 1 ­ Commercial & Residential Painter and Decorator Branch 2 ­ Industrial Painter & Decorator Plumber Precast Concrete Erector Precast Concrete Finisher Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic Reinforcing Rodworker Restoration Mason Roofer Sheet Metal Worker Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installer Steamfitter Terrazzo, Tile and Marble Setter

NOC 7281 7282 7282 7262 7311 7284 7284 7241 7241 7295 7271 7292 7293 7371 7371 7371 7264 7244 7244 7294 7294 7251

PAGE 35 37 39 41 43 45 69 47 49 51 53 55

63 65 83 57 51 59 67

71

7282 7313 7264 7281 7291 7261 7252 7252 7283 75 77 79 81 73

18

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Construction Skills Inventory

T HINKING __ Be detailed __ Make decisions __ Be systematic __ Be quality and safety-minded __ Solve problems __ Find information __ Plan and organize job tasks __ Use memory O RAL C OMMUNICATION __ Listen to instructions and act accordingly __ Clarify instructions __ Interact with co-workers, supervisors, quality-control personnel, customers __ Call suppliers T ECHNICAL

AND

These are some of the skills that frequently apply to occupations in Construction Trades.

Instructions:

Place a checkmark "" beside the skills you already have. Place an "" beside the skills you would like to develop to prepare yourself for work in this field.

C OMPUTER U SE

__ Transfer knowledge and skill from one technology to another __ Computer software programs __ Software programs to confirm measurements and do adjustments __ Computer-controlled machinery N UMERACY __ Measure and calculate __ Make numerical estimations __ Prepare schedules and budgets __ Use money math (financial transactions) __ Analyze data (compare, contrast, predict, averages, summaries, rates) W ORKING

WITH

O THERS

__ Work independently or as part of a team __ Inform other workers __ Orient new employees __ Participate in discussions __ Be respectful to others __ Monitor work performance of others W RITING __ Defect reports __ Work order forms __ Job specifications __ Sketches __ Lists __ Invoices __ Estimates

19

Career in Construction?

If you think you would enjoy a career in the construction industry, create a plan using the space provided. List the courses you must take, volunteer work options, and related hobbies that will help you build on your skills and interests.

R EADING __ Use money math (financial transactions) __ Memos __ Company regulations __ Instructional manuals (machinist handbooks) __ Safety standards __ Job specifications __ Schematic diagrams, blueprints, assembly drawings __ Detailed instructions __ Charts, grade plans, tables

What Skills Do You Need?

School Subjects

Volunteer Work

Recreation & Hobbies

20

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Industrial Interest Inventory

I NTERESTS Check the things you like: S KILLS Check the things you can do and would like to be able to do: Q UALITIES Check below if you are: Able to meet deadlines Punctual Able to use good judgement A person with good hand-eye co-ordination Precise A person who doesn't mind getting dirty Detail-oriented Able to concentrate even with distractions Able to do physical labour Able to remain alert for repetitive tasks or long shifts Assess mechanical problems Use computerized settings on machines Fix machines Assess for quality in production Work individually or in a team Record data on quotas Read schematics and diagrams Apply knowledge of safety regulations Listen to follow instructions Monitor measurement instruments Building or constructing things Inventing Methodical or careful work Designing and drawing Disassembling and assembling things Machines Working with your hands Engineering and computers

These are some of the interests, skills, and qualities that frequently apply to occupations in Industrial Trades

Instructions:

Complete the questions on the following pages by yourself. Think them over and answer honestly. You may discover a new career path along the way.

___ Total Checkmarks

21

Industrial Interest Inventory Results

Note:

If you have checked many of the boxes in this category, review the list of trades in the Industrial Sector you may wish to explore. If you have not checked many of the boxes in this category, you may wish to move on to another Interest Inventory checklist in a different category.

TRADE Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Bearings Mechanic Blacksmith Cabinetmaker Carperson (Railway) Composite Structures Technician Draftsperson ­ Mechanical Draftsperson ­ Plastic Mould Design Draftsperson ­ Tool & Die Electric Motor Rewind Mechanic Electrical Control (Machine) Builder Electrician-Power house Operator (TTC) Electrician (Signal Maintenance) (TTC) Elevating Devices Mechanic Facilities Mechanic Facilities Technician Fitter ­ Assembler (Motor Assembly) Fitter (Structural Steel/Plateworker) Fitter Welder General Machinist Hydraulic/Pneumatic Mechanic Industrial Electrician Industrial Instrument Mechanic Industrial Mechanic Millwright Locksmith Machine Tool Builder & Integrator Mould or Die Finisher Mould Maker Optics Technician (Lens and Prism Maker) Packaging Machine Mechanic Pattern Maker Precision Metal Fabricator Process Operator: Refinery, Chemical & Liquid Processes Pump Systems Installer Roll Grinder/Turner

NOC 7315 7321 7266 7272 7314 7315 2253 2253 2253 7333 9485 9485 9485 7318

PAGE 85

87 89 91

9486 7263 7263 7231 7312 7242 2243 7311 7383 7316 7232 7232 3414 7311 7232 7261 9232 7311 9511 97 101 103 93 95

22

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

TRADE ( CONTINUED ) Ski Lift Mechanic Saw Filer/Fitter Surface Blaster Surface Mount Assembler Tool & Cutter Grinder Tool & Die Maker Tool & Gauge Inspector Tool/Tooling Maker Water Well Driller Welder

NOC 7311 7383 7372 9483 9511 7232 7231 7232 7373 7265

PAGE

107

109

National Occupational Classification (NOC) at http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml

23

Industrial Skills Inventory

These are some of the skills that frequently apply to occupations in Industrial Trades

T HINKING __ Be quality and safety-minded __ Make decisions __ Plan and organize job tasks __ Use memory __ Be specific and detail-oriented __ Solve problems __ Recognize hazardous situations and act appropriately __ Find information O RAL C OMMUNICATION __ Listen to instructions and act accordingly __ Ask for clarification __ Exchange information with co-workers __ Discuss with co-workers __ Communicate with workers on an assembly line __ Interact with management T ECHNICAL

AND

Instructions:

Place a checkmark "" beside the skills you already have. Place an "" beside the skills you would like to develop to prepare yourself for work in this field.

C OMPUTER U SE

__ Apply technical and mechanical knowledge __ Assemble complex machinery __ Use computer-assisted design programs (CAD) __ Create and use computerized production processes N UMERACY __ Measure and calculate __ Use ratios __ Monitor use of measurement instruments __ Make numerical estimations __ Analyze data (compare, contrast, predict; averages, summaries, rates) W ORKING

WITH

O THERS

__ Work independently or as part of a team __ Deal with grievances __ Participate in discussions __ Make suggestions for change __ Be respectful of others __ Assign routine tasks to other workers __ Monitor the work performance of others

24

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

W RITE __ Reports __ Instructions __ Comments __ Prepare invoices __ Record data or quotas __ Descriptions R EADING __ Memos __ Special instructions __ Specification sheets __ Reports __ Charts __ Equipment installation manuals __ Graphs __ Scale drawings __ Assembly drawings

25

Career in an Industrial trade?

If you think you would enjoy a career in the industrial trades, create a plan using the space provided. List the courses you must take, volunteer work options, and related hobbies that will help you build on your skills and interests.

What Skills Do You Need?

School Subjects

Volunteer Work

Recreation & Hobbies

26

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Motive Power Interest Inventory

I NTERESTS Check the things you like: S KILLS Check the things you can do and would like to be able to do: Q UALITIES Check below if you are: Patient Consistent in quality of work Able to work long hours Accountable for your actions Physically fit Adaptable to change Able to keep cool in critical situations Able to do physical labour Reliable Able to notice detail A person with good hand-eye co-ordination Use electric and hand tools Apply knowledge of safety Operate heavy equipment Work independently Follow instructions - verbal or written Sketch plans and solutions Read equipment and regulations manuals Measure and estimate Think in three dimensions Prepare and submit invoices Apply technical and mechanical knowledge Use computer-assisted design programs Read blueprints and job specifications Working with your hands Learning new techniques Working outside or in workshops Working alone Routine activity Working with tools and machines Solving problems Building or constructing things Physics Fixing and repairing things

These are some of the interests, skills, and qualities that frequently apply to occupations in Motive Power trades.

Instructions:

Complete the questions on the following pages by yourself. Think them over and answer honestly. You may discover a new career path along the way.

___ Total Checkmarks

27

Motive Results Power Interest Inventory

Note:

If you have checked many of the boxes in this category, review the list of trades in the Motive Power Sector you may wish to explore. If you have not checked many of the boxes in this category, you may wish to move on to another Interest Inventory checklist in a different category.

TRADE Alignment and Brakes Technician Auto Body & Collision Damage Repairer, Branch 1 Auto Body Repairer, Branch 2 Automotive Glass Technician Automotive Electronic Accessory Technician Automotive Painter Automotive Service Technician Farm Equipment Technician Fuel & Electrical Systems Technician Heavy Duty Equipment Technician Marine Engine Mechanic Motive Power Machinist Motorcycle Mechanic Powered Lift Truck Technician Recreation Vehicle Technician Small Engine Technician Tire Wheel and Rim Mechanic Transmission Technician Truck & Coach Technician Truck Trailer Service Technician

NOC 7315 7322 7322 7321 7321 7322 7321 7312 7321 7312 7335 7231 7334 7334 7383 7335 7321 7321 7321 7321

PAGE 113 115 117

119 121 123 125 127

129

133

135 137 139

National Occupational Classification (NOC) at http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml

28

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Motive Power Skills Inventory

T HINKING __ Be detailed __ Make decisions __ Be systematic __ Use memory __ Solve problems __ Find information __ Plan and organize job tasks __ Be quality and safety-minded O RAL C OMMUNICATION __ Clarify instructions __ Call suppliers __ Listen to instructions and act accordingly __ Interact with co-workers, supervisors, quality-control personnel, customers T ECHNICAL

AND

These are some of the skills that frequently apply to occupations in

Instructions:

Place a checkmark "" beside the skills you already have. Place an "" beside the skills you would like to develop to prepare yourself for work in this field.

C OMPUTER U SE

__ Computer software programs __ Computer-controlled machinery __ Software programs to confirm measurements and do adjustments __ Transfer knowledge and skill from one technology to another N UMERACY __ Use money math (financial transactions) __ Make numerical estimations __ Prepare schedules and budgets __ Measure and calculate __ Analyze data (compare, contrast, predict, averages, summaries and rates) W ORKING

WITH

O THERS

__ Inform other workers __ Orient new employees __ Work independently or as part of team __ Participate in discussions __ Monitor work performance of others __ Be respectful to others W RITING __ Defect reports __ Work order forms __ Job specifications __ Sketches __ Lists __ Invoices __ Estimates

29

Career in a Motive Power trade?

If you think you would enjoy a career in the motive power trades, create a plan using the space provided. List the courses you must take, volunteer work options, and related hobbies that will help you build on your skills and interests.

R EADING __ Memos __ Job specifications __ Company regulations __ Safety standards __ Detailed instructions __ Charts, grade plans, __ Schematic diagrams, blueprints, assembly drawings tables __ Instructional manuals (machinist handbooks)

What Skills Do You Need?

School Subjects

Volunteer Work

Recreation & Hobbies

30

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Service Interest Inventory

I NTERESTS Check the things you like: S KILLS Check the things you can do and would like to be able to do: Q UALITIES Check below if you are: Friendly and outgoing A person with a sense of humour A person with strength and stamina Courteous Adaptable to many situations Able to cope well with stress Conscientious Able to pay attention to detail Able to motivate self and others Positive in attitude Determined Competitive Co-ordinate and organize events Develop marketing strategies Assume leadership when appropriate Analyze data Apply knowledge of first aid and safety Provide instructions Manage equipment and supplies lists Respond and adjust to feedback Deal with customers, including difficult ones Listen to understand Use computer software for schedules, records and billing Meeting new people Sports and sporting events Being outdoors Co-ordinating events Educating people Physical fitness and activities Speaking to groups Helping people Challenges and adventure Answering questions Entertaining people Traveling

These are some of the interests, skills and qualities that frequently apply to occupations in the Service Sector.

Instructions:

Complete the questions on the following pages by yourself. Think them over and answer honestly. You may discover a new career path along the way.

___ Total Checkmarks

31

Service Results Interest Inventory

Note:

If you have checked many of the boxes in this category, review the list of trades in the Service Sector you may wish to explore. If you have not checked many of the boxes in this category, you may wish to move on to another Interest Inventory checklist in a different category.

TRADE Aboriginal Early Childhood Educator Agriculture ­ Dairy Herdsperson Agriculture ­ Fruit Grower Agriculture ­ Swine Herdsperson Appliance Service Technician Arborist Baker Baker ­ Patissier Child and Youth Worker Cook ­ Assistant, Branch 1 Cook, Branch 2 Early Childhood Educator Early Childhood Educator ­ Inclusion Practices Educational Assistant Electronic Service Technician Gemsetter/Goldsmith Hairstylist Horse Groom Horse Harness Maker Horticultural Technician Info. Tech. Support Analyst: Hardware Info. Tech Support Analyst: Help Desk Info. Tech Support Analyst: Network Micro Electronics Manufacturer Native Clothing & Crafts Artisan Network Cabling Specialist Partsperson Pool & Hot Tub/Spa Service Technician Pool & Hot Tub/Spa Installer Retail Meat Cutter Saddlery Special Events Coordinator Wooden Boat Rebuilder/Repairer

NOC 4214 8253 8251 8253 7332 2225 6252 6252 4212 6242 6242 4214 4214 4214 2242 7344 6271 8253 9452 2225 2282 2282 2282 9483 7342 7245 1472 7441 7441 6251 9452 1226 7271

PAGE

X 157 X 141 143 145 167 151 149 147 153

X 155

159 161

163 ? X X X

X X X X

National Occupational Classification (NOC) http://www23.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/2001/e/generic/welcome.shtml

32

INTERESTS & SKILLS INVENTORY

Service Skills Inventory

T HINKING __ Be creative, original __ Make decisions __ Plan and organize job tasks __ Find information __ Use memory __ Solve problems O RAL C OMMUNICATION __ Share stories __ Interact with employers, co-workers __ Greet and converse with customers/clients __ Provide instructions __ Communicate with dispatchers __ Present to groups __ Answer inquiries __ Listen to and deal with the public __ Inform clients __ Speak courteously and effectively T ECHNICAL

AND

These are some of the skills that frequently apply to occupations in Service Sector

Instructions:

Place a checkmark "" beside the skills you already have. Place an "" beside the skills you would like to develop to prepare yourself for work in this field.

C OMPUTER U SE

__ Use word processing and other software for data entry __ Use computer-controlled equipment __ Enter data __ Use billing and accounting software __ Keep and access schedules, records, reports, plans on computer N UMERACY __ Perform calculations __ Make numerical estimations __ Prepare schedules and budgets __ Analyze data (compare, contrast, predict; averages, summaries, rates) __ Use money math (financial transactions) W ORKING

WITH

O THERS

__ Be respectful of others __ Making hiring decisions __ Assume a leadership role when appropriate __ Make suggestions __ Recruit __ Train other workers __ Handle conflict with respect __ Participate in meetings and discussions

33

Career in the Service Industry?

If you think you would enjoy a career in the service industry, create a plan using the space provided. List the courses you must take, volunteer work options, and related hobbies that will help you build on your skills and interests.

W RITING __ Plans __ Explanations __ Sketches __ Reports __ Supply and equipment checklists R EADING __ Magazines __ Equipment manuals __ Guides __ Legislation and Regulations __ Pamphlets __ Schematic drawings __ Training materials __ Legends and maps __ Scale drawings

What Skills Do You Need?

School Subjects

Volunteer Work

Recreation & Hobbies

34

CONSTRUCTION

Brick and Stone Mason

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Brick and Stone Masons perform some or all of the following duties: · Read sketches and blueprints to calculate materials required · Cut and trim bricks and concrete blocks to specification using hand and power tools · Prepare and lay bricks, stone, concrete blocks, structural tiles, and similar materials to construct or repair walls, foundations, and other structures in residential, industrial, and commercial construction · Lay bricks or other masonry units to build residential or commercial chimneys and fireplaces, arches, patios, garden walls, and other decorative installations · Lay radial bricks to build masonry shells of industrial chimneys · Lay or install firebricks to line industrial chimneys and smokestacks, line or reline furnaces, kilns, boilers, using refractory or acid-resistant bricks, refractory concretes, plastic refractories and other materials

NOC 7281

Other Titles

· Apprentice bricklayer · Bricklayer · Brickmason · Refractory bricklayer · Stonecutter · Stonemason

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Brick and Stone Masons can earn $15 - $28.33 per hour, averaging about $21.01 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Place of Work

Contact Information

Who needs a Brick and Stone Mason? · · · · Primary steel companies Building construction companies Construction contractors Some are self-employed

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Work Conditions

Many bricklayers work on a full-time basis. Hours are long, often from early morning until dusk. Weekend work may required to make up for lost time during the week due to bad weather. Bricklayers have a seasonal peak during the spring and summer months, similar to other construction trades. During the winter months workload may diminish unless the company uses tarps and heaters on-site, or if jobs are inside such as building/repairing fireplaces. Work is heavy, primarily outdoors and requires good physical fitness.

Employment Requirements

Brick and Stone Mason is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

35

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Brick and Stone Mason depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively, and the wages below include benefits. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. As an apprentice, wages begin at the low end ($10.00/hour), rising approximately 10% each year or each course that is completed, until reaching the fully licensed bricklayer wage rate. The licensed rate ranges between can be up to $35.00/hour plus benefits in a union shop. A non-union position in southwestern Ontario would pay on average $18.00/hour to $22.00/hour with no benefit package. Those working as stone masons earn a higher wage. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Brick and Stone Masons can earn $15 - $28.33 per hour, averaging about $21.01 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 5 600 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, (this includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification) or Red Seal

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants for this trade must successfully complete Grade 8 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology (Woodworking) Communication and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, blueprint reading, erecting and taking down of scaffolding, form framing, mortar mixing, hoisting.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Brick and Stone Mason but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Concrete Finishers (7282) · Supervisors of bricklayers (in 7219 Contractors and Supervisors, Other Construction Trades, Installers, Repairers and Servicers) · Tilesetters (7283)

36

CONSTRUCTION

Cement Finisher

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Cement Finishers perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · Finish concrete flooring, sidewalks, and patios by hand or machine Expose and finish aggregate in precast and architectural concrete Install fixtures such as anchor bolts, steel plates, and door sills Finish vertical surfaces, repair or replace damaged parts of concrete, apply curing and surface treatments

NOC 7282

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Cement Finishers can earn $15 - $22.55 per hour, averaging $18.11 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

An important consideration is the need to travel to different locations where work is offered. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. Work is heavy, indoors and outdoors, and requires good physical fitness. Machine noise and water can present hazardous conditions.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Cement Finisher? · · · · · Construction companies Brick laying contractors Manufacturers of precast concrete City maintenance departments Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

Cement Finisher is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Cement Finishers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Cement Finishers can earn $15 - $22.55 per hour, averaging $18.11 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

37

Apprenticeship

· Takes 1 to 2 years or about 4 500 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the length · Must complete the terms of the Apprenticeship Contract to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification for this trade, Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available.

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants for this trade must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology (Woodworking) Communication and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, blueprint reading, form framing, cement mixing, curing, surface treatment.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Cement Finisher but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Cement Mason Brick and Stone Mason Stone Cutter Marble Mason

38

CONSTRUCTION

Cement Mason

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Cement Masons perform some or all of the following duties: · Finish concrete flooring, sidewalks and patios by hand or machine · Check formwork, granular base and steel reinforcement materials and direct placement of concrete into forms or onto surfaces according to grade · Expose and finish aggregate in precast and architectural concrete · Install fixtures such as anchor bolts, steel plates, and door sills · Finish vertical surfaces, repair or replace damaged parts of concrete, apply curing and surface treatments · Waterproof, damp-proof, and restore concrete surfaces An important consideration is the need to travel to different locations where work is offered. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. Work is heavy, indoors and outdoors, and requires good physical fitness. Machine noise and water can present a hazard.

NOC 7282

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Cement Masons can earn $15 - $22.55 per hour, averaging $18.11 per hour.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Cement Mason? · · · · · Construction companies Brick laying contractors Manufacturers of precast concrete City maintenance departments Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

Cement Mason is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Cement Mason depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Cement Masons can earn $15 - $22.55 per hour, averaging $18.11 per hour.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

39

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 6 000 hrs, including 720 hrs of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the terms of the Apprenticeship Contract to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship. · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade, Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants for this trade must successfully complete Grade 8 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology (Woodworking) Communication and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, blueprint reading, form framing, cement mixing, curing, surface treatment.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Cement Mason but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Concrete Mason Brick and Stone Mason Stone Cutter Marble Mason

40

CONSTRUCTION

Boiler Maker

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Construction Boiler Makers build and maintain very large tanks, such as: · · · · · · Boilers and pressure tanks in power stations Refineries, and chemical plants Pollution control devices Furnaces Water towers Heat exchangers

NOC 7262

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Boiler Makers are mostly unionized and make between $27.45 and $30.98 per hour, averaging $28.94. Unionized wages are not available.

Boiler Makers perform some or all of the following tasks: · · · · Read blueprints or specifications and lay out steel plates accordingly Operate heavy-metal working machines to cut and shape metal Fit and weld metal parts Erect and install boilers

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union:Boiler MakersLocal 128: 1 905 547 9492 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

An important consideration is the need to travel to different locations where work is offered. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. Work is heavy, indoors and outdoors and requires good physical fitness. Machine operation and noise as well as dangerous materials can present hazardous conditions.

Place of Work

Who needs a Boiler Maker? · Construction companies · Manufacturing industry · Boiler fabrication industry

Work Conditions

Construction Boiler Maker is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Boiler Makers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Boiler Makers are mostly unionized and make between $27.45 and $30.98 per hour, averaging $28.94. Unionized wages are not available.

41

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 6 800 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status (which includes the Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Physics Geometry Communication and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, blueprint reading, metal bending, metal cutting, welding, fitting, hazardous chemicals, hoisting, rigging and crane use.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Boiler Maker but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Boiler Fitter Boiler Installer Structural Metal and Plate Fabricators and Fitters

42

CONSTRUCTION

Construction Millwright

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Construction Millwrights install, maintain and repair stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment. Millwrights: · Read and interpret diagrams and schematic drawings to determine work procedures · Install stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment according to layout plans using hand and power tools · Operate hoisting and lifting devices to position machinery and parts during the installation, set-up and repair of machinery · Construct foundations for machinery or direct other workers Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. Construction Millwrights work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. There is heavy lifting, bending, and standing during the work day.

NOC 7311

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Construction Millwrights can earn $14.58 - $23.68 per hour, averaging $19.18 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656

Place of Work

Who needs Construction Millwrights? · · · · · · · · Motor vehicle manufacturers Electric power companies Machinery and equipment manufacturers Motor vehicle parts manufacturers Primary steel producers Mining companies Pulp and paper companies Mechanical construction firms

Union:MillwrightsLocal 1916: 1 905 385 2462

School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Work Conditions

A Millwright is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Construction Millwrights depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Construction Millwrights can earn $14.58 - $23.68 per hour, averaging $19.18 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

43

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years (8 000 hours), which includes 720 hours of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status. Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade.

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Science Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing (Mechanics) Communication and analytical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout, precision measuring, NC/CNC technology, hand and power and machine tools, materials and fasteners, lubricants, bearings, seals and packing, rigging and hoisting, power transmission system, compressors and pumps, welding, brazing, and soldering, fans and blowers, pneumatics and hydraulic systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a millwright but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Construction Millwright may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Machinist · Machine Shop Inspector · Tooling or Machining Inspector

44

CONSTRUCTION

Drywall, Acoustic & Lathing Applicator

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Drywall Applicators perform some or all of the following installations: · · · · · · Exterior framing and sheeting Mouldings, furring and lathing products Thermal, fire, sound, and vapour barrier insulation and sealants Moulded and cast forms Acoustical and wall and ceiling panels Interior window and door frames and fixtures

NOC 7284

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Drywall Applicators can earn $11.50 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $20.03 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Drywall Applicators earn $31.57 per hour, as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Drywall Applicators work both indoors and outdoors, usually in residential, commercial, and industrial buildings. The work is somewhat cyclical and seasonal, involving shift work. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. There is a potential for injury and dust and hazardous materials could be harmful. There is heavy lifting, bending and standing during the work day.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Painters Local 1824: 1 519 744-4714 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Drywall Applicators? · Construction companies · Plastering, drywalling and lathing contractors · They may be self-employed

Work Conditions

A Drywall, Acoustic and Lathing Applicator is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Drywall Applicators depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Drywall Applicators can earn $11.50 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $20.03 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Drywall Applicators earn $31.57 per hour, as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

45

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or 5 400 h, (including 720 h of in-school post secondary training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass of the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology Construction Technology Communication skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, hand and power tools, materials and joiners, taping, smoothing surfaces, finishing corners, applying compound and sanding, spraying acoustic material and texturing fabricating suspended ceilings.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as an applicator but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, Drywall Applicator may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Plasterer · Drywall Finisher · Wood Lather

46

CONSTRUCTION

Construction & Maintenance Electrician

(T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Construction and Maintenance Electricians perform numerous tasks: · Lay out, assemble, install, repair, maintain, connect or test electrical systems · Plan installations from blueprints, interpret specifications, and install all electrical and electronic devices · Diagnose faults in electrical systems and components · Measure, cut threads, bend, assemble and install conduits and other conductor enclosures · Test electrical and electronic equipment for proper function In general, Construction Electricians work days. Maintenance Electricians can expect to work shifts. They may work overtime to finish a project, especially on construction jobs. The work involves lifting and physical strength. Electricians must pay close attention to safety because the work presents many hazards. Electricians work both indoors and outdoors.

NOC 7241

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Construction and Maintenance Electricians can earn $10.97 $28.92 per hour, averaging $19.21 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 804: 1 519 742 8319 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Electricians? · Developers on construction sites · Maintenance contractors · Large organizations such as resource companies or manufacturers, School Boards, colleges and universities

Work Conditions

A Construction and Maintenance Electrician is a compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory Trades, the Coop Student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Construction and Maintenance Electricians depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Construction and Maintenance Electricians can earn $10.97 - $28.92 per hour, averaging $19.21 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

47

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or 9 000 h, including 840 h of in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology( Drafting) Construction Technology Communication and planning skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, electric code, trade calculations, blueprints and installations, estimating, hand tools, trade communication, construction layouts, electrical-electronic theory, installation methods, drive systems, fire alarm and building systems, electrical equipment maintenance, control systems, power distribution.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is required to start working in the electrical trade. A journeyperson, Construction and Maintenance Electrician, may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own business as a contractor Work as a construction inspector Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Power System Electrician Communication Electrician Power Lineperson Domestic and Rural Electrician

48

CONSTRUCTION

Domestic & Rural Electrician

(T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Domestic and Rural Electricians perform numerous tasks in construction, repair, and renovation of residential and farm buildings: · Lay out, assemble, install, repair, maintain, connect or test electrical systems · Plan installations from blueprints, interpret specifications, and install all electrical and electronic devices · Diagnose faults in electrical systems and components · Measure, cut threads, bend, assemble and install conduits and other conductor enclosures · Splice and terminate electrical conductors · Test electrical and electronic equipment for proper function In general, Domestic and Rural Electricians work days. They may work overtime to finish a project, especially on construction jobs. The work involves lifting and physical strength. Electricians must pay close attention to safety because the work presents many hazards. Electricians work both indoors and outdoors.

NOC 7241

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Domestic and Rural Electricians can earn $10.97 to $28.92 per hour, averaging $19.21 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Electricians? · Private home owners · Self employed

Work Conditions

Domestic and Rural Electrician is a compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory Trades, the Co-op student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Domestic and Rural Electricians depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Domestic and Rural Electricians can earn $10.97 to $28.92 per hour, averaging $19.21 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

49

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or 7 200 h, including 540 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available.

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology Communication, planning and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, electric code, trade calculations, blueprints and installations, estimating, hand tools, trade communication, construction layouts, electrical-electronic theory, installation methods, fire alarm and building systems, instrumentation, drive systems, electrical equipment maintenance, control systems, power distribution.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson or registration as an apprentice is required to start working in the electrical trade. After becoming a journeyperson an Electrician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as a contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Power System Electrician Communication Electrician Power Lineperson Construction and Rural Electrician

50

CONSTRUCTION

Floor Covering Installer

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Floor Covering Installers install carpet, linoleum, vinyl, and other resilient floor coverings in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. They perform some or all of the following installations: · Measure, cut, and fasten underlay and underpadding · Measure, cut, and install carpeting using hand and machine stitcher, seaming iron, and bonding tape · Stretch carpeting using knee-kicker or power stretcher, and secure carpeting to floor or other surfaces using staple gun or other devices · Measure, cut, and install resilient floor covering using adhesive, rollers and other hand tools · Install hardwood floors using staples, glue, nails or other means Floor Covering Installers work indoors. The work is somewhat cyclical and seasonal. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. There is a potential for injury. Heavy lifting, dust and hazardous materials could be harmful.

NOC 7295

Other Titles

· Apprentice bricklayer · Bricklayer · Brickmason · Refractory bricklayer · Stonecutter · Stonemason

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Floor Covering Installers can earn $8.45 - $23.89 per hour, averaging, $13.77 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Place of Work

Who needs Floor Covering Installers? · · · · Construction companies Floor covering contractors Carpet and tile outlets They may be self employed

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Work Conditions

A Floor Covering Installer is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but a registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Floor Covering Installers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Floor Covering Installers can earn $8.45 - $23.89 per hour, averaging, $13.77 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

51

Apprenticeship

· Takes 2 to 3 years or 6 000 h, (including 720 h of in-school post secondary training); prior education and experience may shorten the time needed to complete the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology Communication skills and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, hand and power tools, materials and joiners, taping, smoothing surfaces, applying compound and sanding, measuring, stitching, estimating costs.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as an installer but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, an installer may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as installer · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Contractor · Repairers · Servicers

52

CONSTRUCTION

General Carpenter

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? General Carpenters may work in "roughing" or "finishing" aspect of erecting new buildings or renovating existing structures. In their work carpenters: · · · · · · Use hand and power tools Erect foundations, steel, and wood framing Build stairs, doorways, counters, window frames, cupboards Install doors and windows and all the hardware Use scaffolding, ladders, ropes Install floors, suspended ceilings, and skylights

NOC 7271

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union General Carpenters can earn $11.50 - $27.15 per hour, averaging $18.54 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Carpenters Union Local 785: 1 519 653 7543 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

In general, carpenters work days. They may work overtime to finish a project. The work involves a lot of lifting and physical strength. Carpenters must pay close attention to safety because the work presents many hazards. Carpenters work both indoors and outdoors.

Place of Work

Who needs Carpenters? · · · · · Developers on construction sites Cabinet making shops Maintenance departments for large businesses and industry School boards, colleges, and universities Self-employed, construction companies

Work Conditions

A General Carpenter Trade is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of General Carpenters depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union General Carpenters can earn $11.50 - $27.15 per hour, averaging $18.54 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

53

Apprenticeship

· Takes 2 to 4 years or 5 400 to 7 200h, including 720 h of in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology (Woodworking) Communication, planning, and problem-solving skills and the ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, woodworking, trade calculations, blueprint reading, architectural drawings, estimating, cutting, materials and hand tools, construction layouts, welding, acoustic ceilings

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a General Carpenter but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a carpenter may: · Become a foreman or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Cabinetmaker Drywall Installer and Finisher Roofer and Shingler Floor Covering Installer

54

CONSTRUCTION

Glazier & Metal Mechanic

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Glazier and Metal Mechanics cut, fit, and install glass in wooden and metal frames for a variety of purposes including: · · · · · · · · Glass doors Windows Mirrors Storefronts Aquariums Display cases Skylights Glass building exteriors

NOC 7292

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Glaziers and Metal Mechanics can earn $8.95 - $20.37 per hour, averaging $15.67 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Glazier and Metal mechanics earn $29.94 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Metal Mechanics fabricate frames for glass installation. They also read and interpret specifications to determine type of thickness of glass, frames, and materials required. The work of a Glazier and Metal Mechanic is mainly outdoors and sometimes involves installations at considerable heights. Lifting is involved and a great deal of manual dexterity. Glass installation may be in residential, commercial, or industrial buildings. The Glaziers work a standard 40-hour week.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Painters Local 1824: 1 519 744 4714 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Glazier and Metal Mechanic? · · · · · Construction glass installation contractors Retail service and repair shops Glass fabrication shops Autobody shops repairing or replacing windshields and windows Some glaziers are self employed

Work Conditions

A Glazier and Metal Mechanic is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Glaziers and Metal Mechanics depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Glaziers and Metal Mechanics can earn $8.95 - $20.37 per hour, averaging $15.67 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Glazier and Metal mechanics earn $29.94 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

55

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology (Mechanics) Communication, analytical, and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings, blueprint reading, weld and cut, rig and hoist, measure and mark glass, cut glass using glass cutters.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Glazier and Metal Mechanic but registration in apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Plate Glass Installer · Stained Glass Glazier

56

CONSTRUCTION

Ironworker

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Ironworkers fabricate, erect, hoist, install, repair and service structural ironwork, precast concrete, concrete reinforcing materials, curtain walls, ornamental iron and other metals used in construction of buildings, bridges and other structures and equipment. They perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · Erect and install scaffolding, hoisting equipment, and rigging Signal crane operator to position steel units according to blueprints Assemble and erect prefabricated metal structures Position and secure steel bars and wire mesh in concrete forms to reinforce concrete structures · Install ornamental and structural metalwork such as curtain walls, metal stairways, railings and power doors The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. Physical fitness with strong upper body combined with agility and a comfort working at heights are assets. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7264

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Ironworkers can earn $20.18 - $29.70 per hour, averaging $25.76 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Iron Workers and Rod Workers Local 736: 1 905 679 6439 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs an Ironworker? · Construction ironwork contractors · Manufacturers of ornamental ironworks

Work Conditions

An Ironworker is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Ironworkers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Ironworkers can earn $20.18 - $29.70 per hour, averaging $25.76 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

57

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or about 6 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology Communication and analytical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings, blueprint reading, weld and cut, rig and hoist, hoisting signals. Erecting and taking down scaffolding, assembling and installing components, fabricating various metalworks.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as an Ironworker but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Ornamental Ironworker · Metal Forming · Contractor

58

CONSTRUCTION

Lineworker-Power

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade, branch 1)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Power Lineworkers and Cable Workers operate, maintain, and repair electrical power transmission and distribution systems. Power Lineworkers perform some or all of the following duties: · Install, maintain, and repair electrical distribution and transmission systems including overhead and underground power lines and cables, insulators, conductors, lightning arrestors, switches, transformers and other associated equipment · Erect and maintain steel, wood or concrete poles, towers and guy wires · Splice, solder, and insulate conductors using splicing tools and related electrical equipment · Inspect and test overhead and underground power line and cables and auxiliary equipment using electrical test equipment The work is outdoors. Physical fitness and comfort working in high places are an asset. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7244

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Power Lineworkers can earn $13 - $25 per hour, averaging $19 per hour. Unionized Lineworkers make between $15 and $26 per hour, not including benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 636: 1 519 741 8161 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Lineworkers? · · · · Electrical power generation Transmission and distribution companies Electrical contractors Public utility commissions (e.g., Ontario Hydro)

Work Conditions

A Power Lineworker is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered apprentice to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Power Lineworkers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Power Lineworkers can earn $13 - $25 per hour, averaging $19 per hour. Unionized Lineworkers make between $15 and $26 per hour, not including benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

59

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology Communication and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, using hand and power tools, soldering, measuring and cutting, splicing, power distribution system, transmission networks, splicing equipment, electrical testing equipment, testing techniques.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Power Lineworker but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreman or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Power System Electrician · Telecommunications System · Cable Worker

60

CONSTRUCTION

Lineworker-Construction

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade, branch 2)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Construction Lineworkers construct, maintain, and repair overhead and underground electrical power transmission and distribution systems. Construction Lineworkers perform some or all of the following duties: · Install, maintain, and repair electrical distribution and transmission systems including overhead and underground power lines and cables, insulators, conductors, lightning arrestors, switches, transformers, and other associated equipment · Erect and maintain steel, wood or concrete poles, towers and guy wires · Splice, solder, and insulate conductors using splicing tools, electrical equipment, and tools · Inspect and test overhead and underground power line and cables The work is outdoors. Physical fitness and comfort working in high places are assets. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7244

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Lineworkers can earn $13 $25 per hour averaging $19 per hour. Unionized Lineworkers can earn $17 $35 per hour, averaging $30 not including benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 804: 1 519 742 8319 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Lineworkers? · · · · Electrical power generation Transmission and distribution companies Electrical contractors Public utility commissions (e.g., Ontario Hydro)

Work Conditions

A Construction Lineworker is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be a registered apprentice to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Construction Lineworkers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Lineworkers can earn $13 - $25 per hour averaging $19 per hour. Unionized Lineworkers can earn $17 - $35 per hour, averaging $30 not including benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

61

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or about 6 500 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass a Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology Construction Technology Communication skills and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, soldering, measuring and cutting, splicing, power distribution system, transmission networks, splicing equipment, electrical testing equipment, testing techniques

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Construction Lineworker but a registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreman or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Power System Electrician · Telecommunications System · Cable Worker

62

CONSTRUCTION

Mobile Crane Operator

(HOISTING ENGINEER, Branch 1) (T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? There are several different jobs that crane operators do. One job involves operating a mobile crane. A "Mobile Crane" is a mechanical device or structure capable of moving loads in both vertical and horizontal planes. It is mounted on a mobile chassis and includes a telescoping boom. A Mobile Crane Operator: · Maintains and operates mobile cranes that are capable of lifting and moving weights of more than 7 000 kg · Moves machinery or materials from place to place on a construction site, port, industrial site or railway yards

NOC 7371

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mobile Crane Operators can earn $15 - $26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 International Union of Operating Engineers Local 793: 1 519 658 4724 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Mobile Crane Operators? · · · · Docks or Ports Railway Yards Construction Contractors Industry (Crane Operators load and unload ships, trains, or to move materials at a construction or industrial site)

Work Conditions

A Mobile Crane Operator is a compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice. An apprentice must be paid wages according to the Regulations. An OYAP/Co-op student does not have to be signed and may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Mobile Crane Operators depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mobile Crane Operators can earn $15 - $26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

63

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 6 000 h, including 360 h of in-school post secondary school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · English · Construction Technology · Communication skills Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, communications, crane components and devices, pre-operation, pre-lift set-up and planning, assembly and disassembly of a crane, transporting a crane, operating a crane, maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is needed to start working as a crane operator. After that, a Mobile Crane Operator may: · · · · · Become a foreman or a supervisor Operate other types of cranes Start own business Pre-lift planner Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Heavy Equipment Operator Tower Crane Operator Boom Truck Operator Bridge Crane Operator

64

CONSTRUCTION

Mobile Crane Operator

(HOISTING ENGINEER, Branch 2) (T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? There are several different jobs that crane operators do. One job involves operating a mobile crane. A "Mobile Crane" is a mechanical device or structure capable of moving loads in both vertical and horizontal planes. It is mounted on a mobile chassis and includes a telescoping boom. A Mobile Crane Operator: · Maintains and operates mobile cranes that are capable of lifting and moving weights of more than 7 000 kg · Moves machinery or materials from place to place on a construction site, port, industrial site or railway yards

NOC 7371

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mobile Crane Operators can earn $15 - $26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 International Union of Operating Engineers Local 793 1 519 658 4724 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Mobile Crane Operators? · · · · Docks or Ports Railway Yards Construction Contractors Industry (Crane Operators load and unload ships, trains, or move materials at a construction or industrial site).

Work Conditions

A Mobile Crane Operator is a compulsory certified trade, T.Q.A.A. trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice. An apprentice must be paid wages according to the Regulations. An OYAP student does not have to be signed and may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Mobile Crane Operator depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mobile Crane Operators can earn $15 - $26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

65

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 6 months or 1 000 h, (including about 6 weeks of the in-school post secondary school training), prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Offers (optional) an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) after more training

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · English · Construction Technology · Communication skills Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, communications, crane components and devices, pre-operation, planning, assembly and disassembly of a crane, transporting a crane, operating a crane, maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is needed to start working as a crane operator. After that, a Mobile Crane Operator may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Operate other types of cranes Pre-lift planner Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Heavy Equipment Operator Bulldozer Operator Boom Truck Operator Bridge Crane Operator Tower Crane Operator

66

CONSTRUCTION

Painter & Decorator

(Commercial and Residential, Branch 1) (T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Painters and Decorators apply paint, wallpaper and other finishes to interior and exterior surfaces of buildings and other structures. They perform some or all of the following duties: · Prepare and clean surfaces using methods such as scraping, sanding, sand-blasting, hydro-blasting,and steam-cleaning · Remove old wallpaper and repair cracks and holes in walls · Mix paint to obtain desired colour and texture · Apply paint or other materials, such as fibre glass, metal coating, or fire retardant using brushes, rollers or spray equipment · Provide cost estimates The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects, such as ladders. Physical fitness with strong upper body combined with agility and a comfort working at heights are an asset. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7294

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Painters and Decorators can earn $10 - $21 per hour, averaging $14.18 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Painters and Decorators earn $29.80 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Painters Local 1824: 1 519 744 4714 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Painter or Decorator? · · · · · Construction companies Painting contractors Building maintenance contractors Residential customers They may be self-employed

Work Conditions

A Painter Decorator is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Painter and Decorator depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Painters and Decorators can earn $10 - $21 per hour, averaging $14.18 per hour. Unionized journeyperson Painters and Decorators earn $29.80 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

67

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 - 3 years or about 5 400 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the terms of the Apprenticeship Contract to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Art Construction Technology Communication skills, good colour sense, and hand-eye coordination

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, hoisting signals. Erecting and taking down scaffolding, mixing paints, surface preparation.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Painter and Decorator but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Interior Decorator · Industrial Painter

68

CONSTRUCTION

Plasterer

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Plasterers apply and finish building materials and repair walls and ceilings at a construction site or renovation project. They: · Clean and prepare surfaces · Mix plaster ingredients in a trough to desired consistency · Apply level and smooth coats of plaster using trowels, floats, brushes and spraying equipment · Trowel or spray coats of stucco over exteriors of buildings · Cure freshly plastered surfaces · Finish corners, tape joints, fill cracks, smooth excess compound Plasterers work both indoors and outdoors, usually in residential, commercial and industrial buildings. The work is somewhat cyclical and seasonal, involving shift work. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard. There is a potential for injury and dust and hazardous materials could be harmful. There is heavy lifting, bending, and standing during the work day.

NOC 7284

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region, Plasterers can earn $11.50 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $20.03 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Plasterers? · Construction companies · Plastering, drywalling and lathing contractors · They may be self employed

Work Conditions

A Plasterer is a voluntary certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but a registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Plasterer depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region, Plasterers can earn $11.50 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $20.03 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

69

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 6 400 h, including 720 h of in-school post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Construction Technology Communication skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, hand and power tools, materials and joiners, taping, smoothing surfaces, finishing corners, applying compound and sanding, spraying acoustic material and texturing fabricating suspended ceilings.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a Plasterer is not needed to start working in the Plasterer trade but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Plasterer may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Drywall Applicator · Drywall Finisher · Wood Lather

70

CONSTRUCTION

Plumber

(T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Plumbers install and repair pipes, fixtures, and appliances. Plumbers may be called to fix a leaky faucet or to install oxygen and medical gas in a hospital. They install and maintain sewage and water treatment systems, storage and flow system for toxic wastes, and pipes for natural gas and oil. Plumbers may perform some or all of the following: · · · · · Read blueprints, specifications, plumbing and building codes May have to produce detailed reports of the work done Estimate cost of the job If self-employed, they must keep records of the jobs done May use computer assisted welding

NOC 7251

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Plumbers can earn $11.52 - $28.08 per hour, averaging $20.10 per hour. Unionized journeyperson plumbers make between $31 - $38.74 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 United Association Union Local 527: 1 519 746 3300 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

The work of a Plumber may be performed in cramped areas or at great heights. It is year-round but new construction starts have their peaks and valleys. Shift work is not unusual and a 40-hour work week is standard for unionized workers.

Place of Work

Who needs Plumbers? Considerable degree of choice and variety, some Plumbers are self-employed and others work in different settings: · Residential: homes/apartments and condos · Industrial: municipal buildings, water and sewer systems, factories, hospitals, and schools · Commercial: Business offices, gas and heating/ air conditioning companies

Work Conditions

Plumber is a T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in this trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory trades, the Co-op student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Plumber depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Plumbers can earn $11.52 - $28.08 per hour, averaging $20.10 per hour. Unionized journeyperson plumbers make between $31 - $38.74 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

71

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or about 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school, post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Construction Technology Design Technology Communication, planning, and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade communications, blueprint reading, drainage systems, waste piping, venting systems, water distribution systems, plumbing codes, storm drainage systems, sewage disposal systems, process piping systems, trade calculations and physics, welding, rigging and hoisting procedures.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is needed to start working as a plumber. After that, a plumber may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Become an estimator Start own business Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Pipe Fitter Plumber Gas Technician Steamfitter-Pipefitter Gas Main and Line Technician Sprinkler System Installer

72

CONSTRUCTION

Refrigeration & Air-Conditioning Mechanic

(T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics install, assemble, and repair components of large and small refrigeration and air-conditioning systems in residential, commercial, and industrial settings. They: · Read plumbing and building codes · Install or connect piping for the purpose of conveying refrigerant of all types for either primary or secondary cooling · Overhaul or repair equipment · Test, adjust, maintain all control on refrigeration or air-conditioning systems, including air balancing

NOC 7313

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Refrigeration and AirConditioning Mechanics can earn $8.58 - $23.81 per hour, averaging $16.58 per hour. Unionized journeyperson mechanics make between $33.60 and $41.80 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Place of Work

Contact Information

Who needs Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics? Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics may be employed in: · Residential buildings: homes/apartments and condominiums · Industrial buildings: municipal buildings, factories, hospitals, ice arenas, refrigerated trucks, box-cars, and ships · Commercial: business offices, storage facilities, heating/ air conditioning companies, and computer companies

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 United Association Refrigeration Workers Local 787: 1 800 387 9121 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Work Conditions

Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanic is a compulsory certified trade, T.Q.A.A. trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in this trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory trades, the Co-op student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively, and the total wage below includes benefits. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanics can earn $8.58 - $23.81 per hour, averaging $16.58 per hour. Unionized journeyperson mechanics make between $33.60 and $41.80 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

73

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or about 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Construction Technology (Mechanics) Communication and planning skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, pipe and fitting materials, trade communications, equipment, tools and instruments, trade calculations and physics, brazing, soldering, welding, refrigeration and Air-Conditioning systems, maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson or being registered as an apprentice is needed to start working as a Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Mechanic. A Journeyperson may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Become an estimator Start own business Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Maintenance Worker Pipe Fitter Steamfitter-Pipefitter Sheet Metal Worker

74

CONSTRUCTION

Roofer

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Roofers install, repair or replace flat roofs and shingles, shakes or other roofing tiles on sloped roofs. Shinglers install and replace shingles, tiles, and similar coverings on sloped roofs. Roofers perform some or all of the following duties: · Install, repair or replace built-up roofing system using materials such as asphalt saturated felts and hot asphalt and gravel · Install, repair or replace single-ply and two-ply modified roofing systems using waterproof sheet materials such as modified plastics · Install sheet metal flashings · Install and repair metal roofs · Apply waterproofing coatings to concrete or other masonry surfaces · Install and repair slate and tiles The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects, such as ladders and roofing materials. Physical fitness with strong upper body combined with agility and a comfort working at heights are assets. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7291

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Roofers can earn $10 - $20.95 per hour, averaging $15.49 per hour. Unionized journeyperson roofers make between $26.29 - $31.90 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Sheet Metal and Roofers Local 562: 1 519 744 1311 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Roofer? · Roofing contractors · They may be self-employed

Work Conditions

A Roofer is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Roofer depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Roofers can earn $10 - $20.95 per hour, averaging $15.49 per hour. Unionized journeyperson roofers make between $26.29 - $31.90 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

75

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or about 6 000 h, including 480 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, the completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Construction Technology Communication skills and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, hoisting erecting and taking down scaffolding, using hand and power tools.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Roofer but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Construction Trades · Repairers and Servicers

76

CONSTRUCTION

Sheet Metal Worker

(T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Sheet Metal Workers shape a flat sheet of metal, lay out and form sheet metal products such as: · Furnace and duct systems in homes · Oven and drying systems in an autobody plant · Heating and ventilating systems in high-rise office towers Sheet Metal Workers: · Read engineering drawings · Read and interpret field sketches used in fabrication and erection of products · Manufacture, fabricate, assemble, handle, install, adjust, alter, repair, and recondition sheet metal products · Work with plastics when constructing certain type of systems Sheet Metal Workers work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7261

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Sheet Metal Workers can earn $13.40 - $28.95 per hour, averaging $22.82 per hour. Unionized journeypersons earn from $31.50 - $38.85 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Sheet Metal and Roofers, Local 562: 1 519 744 1311 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Sheet Metal Worker? · · · · · Sheet metal manufacturing companies Air-conditioning and heating Contractors Machine shops Some Sheet Metal Workers are self employed

Work Conditions

A Sheet Metal Worker is a compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in this trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory trades, the Co-op student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Sheet Metal Workers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Sheet Metal Workers can earn $13.40 $28.95 per hour, averaging $22.82 per hour. Unionized journeypersons earn from $31.50 - $38.85 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

77

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or about 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing Technology (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, tool technology, bench work technology, blueprint reading, weld and cut, test adjust and balance, fabricate and install sheet metal products.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson or a registration in the apprenticeship is needed to start working as a Sheet Metal Worker . Once the apprenticeship is completed, a journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Coppersmith Cutter Model Maker Estimator Air-conditioning Mechanic

78

CONSTRUCTION

Sprinkler & Fire Protection Installer

(T.Q.A.A., voluntary certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers lay out, assemble and install: · Water, foam and dry chemical sprinkler systems for fire protection purposes · Piping in any building or structure, and piping for any process connected with fire protection Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers: · Read and interpret design drawings, manufacturer's literature and installation diagrams · Test, maintain and repair all piping systems carrying water for fire protection Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers work indoors and outdoors, in industrial settings, and in residential and commercial buildings. There are potential hazards due to bursting pipes. The work sometimes involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7252

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers can earn $16.70 - $33.30 per hour, averaging $27.43 per hour.Unionized journeypersons earn from $33.90 - $40.90 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 United Association Sprinkler Fitters, Local 853: 1 800 387 7085 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installer? Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers work for: · · · · Manufacturing companies Building contractors Maintenance departments of factories and businesses Other unionized companies

Work Conditions

A Sprinkler and Fire Installer is a voluntary certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. Under TQAA, for voluntary trades, the Co-op student does not have to be a registered apprentice and therefore does not have to be paid during school hours. Students who become registered apprentices may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installers can earn $16.70 - $33.30 per hour, averaging $27.43 per hour. Unionized journeypersons earn from $33.90 - $40.90 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

79

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 7 200 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology Communication, analytical and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings, blueprint reading, physics, system design, plumbing code.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Sprinkler and Fire Protection Installer but registration in the apprenticeship is recommended. A Journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Become an inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Plumber, Steamfitter, Pipefitter · Air-conditioning Mechanic

80

CONSTRUCTION

Steamfitter

(T.Q.A.A. compulsory certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Steamfitters lay out, assemble and install: · Heating systems, cooling systems, or industrial systems · Piping in any building or structure · Piping for any process, including a process that conveys gas, or the tubing for any pneumatic or air handling system Steamfitters read and interpret: · Design drawings, manufacturer's literature and installation diagrams. Steamfitters maintain and repair all piping systems carrying water, gas, oil, steam, chemicals and fuel. Steamfitters work indoors and outdoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. Shift work is not unusual and a five-day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7252

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Steamfitters can earn $16.70 - $33.30 per hour, averaging $27.43 per hour. Unionized journeyperson steamfitters make between $31 and $38.74 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: United Association Local 527: 1 519 746 3300 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Steamfitter? · · · · · Manufacturing companies Air-conditioning and heating contractors Machine shops Old buildings, schools Some Steamfitters are self employed

Work Conditions

A Steamfitter is a T.Q.A.A. compulsory certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. Under TQAA, for compulsory trades, the Co-op student must be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of a Steamfitter depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Steamfitters can earn $16.70 $33.30 per hour, averaging $27.43 per hour. Unionized journeyperson steamfitters make between $31 and $38.74 per hour as a total wage package which includes benefits.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

81

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or about 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing Technology (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, measuring and checking, blueprint reading, physics, pipe and fitting materials, system design, plumbing code, pipe assembly, weld and cut, rig and hoist, heating and cooling condenser system, troubleshooting.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a Steamfitter or registration as an apprentice is needed to start working as a Steamfitter. A Journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Plumber · Air-conditioning Mechanic

82

CONSTRUCTION

Tower Crane Operator

(HOISTING ENGINEER, Branch 3) (T.Q.A.A., compulsory certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? There are several different jobs that crane operators do. One job involves operating a mobile crane. A "Tower Crane" is a mechanical device or structure capable of moving loads in both vertical and horizontal planes. It is of a fixed, traveling, or climbing type and includes a boom, power driven drum, and a wire rope to raise, lower or lift material. A Tower Crane Operator: · Maintains and operates tower cranes that are capable of lifting and moving weights of more than 7 000 kg · Moves machinery or materials from place to place on a construction site, port, industrial site or railway yard

NOC 7371

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Tower Crane Operators can earn $15$26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 International Union of Operating Engineers Local 793: 1 519 658 4724 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Tower Crane Operators? · · · · Docks or Ports Railway Yards Construction Contractors Industry (Crane Operators load and unload ships, trains, or to move materials at a construction or industrial site)

Work Conditions

A Tower Crane Operator is a compulsory certified trade, T.Q.A.A. trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice. Under TQAA, for compulsory trades, the Co-op student may be a registered apprentice and may be paid according to the Regulations.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Tower Crane Operators depends on the employer. In unionized places the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. The rate of wages for an apprentice is a specified percentage of a journeyperson's wage according to experience and level of training. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Tower Crane Operators can earn $15 $26.42 per hour, averaging $20.43 per hour. Unionized wages are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

83

Apprenticeship

· Takes about two years or 4 000 h, (including about 6 weeks of the in-school post secondary school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive both a Certificate of Apprenticeship and a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Offers (optional) an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) after more training

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 10 (or equivalent). However, completion of Grade 12 (OSSD) is advantageous. The following competencies are valuable: · English · Construction Technology · Communication skills Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects. Must be signed as an apprentice to qualify for Co-op.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, communications, crane components and devices, pre-operation, pre-lift set-up and planning, assembly and disassembly of a crane, transporting a crane, operating a crane, maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is required to start working as a crane operator. After that, a Tower Crane Operator may: (pursue Branch 1 qualifications) · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Operate other types of cranes Pre-lift planner Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Heavy Equipment Operator · Boom Truck Operator · Bridge Crane Operator

84

INDUSTRIAL

Aircraft Maintenance Engineer

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Aircraft Maintenance Engineers adjust, repair, and overhaul aircraft instruments, electrical, or avionics systems on aircraft. They may perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · Inspect, repair, and overhaul aircraft instruments Install and test aircraft instruments Inspect, repair, and overhaul electrical systems Inspect, repair, and overhaul aircraft electronic systems including navigational and communication equipment · Troubleshoot aircraft structural, mechanical, and hydraulic systems and repair according to specifications · Dismantle, repair, and reinstall aircraft engines and other systems Although many aircraft systems are similar they can present problems that are both similar and different. A maintenance engineer normally works a standard forty-hour week.

NOC 7315

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County Aircraft Maintenance Engineers can earn $10 - $31 per hour, averaging $16 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Aircraft Maintenance Engineers? · · · · Aircraft manufacturing companies Maintenance and overhaul Establishments Other aircraft operators

Work Conditions

An Aircraft Maintenance Engineer is a non-restricted certified trade. A person is not required to have a Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but being registered as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County Aircraft Maintenance Engineers can earn $10 - $31 per hour, averaging $16 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

85

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 5 years or 9 000 h (including 720 h of post secondary in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued, there is no Certificate of Qualification · Offers (optional) an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining tools and equipment, welding, soldering, repairing bodies, repairing or replacing electrical, heating and cooling components, engine systems, electronic and electrical and fuel systems, gear train systems, suspension and steering systems.

Opportunity to Grow

There is no Certificate of Qualification and a Certificate of Apprenticeship is not required to start working as an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer but an apprenticeship is recommended. Becoming an Apprentice is the beginning. After that, an Aircraft Maintenance Engineer may become a foreperson or a supervisor, get an Aircraft Maintenance Engineers' license issued by Transport Canada work in related areas or occupations.

Related Occupations

· Aircraft Inspector · Engine Assemblers · Avionics Mechanics

86

INDUSTRIAL

Draftsperson Mechanical

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Draftspersons develop and prepare accurate and detailed engineering drawings from preliminary concepts, sketches, calculations, specification sheets and other data. These technical drawings describe size, shape, function of objects and their structure. Draftspersons use computers and computer-aided design (CAD) and graphics drafting stations to make drawings for: · · · · · Industrial machines Machine parts Engines Tools Other mechanical equipment

NOC 2253

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Draftspersons use their eyes and hands as well as their minds. They work with other people as a team, and display patience. The work is done in an office setting. Most Draftspersons work at a computer terminal. Eye strain, wrist and hand problems and back discomfort are common complaints. Must be well organized and neat. Some Draftspersons are paid salaries and others work for wages.

Place of Work

Who needs Draftspersons ? · · · · Architectural and engineering firms Manufacturers Surveying and mapping companies Municipal and provincial and federal governments

Work Conditions

A Draftsperson is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

87

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 to 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 600 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Sciences Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology (Mechanics) Communication, problem-solving, and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, tools and equipment, measuring devices, trade calculations, trade communication, computer technology, graphics, design, physics, CAD, machines, architecture.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Draftsperson. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Industrial Graphics Designer · Architectural Technologist · Civil Engineering

88

INDUSTRIAL

DraftspersonPlastic Mould Design

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Draftspersons develop and prepare accurate and detailed engineering drawings from preliminary concepts, sketches, calculations, specification sheets and other data. These technical drawings describe size, shape, function of objects and their structure. Draftspersons: · Use computers and computer-aided design (CAD) and graphics drafting stations to make drawings for: Complex templates, patterns, plastic moulds, tooling for mould-making and tooling for mould modification · Use their eyes and hands as well as minds · Work with other people as a team · Display patience The work is done in an office setting. Most Draftspersons work at a computer terminal. Eye strain, wrist and hand problems and back discomfort are common complaints. Must be well organized and neat. Some Draftspersons are paid salaries and others work for wages.

NOC 2253

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Draftspersons ? · · · · Architectural and engineering firms Manufacturers Surveying and mapping companies Municipal and provincial and federal governments

Work Conditions

A Draftsperson is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

89

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 600 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Sciences Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology (Mechanics) Communication, problem-solving, and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, tools and equipment, measuring devices, trade calculations, trade communication, computer technology, graphics, design, physics, CAD, machines, architecture.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Draftsperson. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Industrial Graphics Designer · Architectural Technologist · Civil Engineering

90

INDUSTRIAL

DraftspersonTool and Die Design

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Draftspersons develop and prepare accurate and detailed engineering drawings from preliminary concepts, sketches, calculations, specification sheets and other data. These technical drawings describe size, shape, function of objects and their structure. Draftspersons: · Use computers and computer-aided design (CAD) and graphics drafting stations, make drawings for: complex templates and patterns, components for tooling, dies, other tooling components · Use their eyes and hands as well as minds · Work with other people as a team · Display patience The work is done in an office setting. Most Draftspersons work at a computer terminal. Eye strain, wrist and hand problems and back discomfort are common complaints. Must be well organized and neat. Some Draftspersons are paid salaries and others work for wages.

NOC 2253

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Draftspersons? · Engineering firms · Manufacturers · Municipal and provincial and federal governments

Work Conditions

A Draftsperson is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Draftspersons can earn $8 to $28.80 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

91

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 to 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 600 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Sciences Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology (Mechanics) Communication, problem-solving, and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, tools and equipment, measuring devices, trade calculations, trade communication, computer technology, graphics, design, physics, CAD, machines, architecture.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Draftsperson. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Industrial Graphics Designer · Architectural Technologist · Civil Engineering

92

INDUSTRIAL

Electrician-Industrial

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Industrial Electricians perform numerous tasks involving heavy industrial electric machines: · Lay out, assemble, install, repair, maintain, connect or test electrical systems and controls · Plan installations from blueprints, interpret specifications, and installs all electrical equipment and machines · Diagnose faults in electrical systems and components, measure, cut, splice, and bend conduits · Test and repair electrical and electronic equipment In general, Industrial Electricians work shifts. The work involves a lot of standing up. Electricians must pay close attention to safety because the work presents many hazards. Electricians work primarily indoors.

NOC 7242

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Electricians can earn $17.14 $30.09 per hour, averaging $22.93 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs electricians? · · · · · Manufacturing plants Light to heavy industry Marinas Mills Factories and plants

Work Conditions

An Industrial Electrician is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Electricians can earn $17.14 - $30.09 per hour, averaging $22.93 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

93

Apprenticeship

· Takes 4 to 5 years or 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Construction Technology Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning, and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, electric code, trade calculations, blueprints and installations, trade communication, construction layouts, electrical-electronic theory, installation methods, fire alarm and building systems, control systems, power distribution.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as an Industrial Electrician is not required to start working in the electrical trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson an electrician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Work as an industrial inspector · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Power System Electrician · Power Lineperson · Construction and Maintenance Electrician

94

INDUSTRIAL

General Machinist

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Machinists: · Cut, shape and finish metal to make machine components used in all parts of manufacturing · Set up and operate precision metal cutting machines · Plan and prepare for the machine process · Perform surface measurements and calculations · Read engineering drawings · Work with machines, motor vehicles, automotive parts, and aircraft Machinists work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. There is a lot of standing while the machine is working. The work is often repetitive but CNC machines are used to perform long production runs. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7231

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington county, General Machinists can earn $12.75 $22 per hour, averaging $17.69 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Millwrights Local 1916: 1 905 385 2462 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Machinist? · Manufacturing companies · Machine shops · Some machinists are self employed but most work for a company

Work Conditions

A machinist is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington county, General Machinists can earn $12.75 - $22 per hour, averaging $17.69 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

95

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued but apprentices must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing Technology (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning, and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, metallurgy science, precision measuring and checking, tool geometry/tool and cutter grinding technology, turning technology, NC/CNC technology

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a General Machinist but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a machinist may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Automotive Machinist Machined Parts Inspector Machine Shop Inspector Maintenance Machinist Tooling Inspector

96

INDUSTRIAL

Industrial Mechanic Millwright

(A.C.A. non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Industrial Mechanics Millwrights install, maintain and repair stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment. Millwrights: · Read and interpret diagrams and schematic drawings to determine work procedures · Install stationary industrial machinery and mechanical equipment according to layout plans using hand and power tools · Operate hoisting and lifting devices to position machinery and parts during the installation, set-up and repair of machinery · Construct foundations for machinery or direct other workers to construct foundations Industrial Mechanic Millwrights work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. There is heavy lifting and bending. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7311

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Mechanic Millwrights can earn $14.58 - $23.68 per hour, averaging $19.18 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Millwrights Local 1916: 1 905 385 2452 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Industrial Mechanic Millwrights? · · · · · · Manufacturing Automotive parts and assembly Textile industry Food processing Mining and forestry industries Some millwrights are self employed

Work Conditions

An Industrial Mechanic Millwright is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Mechanic Millwrights can earn $14.58 - $23.68 per hour, averaging $19.18 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

97

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Completion of the apprenticeship entitles a person to a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Design Technology (Drafting) Manufacturing Technology (Mechanics) Communication, analytical, and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout, NC/CNC technology, seals and packing, power transmission system, compressors and pumps, welding, fans and blowers, pneumatics and hydraulic systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a millwright but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, an Industrial Millwright may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as a contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Machined Parts Inspector · Machine Shop Inspector · Machining Inspector

98

INDUSTRIAL

Industrial Wood Worker

(A.C.A., non-restricted trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Industrial Woodworkers set up, program, and operate one or more woodworking machines to fabricate or repair wooden parts for furniture, fixtures, or other wood products. They may perform some or all of the following duties: · Read and interpret blueprints and construction drawings · Select materials · Set up, program, and operate one or more computerized or manual woodworking machines such as saws, routers, planers, drills, and sanders to fabricate or repair wooden parts of furniture, fixtures or other wood products · Operate gluing machines and presses to affix wood veneer to wood surfaces · Clean and lubricate equipment · Repair and restyle wooden furniture Industrial Woodworkers work indoors in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. There is a lot of standing. A five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7272

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Woodworkers can earn $10 - $18 per hour, averaging $13.68 per hour. Unionized wages rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs an Industrial Woodworker ? · Manufacturing companies making furniture, kitchen and washroom cabinets · Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Industrial Woodworker is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Industrial Woodworkers can earn $10 - $18 per hour, averaging $13.68 per hour. Unionized wages rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

99

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or 8 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time it takes to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · An Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade in Ontario

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Design Technology (Drafting) Construction Technology (Woodworking) Communication and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/blueprint reading, planing, shaping, gluing, setting up computerized machines.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a woodworker but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a woodworker may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Carpenter Cabinetmaker Contractor Custom Wood Furniture Maker

100

INDUSTRIAL

Locksmith

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Locksmiths inspect, repair, adjust and install locks and make keys. Locksmiths perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · · · · · Inspect and repair locks Inspect, test, and repair mechanical parts of locks Make keys Install door and frame components to secure locks Change combinations on locks Respond to emergencies when people lock themselves out Consult manufacturers' manuals and specifications Determine costs and estimates

NOC 7383

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, local information about the wages of Locksmiths was unavailable. In Ontario their wages are between $15 and $30 per hour averaging $18.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Locksmiths normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. Must be prepared to respond in emergency calls.

Place of Work

Who needs Locksmiths? · Shops providing service of installing, repairing locks, changing lock combinations and making keys · Some Locksmiths are self-employed

Work Conditions

A Locksmith is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Apprenticeship to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, local information about the wages of Locksmiths was unavailable. In Ontario their wages are between $15 and $30 per hour averaging $18.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

101

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 to 4 years or about 7 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Manufacturing (Mechanics) Communication and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining hand and power tools and equipment, measuring devices, shop equipment, trade calculations, trade communication, estimating costs.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Locksmith. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A Journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Safe and Vault Servicer · Gunsmith

102

INDUSTRIAL

Machine Tool Builder & Integrator

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Machine Tool Builders and Integrators: · Build, assemble, and integrate parts and components on stand-alone and multi-station automated machine tool systems · Read and interpret complex engineering drawings, schematics, bill of materials, machine-tool build assembly drawings · Use lathes, mills, saws, drills, grinders and welding equipment to build and prepare tooling · Perform Numerically Controlled (NC) and Computerized Numerical Controlled (CNC) machining · Devise and detail assembly plans for the machine-tool build and integrator process · Assemble and integrate pneumatics and hydraulics, electrical components, power transmission systems, conveyor systems, and feeder systems · Sub-assemble machine tool components · Integrate main-assembly · Build in-process tooling

NOC 7316

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Machine Tool Builders and Integrators can earn $15.95 - $23.89 per hour, averaging $19.51 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Millwrights Local 1916: 1 905 385 2462 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Machine Tool Builders and Integrators? · Manufacturing · Industries · Machine shops

Work Conditions

A Machine Tool Builder and Integrator is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Machine Tool Builders and Integrators can earn $15.95 - $23.89 per hour, averaging $19.51 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

103

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 7 280 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and analytical skills, dexterity and ability to visualize multi-dimensions

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, tool geometry/tool and cutter grinding technology, turning technology, milling technology, NC/CNC technology for mould making.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Machine Tool Builder and Integrator but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Machine Tool Builder and Integrator may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Aircraft assemblers (in 9481 Aircraft Assemblers and Aircraft Assembly Inspectors) · Assemblers of electrical industrial equipment (in 9485 Assemblers, Fabricators and Inspectors, Industrial Electrical Motors and Transformers) · Mechanical Assemblers and Inspectors (9486) · Millwrights (in 7311 Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (Except Textile) · Supervisors of machine fitters (in 7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades) · Welders and Related Machine Operators (7265) · Machined Parts Inspector · Machine Shop Inspector · Tool and Die Maker

104

INDUSTRIAL

Mould Maker

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Mould Makers are machinists who: · Read and interpret drawings, and specifications of moulds and prototypes or models · Repair, design and make moulds to mass produce plastic or metal components and products · Compute tolerances and set up machines · Use metal-cutting machines and specialized equipment to build moulds and models · Fit and assemble moulds for plastic injection moulding or other production processes · Fabricate mould components · Finish and polish moulds for the moulding process Mould Makers work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. There is a lot of standing while the machine is working. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7232

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mould Makers can earn $13 - $26.05 per hour, averaging $20.72 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Millwrights Local 1916: 1 905 385 2462 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Mould Makers? · · · · Manufacturing Industries Mould making shops Some mould makers are self- employed

Work Conditions

A Mould Maker is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Mould Makers can earn $13 - $26.05 per hour, averaging $20.72 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

105

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and analytical skills, dexterity and ability to visualize multi-dimensions

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, tool geometry/tool and cutter grinding technology, turning technology, milling technology, NC/CNC technology for mould making.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Mould Maker but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Mould Maker may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Machined Parts Inspector Machine Shop Inspector Tool and Die Maker Machining Tool Operator Tool/Tooling Maker

106

INDUSTRIAL

Tool & Die Maker

(A.C.A., non-restricted trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Tool and Die Makers are machinists who: · Read and interpret drawings, and specifications of tools, dies, prototypes or models · Compute tolerances and set up machines · Cut, turn, mill, plane, bore, grind or otherwise shape and finish metal to make tools and dies used in all parts of manufacturing · Perform surface measurements and calculations on completed tools, dies, jigs and fixtures and verifies for conformance to specifications using precision measuring instruments · Machine, fit and assemble parts and castings to make metal moulds for plastic injection moulding Tool and Die Makers work indoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work is often repetitive but CNC machines are used to perform long production runs. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7232

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Tool and Die Makers can earn $13 - $26.05 per hour, averaging $20.72 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Millwrights Local 1916: 1 905 385 2462 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs a Tool and Die Makers? · · · · Manufacturing and stamping industries Tool and die and machine shops Mould making shops Some Tool and Die Makers are self- employed but most work for a company

Work Conditions

A Tool and Die Maker is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice is recommended to work in the trade. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Tool and Die Makers can earn $13 - $26.05 per hour, averaging $20.72 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

107

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · · English Computers Mathematics Physics Manufacturing (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and analytical skills, dexterity and ability to visualize multi-dimensions

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/layout development, stamping, milling technology, NC/CNC technology.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Tool and Die Maker but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Tool and Die Maker may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business as a contractor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Machinist · Machined Parts Inspector · Tooling Inspector

108

INDUSTRIAL

Welders (Welder Fitter)

(A.C.A., non-restricted trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Welder Fitters perform some or all of the following duties: · Read and interpret blueprints, or welding process specifications · Operate manual or semi-automatic welding equipment to fuse metal segments using processes such as gas tungsten arc (GTAW), gas metal arc (GMAW), flux-cored arc (FAX), plasma arc (PAW), shielded metal arc (SMAW), resistance welding and submerged arc welding (SAW) · Operate manual or semi-automatic flame-cutting equipment · Operate blazing and soldering equipment · Operate metal shaping machines such as shears and brakes Welder-fitters work indoors and outdoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. There is a lot of standing. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 7265

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Welder Fitters can earn $12 $23.05 per hour, averaging $16.94 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Boiler Makers Union Local 128: 1 905 547 9492 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Welder Fitters? · Manufacturing companies · Machine shops that produce structural steel and platework, boilers, heavy machinery, aircraft, ships · Welding contractors · Many are also self-employed

Work Conditions

A welder is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Apprenticeship or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Welder Fitters can earn $12 - $23.05 per hour, averaging $16.94 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

109

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 6 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification · An Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade in Ontario

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and mechanical skills, good hand-eye co-ordination

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/blueprint reading,, cutting, soldering, welding, brazing, operating welding equipment, operate shaping machines and shop maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a welder but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a Welder Fitter may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Brazing and Soldering Machine Operators · Contractors and supervisors · Underwater Welders

110

INDUSTRIAL

Welding Machine Operator

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Welding Machine Operators perform some or all of the following duties: · Operate manual or semi-automatic welding equipment, which has been preset, to fuse metal segments using processes such as gas tungsten arc (GTAW), gas metal arc (GMAW), flux-cored arc (FAX), plasma arc (PAW), shielded metal arc (SMAW), resistance welding and submerged arc welding (SAW) · operate manual or semi-automatic flame-cutting equipment · operate blazing and soldering equipment · perform spot welding Welders work indoors and outdoors, usually in industrial settings that may be noisy and potentially hazardous. The work often involves lifting and carrying heavy objects. There is a lot of standing. Shift work is not unusual and a five day work week of 35 to 40 hours is standard.

NOC 9510

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Welders can earn $8 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Boiler Makers Union Local 128: 1 905 547 9492 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Welders? · Manufacturing companies · Machine shops that produce structural steel and platework, boilers, heavy machinery, aircraft, ships · Welding contractors · Many are also self-employed

Work Conditions

A welder is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Welders can earn $8 - $27.50 per hour, averaging $16.25 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

111

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or about 6 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · An Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade in Ontario

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Manufacturing Technology (Machining) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication and mechanical skills, good hand-eye co-ordination

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, applied trade calculations, engineering drawings/blueprint reading,, soldering, welding, brazing, operating welding equipment, operate shaping machines and shop maintenance.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a welder but an apprenticeship is recommended. After that, a welder may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Welder-Fitter · Contractors and Supervisors · Underwater Welders

112

MOTIVE

Alignment & Brakes Technician

(A.CA., restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Alignment and Brakes Technicians specialize in braking and steering systems and in alignment of wheels. They diagnose and repair: · · · · · Faulty alignment of wheels Faulty steering mechanisms Problems with axles and frames Faulty brakes and braking systems and controls Torsion bars, joining pins, ball joints, and bushings

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Alignment and Brakes Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Alignment and Brakes Technicians:

· Use hand and power tools to correct or replace faulty parts · Consult service and owner manuals · Advise customers of potential problems and proper maintenance procedures There is a great variety of problems to solve and tasks to perform. A Service Technician normally works a standard forty-hour week changing brake pads, turning rotors, lubricating joints, and topping up brake and steering fluids.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Alignment and Brakes Technicians? · · · · Retail industry Automotive repair shops Service stations Car or truck dealerships

Work Conditions

An Alignment and Brakes Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in this trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, non-union Alignment and Brakes Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

113

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 years or 5 000 h (including 720 h of post secondary in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication skills and mechanical aptitude

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining tools and equipment, brake systems, suspension systems, steering systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification (as a journeyperson) or registration as an apprentice in the trade is required to start working as an Alignment and Brakes Technician. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own automotive repair shop · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Parts Person · Automotive Service Technician · Inspector, Tester, Assembler

114

MOTIVE

Auto Body Repairer & Collision Damage Repairer

(A.CA., restricted certified trade, branch 1)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Auto Body Repairers and Collision Damage Repairers: · Repair, reshape and refit body panels, fenders, hoods, bumpers, and other exterior parts of motor vehicles · Weld breaks in body panels, fenders and other components · Shrink and stretch metal panels by heat treatment · Repair, remove or replace wiring harnesses, air-conditioning systems and water pumps · Straighten and align frames and unibody assemblies · Remove or replace electrical, electronic or vacuum components · Remove, replace or adjust steering and suspension components · Align wheels · Prepare the vehicle for repainting, select and apply the paint. No two damaged vehicles are alike and so there is a new problem to solve every time. A repairer normally works indoors, a standard 40-hour week. The work may be physically hard and hazardous.

NOC 7322

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Auto Body Repairers can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Auto Body Repairers? · Independent auto body shops · Shops associated with car or truck dealerships · Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Auto Body Repairers can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

115

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 years or 7 200 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication, planning, and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, preparing a vehicle for painting, using and maintaining tools and equipment, removing and replacing trim, hardware and glass, welding, soldering, repairing bodies, repairing or replacing electrical, heating and cooling components, painting technology.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is needed to start working as a Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer or at least registration as an apprentice. After becoming a journeyperson a repairer may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own auto body shop business Become an insurance appraiser Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Automotive Service Technician Sheet Metal Worker Machinist Welder

116

MOTIVE

Auto Body Repairer

(A.CA., restricted certified trade, branch 2)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Auto Body Repairer and Collision Damage Repairers: · Repair, reshape and refit body panels, fenders, hoods, bumpers, and other exterior parts of motor vehicles · Weld breaks in body panels, fenders and other components · Shrink and stretch metal panels by heat treatment · Repair, remove or replace wiring harnesses, air-conditioning systems and water pumps · Straighten and align frames and unibody assemblies · Remove or replace electrical, electronic or vacuum components · Remove, replace or adjust steering and suspension components · Repair doors and frames · Work on underbody components · Review damage, estimate costs No two damaged vehicles are alike and so there is a new problem to solve every time. A repairer normally works a standard 40-hour week. The work may be physically hard and may be hazardous.

NOC 7322

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Auto Body Repairers can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Auto Body Repairers? · Independent auto body shops · Shops associated with car or truck dealerships · Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Auto Body Repairer is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Auto Body Repairers can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

117

Apprenticeship

· Takes 2 to 3 years or 4 800 h, including 480 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available for Branch 2 of this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication, planning, and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, preparing a vehicle for painting, using and maintaining tools and equipment, hardware and glass, welding, soldering, repairing bodies, repairing or replacing electrical, heating and cooling components, painting technology.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson or registration as an apprenticeship is required to start working as a Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer. After becoming a journeyperson a repairer may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own auto body shop business Become an insurance appraiser Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Sheet Metal Worker · Machinist, and Welder

118

MOTIVE

Automotive Painter

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? In addition to painting vehicles, Automotive Painters: · Prepare the surface for painting by sanding and masking the work area · Know how to treat different surfaces, such as steel, plastic, and aluminum, to achieve a durable and attractive finish · Pay attention to details · Mix paint and matches colours Paint fumes are part of the job. Good ventilation and wearing a mask is essential. Most shops have special fume-exhaust systems to disperse paint fumes. Most Automotive Painters work a standard 40-hour week. The work requires good colour vision, good physical stamina, and artistic aptitude.

NOC 7322

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Automotive Painters can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Place of Work

Who needs Automotive Painters? · · · · Independent auto body shops Shop associated with car or truck dealerships Automobile manufacturers Some are self employed

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Work Conditions

An Automotive Painter is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification but registration as an apprentice to work in the trade is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Automotive Painters can earn $8 - $23 per hour, averaging $14.40 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

119

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 years or 3 600 h, including the post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship, an apprentice receives a Certificate of Apprenticeship · To receive a Certificate of Qualification (with journeyperson status), passing the Provincial Qualifying Exam is mandatory · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is available for this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology Communication and painting skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, preparing a vehicle for painting, using and maintaining tools and equipment, removing and replacing trim, hardware and glass, welding, soldering, repairing bodies, repairing or replacing electrical, heating and cooling components, painting technology.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as an Automotive Painter but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson an Automotive Painter may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own auto body shop business Become an insurance appraiser Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Auto Body Repairer · Automotive Service Technician

120

MOTIVE

Automotive Service Technician

(A.CA., restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Automotive Service Technicians keep cars and light trucks running smoothly. They may specialize and work on one part of the vehicle but many work on the whole vehicle. Automotive Service Technicians diagnose and repair: · · · · · · · · · Engine and engine management systems Electrical, starting and charging systems Ventilation and air-conditioning systems Transmission, clutches, drive shaft, differential, and drive axle Fuel delivery systems Suspension systems and frames Steering and braking systems Tires, wheels, rims, and hubs Body and trim

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Automotive Service Technicians can earn $9.46 $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

There is a great variety of problems to solve and tasks to perform. A Service Technician normally works a standard 40-hour week changing oil, lubricating joints and performing tune-ups.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Automotive Service Technicians? · · · · · Retail industry Automotive repair shops Service stations Car or truck dealerships Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Automotive Service Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Automotive Service Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

121

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 5 years or 9 000 h including 720 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology Design Technology Communication, planning, and problem-solving skills and mechanical aptitude

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum at Conestoga College or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, welding, soldering, repairing or replacing electrical, heating and cooling components, engine systems, electronic and electrical systems, fuel systems, gear train systems, suspension and steering and brake systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is required to start working as an Automotive Service Technician. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own automotive shop · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Auto Body Repairer, Parts Person · Mechanical Installer and Servicer · Heavy-Duty Equipment Servicer

122

MOTIVE

Farm Equipment Technician

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Farm Equipment Technicians repair, overhaul, and maintain mobile heavy-duty equipment used in landscaping, land clearing, farming, and similar activities. They perform the following tasks: · Check bulldozers, tractors, graders, combines, plows, spreaders, planters, sprayers, and other heavy equipment for proper performance, and inspect equipment for faults and malfunction · Adjust, repair or replace defective parts, using hand and power tools · Clean and lubricate, and perform other tasks to make the equipment safe and functional · Use specialized electronic equipment for diagnosis Farm Equipment Technicians normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. They work both indoors and outdoors and need to have a strong physical stamina. Sometimes they will perform tasks on site, on a farm.

NOC 7312

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Farm Equipment Technicians can earn $12.90 - $20.10 per hour, averaging $16.70 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Farm Equipment Technicians ? · Dealerships · Repair shops · Landscaping companies

Work Conditions

Farm Equipment Technician is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Farm Equipment Technicians can earn $12.90 - $20.10 per hour, averaging $16.70 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

123

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 1/2 years or 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and can write a Provincial Qualification Exam for a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Offers (optional) an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Science Mathematics Planning skills Transportation Technology Communication, planning and problem solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, welding, motive power suspension systems, motive power engine systems, motive power electrical, electronic and fuel systems, motive power gear train systems, stirring and brake systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Farm Equipment Technician but apprenticeship is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a mechanic may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Aircraft Maintenance Technician · Crane Operator, Mining Machine Operator

124

MOTIVE

Fuel & Electrical Systems Technician

(A.CA., restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Fuel and Electrical Systems Technicians specialize in repairing and replacing components of the fuel and electrical systems in cars, trucks, and buses. They inspect, diagnose, and repair: Faults in fuel systems Engine management systems Faults in ignition, charging, and starting systems Emission control systems Panel instruments, wiring, and other electrical and electronic systems and equipment · Air-conditioning and refrigeration/heating systems · · · · ·

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Fuel and Electrical Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Fuel and Electrical Systems Technicians:

· · · · Use hand and power tools to correct or replace faulty parts Perform engine tune-ups Consult service and owner manuals Advise customers of problems and proper maintenance procedures

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

There is a great variety of problems to solve and tasks to perform. A Technician normally works a standard forty-hour week. This may include weekends and holidays.

Place of Work

Who needs Fuel and Electrical Technicians? · · · · Retail industry Automotive repair shops Service stations Car or truck dealerships

Work Conditions

A Fuel and Electrical Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Fuel and Electrical Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

125

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 to 6 years or 5 400 h including 480 h of post secondary in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Mechanics Science Transportation Technology Communication and problem-solving skills, mechanical aptitude and manual dexterity

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, engine systems, engine management, gear train systems, exhaust and emission systems, electrical and fuel systems, air-conditioning and refrigeration systems, lubrication, electricity and electronics.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification is required to start working as a Fuel and Electrical Technician or at least registration as an apprentice in the trade. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own automotive repair shop · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Parts Person · Automotive Technician · Inspector, Tester, Assembler

126

MOTIVE

Heavy-Duty Equipment Technician (Mechanic)

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Heavy-Duty Equipment Technicians repair, overhaul, and maintain mobile heavy-duty equipment used in construction, forestry, mining, material handling, landscaping land clearing, farming, and similar activities. They perform the following tasks: · Check bulldozers, cranes, graders, and other heavy equipment for proper performance, and inspect equipment for faults and malfunction · Adjust, repair or replace defective parts, using hand and power tools · Clean and lubricate, and perform other tasks to make the equipment safe and functional · Use specialized equipment for diagnosis Heavy-Duty Equipment Technicians normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. They work both inside and outdoors and need to have a strong physical stamina.

NOC 7312

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, HeavyDuty Equipment Technicians can earn $12.90 - $20.10 per hour, averaging $16.68 per hour. Unionized wages are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Heavy -Duty Equipment Technicians ? · · · · Mining, forestry, construction companies Landscaping companies and farmers Municipalities Road construction and cleaning companies

Work Conditions

Heavy-Duty Equipment Technician is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Heavy-Duty Equipment Technicians can earn $12.90 - $20.10 per hour, averaging $16.68 per hour. Unionized wages are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

127

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 1/2 years or 9 000 h, including 720 h of in-school post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship and can write a Certificate of Qualification Exam for a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Science Mathematics Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining tools and equipment, welding, motive power suspension systems, motive power engine systems, motive power electrical, electronic and fuel systems, motive power gear train systems, stirring and brake systems.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Heavy-Duty Equipment Technician but an apprenticeship is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a mechanic may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Aircraft Maintenance Technician · Crane Operator, Mining Machine Operator

128

MOTIVE

Motorcycle Mechanic

(A.C.A., restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Motorcycle Mechanics: · Repair and maintain motorcycles, motor scooters, mopeds, and all-terrain vehicles · Inspect, test and repair engines · Inspect, test and repair mechanical parts, such as brakes and carburetor, and electrical and fuel systems · Discuss with customers problems, estimate costs and preventative maintenance · Consult manufacturers' manuals and specifications Motorcycle Mechanics normally work a standard 40-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays but the work is seasonal and slow in winter. Some Motorcycle Mechanics work on snowmobile machines in winter. The work sometimes involves heavy lifting, bending and standing.

NOC 7334

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Motorcycle Mechanics can earn $11 to $20 per hour, averaging $16.60 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Motorcycle Mechanics ? · · · · Motorcycle dealerships Motorcycle shops Garages Some Motorcycle Mechanics are self-employed

Work Conditions

Motorcycle Mechanic is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Motorcycle Mechanics can earn $11 to $20 per hour, averaging $16.60 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

129

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 5 400 h, including 480 h of in-school training); prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of the apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication, problem-solving, and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, engines, transmission and mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, frames, wheels and brakes, welding, trade calculations, trade communication.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification or registration as an apprentice is required to start working as a Motorcycle Mechanic. A Journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own motorcycle shop business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Small Engines Technician · Heavy-Duty Equipment Technician

130

MOTIVE

Partsperson (Automotive)

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Partspersons or parts clerks store and issue parts and supplies for use by the establishment in which they work and for sale to public. Some of the tasks include the following: · Receive and sort incoming parts · Store in an orderly and accessible manner in a warehouse, tool room, supply room or other area · Process incoming requisitions and issue or distribute parts and supplies for internal use · Maintain records of amount, kind, location of parts and supplies on hand using manual or computerized inventory system · Prepare requisition orders to replenish parts, supplies and materials Automotive Partsperson normally works a standard 40-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. They work inside and need to have a strong mental stamina for processing various requests.

NOC 1472

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Partspersons can earn $8 $16.61 per hour, averaging $11.95 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Automotive Partsperson ? · Dealerships and repair shops · Large manufacturing auto plants

Work Conditions

Automotive Partsperson is a non-restricted certified trade. In this trade there is no Certificate of Qualification and to work in the trade a Certificate of Apprenticeship is not required. Registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Partspersons can earn $8 - $16.61 per hour, averaging $11.95 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

131

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 years or 4 000 h, including 480 h of in-school post secondary training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Completing the apprenticeship, an apprentice receives a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Accounting Computer Science Communication and planning skills, and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using computer skills, communication, accounting principles, organizational skills, trade mathematics.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Partsperson but an apprenticeship is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Partsperson may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Heating and Ventilation parts · Air-conditioning and refrigeration parts

132

MOTIVE

Small Engine Mechanic

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Small Engine Mechanics or Technicians test, repair, and service small gasoline and diesel-powered equipment, such as garden tractors, outboard motors, lawn mowers, and other related equipment. Small Engine Mechanics perform some or all of the following duties: · Inspect, test and repair engines · Inspect, test and repair mechanical parts, such as brakes and carburetor, and electrical and fuel systems · Discuss with customers problems, estimate costs and preventative maintenance · Consult manufacturers' manuals and specifications · Determine costs and estimates Small Engine Mechanics normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays but the work is seasonal and slow in winter. Some mechanics work on snowmobile machines in winter. The work sometimes involves heavy lifting, bending, and standing.

NOC 7335

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Small Engine Mechanics can earn $9.40 to $18.58 per hour, averaging $12.49 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Small Engine Mechanics ? · · · · Dealer service shops Independent repair shops Garages Some small engine mechanics are self-employed

Work Conditions

Small Engine Mechanic is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Small Engine Mechanics can earn $9.40 to $18.58 per hour, averaging $12.49 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

133

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 to 3 years or 4 000 h, including 480 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication, problem-solving, and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Students would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining hand and power tools and equipment, measuring devices, engines, shop equipment, transmission and mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, frames, wheels and brakes, welding, trade calculations, trade communication.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Small Engine Mechanic. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small engines repair shop · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Motorcycle Technician · Heavy-Duty Equipment Technician

134

MOTIVE

Transmission Technician

(A.CA., restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Transmission Technicians specialize in automatic and manual transmissions in cars, trucks, and buses. They diagnose and repair: · · · · · · · · Drive train components Shafts Axles Transfer cases Use hand and power tools to correct or replace faulty parts Consult with the supervisor and customers Consult service and owner manuals Advise customers of potential problems and proper maintenance procedures

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Transmission Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Transmission Technicians:

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

There is a great variety of problems to solve and tasks to perform. Transmission Technicians normally work a standard 40-hour week.

Place of Work

Who needs Transmission Technicians? · · · · Retail industry Automotive repair shops Service stations Car or truck dealerships

Work Conditions

A Transmission Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Transmission Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

135

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 to 3 years or 5 400 h including 480 h of post secondary in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Communication and problem-solving skills, and mechanical aptitude

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: Safety, manual transmissions, automatic transmissions, general shop practice, electricity and electronics, drive train components.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate of Qualification (as a journeyperson) is needed to start working as a Transmission Technician or at least registration as an apprentice in the trade. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own automotive repair shop · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Parts Person · Automotive Technician · Inspector, Tester, Assembler

136

MOTIVE

Truck & Coach Technician

(A.C.A., restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Truck and Coach Technicians repair and maintain all manner of trucks and tractors and buses. Technicians: · Repair and maintain truck, tractor and bus engine, starting system, power train, steering, suspension, frame and wheels, braking system, drive shafts, transmission, differentials, axles, fuel, and electrical system · Check and repair pressure lines and fittings · Often check manuals or other references in order to diagnose the problem correctly · Use specialized equipment for diagnosis · Check emission controls, heating and air-conditioning system Truck and Coach Technicians normally work a standard 40-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. Most of their work is indoors but occasionally outdoor work is required. Some physical strength is necessary.

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Truck and Coach Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Truck and Coach Technicians ? · Trucking and bus companies · Truck-trailer garages · Retail industry

Work Conditions

Truck and Coach Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Truck and Coach Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

137

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 5 years or 9 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary, in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Upon completion of apprenticeship a Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued · must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, welding, air-brakes system, suspension systems and frames, trailer body, electrical system, heating and refrigeration system.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is required to start working as a Truck and Coach Technician or at least registration as an apprentice. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a Mechanic · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Aircraft maintenance Technician

138

MOTIVE

Truck-Trailer Service Technician

(A.C.A., restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Truck-Trailer Service Technicians: · Repair and maintain truck-trailer suspension system, brake system, electrical systems, frames, hitching systems, and refrigeration and air-conditioning systems · Maintain in working order a single or multi-axle semi-trailer where part of the load is carried on a heavy truck by means of the upper and lower coupler assembly · Check and repair pressure lines and fittings · Refit wrecked trailer bodies · Often check manuals or other references in order to diagnose the problem correctly · use specialized equipment for diagnosis Service technicians normally work a standard 40-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays.

NOC 7321

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, TruckTrailer Service Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Truck-Trailer Service Technicians ? · Trucking companies · Truck-trailer garages · Retail industry

Work Conditions

Truck-Trailer Service Technician is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Truck-Trailer Service Technicians can earn $9.46 - $21.99 per hour, averaging $15.42 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Being able to use computers to diagnose problems and create solutions dramatically increases your earning power in the automotive industry.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

139

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 5 400 h, including 480 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete the apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Transportation Technology (Mechanics) Design Technology (Drafting) Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, welding, air-brakes system, trailer suspension systems and frames, trailer body, electrical system, refrigeration system.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is required to start working as a Truck-Trailer Service Technician or at least registration as an apprentice. After becoming a journeyperson a technician may: · Become a Mechanic · Become a foreperson · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Automotive Service Technician · Aircraft maintenance Technician

140

SERVICE

Appliance Service Technician

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Appliance Service Technicians test, repair, and assemble prefabricated parts to repair household, commercial, and industrial appliances and equipment. They may perform some or all of the following duties: · Test and repair electrical and electronic appliances, such as stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, and dryer · Assemble or repair home water systems · Test and repair gas water heater · Service coffee makers, vacuum cleaners · Repair lawn mower or power tools · Test electrical voltage, resistance and current using meters · Refer to schematic diagrams or product manuals and repair parts Appliance Service Technicians normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts including weekends and holidays. Must be prepared to respond in emergency calls.

NOC 7332

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Appliance Service Technicians can earn $10 to $15.75 per hour, averaging $12.58 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Appliance Service Technicians ? · · · · Repair shops Appliance service companies Repair departments in department stores Some Appliance Service Technicians are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Appliance Service Technician is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. Self-employed technicians set their own per hour fees and charge for service calls. This is one trade where it really pays to be self-employed. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Appliance Service Technicians can earn $10 to $15.75 per hour, averaging $12.58 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

141

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or about 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology Communication, problem-solving and mechanical skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining hand and power tools and equipment, measuring devices, shop equipment, trade calculations, trade communication, physics, estimating costs.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as an Appliance Service Technician. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Factory Assembler and Inspectors · Manufacturing

142

SERVICE

Aborist

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade )

Work Description

What would I be doing? Arborists are part of a group of landscape and horticulture technicians who survey and assess landscapes and draw sketches and build models of landscape designs. They construct and maintain: · · · · Gardens Parks Golf courses Other landscape environments

NOC 2225

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Arborists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Arborists perform some or all of the following duties: · Inspect trees and shrubs to diagnose problems and diseases · Apply various treatments, such as:Pruning, spraying, repairing damaged areas, injecting with treatment solutions Arborists normally work a standard forty-hour week. They may work shifts. The work is outdoors and requires good physical stamina.

Place of Work

Who needs Arborists ? · · · · · · · Landscape designers and contractors Lawn service Tree care establishments Golf courses Nurseries and greenhouses Municipal and provincial parks Some are self-employed

Work Conditions

An Arborist is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade. Apprenticeship is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Arborists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

143

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 to 4 years or about 7 000 h, including 600 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of the apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Biology Communication, problem-solving and mechanical skills, and ability to work at heights

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or an approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The Apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, using and maintaining hand and power tools and equipment, measuring devices, shop equipment, trade calculations, Chemical application, plant diseases, trade communication, estimating costs.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as an Arborist. Registration as an apprentice and becoming a journeyperson are the first steps in growth. A journeyperson may: · Become a foreperson or supervisor · Start own small business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Landscape Architect · Forestry Technician / Technologist · Nursery and Greenhouse Worker

144

SERVICE

Baker

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Bakers are persons who: · Mix and blend a variety of ingredients and bake them in an oven, producing breads, buns and rolls · Produce yeast-raised dough goods · Produce puff paste goods · Bake cookies, pies, tarts, and squares · Produce batter for battered foods · Produce cakes, icing, creams and fillings for baked goods · Manage materials, purchasing and storage · Manage product costing and marketing · Hire and train baking personnel In general, most Bakers work days but some may work shifts. Bakers must pay close attention to safety. Machinery, hot ovens, and hot baked goods can cause serious injury. Bakers work indoors where heat may be a problem unless the facility is air-conditioned. Most of the time bakers are on their feet.

NOC 6252

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Bakers can earn $7.15 - $14.50 per hour, averaging $9.26 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs bakers? · · · · · Bakeries Supermarkets Hotels and restaurants Hospitals Some are self employed operating baked goods businesses

Work Conditions

A Baker is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Bakers can earn $7.15 - $14.50 per hour, averaging $9.26 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

145

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 6 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Receives a Certificate of Apprenticeship upon completion of apprenticeship but must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is available after some additional training

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Hospitality and Tourism Communication, planning and creativity skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or an approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation and safety, trade calculations, estimating, trade communication, nutrition, ingredients, fermentation and related theory, decorating and related theory, bakery management, cookies and cakes and related theory.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working in the Baker trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Baker may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Become a Patissier Start own business Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Patissier · Cook · Chef

146

SERVICE

Cook

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade, branch 2)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Cooks prepare, season and cook foods such as soups, salads, meats, gravies, vegetables, desserts, sauces, and casseroles. They prepare complete meals, single portion or buffet style. Cooks must also: · Have working knowledge of table service, weights and measures, hygiene, and equipment · Have knowledge of stock control, receiving, issuing, menu planning, food costing and purchasing · Know how to prepare foods for special diets · Hire new cooks and train apprentices Most cooks work in shifts, including weekends and holidays. There is some lifting involved and good physical stamina is an asset. Work is done under pressure, around hot appliances, sharp knives, and dangerous equipment such as grinders, slicers and mixers. The temperature is usually high and working space crowded. It is the cook's responsibility to ensure that the kitchen is safe and sanitary at all times.

NOC 6242

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Cooks can earn $7.15 - $12.81 per hour, averaging $9.32 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Cooks? · Restaurants · Schools · Catering companies · Camp grounds · Summer resorts · Food processing plants · Prisons · Retirement homes · Hospitals · Cruise ships, planes, and ships

Work Conditions

A Cook Trade is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Cooks can earn $7.15 - $12.81 per hour, averaging $9.32 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

147

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 years or 6 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Hospitality and Tourism Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation, safety and equipment, basic nutrition, communication, trade calculations, food theory, culinary techniques, quantity food preparation, food, beverage and labour cost control, pastry and related theory.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Cook but a registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Cook may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own business Become a Sous-Chef Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Baker Meat Cutter Dietitian Caterer

148

SERVICE

Assistant Cook

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade, branch 1)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Assistant cooks prepare meals and perform many tasks in the kitchen but are not in charge. Some of these tasks may be: · · · · Prepare complete breakfasts Prepare simple salads, sandwiches, vegetables Serve non-alcoholic beverages Carve meats, poultry, and fish

NOC 6242

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington county, Assistant Cooks can earn $7.15 - $12.81 per hour, averaging $9.32 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Assistant cook is the entry level into the trade and makes the lower end wages.

Most assistant cooks work in shifts, including weekends and holidays. The work, in general, does not involve heavy lifting but stamina is an asset because the work is done under pressure, around hot appliances, sharp knives, and dangerous equipment such as grinders, slicers and mixers. The temperature is usually high and working space crowded. It is the cook's responsibility to ensure that the kitchen is safe and sanitary at all times.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Short-Order Cooks? · · · · · · · · · · Restaurants Schools Catering companies Camp grounds Summer resorts Food processing plants Prisons Retirement homes Hospitals Cruise ships, planes, ships

Work Conditions

A Cook Trade is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington county, Assistant Cooks can earn $7.15 $12.81 per hour, averaging $9.32 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available. Assistant cook is the entry level into the trade and makes the lower end wages.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

149

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 1 year or 2 000 h, including 360 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Receives a Certificate of Apprenticeship upon completion of apprenticeship but must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available.

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) Or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Hospitality and Tourism (Cooking) Communication, planning and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation, safety and equipment, basic nutrition, communication, calculations (basic and advanced), kitchen management, food theory, quantity food preparation, food, beverage and labour cost control, pastry and related theory cuisine a la carte.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as an Assistant Cook but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson an Assistant Cook may: · · · · Become a cook Start own business Become a chef Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Cook Baker Meat Cutter Dietitian Caterer

150

SERVICE

Child & Youth Worker

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Child and Youth Workers perform many different roles from supervising structured activities to escorting youth to a court house for a hearing. In general the workers: · Interview clients to identify needs · Encourage change in children and youth who are experiencing a range of social, emotional, learning, and behavioural challenges in their lives · Teach various life skills, and provides counseling · Present a good role model by being positive, enthusiastic The job is never dull and it can be exhausting. The workplace could be noisy, sometimes security alarms must be worn for personal protection, and a lot of patience may be exercised but a person who likes helping others gets a lot of job satisfaction. Most workers in this trade work shifts, including weekends and holidays. A 40-hour week is normal.

NOC 4212

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, full-time Child and Youth Workers can earn $8 - $19.50 per hour, averaging $13.92 per hour. Unionized Child and Youth Workers can earn $16.40 $19.98 per hour.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: OPSEU 1 800 265 2660 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Child and Youth Workers? · · · · · · Psychiatric hospital Group home Private home Correctional institutions Schools May be self-employed

Work Conditions

The Child and Youth Worker Trade is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, full-time Child and Youth Workers can earn $8 - $19.50 per hour, averaging $13.92 per hour. Unionized Child and Youth Workers can earn $16.40 - $19.98 per hour.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

151

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 4 years or 7 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary, in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements:

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Social Science Communication and planning skills, creativity, patience

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation, personal and client safety, basic communication, calculations, conflict resolution, counseling, life-skills, first aid or CPR, child care, child development.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not needed to start working as a Child and Youth Worker but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a worker may: · · · · Become a foreperson or a supervisor Start own day care business Group home supervisor Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Mental Health Worker · Teacher Assistant, Day-Care Worker

152

SERVICE

Early Childhood Educator

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Early Childhood Educators plan and organize activities for pre-school children and lead children in these activities to encourage their intellectual, emotional and physical growth. In general, Early Childhood Educators may perform some or all of the following duties: · Develop daily activities for children · Lead children in activities by telling or reading stories, teaching songs, demonstrating the use of simple musical instruments, preparing craft materials and demonstrating their use and taking children to local points of interest · Guide children in the development of proper eating, dressing and toilet habits · Observe children for possible learning disabilities or emotional problems · Discuss progress and problems with parents · Learn new teaching methods The workplace could be noisy. Most workers in this trade work a standard 40-hour week.

NOC 4214

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, full-time Early Childhood Educators can earn $8.04 - $17.22 per hour, averaging $11.79 per hour. Unionized workers make between $18.96 and $23.00.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 Union: Ontario Public Service Employees Union Local 238: 1 800 265 2660 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Early Childhood Educators? · Child-care centres or facilities · Pre-school sections of hospitals and schools · They may be self-employed

Work Conditions

An Early Childhood Educator Trade is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, full-time Early Childhood Educators can earn $8.04 - $17.22 per hour, averaging $11.79 per hour. Unionized workers make between $18.96 and $23.00.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

153

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 6 000 h, including 720 h of post secondary, in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · Must complete apprenticeship to receive a Certificate of Apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available in this trade

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Social Science Communication and planning skills, creativity and patience

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation, personal and client safety, basic communication, calculations, conflict resolution, counseling, life-skills, first aid or CPR, child care, child development.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as an Early Childhood Educator but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a worker may: · Become a supervisor · Start own day care business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · Mental Health Worker Teacher Assistant Child and Youth Worker Worker in a Group Home

154

SERVICE

Electronics Service Technician

(Household and Business Equipment) (A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Electronics Service Technicians perform service and repairs on household and business electronic equipment: · Install, maintain, and repair: televisions, radios, video cassette recorders, stereo equipment, photocopiers, and computers · Inspect and test electronic equipment using multimeters, circuit testers, oscilloscopes, logic probes and other electronic tools and testers · Diagnose and locate faults in circuits, equipment, and components · Follow manual schematics to repair and replace components · Use soldering and other hand and power tools In general, Electronic Service Technicians work days. Some may work shifts. Electricians must pay close attention to safety but the nature of work is not inherently hazardous. Electronics Technicians work primarily indoors but some components of installation involve outdoors.

NOC 2242

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Electronics Service Technicians can earn $8 - $16.23 per hour, averaging $11.77 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Electronics Service Technicians? · · · · · Electronics service establishments Retail and wholesale distributors Within service departments of manufacturing companies Large institutions such as school boards Some are self employed

Work Conditions

An Electronics Service Technician is a non-restricted certified trade. A person does not have to have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Electronics Service Technicians can earn $8 - $16.23 per hour, averaging $11.77 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

155

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 4 years or 8 000 h, including 720 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Certificate of Qualification exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal)

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Physics Design Technology - electronics Communication and problem-solving skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or an approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade calculations, manual schematics and installations, estimating, hand and power tools, trade communication, electrical-electronic- theory, installation methods, instrumentation, maintenance, control systems, power distribution, multimeters and oscilloscopes.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working in the electronics service trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson an Electronics Service Technician may: · Become a foreperson or a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Aircraft Instrument Technician · Technical Sales Specialist · Instrumentation Technician

156

SERVICE

Fruit Grower-Agriculture

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Fruit Growers work on fruit farms using a variety of farm equipment. They may perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · · · · · · Plant and transplant new fruit trees, grape wines, plants, and canes Cultivate the soil in a field, vineyard, or orchard Spray according to a schedule Prune Graft Irrigate Fertilize Harvest, grade, process, and pack fruit Operate, clean, and maintain packing lines, buildings and facilities

NOC 8251

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Fruit Growers can earn from $9 - $17.50 per hour, averaging $13.08 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Fruit growers may carry out duties related to general farming. This includes working with and maintaining farm machinery and tools. Fruit farming is seasonal and primarily outdoors, however, in winter growers work indoors, performing related tasks, such as equipment repair. Farming is a strenuous activity and good health and physical fitness are an asset.

Place of Work

Who needs Fruit Growers? · Fruit Farms · Nurseries · Experimental Farms and Teaching Institutions

Work Conditions

A Fruit Grower is a non-restricted certified trade. A person need not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary of Fruit Growers depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Fruit Growers can earn from $9 - $17.50 per hour, averaging $13.08 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

157

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 to 3 years or 4 000 to 6 000 h, including 480 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

An OYAP student must be 16 years old and have completed Grade 10 (or equivalent). The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Science Communication and planning skills, and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or an approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade calculations, trade communication, hand and power tools, farm machinery, basic first aid, chemical hazards and hazardous materials, Occupational Health and Safety Act (WHMIS), Government Regulations, environmental legislation protocols.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working in the Fruit Grower trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Fruit Grower may: · Become a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Farm Manager · Nursery and Greenhouse Operator · Agricultural Service Contractor

158

SERVICE

Hairstylist

(A.C.A., restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Hairstylists may perform the following: · Shampoo and rinse hair · Cut, curl, trim, taper, wave, perm, and style hair · Provide chemical treatment, such as bleach, colouring, frost, tint, and highlighting · Follow clients instructions or suggest a style compatible with client's features · Provide advice for beauty care treatment of scalp and hair · May trim mustaches, trim or shave beards · Manage materials and equipment in the salon · May train or supervise other hairstylists and apprentices In general, most Hairstylists work days but some may work evenings. Hairstylists must pay close attention to safety. Blades, scissors and hot liquids and foams can cause serious injury. Hairstylists work indoors in comfort of air-conditioned salons but they spend most of the time on their feet.

NOC 6271

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Hairstylists can earn $7.15 - $12.64 per hour, averaging $9.20 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs hairstylists? · · · · · Barber shops Hairdressing salons Vocational schools Hair replacement clinics and studios Health care establishments, theatre, film, and television establishments

Work Conditions

A Hairstylist is a restricted certified trade. A person must have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade or have registered as an apprentice. An apprentice must be remunerated.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Hairstylists can earn $7.15 $12.64 per hour, averaging $9.20 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

159

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 to 2.5 years or between 3 500 and 5 500 h, including 480 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available but qualified Hairstylists may write an exam in other provinces and work anywhere in Canada

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Chemistry Beauty Culture Communication, planning, and creativity skills

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through an approved Training Delivery Agent. A graduate of an accredited private hairstyling school may be exempt from the in-school training.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation and safety, trade calculations, trade communication, hair and scalp theory, chemical service-hair relaxing, curling, toning, colouring, lightening, and waving.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is required to start working in the Hairstylist trade or a student must be registered as an apprentice. After becoming a journeyperson a Hairstylist may: · Become a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Colour/Permanent Wave Technician · Skin Care and Cosmetics Consultant · Aesthetician

160

SERVICE

Horse Groom-Agriculture

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Horse Grooms work with horses and stable equipment. They may perform some or all of the following duties: · · · · · · · · · · Handle and control horses Groom horses Tack and untack horses Feed horses Perform health and maintenance procedures Perform stall care Maintain tools and equipment Maintains stable facilities Handle supplies Communicate with Farrier, Veterinarian and co-workers

NOC 8253

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horse Grooms can earn from $8.26 - $19.28 per hour, averaging $13.04 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Horse Grooms work indoors and outdoors and perform many tasks requiring good physical stamina. Grooms begin work early in the morning, usually by feeding horses, and may stay quite late in the evening to finish daily tasks.

Place of Work

Who needs Horse Grooms? · Race Tracks · Horse Farms · Zoos and Animal Parks

Work Conditions

A Horse Groom is a non-restricted certified trade. A person need not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but a registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horse Grooms can earn from $8.26 - $19.28 per hour, averaging $13.04 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

161

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 3 years or 6 000 h, including 400 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · There is no Certificate of Qualification in this trade · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · English Mathematics Science Communication and planning skills, and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade calculations, trade communication, hand and power tools, stable equipment, basic first aid, equine first aid, Occupational health and Safety Act (WHMIS), guidelines of WSIB, Government Regulations and Guideline of OMAFRA, environmental legislation protocols.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working in the Horse Groom trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Horse Groom may: · Become a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· Farm Manager · Horse Trainer · Farrier

162

SERVICE

Horticulturist NurseryGreenhouse Worker

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade, branch 1)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Horticulturists, working in a greenhouse or in a nursery, may perform the following: · · · · · · · · · Identify and propagate plants and crops Tend the plants or shape trees Apply fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides Improve drainage, and irrigation Assist in planting gardens Maintain and operate machinery Control the heating and lighting Work in retail outlets or garden centres Design, construct and sell greenhouses and landscape structures

NOC 2225

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horticulturists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

In general, most nursery and greenhouse workers work days, often long hours in season. Horticulturists must pay close attention to safety. Machines, chemical sprays, and many tools can be very hazardous. Horticulturists work indoors and outdoors, requiring both stamina and strength for lifting bags of soil, fertilizer, and potted plants.

Place of Work

Who needs horticulturist? · · · · · · · · Commercial nurseries, greenhouses Landscaping contractors Sod production companies Botanical gardens Public parks Golf courses Colleges and universities Some are self employed

Work Conditions

A Horticulturist is a non-restricted certified trade. A person need not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horticulturists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

163

Apprenticeship

· Takes 2 to 2.5 years or 4 500 h, including 600 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Business Transportation Technology (Small Engines) Communication and planning skills, and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or an approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade calculations, trade communication, hand and power tools, botany, plant materials, soils and fertilizers, planting techniques, disease and pest control, propagation and production, irrigation, drainage, small engines, marketing.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working in the Nursery-Greenhouse Worker trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Horticulturist may: · Become a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · · Arborist Botanist Gardner Agricultural Technician Mycologist Grounds Keeper

164

SERVICE

Horticulturist Landscaper-Greenskeeper

(A.C.A., non-restricted certified trade, branch 2)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Horticulturalists, working in landscaping and greenskeeping, may perform the following: · · · · · · · Select and plant trees and plants Tend the plants or shape trees Apply fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides Improve drainage, and irrigation Assist in planting gardens Design, construct and sell greenhouses and landscape structures Maintain greens on golf courses

NOC 2225

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horticulturists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

In general, most Landscapers and Greenskeepers work days, sometimes long hours in season. Horticulturists must pay close attention to safety. Machines, chemical sprays, and many tools can be very hazardous. Landscapers and Greenskeeper work mainly outdoors, requiring both stamina and strength for lifting bags of soil, fertilizer, and potted plants. They must also know a lot more science than they used to.

Place of Work

Who needs Horticulturists? · · · · · · · · · Commercial nurseries Greenhouses Landscaping contractors Sod production companies Botanical gardens Public parks Golf courses Colleges and universities Some are self employed

Work Conditions

A Horticulturist is a non-restricted certified trade. A person need not have a valid Certificate of Qualification to work in the trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. A Co-op student, who is not a signed apprentice, does not have to be paid. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Horticulturists can earn $10 to $16.75 per hour, averaging $13 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

165

Apprenticeship

· Takes about 2 to 2.5 years or 4 500 h, including 600 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship · Must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification · Inter-Provincial Trade Certification (Red Seal) is not available

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · · English Mathematics Science Business Transportation Technology (Small Engines) Communication and planning skills, and ability to work unsupervised

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: safety, trade calculations, trade communication, hand and power tools, botany, plant materials, soils and fertilizers, planting techniques, disease and pest control, propagation and production, irrigation, drainage, small engines, marketing.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working in the Horticulturist, Landscaper-Greenskeeper trade but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Horticulturist may: · Become a supervisor · Start own business · Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Arborist Botanist Agricultural Technician Mycologist Greenhouse Worker

166

SERVICE

Patissier

(A.CA., non-restricted certified trade, Branch 2)

Work Description

What would I be doing? Patissiers work in a kitchen and may perform the following: · Manage the kitchen, handle specialized and artistic creations · Prepare ingredients and bake cakes, cookies, pies, bread and specialized items · Create a variety of pastry items · May prepare and cook complete meals, banquets or specialty foods · May hire and train cooks · Purchase and store supplies In general, most Patissier chefs perform other chef duties in addition to baking pastries. They may work long hours when preparing for special functions. Most chefs work evenings but many work shifts including weekends and holidays. There is some lifting involved and good physical stamina is an asset. Work is done under pressure, around hot appliances, sharp knives, and dangerous equipment such as grinders, slicers and mixers. The temperature is usually high and working space crowded. It is the chef's responsibility to ensure that the kitchen is safe and sanitary at all times.

NOC 6241

Salaries/Wages

In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Patissiers can earn $8.60 - $17.23 per hour, averaging $12.27 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Contact Information

Apprenticeship Office: Waterloo Region 1 519 571 6009 Wellington County 1 800 265 6180 Apprenticeship web: www.edu.gov.on.ca WWTAB web site: www.wwtab.com Training Hotline: 1 800 387 5656 School Guidance/ Co-op Office

Place of Work

Who needs Patissiers? · · · · Restaurants Bakeries Hotel industry Cruise ships

Work Conditions

A Patissier is a non-restricted certified trade. A person may or may not have a valid Certificate of Qualification or be registered as an apprentice to work in the trade but apprenticeship is strongly recommended. An apprentice may be paid wages.

Salaries/Wages

The salary depends on the employer, years of experience, and level of training. In unionized workplaces the wages and conditions of work are negotiated collectively. In Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Patissiers can earn $8.60 - $17.23 per hour, averaging $12.27 per hour. Unionized wage rates are not available.

Prospects of Employment Waterloo Region and Wellington County

Information about Employment Prospects for Waterloo Region and Wellington County is subject to change due to fluctuations in our local economy. If you are interested in employment prospects for individual occupations on a provincial level, visit the Ontario Government's Job Futures site at http://www1.on.hrdcdrhc.gc.ca/ojf/ojf.jsp

167

Apprenticeship

· Takes 3 to 3 1/2 years or 7 000 h, including 150 h of in-school training; prior education and experience may shorten the time to complete all the competencies, · A Certificate of Apprenticeship is issued upon completion of apprenticeship but must pass the Provincial Qualifying exam to receive a Certificate of Qualification with journeyperson status, which includes an InterProvincial Trade Certification (Red Seal).

Entrance Requirements

All apprenticeship applicants must successfully complete Grade 12 (OSSD) or equivalent. The following competencies are valuable: · · · · · English Mathematics Science Hospitality and Tourism (Cooking) Communication and planning skills, creativity

Upon leaving secondary school, apprentices will complete the apprenticeship curriculum in college or through another approved Training Delivery Agent.

On the Job Training

The apprentices must follow a program in the Apprenticeship Training Standards book that is given to them in the workplace when they register. As each competency is achieved the employer signs it off. As a high school Co-op credit (towards O.S.S.D.), learning is connected to one of the school subjects.

OYAP Requirements

Students who are at least 16 years of age, have completed Grade 10, and are in full-time attendance in secondary school. Student would take technical courses and Co-op education.

Classroom Training Component

Specific skills learned include: sanitation, safety and equipment, basic nutrition, communication, calculations (basic and advanced), bake theory, culinary techniques, pastry and related theory.

Opportunity to Grow

A Certificate as a journeyperson is not required to start working as a Patissier but registration as an apprentice is recommended. After becoming a journeyperson a Patissier may: · · · · Become a supervisor Start own business Become a sous-chef, chef Work in related areas or occupations

Related Occupations

· · · · · Baker Cook Meat Cutter Dietitian Caterer

168

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