Read untitled text version

NEWS

WW's Hofmann A First for Hospital

hen Princeton Healthcare System decided to move its hospital from its longtime home in downtown Princeton to its new site on Route 1 in Plainsboro, it broke a lot of tradition. Now it has broken another tradition: For the first time in its 91year history a non-Princeton resident has been chosen as chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Princeton HealthCare System. The new chair is Don Hofmann of West Windsor, a partner in a private equity firm, Crystal Ridge Partners, who begins his tenure at an historic time. During his threeyear term, the new University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro, the system's replacement hospital for University Medical Center at Princeton, is scheduled to open. Hofmann's new role could be considered emblematic of the hospital's desire to connect to the community outside of Princeton Borough and Township. Not only is the hospital being constructed in Plainsboro, on the other side of Route 1, it has been reaching out to the surrounding communities and their residents. "The hospital serves many people from this side of Route 1," said

WEST WINDSOR & PLAINSBORO

WW-P'S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

WWPINFO.COM

Letters: Are WW-P Teachers Paid Too Much? WW-P Negotiates More Than $1M In Union Givebacks WW May Ask State To Develop Junction Garage High School Sports Roundup Police Reports 34 Classifieds Is the Next Lang Lang From West Windsor?

ISSUE DATE: MARCH 19, 2010 NEXT ISSUE: APRIL 2

2 11 13 18 35 36

People In The News

WW-P District State Aid Slashed By $7.56 Million

the governor had been saying all along, but we weren't expecting he West Windsor-Plains- this drastic of a change, which is a boro school district was severe reduction, not just for WWscurrying to adjust its 2010- P, but for suburban districts," said '11 school budget on March 18, a Gerri Hutner, the district's director day after the governor's axe of communications, on March 18, chopped $7.563 million in aid to as officials prepared to head into the district. day-long meetings to get the budThe state aid figures were re- get ready for vote. leased late on March 17, a day after "We've been very cost-efficient Governor Chris Christie anand conservanounced in his tive in our planbudget address ning," added his intent to WW-P will only receive Hutner. "We've drastically cut been very care$3.127 million in state aid to schools ful in the budaid next year, down districts by gets we put forfrom $10.7 million last $820 million. ward to the pubAccording to year. `We had not anticlic, and it hits us those figures, hard. We had ipated this degree.' WW-P will onanticipated ly receive some change, $3.127 million but we had not anticipated this dein state aid next year, down from gree of reduction." the $10.7 million it received last The $7.563 million reduction year. represents a 71 percent decrease in School officials warned that the the total state aid given to the disreduction in state aid will create trict. The Montgomery and Princechanges to the $159.3 million pre- ton Regional districts saw 65 and liminary budget the board had pre- 67 percent decreases, respectively. viously drafted. The school board Hopewell Valley saw an 85 perwas scheduled to vote on an adjust- cent reduction in state aid. More ed budget on March 18 -- after the urban districts saw fewer reducNews' deadline -- in order to sub- tions in state aid. Trenton, which mit the budget by the state-mandat- will receive $242.1 million in state ed deadline of Monday, March 22. aid next year, saw a reduction of [Visit www.wwpinfo.com for up- $12.4 million, a 5 percent reducdated information.] tion. "We had anticipated there would be changes based on what Continued on page 11

W

by Cara Latham

T

by Cara Latham

Chairman of the Board: Don Hofmann, with his sons, Jonathan and Jeremy, and his wife, Joyce.

Hofmann, who says the hospital's goal is to create a "greater presence in the community." In addition to his work in finance -- Hofmann co-founded Crystal Ridge in 2005 after 15 years with JP Morgan and its predecessors -- he also has considerable nonprofit experience. He served as a board member of HomeFront, a nonprofit group based in Lawrenceville that works with families to break the cycle of poverty. He is also a former trustee of Princeton Day School, where his two sons attended school. But the Duxbury Court resident has always had a special interest in the hospital, where his two sons were born. "You develop an affinity for the place where your children are born," he said. Hofmann was born in northern New Jersey and lived in Wayne until his family moved to Delaware when he was 11 years old, when his father, a controller for a chemicals company, needed to relocate. While there, his mother did volunteer work for Christiana Hospital in Newark, Delaware, and won an award for 30 years of service. She provided rides to people who couldn't get to the hospital and served as a Eucharistic minister. In

Continued on page 6

DAY-BY-DAY IN PLAINSBORO & WEST WINDSOR

For more event listings visit www.wwpinfo.com.

Friday March 19

Dance

I'll Have What She's Having Dance Project, YWCA Princeton, Yvonne Theater, Rider University, Lawrenceville, 609-4972100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Professional dancers include Nancy Musco of Plainsboro and West Windsor residents Henry Velandia, Mira Estaphanous, and Linda Mannheim. $20. Also Saturday, March 20. 8 p.m.

American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama. $15 to $55. 8 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "You a Man Now?" written and performed by Mo Beasley. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m.

Film

Lunafest, College of New Jersey, Concert Hall, Ewing, 609-7712368. www.tcnj.edu. National fundraising film festival that showcases short films by, for, and about women, presents nine short films ranging from animation to fictional drama. Topics include women's health, motherhood, body image, sexuality, cultural diversity, and breaking barriers. Benefit for Womanspace and breast cancer research. $10. 7 p.m. Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville, 609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Screening of "Precious." $5. 7 and 9:20 p.m.

Drama

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Kelsey Theater, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Maurer Productions Onstage. $16. 7 p.m. Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m.

Dance Over 40: Marie Alonzo and Henri Velandia, both of West Windsor, perform in `I'll Have What She's Having,' a performance of works by women choreographers over the age of 40, Friday and Saturday, March 19 and 20, Yvonne Theater, Rider University. 609-397-2100.

Continued on page 20

2

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

JoanGreater Princeton Eisenberg Office: 609-951-8600 x110 RE/MAXJoan Eisenberg Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile:609-306-1999 Princeton Greater Princeton RE/MAX Forrestal Village [email protected] Office: 609-951-8600 x 110 Mobile:609-306-1999 Princeton Forrestal Village Mobile:609-306-1999 www.JoanSells.com [email protected] Office: 609-951-8600 x 110

Mobile:609-306-1999 www.JoanSells.com [email protected]

Owner/Sales Associate

[email protected] com

Joan Eisenberg Joan Eisenberg

Views & Opinions

To the Editor: Is Teacher Pay Too High in WW-P?

West Windsor VALUES VILLAGE GRANDEValues

A

West Windsor: This 5 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath Home has been tastefully updated and expanded! The gourmet Kitchen features cherry cabinetry, granite counters & Island & Sub Zero refrigerator/freezer. Vaulted Family Room addition features a huge window with palladium topper. Formal Living Room & Dining Room. 1st Floor Bedroom/Office. MBR w/3 closets. All baths remodeled. 2nd Flr Laundry. Finished basement. Trex deck, large yard. Hardwood flooring, decorative detail moldings, recessed lighting. So Much More... A Must See!!! $725,000

West Windsor: This 4 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath home on and oversized lot is light and bright. Freshly painted interior, all new carpeting, new stove and new Timberline roof. EIK with oak cabinetry and sunny breakfast area with view to open yard with young fruit trees. The Family Room features a fireplace and new neutral carpeting. The Sunroom has been converted to a 4 season den. Updated hall bathroom, MBR with newer tiling. 1st floor laundry,. Close to commuter train, shopping and major roadways. $629,000

tures were teacher compensation, and 5 percent were administrative costs. Looking at district total governmental activities, which include special education and other activim I the only one upset by ties receiving grant funding, inhuge and ever increasing structional costs are an even higher property taxes? And school 62 percent of total costs. The disofficials who say they are showing trict's school board granted a 4.9 restraint by "only" increasing bud- percent teacher salary increase in gets 2-4 percent per year in times 2009, a 4.8 percent increase in of virtually no inflation? If tax 2010, and a 4.7 percent increase in levies must increase 2-4 percent 2011, at a time when most private sector workers forever, absent are seeing wages massive injecreduced. tions of state aid, The best way to know if The district we are lost. your are offering the just announced a Even Governegotiated threenor Christie's right salary is to month delay of proposed consti- observe the number of the 2011 raise, tutional amend- qualified people who inconsequential ment for "only" to long-term apply for open spots, continual 2.5 pertrends, in return cent increases and by this measure for granting an doesn't solve the area schools are additional 3.4 problem if infla- currently overpaying. percent increase tion is 0 percent. in 2012. Is it any The bulk of propwonder why the erty tax goes to tax rate is rising? According to the school districts, and it's not hard to know why schools want increasing National Education Association, amounts of money, despite com- New Jersey teacher salaries ranked ments by some school officials that fourth in the nation in 2008, with service costs and charter schools an average salary of $63,018. The best way to know if you are are responsible. offering the right salary is to obIn fiscal 2009, 47 percent of West Windsor-Plainsboro school serve the number of qualified peodistrict's general fund expendi- ple who apply for open spots, and

Richard K. Rein Editor and Publisher Cara Latham News Editor Lynn Miller Community News Editor Brian McCarthy Craig Terry Photography Vaughan Burton Production Diana Joseph-Riley Martha Moore Account Representatives Bill Sanservino Production Manager

Lawrence L. DuPraz 1919-2006 Founding Production Adviser

Euna Kwon Brossman Jack Florek, Bart Jackson Pritha Dasgupta Jennifer Bender Phyllis Spiegel Caroline Calogero Contributing Writers For inquiries, call 609-243-9119. Fax: 609-243-9020. E-mail: [email protected] Home Page: www.wwpinfo.com Mail: Box 580, West Windsor 08550. Physical Location: 12 Roszel Road, Suite C-205, West Windsor © 2010 by Richard K. Rein.

Call Joan Today for More Information or to see a Property! Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile 609-306-1999

The News welcomes letters. Mail them to Box 580, West Windsor 08550. Fax them to 609-243-9020. Or E-mail them: [email protected]

I get my sellers avg. 98.48% list price to sale price for last 2.5 years!

MARKET UPDATE SEMINAR Sat., 3/20, 11 am at my office. Call Donna. Walk-ins welcome!

SPRING IS HERE! SELLERS' MARKET!

DONNA LUCARELLI

Anna Shulkina

Sales Associate

NJAR Circle of Excellence `01`08; Gold Level `03 - `08 Direct Line: 609-750-5395 Cell: 609-903-0621 · email: [email protected]

Princeton Landing

Plainsboro. This Townhouse is one of the largest models. 3 BR, 2 ½ BA and loft. Spacious eat-in kitchen completely remodeled. Formal dining rm. and LR overlook professionally designed brick atrium. Gleaming hardwood floors. Full walk-out basement. Newer appliances. $409,000

SE PM U -4 O 1 H 1 2 EN 3/ P O AY D N SU

16 PIEDMONT DRIVE, PRINCETON JCT - Premium Location. Walk to Princeton Jct. Train. 2 ACRES OF LAND. 2zone heating A/C. 200 amp electric. Cul de sac invites you to a private oasis in spacious light filled home. Hardwood Floors. PRICE REDUCTION! $599,000. Assessed value $601,100. WOW!

20 WARREN STREET, PLAINSBORO. DECORATOR'S Paradise. A renowned ARTIST lived here and made this her haven. LARGEST model (SQ. ft. 2,624), 3 bed 3 full bath and FINISHED LOFT. This home is LOADED with every UPGRADE. A WORK OF ART! $368,000

Rental is 103 Sequoia Unit 12 the Penthouse! $1900 a month. COMPLETELY FURNISHED CLOISTER MODEL. 3RD FLOOR. This was the MODEL for COLONNADE POINTE. MAGNIFICENT is the only word to describe this unit. All furniture, BRAND NEW KITCHEN, all appliances, all cookware, dishes, linens custom draperies are ready for you to enjoy. Washer and dryer in unit. Nothing to buy but the food. Move in and enjoy all the amenities this unit boasts. Walk to Princeton Marketfair, downtown to Nassau Street, Princeton University. Call Donna for details.

Jeanette E. Jones Sales Associate/Realtor

NJAR Circle of Excellence 08-09 The Jeanette Jones Team Direct: 609-936-2525 X2557 Cell: 609-865-2216(best) · [email protected]

SE PM U 4 O 1H 1 N /2 PE Y 3 O A D N U S

Mortgage Rates going up by Mar. 30! FIRST TIME homebuyer tax credit of $8000 available. Buyer must be UNDER CONTRACT by April 30. No extensions. Call Donna for details.

West Windsor Market Statistics

Dec. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE: Jan. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE: Feb. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE: Dec. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE: Jan. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE: Feb. AVERAGE SOLD PRICE:

Statistics taken from Trend MLS.

$516,765 $518,982 $559,990 $299,525 $453,100 $328,954

Days on Market: 56 Days on Market: 56 Days on Market: 77 Days on Market: 35 Days on Market: 96 Days on Market: 95

Plainsboro Market Statistics

See Me and More Info at My Website:

Former Teacher, Top-Producing Realtor DONNALUCARELLI.COM Cell: 609-903-9098 · Office: 609-799-3500

[email protected]

Hightstown. 101 Hutchinson Street. Located across from park! Lovely 3BD, 2BA home with updated kitchen, living & dining room, office/nursery, sun porch, full basement, large wooden deck, paver patio and fully fenced backyard. Kitchen remodeled 2 years ago, newer windows, furnace and vinyl siding w/ gutter protectors. Walk to downtown shopping. $299,900.

53 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. · Princeton Junction, N.J.

MAKE THE EDUCATED CHOICE.

LONG & FOSTER

Real 609-936-2500 Estate

33 Princeton-Hightstown Road Princeton Junction, NJ 08550

Professional, Experienced & Educated Agents

NE W

LI ST IN G

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 3/21 1-4PM

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 3/21 1-4PM

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

3

by this measure area schools are currently overpaying. This might be an unpopular truth in certain quarters. West Windsor claims that a 100-student loss to a charter school is causing problems, but officials who can't handle a routine fluctuation of that amount within an enrollment of more than 9,800 should be replaced. For this particular year, schools can point validly to a one-time loss of state aid, but a one-time loss isn't a reason for a long-term trend. The real responsibility lies with the districts themselves. I moved to this area partly because of the good school system, and I admire my kids' teachers. I would love all employees to have ever higher wages -- if we could afford it. However, the board's responsibility is to give us a budget without one of the highest taxes in the nation. As a start, I would suggest they benchmark their cost structure against states that don't have our ever higher and onerous tax rates. David Hitchcock Springhill Drive, West Windsor

Charter School Not Fair For Taxpayers

hear the mayor's important annual speech about the town. The mayor delivered a well-prepared speech that touched on all aspects of the town, from the budget to commercial development to roads and traffic, among others. It presented a solid state of the township, with good progress on all fronts. The mayor also unveiled a delightful new video about West Windsor that showcases different aspects of the township from shopping to commercial areas to parks and open spaces. Unfortunately the audience had to also sit through a staged presentation by a few town residents rehashing old business and a councilman's own long-winded speech. Both presentations were unnecessary and purely grandstanding. The councilman in particular had no business presenting his own "state of the township" address. He is not the mayor. These types of interruptions to the council meetings happen time and again and cost the taxpayers a lot of money in wasted time and effort. We cannot afford this. I suggest we implement some constraints to put a limit to the rabblerousing and get on with business. Lindsay Diehl

Plainsboro's No. 7, West Windsor's 176; Who's to Blame?

350 Nassau Street Princeton, N.J. 08540

Realtors

609-921-1900

T

he March edition of New Jersey Monthly Magazine rated Plainsboro the No. 7 best town to live in and West Windsor No. 176. With the same school district, why is Plainsboro rated 250 percent better than West Windsor? West Windsor has seen a large and steady dose of tax increases over the last 10 years, including the 2005 immense hidden tax hike when your house was reassessed at the top of the housing bubble. We simply have gotten much less bang for our buck than other townships. As we prepare for yet another "normalized" tax hike from our mayor, we should take this into consideration. In financial terms, West Windsor consistently underperforms the marketplace. You get less return on your capital than you would elsewhere. You only have to look at the next town over to validate this statement. While we get less bang for our buck in West Windsor, our mayor

Continued on page 5

Riviera at East Windsor

Open House Sunday, 3/21, 1-4pm 151 Einstein Way

55 or Better. No lawn work!! No snow shoveling!! Clubhouse, 2 pools, tennis & fitness center. Narberth Model with brick front. Heavily upgraded, pristine. Gorgeous custombuilt wall unit in 2-story family room. Hardwood flows from 2-story LR & DR to the elegant kitchen & fam rm. Granite counters & European-style 42" maple cabinets. Kit adjoins sunny breakfast area that opens to landscaped paver patio. Master suite w tray ceiling & elegant bath w soaking tub & chandelier. Br 2 with full bath - ideal home office/guest bedroom. Upper level - Br 3, full bath, huge storage rm & large loft overlooking Fam Rm. Marvelous neighborhood & lifestyle!! Offered at $428,000. Directions: Route 571 to One Mile Rd E bound, Turn right into Riviera, take 2nd left on Einstein to 151.

Marketed by

HARRIET HUDSON

609-577-7335 (cell) Weichert's President's Club Top 1% Nationwide

I

'm heartened to see that our elected school board officials are working diligently to trim the school budget in West Windsor. They need to cut close to the bone without sacrificing academic standards. The people of West Windsor need to turn out in droves for the upcoming election; their financial solvency may depend on it. The era of rubber stamped school budgets is over for good. Who can afford more taxes than we pay already? It is preposterous that another $1 million is being tied onto the already oversized budget to subsidize the Princeton International Academy Charter School, which will teach Mandarin to kids in our town as well as Princeton, Montgomery, and South Brunswick. We already pay too much in property taxes, albeit for a blue ribbon school system, but the notion that we should have to foot the bill for a school that teaches what the public schools already teach is ludicrous and totally unnecessary. The school board should file suit immediately to stop the charter school in its tracks until a rigorous public debate occurs. We the people pay the taxes. We the people should decide by referendum if the charter school should be allowed to go forward. This charter school should be paid for by the parents of the kids who go there, not by the taxpayers of the town, most of whom will not go there. In sum, the Princeton International Academy Charter School is a bad idea, especially at this terrible time financially. Before the school should ever see the light of day, we should have a full and open public debate and vote for or against it by referendum. It shouldn't be shoved down our throats, especially since we'll be picking up the tab. Brian Reilly Benford Drive, Princeton Junction

Stop The RabbleRousing at Meetings

T

here was some good entertainment at West Windsor town council's regular business meeting on Monday, March 1. Unfortunately, the "entertainment" distracted from the task at hand. The task at hand was the mayor's annual State of the Township Address. The audience had come to

4

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Shopping

for a

Suburban Mom

o be a Suburban Mom is to understand the art of juggling. The metaphor is obvious: spinning many balls in the air and preventing them from dropping to the ground, while smiling and maintaining a sense of grace, or at least trying. I've always wanted to learn the actual art of juggling, and some day, when I have some more time, I'll get around to it. But kids in this area don't have to wait, thanks to Camp College at Mercer County Community College, which is offering juggling as one of its many summer programs. "In addition to learning how to juggle, I think the kids' self-confidence goes up at the same time, because my classes are also about setting goals and encouraging kids to ask as many questions as necessary to help achieve them," says 19year-old Jesse De Agustin of West Windsor, who is teaching the course. "Also, the class is not all juggling. We have discussions and play hand-eye coordination games that will help hone in on their concentration and improve their juggling as well." Jesse is truly "paying it forward," since he learned how to juggle at Camp College more than a decade ago as an 8-year-old under the tutelage of then-instructor Lou DeLauro, who now runs the nonprofit charity, Juggling Life. Among other things, DeLauro's organization teaches youths with disabilities how to juggle. It is obvious that Jesse took his lessons seriously, as he is now a masterful juggler who enchants with his performance. He can juggle bowling

New Home?

Now Is the Perfect Time!! Low Interest Rates and Stimulus Rebates!

T

by Euna Kwon Brossman

pins, machetes, yes, machetes, (don't worry, this is not included in the Camp College curriculum), and even apples he can chomp in the middle of tossing them. This will be Jesse's second summer as a Camp College instructor, and he relishes every moment of working with the kids. "Camp College clearly differentiates itself from any camp in the area because it gives the kids lots of flexibility and fun when it comes to class selection and structure. In one class kids can be juggling with me, and then in the next block they are playing sports in the quad. Then they can have lunch and choose a quiet

-

`I feel that Camp College is a great opportunity for younger kids to feed a curious mind,' says Jesse De Agustin.

activity such as arts and crafts. There are also specialty camps that meet for three hours a day for one week." The theme for Camp College this year is "Have Fun Under the Big Top," and Jesse understands that many people associate juggling with the circus. While this is a natural connection, and the kids can have fun with that concept, Jesse explains that his classes are also associated with a more academic branch of juggling that takes the art to a higher level. In fact, the

In This Market You Need an Experienced Agent & Good "Karma"

Karma Estaphanous

Broker/Sales Associate Over 18 Years full time Agent NJAR Circle Of Excellence (96-09) Re/Max Hall Of Fame ­ 2007

Re/Max of Princeton

www.karmarealtor.com [email protected]

Office: 609-452-1887 x 7080 Cell: 609-851-4844

343 Nassau St Princeton, NJ 08540

CALL NOW FOR A NO-COST PROPERTY MARKET EVALUATION

International Juggling Association (IJA) has conventions of jugglers who stage extremely slick, elaborate, and entertaining shows and boasts a membership ranging from "top professionals to avid hobbyists to enthusiastic beginners." When it comes to juggling, Jesse says there are some tricks and nuances that make it easier to pick up the skill. "It's essential that the kids have the right mindset and attitude even before we pick up one bean bag. That's why we spend a lot of time talking about other things that were challenging to learn ­­ for example, riding a bicycle ­­ that, after practice, become part of our skill set and then self-confidence that stays with us for life. The right frame of mind then leads to tricks to learn the right technique, such as throwing to two "X" marks on the wall, or throwing the beanbags and letting them fall on the floor. This reinforces the fact that juggling is the art of making great tosses. If the tosses are good, the catches will follow." De Agustin is a 2008 graduate of High School South and currently a sophomore majoring in philosophy at the College of New Jersey. "I entered as an accounting major but after taking some philosophy courses, decided that the ability philosophy has to train our minds to think critically is invaluable. I may earn my Masters in Education and teach. I am also interested in working in Business to Business account management, but I'm exploring opportunities and keeping all my options open. Just like college (for big kids), I feel that Camp Col-

E US PM O H 1-4 N 1 PE /2 O N3 U S

Cranbury Twp $979,000 TRULY GORGEOUS! 5 bdrm/3.5 bath w/Guest suite. Sweeping staircase in foyer. Fabulous location custom inside & out. LS#5603323 Marketed by Maureen Provenzano (609) 924-1600

East Windsor Twp $169,900 You will fancy this welcoming 2BR/2BA condo. Eat-in kitchen, central air. It deserves a prize for genuine value. LS#5618578 Marketed by Annie Battash (609) 799-2022

East Windsor Twp $202,900 833 Woodmill Drive. Hurry to see this engaging 2BR/2BA condo. Security and intercom systems, cozy fireplace. Cathedral ceilings, eat-in kitchen, central air. LS#5662860 Marketed by Rozana Yoosuf (609) 799-2022

Plainsboro Settle with ease in this 3BR/2+BA condo. Cozy Family room, central air. the best! LS#5665290

$309,000 delightful fireplace. Anticipate

Princeton $429,000 Set your sights on luxury in this beautiful 3BR/2+BA condo. Gas fireplace. Family room, cathedral ceilings, central air. Garage. LS#5665292 Marketed by Lana Chan (609) 799-2022

Marketed by Lana Chan (609) 799-2022

Princeton Twp $974,900 Achieve the gracious living that comes with this irresistible 5BR/3+BA home. Security system, 2 fireplaces. Family room, fire sprinklers. LS#5565296 Marketed by Rocco D'Armiento (609) 799-2022

South Brunswick $429,000 Welcome the good life in this distinctive 3BR/2+BA condo. Gas fireplace. Family room, central air. Garage. It's captivating & genial! LS#11996 Marketed by Lana Chan (609) 799-2022

South Brunswick $599,900 Discover the charm and elegance pervading this distinctive 3BR/2BA residence. Gas fireplace. Family room, pantry. Provides luxurious living! LS#6988 Marketed by Young Gaze (609) 799-2022

Washington Twp $564,000 Delight in the distinctive design of this gracious home 4BR/2.5BA, 4 car gar on 0.64 acres. Completely refurbished! LS#5652088 Marketed by Ginny Sheehan (609) 799-2022

West Windsor Twp $369,000 Walk to train station. This Craftsman era cape was completely remodeled in 2007. Main bedroom & bath on 1st floor. Hardwood floors & AC. LS#5652527 Marketed by Blanche Paul (609) 924-1600

West Windsor Twp $450,000 Bright 2BR patio home in desirable Westwinds. 2 story foyer, eat-in kit., formal DR, LR w/FP & cathedral ceiling. 2 car garage & paver patio. LS#5668466 Marketed by Eva Petruzziello (609) 924-1600

West Windsor Twp $470,000 Tastefully decorated cape with 5 spacious bedrooms, 2 full baths; featuring gleaming hardwood floors throughout and on a large, private lot. LS#5656320 Marketed by Lisa Candella-Hulbert (609) 924-1600

E US PM O H 1-4 N 1 PE /2 O N3 SU

E US PM O H 1-4 N 1 PE /2 O N3 U S

West Windsor Twp $534,900 Superb 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath Patio Home at Canal Pointe. A truly "move in" home with the most desirable location. LS#5662140 Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz (609) 924-1600

West Windsor $685,000 17 Hamilton Drive. Outstanding 4BR/2.5BA in Princeton View! Well maintained w/many upgrades. Professionally landscaped & backs to wooded lot. LS#5656577 Marketed by Maureen Provenzano (609) 924-1600

www.prufoxroach.com

West Windsor Twp $729,000 80 Saratoga Drive. GORGEOUS! Remodeled & Fab-ulous! 4bdrm/2ba in Kings Point. Beautiful landscaping! Private backyard! Upgrades & custom features throughout. LS#5644507 Marketed by Maureen Provenzano (609) 924-1600

West Windsor Twp $750,000 Beautiful Turnbury in Windsor Hunt. Upgraded kitchen, remodeled baths, Brazilian cherry wood flr, fin. BSMT, heated inground pool & much more. LS#5671512 Marketed by Eva Petruzziello (609) 924-1600

West Windsor Twp $779,000 Pamper yourself with luxury in this gracious 5BR/3BA residence situated on 0.80 acres. Security system, gas fireplace. Family room. LS#5659558 Marketed by Lana Chan (609) 799-2022

West Windsor Twp $949,900 Beautifully upgraded! 5BR/4.5BA, library & guest suite on 1st fl, gourmet granite kitchen, finished BSMT+ bonus rm! Paver patio & potting shed. LS#5664390 Marketed by Carole Tosches (609) 924-1600

Princeton Home Marketing Center Princeton Junction Office 253 Nassau St. 44 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. 609-924-1600 609-799-2022

An Independently Owned and Operated Member of the Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.

Mortgage · Title · Insurance

Everything You Need. Right Here. Right Now. Mortgage · Title · Insurance Everything You Need. Right Here. Right Now.

The Perfect Settlement...We Guarantee It!

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

5

Continued from page 3

is drunk with political power. In the March 5 edition of the WW-P News, Richard Moody declared in a letter to the editor that the mayor "still refuses to meet" with him to discuss township issues. The mayor's secretary told him "she was not allowed to make an appointment for the Mayor with him." The "Cell Group" and many others have continually asked the mayor to work with them and they too have been "stonewalled." I have reached out to the Mayor in good will, many times, only to be stonewalled and even thwarted in my efforts on Route 571. Our stories are just a few of many in West Windsor. While I think my point is reasonable and sound, the mayor and his attack dogs want you to think that I am "full of it" for pointing this out to you. They want you to think that my point makes me a bad person. One of the mayor's attack dogs even yelled out for me to "get a life" for speaking my fact-based point of view at the State of West Windsor meeting. The mayor and his attack dogs use Rovian political tactics to attack anyone with an opposing viewpoint. It is time for West Windsor residents to have an honest discussion about our leadership. Too often any differing viewpoints are being demonized by the mayor and his atlege is a great opportunity for younger kids to develop new interests and feed a curious mind." When he's not studying or teaching juggling, Jesse demonstrates natural food products at Whole Foods and other stores around the state for Distinctive Demos, a Cherry Hill-based company. In fact, juggling kind of runs in the family. Jesse's younger brother, Charles, is in sixth grade at Grover Middle School and, like Jesse, learned to juggle at Camp College. Their parents, Maxine and Luis, also juggle by working in business and raising their sons. As a graduate of Camp College and now an instructor, Jesse is an enthusiastic proponent of all of Camp College's programs because they are unique and fastpaced, a great antidote to summer doldrums and the dreaded "I'm bored" whine that afflicts even the most good-natured of students. With juggling, there is no report card to reflect performance and achievement, but Jesse says there is a Camp Finale show that can showcase the progress the kids have made. "They get the opportunity to apply their strengths and learn something new in an environment that is very supportive and receptive to new ideas and innovation." For more information about juggling and other fun courses offered at Camp College, go to www.mccc.edu/campcollege or call 609-570-3311.

tack dogs. Too often the mayor uses slimy political tactics to "stonewall" and even work against the very West Windsor residents he is supposed to represent. The facts are the facts. This mayor and his 10-year spending spree have not measured up. Andrew Hersh West Windsor

News to Ponder

est Windsor Council will hold a Special Session on Monday, March 22." "Since WW Council has not received the 2010 budget, and since the new budget will not be introduced by April 1, WW Council will discuss and approve an emergency temporary budget to appropriate funding for the second quarter." "The 2010 budget was due January 1." Concurrently, the Township has announced its Dumpster Drop-Off Day: http://westwindsornj.org/dumpster-drop-off-day041710.pdf Given the headline: "It's Time to Clean the Trash from your Garage, Attic, or Basement," it needs amending to include our esteemed politicians. It is time to recycle your fully accountable, directly elected mayor and his $140,000 appointed administrator. How can taxpayers tolerate this fiscal irresponsibility? I am tired of the excuses and political gamesmanship from a township official who must be familiar with a budget he has reviewed (and increased) 19 times in 19 years. Yet the budget remains hidden from taxpayers and Council. Endless dollars have been spent on no-bid professional services contracts, almost exclusively on this mayor's watch. His support for the infamous "Taxes Trainsaw Massacre," aka Transit Village, has been a house of cards. Targeted spending of $1 million on the restoration of the old Princeton Junction Firehouse for the West Windsor Arts Council. Rebid cost increases for the unnecessary expansion and necessary reconstruction of the 20-year-old West Windsor Senior Center. When is the last time you heard the mayor's input on containing or reducing WW-P school costs? As I have previously written, "ignorance and inattention to detail are very, very expensive." Peter R. Weale 144 Fisher Place, West Windsor

W

addicted to cell phones that they can't stop, I suggest that Christie raise the fine to $1,000 and use the money for a general state fund. This fundraising method is certainly less punitive than removing state funding from schools, arts organizations, and New Jersey Transit. Another way of raising a lot of money is to increase the gasoline tax in New Jersey, which is very low relative to most other states. Recently the Washington Post suggested raising the gasoline price to $7 per gallon as price increases have been the only method that makes people conserve. Ronald A. LeMahieu Sequoia Court, West Windsor

NEW LISTING!

RADHA CHEERATH

"Excellence is not an act, but a habit"

· NJAR Circle of Excellence Award Gold Level `03-'08 · NJAR Million Dollar Club Award Silver Level `01-'02 · Mercer County Top Producers Association `01-'08 Email: [email protected] Office: 609-750-4118 Cell: 609-577-6664

BROKER ASSOCIATE

8 Kingstone Lane, East Windsor NJ 08520

Correction

Due to an editing error in the March 5 Views & Opinions column, Tom Tonon's comparison of pay raises granted in his industry to those being sought by custodial employees was garbled. His letter should have said "Working as a professional engineer with my present employer, over the last 15 years my average yearly salary increase was 2.2 percent." The custodian union was asking for a 19 percent raise over four years.

Gorgeous upgraded newer home with newly installed flooring in living room, dining room, and family room.This 3-4 bedroom home features a spacious loft that can be easily converted into the fourth bedroom. Open layout with a spacious living room is ideal for entertaining.Well appointed eat-in-kitchen with ceramic tile flooring and newer refrigerator. Spacious family room with fireplace and ceiling fan. Relax in the spacious master bedroom suite with sumptuous bath attached. Enjoy summer entertaining on the beautiful brick patio and the oversized lot. Large 2 car garage completes this move in condition home. Close to NYC transportation, shopping, and major highways.

RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

Offered at $419,000.

50 Princeton-Hightstown Rd · Princeton Jct. NJ

609-799-8181

Real 609-936-2525 x Estate

33 Princeton-Hightstown Road Princeton Junction, NJ 08550

LONG & FOSTER

Lori Ann Stohn

Broker/Sales Associate

Professional, Experienced & Educated Agents

Mary E. Weaver

Broker/Sales Associate

Anji Goyal

Broker/Sales Associate

ABR, GRI, ASP

Dir: 609-936-2525 x5384

Cell: 908-578-0545 [email protected]

ABR, CRS, SHS

Dir: 609-936-2525 x5365

Cell: 609-865-8223 [email protected]

GRI, CRS, CRP

Dir: 609-936-2525 x5361

Cell: 609-721-1537 [email protected]

Sales Associate, ASP,

Maria DePasquale SRES

Cell: 609-851-2377 [email protected]

Josephine "Josie" Rost

Broker/Sales Associate

Joseph Gulino

Broker/Sales Associate

Dir: 609-936-2525 x2549

ABR, GRI

Dir: 609-936-2525 x5370

[email protected]

Dir: 609-936-2525 x2554

Cell: 609-213-0548 [email protected]

ABR: Accredited Buyer's Representative · CRS: Certified Residential Specialist ASP: Accredited Staging Professional · GRI: Graduate Realtor Institute · SHS: Senior Housing Specialist

SE U M O P H 1-4 N 1 PE /2 O N3 U S

ecent articles about citations for driving while using a cell phone suggest another way for Governor Christie to handle New Jersey's finances. There have been 224,725 citations in the 23 months the law has been in effect. At $100 each this brings in $22.47 million. Since most people are now so

R

PR

Raise Cell Phone Fine to Help Budget

IC

E

RE

DU

CT

IO

N

East Windsor $439,000 Almost Brand New!!! Riviera at East Windsor 55+ Active Adult Community. Formal entry foyer with tray ceiling. Lg. 2 story great room, kitchen with 42" Cherry cabinets,granite counters, tiled backsplash, tiled sunroom w/skylights to both great rm. & kit. M. Suite w/upgraded neutral carpet, tray ceiling, walk-in closet, private BA. Grand staircase with wrought iron spindles to the upper level w/lg. open loft, 3rd BR and private full bath. Call Lori Ann Stohn 609-750-5384

East Windsor $379,900 125 Hickory Corner Rd. This 5+ bdrm, 2 ba home has new energy saving roof, siding, & windows. A sunny family rm w treed views, some new floors, fresh paint and possible in-law suite. There is a full basement, new porch, walk, & large patio. Oversized att. 2 car garage with attic plus large detached outbuilding with electric. Set on .63 acres among mature trees. Tremendous value! Call Mary Weaver 609-865-8223

West Windsor $599,900 Premium location backing to woods offering 3 BR, 2.5 baths. First flr w/gleaming hrdwd flrs. Dramatic twostory foyer. Living rm w/cathedral ceiling. Dining rm w/chair rail & crown molding. Family rm w/flr to ceiling fp & ceiling fan. Kitchen boasts Cherry cabinets, granite counters, tile backsplash & more. Eating area offers bay window & skylight. Master bed offers WIC, ceiling fan & bath w/jacuzzi, upgraded tiles, double sinks & more. Gorgeous EP Henry patio, 2-car garage. Call Anji Goyal 609-721-1537

BARBER SHOP

33 Hightstown Rd., Princeton Jct. ELLSWORTH'S CENTER (Near Train Station)

Hrs: Tues - Fri: 10am - 6pm Sat: 8:30am - 3:30pm

West Windsor $950,000 Welcome Home. Pristine 5 bedroom, one of the rare private lots in the sought after Estates at Princeton Junction. Fabulous Kitchen with Cherry Cabinets, Granite Countertops, Solarium, sweeping staircase, custom moldings and millwork, wet bar, loaded with many upgrades. Community amenities include pool, tennis, playgrounds. Close to P.J. train and minutes to downtown Princeton. Excellent West Windsor schools.

JUNCTION

West Windsor $495,000 Beautifully updated 5 BR 3.5 BA home. Taste-fully decorated, crown mould., recessed lights. Wood flrs. Kit. w/granite countertops. Cer. tile flr. & backsplash; coordinating appls. DR w/new cust. built in china cab. Paver patio & lndscpd. fenced backyard. Gas FP. MBR ste. w/sit. rm., dress. rm., vaulted ceil., wood-burning FP, skylights & balcony. 5th BR ste. on main flr. Adjoining full BA. All BAs updated w/new fixtures & cust. painting. Call Josie Rost 609-306-2074

RE

DU

CE

D

609-799-8554

Robbinsville $244,900 Gorgeous 2nd floor condo. "Lofts at Town Center." Contemporary, elegant lifestyle w/all great aspects of urban living. 1,100 SF. Open-floor plan condo. Largest 1-BR unit available! Fully upgraded kit. w/granite countertops, built in wine fridge, stainless steel appls. & center island w/bar stools. Hdwd. floors, high ceils. w/recessed lighting, fully upgraded BA w/granite countertops & very spacious BR. On-site fitness center, assigned parking space. Secure storage unit. Requires access key to enter building & elevator. Call Joseph Gulino 609-213-0548

Call Maria DePasquale 609-851-2377

6

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Don Hofmann

Continued from page 1

MLS5667402

PLAINSBORO $449,900 Meticulous 3-BEDROOM, 2.5BATH Princeton Crossing colonial; open floor plan; H/W foyer; LR with fireplace; EIK; fenced yd; 2nd flr laundry; walk to grade sch; conv to shopping, hwys. MLS5667402

MLS5666262

PLAINSBORO $479,900 Pristine 3BR, 2.5BA colonial; open floor plan. FR w/3 walls of windows overlooking patio; upgraded KIT;1st lvl laundry; conv loc; Blue Ribbon schools. MLS5666262

MLS5613375

PLAINSBORO $400,000 Immaculate 2 BR, 2.5 BA Princeton Landing Stockton model townhouse w/loft. Newer H/W flrs, kit w/ b'fast area, ceiling fans, pvt deck. Master w/ Jacuzzi, Fin bsmnt, 2-car garage. MLS55613375

MLS5642141

CRANBURY $415,000 Largest model in Four Seasons. 3BR, 2BA w/FR, patio. Great location, close to clubhouse & walking distance to Historic downtown Cranbury. MLS5622141

MLS5663659

WEST WINDSOR $735,000 Beautiful 4BR, 2.5BA col. on lot backing to woods; gourmet kit w/42" cabinets, stainless appls & granite cntrs; gas fpl; huge master ste; full bsmt w/9ft ceil; min to train. MLS5663659

MLS5651299

PRINCETON JCT $1,185,000 EXCEPTIONAL 5BR, 6.5BA Crown Pointe home; H/W flrs; custom moldings; gourmet kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, Bosche 6-burner stove; lavsh MBR ste; granite patio, pool, resort-like yard. MLS5651299

addition, says Hofmann, "she would visit people on an as-needed basis. She was a kind soul." She did that on top of raising four boys -- no easy task, Hofmann says. "My parents were very involved," says Hofmann. "They didn't talk a lot about it, but they did it." After Hofmann graduated from high school in Delaware, he attended Hofstra University, where he met his wife, Joyce (the couple's 30th anniversary is approaching). He worked for a few years in New York and then earned his MBA at Harvard Business School in 1983. Upon graduation, he and his wife, who owns Princeton Weight Loss, moved to Lawrenceville, where they lived for three years before moving to West Windsor in 1987. "We wanted a town that had great schools" but was also an easy commute to and from New York. Their two boys attended WW-P schools through middle school before moving on to Princeton Day School. His oldest son is a graduate of Georgetown University and works in New York. His younger son currently attends Villanova. Hofmann began to get involved in the community when his sons were younger. He was a Little League coach for 10 years. He was asked to join the hospital board seven years ago by Jack Chamberlin, who was its chairman from 2004 to 2007. "It was natural when Jack asked me," said Hofmann, citing his connections to the hospital and service. "I'm inspired by our leadership." As chairman of the board at the healthcare system, Hofmann looks forward to the opportunities associated with the new hospital, located on 50 acres of a 160-acre site in Plainsboro off Route 1. When the new facility opens in late 2011, it will consist of 636,000 square feet of interior space, including 237 single patient rooms, operating rooms, treatment areas, and an emergency department twice the size of the current one.

The new medical center will be located on a campus that will also include a medical office building, a fitness and wellness center, a health education center, a senior residential community, a skilled nursing facility, pediatric services, and a 32-acre public park along the Millstone River. As a member of the board for the past seven years, Hofmann has seen the process unfold as officials developed plans for the new hospital -- from choosing a site and getting the approvals to groundbreaking and beginning construction. "This goes back many years; we visited many sites," he said. "[The Plainsboro site] worked itself out as being a great location. We want to be in Plainsboro," he said, citing access to the site as just one of the factors. "We think that this new site is going to attract many new patients," he says. "It is in a great location."

Science Bowl Winners

T

wo teams from High School South were winners at the New Jersey State Science Bowl Competition, sponsored by the Department of Energy. South's B team captained by Neeli Mishra and including Ante Qu, Nikita Singh, Rishabh Singh, and Sudershan Sudershan, placed fifth in the state; and High School South's A team captained by Mark Benjamin and including Alexander Clifton, Kunal Desai, Satyajeet Pal, and Aniruddh Shivram placed first in the state and will represent New Jersey at the National Science Bowl Competition in Washington, DC. "This was my fourth and last year to do Science Bowl," says Mark Benjamin, a senior at South. "Both the A and B teams from our school did extraordinarily well in competition and both exceeded my expectations. Science Bowl was the first science competition I had ever participated in and there is no doubt in my mind that without it I would not be nearly as excited about science. I just hope that the Department of Energy realizes how successful Science Bowl is."

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

7

Scouting News

ichard Ruff of West Windsor received the Award of Merit by the Mercer Area District of the Boy Scouts. An assistant scoutmaster for Troop 40, he previously served as a leader in Pack 40. "It's always nice to be recognized by your peers," he says. Ruff has been in Boy Scouts for 24 years: 12 as a youth who earned his Eagle Award and 12 as an adult committee member and assistant scoutmaster. He is a regional sales manager for Hilt Tool Company. His son, Jonathan, 18, is a freshman at the College of New Jersey. He was awarded his Eagle Scout award two weeks ago. His daughter, Danielle, is nine; and his wife, JoAnne, is a homemaker. Ruff is also the scoutmaster for the Central Jersey Council associated with the national Boy Scout jamboree in Virginia this July.

R

Kathryn Baxter, Realtor Associate

www.kathybaxter.com

SU OP N. EN 3/ HO 21 U 1- SE 4P M

West Windsor, NJ 31 Monterey Drive

A commuters dream... walk to train. Beautiful 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Colonial in Benford Estates. New kitchen w/ maple cabinets, black granite counters, upgraded ss appliances. Huge great room with woodburning fireplace. Finished basement. Fenced yard, great location. $650,000

SU OP N. EN 3/ HO 21 U 1- SE 4P M

Richard Ruff received the Award of Merit from the Mercer Area District of the Boy Scouts.

Individual Performance: Lavanya Ganesh with "All Under One Roof: The Innovation of the Waltham-Lowell System;" and Shivani Badgi with "Public Education: The Evolution of Knowledge for All." Group Documentary: Ingrid Ma and Thea Ma with "Streptomycin: A Pioneer Antibiotic;" and Giri Sharma, Mohit Dandekar, and Mohit Hajarnis with "Achtung Panzer: The Birth of the Blitzkrieg." Individual Documentary: Carolyn Lipka with "Nuclear Innovation and the Myth of Inevitability" and Matt Greenberg with "Evolution: Driving Reforms." Individual Exhibit: Olivia Hu with "Thalidomide." Group Exhibit: Meea Yim and Kimberly Shiao with "An Unconventional Group: The United Nations." Individual Paper: Anne Corbett with "The National Child Labor Committee Lobbying for Reinvention of Industry;" Sushruth Kamath with "Mahathma Gandhi Satyagraha: The Innovation of Peace in Modern Warfare;" and Emma McGregor with "The Lobotomy: Remembering and

Continued on following page

West Windsor, NJ 11 Woodland Court

North facing home that has it all...beautiful 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath home in Heatherfield. One bedroom and full bath on main floor for in-law/au pair, sunroom, finished basement. 3 car garage, fully fenced, heated inground pool, gorgeous yard, wooded property. $850,000

National History Day

H

igh School North National History Day Club members took home ribbons in almost every category at the regional contest held at Rider University on March 5. National History Day, an academic competition for middle and high school students, in which students research historical topics related to this year's theme, "Innovation In History: Impact and Change." After research, they analyze, interpret their findings, and present papers, websites, exhibits, performances, and documentaries. Students who qualified for the upcoming state tournament at William Paterson University include: Group Performance: Aneesha Raghunathan, Adam Niemann, and Siddhi Sundar with "Broadcasting: an Innovation In Communication;" Varnika Atmakuri, Vikram Kesavabhotla, Eugene Tang, Payal Marathe, and Sanjana Manikandan with "Struggle of Colors: The Innovation of the Jim Crow Laws."

Kathryn Baxter

Henderson Sotheby's International Realty 37 North Main Street Cranbury, NJ 08512 Office: 609-395-0444 · Cell: 516-521-7771 Home: 609-844-9687 · Fax: 609-844-9689

Looking all over for a great realtor...

· · · · ·

Pruning shaping tree removal lots cleared top quality colorized MULCH

· · · · ·

75' bucket truck stump grinding snow plowing FIREWOOD CABLING/ BRACING

quality work · fully insured

call john stanley

Gloria Hutchinson

Owner/Sales Associate

www.timberwolftreeservice.net

609-918-1668

Janice Hutchinson

Sales Associate

please support local small businesses

8

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Continued from preceding page

We're Glad to Announce that

Mamta Bansal Gupta, M.D.

Is Joining Our Practice.

Learning from Medicine's Mistakes."

Physics Team

he American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT) announced the top students to advance to the semifinal round of U.S. Physics Team selection. Of the roughly 40 High School South students who took the first test, Mark Benjamin, Ante Qu, Michael Wu, and Daniel Xia advanced. The International Physics Olympiad (IPHO) is a nine-day competition among pre-university students from more than 80 nations. The 2010 Olympiad will be held in Zagreb, Croatia, from July 17 to 25. About 40 students from High School South took the preliminary test in January.

T

Her Specialties Are Pediatrics & Adolescents

We Welcome Her!

Child Health Associates of Plainsboro

666 Plainsboro Road · Ste. 1050 Plainsboro, NJ 08536 · 609-750-1521

In School

8th Grade Givers: From left, Emma Fleming of Plainsboro, Brian Chevlin, Jewish Community Center of Princeton Mercer Bucks, Samantha Cirkus of West Windsor, and Allison Fleming of Plainsboro.

Elianna Wydra, Ben Meshumar, and Michael Miller, all of West Windsor, The group donated $1,900 for Hias' Legal Aid Project for Priority Asylum Seekers, a program that provides legal services to migrants in America who are seeking asylum. Tenth grade students included Darren Freedman of West Windsor. The group donated $2,000 for the CGJC Art Activities for Visiting School Groups Program for Public Schools, Congregational Schools, and Families, a program to engage children and accompanying adults in the exploration of Jewish history through interactive exhibitions. lating all the participants on their fine work." This year's winners include grade one, Arya Sasane, Maurice Hawk School, who also took second place in the Gifted Kids Change the World 2010 Art and Writing Contest; grade two, Arun Ayalur Raman, Dutch Neck Elementary School; grade three, Mia S. Pangasnan, Town Center Elementary School; grade four, Dereck Wang, Village School; grade five, Priya Kothari, Millstone River School; grade six, Miriam Li, Community Middle School; grade seven, Emily Vena, Thomas R. Grover Middle School; grade eight, Saaketh Krosuri, Thomas R. Grover Middle School; grade ten, Connie Zhang, High School North; and grade eleven, Anesha Raghunathan, High School North. The contest is open to all grade 1-12 students residing in West Windsor and Plainsboro. Each winner receives a U.S. Savings Bond.

P

Hair Plus Hair Plus

TH E SALON

609-897-0400

HAIR, NAIL & S KIN CARE

hillips Exeter Academy: Brandon G. Kaplowitz, grade nine, is on the honors list. Jackie Kay, grade 12, is on the highest honors list. They are both West Windsor residents.

Faith

WEST WINDSOR HAIR, NAIL & S KIN CARE

Southfield Center, Princeton-Hightstown Road OPEN 7 DAYS

TH E SALON

609-897-0400

T

WEST WINDSOR

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR MONTHLY SPECIALS ON: HAIR: · SKIN & & styling, color, high- & low-lighting, HAIRdesign cutting NAIL PRODUCTS · SERVICES

custom waves; NAILS: manicures, pedicures, tips & wraps, SKIN: facial & body SKIN: facial & body application nail art, paraffin treatments; waxing; make-upwaxing; make-up application & make-overs; facials. & make-overs; facials.

Southfield Center, Princeton-Hightstown Road OPEN 7 DAYS

COME VISIT US

First Time Clients Only. Mondays Only Facials: Restore Your Youthful Appearance. Reg. $115 NOW $85 European Repair Facial Reg. $85 NOW $55 First Time Clients Only: $10 Off Any Hair Service of $55 or More. 10% to 20% Off Any Retail Item Including: Paul Mitchell, Biolage, Loreal, Kiwi, Redken, Aquage

he Jewish Community Youth Foundation (JCYF), a Jewish teen philanthropy program administered by Jewish Family & Children's Service of Greater Mercer County, celebrated its seventh year by distributing a total of $64,800 to 27 Jewish programs and agencies at its annual philanthropy fair and check presentation ceremony on Sunday, March 7, at Robbinsville High School. The keynote speaker was Charles Bronfman, chairman of the Andrea and Charles Bronfman Philanthropies. Glenn Harris and Alison Berg, both of West Windsor and graduating seniors, addressed the audience reflecting on their five years of participation in the program. Eighth grade students included Emma Fleming and Allison Fleming, both of Plainsboro, and Samantha Cirkus of West Windsor. The group donated $2,500 for the Carousel Program, a socialization and recreation program for disabled teens and young adults. Ninth grade students included

Essay and Poem Contest

est Windsor Lions Club presented awards to the eighth annual "Why I Love America" Essay/Poem Contest winners. "It is a pleasure and an inspiration to read the perceptive observations of these young scholars," says Jim Hynes, president of the Lions Club. "And it is gratifying that they are so appreciative of the freedom and unity we all enjoy among the rich diversity we celebrate in this wondrous land. I join the other West Windsor Lions in applauding the contest winners and congratu-

W

Community Service

G

rade five students at the Village School assembled gift bags for the mothers served by HomeFront, an organization that assists families in their struggle to become independent. These gift bags were filled with hygiene and grooming supplies, which the students' families generously donated. Festively decorated, the bags were delivered to HomeFront in celebration of Valentine's Day. Teachers participating included Eileen Beam, Joanne Glover, Lois Huber, Karen Orlovsky, Carol Murphy, Janice Elliott, Dana Kercheval, and Janette Young. Their students watched a video that showed how poverty is a continuing problem here in Mercer County affecting mainly children.

Mock Trial

arshall Academy, based in West Windsor, won the Mercer County title for the Vincent J. Apruzzese High School Mock Trial Competition for the second year in a row. The team is coached by Barbara Rapaport in her home. Jeremy Rapaport-Stein, a senior on the team, plays the role of a prosecuting attorney. "I first learned about mock trial from a friend whose older child had competed on a team in Somerset County," she says. "I'm always on the lookout for experiential learn-

M

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

9

North alumna Kristen Castellano and Ryan O'Grady are planning an August 15 wedding.

ing opportunities -- given Jeremy's interest in civics and law, mock trial seemed like a perfect fit. We offered the opportunity to other New Jersey homeschooling families, and the kids chose the name Marshall Academy in honor of Justices John Marshall and Thurgood Marshall." In the event students try a fictitious criminal case before judges and attorneys at the New Jersey Law Center in New Brunswick. In this trial Loren Perry is accused of kidnapping 12-year-old Bailey Reynolds and is also charged with criminal restraint and false imprisonment. "Sadly, the team lost a very close match in the first round," says Rapaport. lege of Education and Public Policy; and Christopher Mancini, an electrical engineering major in the College of Engineering. Also juniors Andrew Meltzer, a history and political science major in the College of Arts and Sciences; Jonathan Scheer, a history education major in the College of Arts and Sciences; Patrick Shock, a biological sciences and neuroscience major in the College of Arts and Sciences; Casey Spencer, a freshman pre-vet medicine and animal biology major in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources; and Lisa Dokovna, a sophomore anthropology major in the College of Arts and Sciences. Kean University: Genevieve Thayer of West Windsor is on the dean's list. University of Michigan: Junichi Hara of West Windsor received a William J. Branstrom Freshman Prize for being in the top five percent of his freshman class. He graduated from High School South in 2009.

Strong Mind & Body Improv Yourself! Improve Yourself!

Tae Kwon Do

· Our Specialized Programs · Make Learning Fun and Exciting · Our Curriculum Helps Students · Improve Concentration, · Confidence & Discipline In School

Trial Program

Only $39

Includes 2 Weeks Instruction Plus Uniform

Deaths

Master Yoon Kak Kim

is one of the most successful head coaches of the U.S National Tae Kwon Do Team. Master Kim has earned international recognition.

A

Master Gardeners

aster Gardeners of Mercer County held a graduation ceremony at the Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Mercer County. The new class includes West Windsor residents Bonnie Blader, Paola Blelloch, and Paul Eland. Blader, who volunteered more than 100 hours, received a special award. The volunteer Master Gardener Program was started in Washington state in 1972 to meet the enormous increase in requests from home gardeners for horticultural information. The program has expanded to all 50 states and Canada, and 18 of New Jersey's 21 counties now have programs. The Master Gardeners of Mercer County helpline may be reached at 609989-6853, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information contact Rutgers Cooperative Extension at 609- 989-6830 or visit www.mgofmc.org.

M

Engagement

K

In College

U

niversity of Delaware: Kelly Twamley of West Windsor graduated with a bachelor of science in leadership and human services, education, and public policy. Dean's list students include Plainsboro residents Divya Basavapatna, a junior visual communication major in the College of Arts and Sciences; Gregory Quinton, a sopho more finance and accounting major in the College of Business and Economics; Caroline Tiffany, a junior nursing major in the College of Health Sciences; Eric Voigtsberger, a senior finance and marketing major in the College of Business and Economics; Alyssa Weiskopf, a sophomore elementary teacher education major in the College of Education and Public Policy; Carrie Winiker, a senior communication major in the College of Arts and Sciences; and Erica Zalma, a freshman hotel, restaurant management major in the College of Business and Economics. West Windsor residents on the dean's list include juniors Kimberly Ashton, an exercise science major in the College of Health Sciences; Cynthia Barclay, an operations management and marketing major in the College of Business and Economics; Ian Clark, a communication major in the College of Arts and Sciences; and Chelsea McFarland, a music education and instrumental major in the College of Arts and Sciences; and sophomores Melanie Bugher, an elementary teacher education major in the Col-

risten Castellano and Ryan O'Grady are planning a wedding on August 15. The bride-to-be is the daughter of former West Windsor residents, Ozana and Michael Castellano, now of Robbinsville. A graduate of High School North, Class of 2002, she received a BBA from Loyola University in Maryland and is currently completing her MBA at Drexel University. She is a financial professional with BlackRock. The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mary O'Grady of Phoenixville, PA. A graduate of the Wharton School, he is a financial professional with JPMorgan Chase.

memorial service will be held Saturday, March 20, at 2 p.m. at the Dutch Neck Presbyterian Church, 154 South Mill Road, West Windsor, for Shirley Doris Holman, a longtime West Windsor resident who died January 14 at the age of 76. Born in Cranbury she lived in Dutch Neck all her life before moving to Mansfield in 2006. Donations may be made to HomeFront, 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville 08648, www.homefrontnj.org; Doctors Without Borders, Box 5030, Hagerstown, MD 21741-5030, www.DoctorsWithoutBorders.org; Trenton Area Soup Kitchen, Box 872, Trenton 08605, www.trentonsoupkitchen.org; or Visiting Nurse and Hospice Services, 204 Creek Crossing Boulevard, Hainesport 08036, www.vnhsnj.org. Elwood "Ted" Swenson, 78, of New Brunswick died February 28 at home. Born in Staten Island, NY, he lived in the Plainsboro area for 30 years. A Navy veteran, he was a 1962 graduate of Wagner College, a former accountant with Merrill Lynch, and a deacon at the First Presbyterian Church of Cranbury. Survivors include daughter and son-in-law, Audrey and Ralf Lange; a son, Karsten Swenson and his girlfriend, Birgitta Mauer; a brother, Arthur Swenson; two grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Donations may be made to the First Reformed Church of New Brunswick, 9 Bayard Street, New Brunswick 08901, or to the First Presbyterian Church of Cranbury, 22 South Main Street, Cranbury 08512.

Continued on following page

United Black Belt

295 Princeton-Hightstown Road Southfield Retail Center · West Windsor www.unitedblackbelt.com

609-275-1500

How Well Does Your Child See?

Births

The University Medical Center at Princeton has announced that a daughter was born to Plainsboro residents Alicya and Pawel Tadych, March 8.

Child Health Associates of Plainsboro 666 Plainsboro Road Ste. 1050 Plainsboro, NJ 08536

Skey& Bhattacharya Attorneys-at-Law

At Skey & Bhattacharya, our mission is to represent you and manage your case through effective negotiation or litigation in order to resolve your difficulties in the most efficient way possible. With over 30 years of experience, Skey & Bhattacharya understands the legal process and has the knowledge necessary to predict likely results and avoid possibly expensive and needless litigation so that you can move ahead with your new life quickly and return to a sense of normalcy.

(609) 896-8100 www.sbfamilylaw.com

10

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

www.harmonyschools.com

REGISTER NOW! Summer Camps & Kindergarten 2010-2011

Ages 6 Weeks through 9 Years Full and Part Time Family Friendly Schedules

Pre-K Plus · Drop In Care · School-Aged Backup Care

Continued from preceding page

Ask About Our New Building!

29 Years of Quality Education

Norman J. O'Brien, 80, of Las Cruces, New Mexico died March 2 at La Posada Mesilla Valley Hospice. Survivors include daughter and son-in-law, Kathy and John Farrell of West Windsor. Donations may be made to Mesilla Valley Hospice, 299 East Montana Avenue, Las Cruces, NM 88005. Phyllis Galietti, 85, of Toms River, died March 3 at Rose Garden Care Center, Toms River. Survivors include son and daughterin-law, Raymond and Maureen Galietti of West Windsor. Donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Association, Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090 or www.alz.org Claire S. Allen, 87, died March 5 in Lakewood. Survivors include a nephew, Richard Weber of West Windsor. Donations may be made to the Salvation Army. Mae Rapaport Sockolof of Monroe Township died March 6 at the Francis E. Parker Home in Piscataway. Survivors include daughter and son-in-law, Debbie and Lou Schwartz of West Windsor; and

Writing Became a Ride

lexus Davis, right, of West Windsor had her novel, "Juke Joint," published. A junior at Princeton Day School, she was encouraged to write the book after meeting with author Jamie Adoff, a visiting artist at the school. She corresponded with Adoff, who read her manuscript and recommended ways to publish her work. "My characters have been inspired by the personality traits of people around me but the characters are all fictional," she says. "The book definitely took me on a ride." The book is available through amazon.com. her grandson Jason Schwartz. Donations may be made to Susan G. Komen, for the Cure, 2 Princess Road, Suite D; Lawrenceville 08648; Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104; or The Martin and Edith Stein Hospice, 49 Veronica Avenue; Suite 206, Somerset 08873. Hannah R. Tindall, 90, of Monroe Township died March 8 at the Monroe Village Health Care Center. Born and raised in Lawrenceville, she was a former resident of Dutch Neck as well as the postmaster for Dutch Neck for 10 years before retiring. She was also a licensed real estate agent, and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Survivors include her two sons and daughters-in-law, Charles G. and Jean Tindall Jr. and John R. and Sheryl Tindall; five grandchildren, Andrew, Jonathan, Matthew, and Meredith Tindall, and Danielle Freedman; eight great-grandchildren; and her sister, Lucile Silvester. A memorial service will be held Saturday, March 27, at 1 p.m. at Poulson & Van Hise Funeral Directors, 650 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, with Rev Paul L. Rhebergen, pastor of the Dutch Neck Presbyterian Church, officiating. Donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 3076 Princeton Pike, Lawrenceville 08648. Florence May Durland, 78, of Plainsboro died March 9 in Compassionate Care Hospice at St. Francis Hospital in Trenton. Born in Hightstown, she moved to Plainsboro in 1951. A waitress at the Grotto Restaurant in Princeton for 35 years, she retired from the deli department of the Plainsboro Super Fresh supermarket in 1996. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Plainsboro, the Plainsboro Senior Citizens Club, and a spokeswoman for the AARP. Survivors include her husband of 60 years, Kenneth E. Durland Sr.; daughters and sons-inlaw; Sharon Durland and Edward Blechschmidt of Reading, PA, Florence and David LaBeur of Green Cove Springs, FL, and Grace Moylan of Hamilton; and sons and daughter-in-law, Kenneth E. Durland Jr. of Hamilton, and Charles M. and Karen Durland of Plainsboro; six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren; and her aunt, Madeline Payton of Hightstown. Donations may be made to the First Presbyterian Church of Plainsboro. Dwayne Cade, 43, died at his home in Glen Mills, PA. A graduate of West Windsor-Plainsboro High School, he attended Ohio State University. Survivors include his mother Jean Cade; his sister Roxanne Parker; his brother Grady Lee Cade Jr.; his half sisters Rene, Robin, and Renata Smith; his half brother Reginald Smith; his foster sisters Carla Cogdell and Maria Bainbridge; his foster brothers Thomas, Timothy, Mark, and James Bainbridge; and his foster father Thomas Bainbridge. Anthony Bellidora Jr., 65, of Plainsboro died March 11. Born in Rockville Centre, NY, he was a longtime area resident and was employed with Harris Interactive of Princeton for 20 years. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War. Survivors include his wife, Carol M. Bellidora; his daughter and son-in-law, Dawn and Greg Anderson; his mother, Lucy Bellidora; two brothers and sisters-in-law, Ralph and Dolores Bellidora, and Thomas and Darlene Bellidora; and two grandchildren, James and Sarah Anderson. Donations may be made to the Queenship of Mary Food Bank Program, 16 Dey Road, Plainsboro 08536, or American Heart Association, 1 Union Street, Suite 301, Robbinsville 08691. Eugene J. Nowak, 88, of Manchester died March 12 in Toms River. He served in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Survivors include son and daughterin-law, Gregory and Kathleen Nowak of Plainsboro. Donations may be made to the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. Harold Rubin, 91, died March 11 at St. Vincent's Hospital in Bridgeport, CT. An Army veteran, he served during World War II. Survivors include a daughter, Myra Rubin of West Windsor. Donations may be made to the Jewish Home for the Elderly, 175 Jefferson Street, Fairfield, CT 06825. Harold B. Bierman, 96, of Dayton died March 12 in Bear Creek Assisted Living, West Windsor. Born in New York City he was a Dayton resident for 35 years. He retired from the United States Army as a transportation specialist. Survivors include two sons, Eugene and Harold; daughter, Anna; three grandchildren; and two great grandchildren. Sean Turi, 40, of Washington died March 13 at home. Survivors include his cousins, Anthony and Dorothy Sudnick of West Windsor. Donations may be made for the children's education to the Sean Turi Memorial Fund, 110 Demeter Road, Washington 07882. Richard W. Gramlich, 56, of West Windsor died March 13. A graduate of Lehigh University, he was chief engineer of the Trans Hudson Express Tunnel Project. Survivors include his son, Richard D. Gramlich of Tallahassee, Florida; and his brother, George Gramlich of Minerva, New York. Visitation is Friday, March 19, 7 to 9 p.m. at Knott's Colonial Funeral Home, 2946 South Broad Street, Hamilton. Graveside funeral services will be Saturday, March 20, 11 a.m. at the Hackensack Cemetery, 289 Hackensack Road, Hackensack 07601.

A

Where Little Dreams Growsm

Visit us on Facebook!

OPEN HOUSES

SATURDAY, MARCH 27TH

Princeton - 11am - 1pm Princeton Forrestal Village 139 Village Blvd Princeton, NJ 08540 609-799-4411 Foxmoor - 10am - 12pm 2022 Washington Blvd Robbinsville, NJ 08691 609-443-7575 Now open on Saturdays!

Corner of Ancil Davison Rd

The Cranbury Swim Club, a family-oriented community pool, o is now accepting applications for the 2010 season.

Old Trenton Road

&

Application fee waived for new members Family Membership Fee: $650

Mention this ad and receive 12 free guest passes.

Visit www.cranburyswimclub.com to apply and for additional member information

EDINBURG ANIMAL HOSPITAL

www.edinburgvet.com

Douglas B. Weekes DVM

Kerry Danielsen VMD

An Interesting Case Study at Edinburg Animal Hospital

Boomer, a 21 month old Labrador Retriever, presented to our hospital with vomiting and lethargy that had been going on for about 24 hours. Boomer has a history of eating things he shouldn't such as socks and gloves, so a foreign body was suspected. Radiographs were taken and were suggestive of a possible foreign body. After another 12 hours of continued vomiting he was admitted to the hospital for exploratory surgery. The veterinarian removed approximately 14 inches of cloth or towel from his intestines. Boomer recovered quickly from surgery and is doing very well. Dogs and cats are prone to ingesting materials that they shouldn't. You should regularly check your house for anything that could be ingested and place it out of your pets reach.

609-443-1212 609-275-1212

BUSINESS HOURS:

Mon-Fri 7AM-8PM Saturday 7:30AM-NOON Dr. Hours by Appointment

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

11

State Aid Cut

Continued from page 1

for the 2009-'10 year. The district included that number in its preliminary budget for the upcoming school year, which it presented to the public on March 9. That preliminary $159.3 million budget for the 2010-'11 school year, as it existed before the state aid numbers, would increase taxes by 3.8 percent. Using those figures, the overall budget represents a total increase of 2.2 percent -- $3.4 million increase over last year's $155.9 million budget. The March 9 presentation broke down the figures in specific areas of the budget, including a proposed 3.4 percent increase in regular instruction to $52 million. Larry Shanok, assistant superintendent for finance, said a large portion of that increase came as a result of $800,000 the district has to pay to the new Princeton International Academy Charter School (see page 12) for tuition of an estimated 75 students. Co-curricular and athletics saw an increase of 0.7 percent to $2.4 million, while special services saw an increase of 3.4 percent to $23.4 million. Student support makes up $6.4 million -- a 0.9 percent increase -- and administration makes up $11.3 million of the budget, a 2.2 percent increase. In the area of improvement of instruction and professional development, there was a 14.9 percent decrease to $2.8 million. Shanok said realignment and a decrease of three positions contributed to the decrease. Building and grounds saw a 0.6 percent decrease to $12.4 million. Staff benefits will increase to $25.5 million -- a 5 percent increase. The transportation budget will see a proposed decrease of .09 percent to $9.1 million. Shanok said officials will "squeeze a little more" out of the budget by realigning bus routes, most likely resulting in longer trips for students. Two areas of expenses remained flat -- the capital outlay budget of $1.5 million and the adult school budget of $9,286. Debt service dropped by 2.3 percent. In the elementary and middle school budgets, officials will leverage declining enrollment. At the high school, officials are streamlining co-curricular programs and reducing costs not directly associated with class size and course offerings, like supplies and printing costs, Shanok said. At the time, though, the budget reflected only a 3.4 percent decrease in state aid, including the $10.7 million base as well as debt service support. The reason the district showed a decline at that time was because in previous years, the board accounted for extraordinary state aid, which was left out of this preliminary budget because officials did not think they would receive it next year, Shanok said. However, how the new numbers affected the budget was still unclear. The district in its budget presentations so far, has included a number of $10.7 million in the area of state aid in its budget discussions, not reflective of the $7.6 million decrease. In addition, Christie also said he was trying to cap annual property tax increases at 2.5 percent through a constitutional amendment -- more stringent than the current 4 percent cap. Only local referendums would permit tax increases above 2.5 percent.

On March 17, Shanok referenced Christie's suggestion that districts be given tools to keep the cost of union contracts from increasing more than the caps on property tax increases. "He said nothing about tools to keep wage increases to 2.5 percent or less, or health premium cost increases to 2.5 percent increases," said Shanok. "I'm a little unsure of where all these tools are." Officials were still determining on March 18 which areas would be affected by the state aid reduction. "It will change it," said Hutner. "We're in meetings all day today to finalize that before tonight's meeting." Hutner said officials will be deciding which changes and reductions have to be made, but said that those changes would be made carefully. "Any changes will have the least effect on the classroom," said

`With these changes, we will have to go back and see what has to be done to meet our obligations,' said Gerri Hutner.

Hutner. "Our goal is to protect our environment. But with these changes, we will have to go back and see what has to be done to meet our obligations." A public hearing on the budget is scheduled for Wednesday, March 31. School board elections and voting on the budget will be held Tuesday, April 20.

Unions Give Back $1M Plus In Salary

I

n an unprecedented move, the WW-P school board has renegotiated contracts with its teacher and administrator unions to create savings of more than $1 million in the upcoming budget. At its March 9 meeting, the school board approved, by an 8-1 vote, the contracts with the WW-P Education Association, which represents 875 employees, including teachers, school nurses, guidance counselors, athletic trainers, occupational therapists, and physical therapists, as well as the WW-P Administrators Association, which represents 39 principals, directors, and supervisors. Salary raises will be frozen for the first six pay periods -- a 12week period beginning September 1, 2010, for the two unions. The teachers' current contract, set to expire in June, 2011, will be extended to the 2011-'12 school year. That year, teachers will receive a 3.38 percent increase. The board also said it came to an understanding with its central office staff, which is not represented by a union, to find areas of savings by April, when contracts for those employees are reviewed. "Although they were not obligated, the leadership of the Education Association and Administrators Association came forward and agreed upon ways to reduce costs without impacting the educational program," said Board President Hemant Marathe. "Our settlements responded to the current economic times. The associations agreed to open their contracts for negotiations on salary and benefits -- a clear recognition and response to the difficult financial times present in New Jersey." The board and Superintendent Victoria Kniewel described the move as an expression of "collaboration" in all areas of the district.

The move was criticized, however, by Board Member Todd Hochman, who cast the lone "no" vote against the new contracts, as well as members of the unions representing the district's custodial and maintenance employees. They have been trying to negotiate a new contract for nearly two years. Calling the move "short-sighted" and "ill-conceived," Hochman said the new contract should include contributions to health benefits from teachers and administrators, which is not required under the terms of the re-negotiated contract. The approved revised settlement with the teachers' union for the first six pay periods of 2010-'11 will save some $775,000. The total savings in the re-negotiated contracts will total over $1 million, as the union also agreed to forgo the professional conference benefit for the 2011-'12 school year. That will result in a savings of $200,000. Prior to the re-negotiated settlement, under the terms of the threeyear contract agreement reached in June, 2008, the Education Association members had been scheduled to receive a 4.7 percent salary increase for the 2010-'11 school year. As for the contract negotiated with the WW-P Administrators Association, the members of the union will also forgo the previously negotiated salary increases for the first six pay periods in 2010-'11 and reduce professional conference benefits, for a savings of approximately $80,000. Under the terms of the old three-year contract agreement reached in June, 2008, the Administrators Association was to receive a salary increase totaling 3.8 percent for the 2010-'11 school year. The administrators' contracts were also extended a year. Now, for the 2011-'12 school year, the members of the union will receive a salary increase of 2.9 percent. As for the central office administrators, their compensation is set annually by the board, which will determine their compensation after its reorganization meeting in April. "This group of administrators has already taken steps to contain cost increases in health insurance and will make comparable adjustments in salary as those agreed upon by the Education and Administrators Associations," stated a press release from the district. "The collaboration between and among board members, the administrators association, education association, and central office administrators demonstrates the value we all place on the teaching and learning that takes place in WW-P," said Kniewel. WW-P Education Association president Debbie Baer said during the March 9 meeting that the union members are willing to contribute over $1 million "so even in these ongoing difficult economic times, we can come together to support the district." High School South Principal Chuck Rudnick, representing the administrators association, said that his association will have saved the district some $100,000. He said that the move allows the board to focus funding on the students and the reputable education offered to them. "The concern and willingness in all parties during this difficult economic year is really appreciated," said board Vice President Bob Johnson. "They offered to give back to help us out." But not everyone was imContinued on following page

CASH

Highest Price Paid

GOLD · DIAMONDS · SILVER

Gold Jewelry (can be damaged) Sterling Silver Jewelry · Sterling Silver Flatware Tea Sets · Silver Coins · Gold Coins Dental Gold · Diamonds ¼ Carat & Up Rolex Watches

With the Precious Metal Market at an All-Time High, Now Is the Time to Turn Broken Jewelry and Unwanted Items to CASH!

Trent Jewelers

16 Edinburg Rd. at 5 Points · Mercerville, N.J. 609-584-8800 5 8

Senior Care Management®

Specializing in Elder Care Services CARE MANAGEMENT

· Assessments/Recommendations · On Going monitoring for families living at a distance

HOME CARE

· Personal Care Assistance · Meal Preparations · Transportation · Companionship · Certified Home Health Aides · Nursing Supervision

Mercer County, NJ (609) 882-0322 Bucks County, PA (215) 321-1401

www.seniorcaremgt.com

12

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Continued from preceding page

pressed. Hochman cited a new bill moving through the state legislature that would require public employees to contribute 1.5 percent of their salaries to their health benefits once their current contracts expired. The renegotiations resulted in a contract that was extended for another year with a "hefty 3.8 percent salary increase for 2010-'11," and "they're still not contributing a single penny towards their health insurance premiums," said Hochman. "The contract was expiring at the end of next year," said Hochman. "If the bill passes, which I think it will, it would not take effect until after the current contract expires." He said approving the contract now is the board's way of "shoving it in right before the new law takes effect." Hochman pointed out that federal employees are required to contribute 25 percent of the cost of their health benefits. "Talk about a sweetheart deal," Hochman said of the new contracts. Marathe maintained that the teachers did not have to come to the table at all, but were willing to do so to help the district. "Overall, we still feel it's a win-win situation," Marathe said. The members of the WW-P Service Association, representing the custodial staff who face the possibility of losing their jobs if the school board decides to outsource the work, were also unhappy. They criticized the board for what they believe is the board's acceptance of a fair giveback from teachers but its unwillingness to negotiate fairly and ask for givebacks from the custodians that are reasonable. Susan Levine, the association's president, said the board accepted "realistic standards for the teachers and administration." In order to give as much as $1 million back to the school district (like the teachers), the union, made up of a little

hree residents of Plainsboro and West Windsor -- Stuart Chen-Hayes, Bob Eng, and Yu Miao -- are cofounders of the Princeton International Academy Charter (PIAC) School, and give reasons as diverse as their backgrounds for supporting the creation of the school. Chen-Hayes, a resident of Plainsboro, is associate professor and program coordinator at City University of New York/Lehman College. He has written and coauthored 40 refereed journal and book chapter publications, and two DVDs on counseling in school and family settings for equity and social justice. He and his partner, Lance Chen-Hayes, a physical therapy supervisor at Vorhees Pediatric hospital, are the parents of a sixyear-old who is equally fluent in spoken English and Mandarin, reading and writing fluently in English, and is developing Chinese reading and writing skills. "Our public schools do an outstanding job of educating students but they are not equipped to provide dual language immersion instruction in Mandarin Chinese," said Chen-Hayes in his founder's statement of interest posted on the PIAC website. more than 100 employees, would have to accept zero percent salary increases for three years and a 20 percent decrease in the last year of a proposed contract. "And you wonder why we cannot settle." The district has gone out to bid for custodial, maintenance, grounds, and management services, opening bids last month, but no decision on privatization has been made yet. Warren Mernone, a member of the union's negotiation team, criticized the board for ignoring the union's pleas to negotiate. And, he

T

Faces Behind The Charter School

"As a person who struggled through years of high school and college French, and who has taken years of local adult school Mandarin classes, I am far from fluent in either language. Yet, had I been an immersion school student at the elementary level, I would have gained fluency early in life at the time that my brain was most likely to develop and retain fluency -- early childhood," Chen-Hayes said. Eng, of West Windsor, has worked as both an educator and investment professional. He holds a master's degree in bilingual childhood education from Brooklyn College at the City University of New York and a doctorate in human development and psychology from Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. In addition to New York City public schools, Eng has taught in the education department at Colgate University, and graduate education courses at the New School and New York University. "For youngsters growing up now, the opportunities are vast and indeed global," said Eng in his founder's statement. "Just today, a U.S. college student with an Italian surname left a voice message that was spoken partly in perfect Mandarin Chinese. That said, "if we do get fired, I don't think the taxpayers' rates are going to go down." Ramon Garcia, also a custodian in the district, criticized the board's use of the word "collaboration." "We've been negotiating for nearly two years," he said. "Where's the collaboration?" He said the teachers and administrators made their deals, but the custodians "are paid a pittance," and should not be required to give back as much as employees who make a lot more. Sherri Bailey, a secretary at

PIAC Charter School Co-Founders Joy Zhao of West Windsor, left, lead founder Bonnie Liao, Yu Miao of West Windsor, and Stuart Chen-Hayes of Plainsboro.

young person has a bright future. But so can millions of Americans more." Miao, a resident of West Windsor, is a math teacher at YingHua International School, a ChineseEnglish bilingual school, and holds a master's degree in special education from Auburn University. As a special education teacher, she taught remedial reading in a public middle school in Alabama. "As globalization becomes inSouth, said the secretaries have been working very hard, picking up more work as positions are reduced through attrition. "We've been giving back for 10 years, and no one thanked us." creasingly prevalent and China has stepped front and center into 21st century business and commerce, China's political and economic prowess is persuading more Americans to learn Chinese," said Miao in her Founder's statement. "It definitely reflects a shift from the assumption that learning a language was a formality, to partner with the rest of the world."

WW-P Boasts High Test Performance

T

he WW-P school district touted student academic performance during the March 9 meeting. Officials pointed out that the district has the second and third highest SAT scores in Mercer County. South students averaging 1,835 and North students averaging 1,816 -- behind only Princeton. This is despite the fact that the district is listed as the seventh lowest in Mercer County in per pupil costs. Russell Lazovick, the assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction, used test scores -- reported on the state school report cards issued last month -- to show the district's above-average student achievement. He showed statistics that use national tests to measure students' performance. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) test measures student performance ever two years in reading and mathematics and measures other subjects every four years, Lazovick explained. In the 2007 data, in fourth grade reading, New Jersey students outperformed students in 45 other states and performed on the same level as three other states. There was only one state, Massachusetts, which outperformed students in New Jersey. In math in grade 8, there were only two states that performed higher than New Jersey students. To further break it down, Lazovick collected state data to localize the progress. In order to keep with the national study, Lazovick compiled data from the 4th and 8th grades in language arts, math, and science. He showed bar graphs for each subject and each grade. The bar graphs included scores

from all of the district factor groups -- from the group containing the poorest districts to the wealthiest, where WW-P falls. West Windsor's district factor group performed the best. But then, Lazovick showed the same bar graphs and added a graph in each slide for West Windsor-Plainsboro, and in virtually all cases, the WW-P students scored higher than those in the J group. Broken down even further in a district-by-district comparison, West Windsor-Plainsboro hovered near the top of the list in every case, although it never reached the top. Still, "it's not just how our students are passing, but how high they're passing," Lazovick pointed out. "This is among the best factor group." Board member Richard Kaye pointed out that, in the last category, WW-P was not always at the very top. However, the ones that were at the top were smaller than WW-P. "There were none that had 10,000-plus students" or the diversity that West Windsor-Plainsboro students have, he said. "Many were K-8 districts."

Snow Days Equal Make-Up Days

S

tudents in the West WindsorPlainsboro school district will have to give up a day in the middle of spring break to make up a snow day. Schools will be open on Wednesday, March 31, which would have been a day off, if not for the snowy weather on February 26. School officials chose the date in the middle of the week to avoid interference with religious holidays. The district exceeded its two allotted snow days, when classes were canceled on February 10 and 11. Because of those two snow days, students will be getting a shorter Memorial Day weekend this year, with school in session on Thursday, May 27, and Friday, May 28, as well -- both of which had been built into the schedule as days off.

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

13

WW Looks To Develop Junction Garage

est Windsor is considering submitting a proposal to New Jersey Transit that would designate the West Windsor Parking Authority as the developer of a new parking garage at the train station. The move would allow the township to have a higher level of control over the project. "This is to try to push them (NJT) into a partnership with us," township redevelopment attorney Ed McManimon explained to the Township Council on March 15. If successful, the move would be an "avenue into the next stage of development." A vote on submitting the proposal is set for Monday, March 22. Although developing the projected 2,200-space garage would give the township a greater ability to oversee the project, West Windsor cannot reserve any parking spaces specifically for township residents in the garage. The resolution was originally discussed on March 15, but only three council members attended the meeting. Council Vice President Linda Geevers, acting as president in place of George Borek, said it would be better to delay the vote until more members were present. She said it would also give council a week to digest the information presented by McManimon. Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh, however, urged the council to take action quickly. "The council wanted the township to designate the parking authority as the redeveloper for parking garage-related issues and construction," he said, referring to discussions that took place last year by council after the redevelopment plan was adopted. "This is exactly the step we are taking right now." State law allows the parking authority to, as a developer, work with NJT under the guidelines of the township. Hsueh explained that the parking authority would serve as contractors in dealing with the parking issues in the redevelopment area. The resolution states that the township and parking authority believe they can undertake the development of the project by "constructing, operating, and maintaining it in a significantly more financially advantageous manner than any private proposal." Further, it states that if the joint proposal is accepted by NJT, "the Parking Authority, acting as the agent of the township, will take responsibility for identifying a developer for the Transit Parking Project, negotiating the terms of a contract for the development of the Transit Parking Project, and submitting such development contract to the township for approval and designation by the township." The resolution also states that the township would be responsible for half of the costs of the redevelopment attorney fees, with the parking authority paying the other half. However, McManimon stressed that the new parking garage will pay for itself through the new rates charged to users who will pay to park in the facility. According to estimates provided by Parking Authority consultant Tom Calu, a parking garage of around 2,000 parking spaces would cost no more than $18,000 a space -- excluding engineering, architect, and professional costs. "The bonding will be done by the Parking Authority and will be

W

by Cara Latham

paid for by the people who use that facility," said McManimon, adding that the township would be guaranteeing the bonding done by the Parking Authority. Geevers called for all the attorney's fees to be paid by the parking authority as well. "I would like to have the parking authority pay 100 percent," she said, citing cuts in funding in all areas of the upcoming 2010 municipal budget, amid a tough economic climate. Geevers asked Calu, who also spoke at the meeting, to ask the parking authority about the possibility. McManimon, referring to his previous discussion with council months ago, said it was difficult to develop the sites within the core area of the 350-acre Princeton Junction train station redevelopment area, particularly because the township did not allow for eminent domain in its adopted redevelopment plan. "New Jersey Transit, as a publicly body, has control over a large segment of that site," he said. McManimon added that he and other township representatives, and Calu have been able to discuss and meet with NJT. He said NJT has been

West Windsor is considering a proposal to the state that would name the township Parking Authority as the developer of a train station parking garage.

very cooperative in adjusting its thinking to account for West Windsor's concerns for the site. NJT officials told township representatives that they were looking at developing a structured parking facility in the neighborhood of 2,200-parking spaces. He said township officials encouraged NJT to include the retail space in the design. "It's important to the township to have retail space," McManimon said. "They have done that." "I think that they believe that how this facility will ultimately be built, it will be the entrance into the next phase and whatever comes further with regard to that site," McManinom said. "There is significant advantage to having the parking authority and township work together to develop this site." Still, when NJT officials indicated they would be soliciting quotes for the development of the parking facility and retail space, the township attempted to ask for a delay so that it would submit a quote to them and sit down and work out the details. West Windsor believes that particularly with the experience that the parking authority has in running its current space at the train station, it has the expertise to take on the project, McManimon said. However, "they advised us respectfully that they felt they needed to seek proposals, and that they were largely seeking proposals among private companies," similar to the Nexus firm that recently built a structure at the Hamilton station. However, NJT said it would entertain public proposals, but not exclusively from a public entity. Township and parking authority officials discussed the issue further, McManimon said. "We believe a preemptive strategy would keep the best control of this area," he said. Advantages to submitting the

proposal include that, if accepted by NJ Transit, it would give direct control to the public through the Parking Authority and the township, including control over issues affecting traffic flow as well as the future development of the site. McManimon said. A private firm, McManimon said, does not have a vested interest in the retail on site. Under the proposal, however, the township could have control over the policy and management of the site, and the public would have control over the operations of the entire facility. "There will probably be spaces developed in the interim while building the parking garage," said McManimon. "The Parking Authority has the ability to provide that." The venture also comes with significant financial advantages. The debt accrued by the project will come at a much higher cost if not taken on by the township, which can use its AAA bond rating to get low rates, McManimon said. And, the public can share in the profits generated by the facility. There will also be no sales tax on the parking spaces if the facility is publicly-owned and operated, while the sales tax would be in effect if the facility is privatelyowned. Still, McManimon said, the resolution is not a contract. That will come later, along with the financing details, he said. This resolution simply is the beginning of the process, which allows the township and parking authority to put together a proposal and negotiate with NJT. The township has redevelopment powers, while the parking authority does not. But redevelopment law allows the township to contract with a public body to undertake projects that it has a legal authority over. West Windsor will work with the the parking authority, which will be able to contract out the work for building the parking garage. Financially, the parking authori-

Big Storm, Little Damage

hile many parts of New Jersey experienced extensive flooding and widespread damage from the weekend storm on March 12 through 14, West Windsor and Plainsboro escaped -- for the most part. However, downed utility poles caused road closure on a portion of Scudders Mill Road for three days, while flooding closed a section of Mapleton Road on Monday. According to Plainsboro police, around 3:13 p.m. on March 13, two utility poles broke in half and were hanging above the southbound lane of Schalks Crossing Road. Because of the dangerous condition, police closed both lanes of Schalks Crossing Road between Wyndty has significant revenues that it generates on its own and is sharing in the financial burden by paying for its financial advisers, its consultant, and its engineering and architectural firms to work on the project. Calu described what could occur in the absence of an agreement with New Jersey Transit -- if the council decided not to approve submittal of the proposal or if the proposal is rejected by NJT. First, the township would have no control over the functionality of the site. It would also lose the opportunity to get into finite details of the kiss-and-ride area, for example. He also warned that there would be no guarantees that the project wouldn't "turn into a Metropark." The township could also lose control over the size of the retail mix, as well as control over the types of tenants the retail area will hold. The township could also lose control over the rules that apply to the retail space, including the hours of operation, he added. And it would not have ongoing control over continuing parking operations and "parking behaviors" at the train station, including traffic.

W

hurst Drive and Research Way to traffic. PSE&G was called to make repairs, but officials from the utility company could not complete the job until March 16. On Mapleton Road, flooding closed Mapleton Road between seminary and Route 1 South on March 15. A traffic light at Merrill Lynch Drive and Squibb was out for part of the day on March 15, and left turns were prohibited. Also for a short time, Plainsboro Road between Route 1 and Connector Road was closed due to flooding. In West Windsor, however, the damage was limited to a few fallen trees and slight damage to the pump station. However, "the Department of Public Works has everything under control at this time," reported Business Administrator Robert Hary. "You would simply be the community that is hosting it," Calu said. Financially, the township could miss out on the opportunity to participate in the positive cash flow generated by the facility. The sales tax would apply, and the interest rates would be higher. "The members of the general public and residents would pay more for that parking, but you'd see none of that cash flow," Calu said. As for risks associated with approving the venture, Calu cited future projections for needed parking at the train station. Prior projections for 2015 indicated there would be a need for 900 more parking spaces at the train station. As of October, 2009, however, projections through 2017 show a need for 1,100 spaces there. Projections show that the new parking garage would yield a net increase of 1,360 spaces. This is because the parking garage's footprint would be built on top of existing surface parking.

Continued on following page

14

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Continued from preceding page

Still, "my review of that site plan, which is a conceptual drawing, doesn't convince me it would yield 1,360 spaces," Calu said. "I think it would not make sense to build the project if it would not be yielding at least 1,000 spaces." Councilwoman Diane Ciccone questioned how many of the spaces in the new garage could be reserved for West Windsor residents. Ultimately, McManimon said the township is not permitted to restrict any parking spaces to West Windsor residents and that the new parking must be available for everyone. However, officials said that projections show 60 percent of the new users of the parking facility will be West Windsor residents. In addition, Hsueh said that the township is in the process of remediating the township-owned compost station site on Alexander Road, where new surface parking will be created. Officials will use that surface lot as temporary parking for those displaced by the construction of the parking garage, he said. But once the garage is built, there will be 400 to 500 spaces that will be restricted to West Windsor residents in addition to the Vaughn Drive and Wallace Road lots. Hsueh said he wanted to see the process move forward. "Right now, we already worked out a concept with NJT," he said. "When they are ready to go, the public will have an opportunity to look at what they want to do. They have incorporated our ideas into their RFP,"

even though they were not required to do so. "At the present time, all we are doing is making sure we have some type of proposal sent to NJT," Hsueh added. "At the same time, this will allow the town to sit down with NJT to start talking about what we will be able to do, what we can do together." If the proposal is accepted by NJT, officials will still have to come back to council for final approval, Hsueh explained.

Volunteers Oppose Billing Measure

embers of the Twin "W" First Aid squad, which responds to overnight emergency services calls within the township, are opposing an ordinance that would allow West Windsor to bill for calls covered by its paid personnel. Among the arguments against the ordinance, scheduled for a public hearing and possible adoption on Tuesday, April 6, is that the move will hurt the image of the volunteers, who collect donations throughout the year to support their needs, said Michael Lahey, the squad's president. "This impacts us in our fund drive, our relationship with the township residents," said Lahey. "It's going to hurt our reputation." If adopted, the ordinance would permit the township to bill thirdparty insurances for ambulance services that are provided from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Township residents will not be charged directly for ser-

M

vice, nor will they be asked to pay a co-pay when their insurance companies are billed. Township officials estimate that the township can generate some $200,000 in revenues annually by adopting the ordinance. Township officials insist that the billing measure is not aimed at hurting the volunteers. "It is not the intention of the township to jeopardize any of the operations of the volunteer first aid squad because we recognize the valuable service provided to the township," Business Administrator Robert Hary said. "We want to continue to support them in any way we can -- it's a win-win situation for the residents if the services are provided on a volunteer basis rather than having to go to a paid service 24/7." According to the ordinance, the township will contract with a professional medical billing service for the collection of payment for services by the township's fire and emergency services personnel. The bill will be issued to the insurance company for the person served, if any, or directly to that person if insurance coverage is not available. The ordinance also sets up the fees that will be charged for service. For ambulance transportation: $600. Other charges include $14 per loaded mile for basic life support; $75 for oxygen administration; $75 for automatic external defibrillator pads; $25 for cervical collars; $1,000 for motor vehicle extrication; $250 for first responder engine response; and $150 for fire responder response.

If a resident requires an ambulance or emergency response, the resident's insurance carrier will be charged. The resident, however, will not be responsible for covering the co-pay, nor will a resident without insurance be forced to pay the entire bill. The volunteer squad, however, is not satisfied. Even though township officials said that West Windsor residents would not be billed because they pay taxes, "they would still be billing your insurance carrier," alleged Lahey. "I'm a resident of the township. You're telling me it's going to cost $1,000 to remove my son or daughter from a vehicle because I have insurance, or you're going to say it's $1,000 you're going to write off because I don't have insurance." As a result, he said, members of the rescue squad are launching a campaign to ensure township resi-

`This impacts us in our fund drive, our relationship with the township residents,' said Michael Lahey, Twin W president. `It's going to hurt our reputation.'

dents know that the volunteer squad will not bill for expenses associated with any of the calls to which it responds. The volunteers respond to calls Monday through Friday from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. and on second calls when the paid staff is working. "We want to make sure that the residents of this township are very clear that between the hours of 7 p.m. and 7 a.m., or any second call, the residents will not be billed," said Lahey. Another argument against the move made by Lahey is that the volunteer squad purchases the medical supplies used by both the volunteers and paid personnel hired by the township. It does not currently require reimbursement from the township, but "we're going to have to bill the township now," he said. "We stock the ambulance with medical equipment and supplies. The township is saying they're going to have to bill for those medical supplies. The volunteers are going to have to bill the township for stocking the vehicles." "We do not support billing because it will hurt the volunteer," he said. "We supply the medical supplies to the township. It is very interesting that they would have a price list that's standard for the industry." But those prices are "astronomical" because the township is "meeting an already-established price listing in the state of New Jersey," added Lahey, who also said that the township stores its ambulances and provides a facility for its personnel in its own building. "We provide them office space, we provide them facilities," he said. "Unless they're going to build their own building, we're just going to make sure that we can meet our requirements, too." Lahey also said that the administration slipped the measure through without discussing it with the volunteers. "There was no communication to us that they were posting this ordinance," he said. "They brought it up in a public safety meeting, but they never gave us any indication it was going up for an ordinance." Added Lahey: "When they need something from the volunteers,

SCHAFER SCHOOL OF GYMNASTICS

1880 PRINCETON AVE., LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 08648

SCHAFER SCHOOL OF GYMNASTICS QUALITY TEACHING IN A PROFESSIONAL ENVIRONMENT SINCE 1988

Now Offering13 Weeks of Summer Camp Including Pre-Camp for Pre-Schoolers! 2009 Prices in Effect Until 4/15/10! Register Early!

Convenient Class Times Mornings · Evenings · Saturdays 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE! WWW.SCHAFERGYMNASTICS.COM

609-393-5855

· 18 months 3 yrs w/ adult · Preschoolers ages 3-5 · Girls & Boys FREE TRIAL CLASS Skill Classes FOR NEW STUDENTS! · Recreational Teams · Competitive Teams · Tumbling Classes We are still taking · Birthday Parties · Special Needs enrollment! · Private Lessons · Day Trips · Parents Night Out · Sports Combo Class · Karate · Spring Break Camp

they're very quick, but they're very good at not talking to the volunteer organization." Lahey said the other downfall to approving the measure is that township residents may be inclined to forgo calling for emergency response if they do not have insurance and do not want to be billed. Further, the revenue the township is estimating to bring in from billing "has not been substantiated," said Lahey. "If you bill, where does the money go? We never got a clear answer on that." In response to Lahey's concerns, Hary said that "the last thing that the township wants to do is to hurt the first aid squad's ability to fund raise." In order to help the first aid squad, Hary said that when he and Township Council President George Borek announced the pending introduction of the billing measure at a public safety meeting, "we agreed to help with literature so we can educate the public about what service is offered by the volunteers and what is provided by the paid staff." "We're going to make it as clear as we can that the billing service is only for when our career staff is providing the service," he added. The administration has been "adamant" in the development of the ordinance that the "plan is not to balance-bill residents for this service," Hary explained. "The idea is that when a service is provided, the third party insurer will be billed. Any balance will be accounted for by tax dollars. It's been done similarly in neighboring towns and has been successful." Further, the only other municipality in Mercer County that does not have third-party billing is Hopewell, Hary said. "Clearly a large majority of them are already doing this and have found that the revenue stream significantly offsets the costs associated with the service."

WW Budget Goes to Council For Review

embers of the Township Council are expected to have the proposed 2010 municipal budget in their hands on Friday, March 19 -- as promised by Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh and his administration. Though the council is working on scheduling an official budget session, the budget is expected to come up for discussion at the meeting on Monday, March 22. Hsueh emphasized during the March 15 Township Council meeting that the township was specifically told in a memorandum from the state that it would not receive direction from the state until Governor Chris Christie gave his budget speech on March 16. Still, the administration has been working on the budget. Hsueh said the administration would have taken the information provided by the governor in his speech and calculated into the budget over the next three days to have it to council by Friday, March 19. Business Administrator Robert Hary told council the budget so far was "the most austere and tightest budget" he has seen in 20 years. In the meantime, the council is working on scheduling an all-day budget session for some time after April 6, during which the heads of all the township departments would be available to answer council's questions, although Hary said that because the budget has been reduced in most areas, he is anticipating the department heads will

M

2010

Sunday Monday Tuesday

MARCH

Wednesday Thursday Friday

2010

Saturday

5

10:45AM-12:45PM 4-5:45PM 7:45-9:45PM

6

12:15-2:15PM 5-6:45PM 7:30-9:30PM

7

12:15-2:15PM 4:15-6:15PM

8

9

10

11

3:30-5:10PM

12

10:45AM-12:45PM 4-5:45PM 7:45-9:45PM

13

12:15-2:15PM 4:30-6:15PM 7:45-9:45PM

14

12:15-2:15PM 3-4:45PM

15

16

17

6-7:30PM

18

3:45-5:30PM

19

10:45AM-12:45PM 4-5:45PM 7:45-9:45PM

20

12:15-2PM 8:15-10PM

21

12:15-2:15PM 4:30-6:15PM

22

23

24

6-7:30PM

25

3:45-5:30PM

26

10:45AM-12:45PM 4-5:45PM 7:45-9:45PM

27

12:15-2PM 4-6PM 7:45-9:45PM

28

12:15-2:15PM 4-5:45PM

29

30

31

6-7:30PM

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

15

Junction Firehouse Contract Increased

T

he West Windsor Township Council has approved a $5,000 contract increase with Fett & Foran Architects, of Yardville, for continuing renovation work at the old Princeton Junction firehouse on Alexander Road. The contract increase, approved March 1, was originally awarded in 2007 but that was revised in May, 2008, to increase by $18,500. The new addition of $5,000 for contract administration brings the total contract to $63,000. According to Business Administrator Robert Hary, "they're on schedule with construction and hope to be finished either early or on time. We're very happy with the progress." Work began by Dell-Tech Inc. of Trenton in December to transform the 75-year-old former Princeton Junction firehouse on Alexander Road into its new home. have little to say. He anticipates most of the questions will be for him.

Art's New Home: The facade of the renovated firehouse, which will house the West Windsor Arts Council, is pictured in the above schematic. At right, is the building's interior.

The first phase of the project includes a 125-seat performance space, an education space for classes, and a community meeting room-lobby-cafe, with Wi-Fi access. The township awarded a contract for $685,000 to Dell-Tech in October to perform the renovation work necessary to bring the building into code compliance, including plumbing, electrical, and other work. The remainder of the work in outfitting the facility for the first phase will be funded by the West Windsor Arts Council. However, Councilwoman Linda

Geevers said she was concerned with the inclusion of work related to a SMARTboard, curtains, and a projection screen that was listed on the bill, saying she did not think those items fell under the realm of "code compliance," and thus, were not the township's obligations to fund.

"All we're supposed to do was bring the building up to code," Geevers said. "I'm seeing other items." Hary said the contract extension was for work related to contract administration. Officials are targeting July for the opening of the new facility. Gambatese said it was funny that the township can tolerate signs for vacant office space, but "it won't tolerate the signs for businesses that support the community." He also referenced signs he saw for an Italian-American event and a festival in Cranbury that are able to be advertised in the township. Businesses in the township make bigger tax payments to help offset the burden to residents and should be encouraged -- and the township should help them by allowing them to advertise on signs, he said. Council members seemed to be on board with the idea. Geevers told Gambatese to get the business owners together to recommend specific changes to the ordinance for council's review. "We certainly want to support West Windsor

The second phase of construction will convert the fire truck bays into a major exhibit area/gallery with artists' studios and instructional rooms. That area is still being used by the fire company, including for storage of hazmat equipment.

Special Meeting For Mayor's Address?

eferencing public comments, including those by Councilman Charles Morgan, that were critical of the mayor both before and after his State of the Township speech to council earlier this month, members of the Township Council want to move the annual address to its own special session. A discussion on the matter is expected to be on the agenda for Monday, May 3. Before the mayor's annual address on March 1, a group of residents who were opposed to a cell phone tower ordinance that was to be addressed later criticized the mayor and the Planning Board chairman during public comment for their role in the process. Former council candidate Andrew Hersh also criticized the mayor for ignoring residents and called for his resignation. The mayor delivered his 20minute speech following public comment. Then, after he was fin-

R

ished, Morgan gave what appeared five-minute limit. "That way it cuts to be a rebuttal to Hsueh, accusing off the grandstanding," she said. the mayor of portraying township Ciccone said a time limit on business in an optimistic manner, council members' comments with which he disagreed. should be an issue discussed sepaCouncilwoman Diane Ciccone, rately and that a separate session who avoided pointing to comments for the mayor's address would specifically from Morgan, said she work better. "I don't think people wanted to make are going to it a special sesmind coming sion in order to out one more After attacks by the pub"give it the retime," for the lic before the mayor's spect that is state of the speech, and a rebuttal by due." township ad"It's a spedress, she said. a member of council afcial session and ter, the idea of holding a Sign Ordiwe listen to the nance. In other special session for the mayor's report, business durmayor's State of the and that's it," ing the March she proposed. Township address is be15 meeting, Councilman ing considered by the former counKamal Khanna cilman Franc township council. supported the Gambatese, idea of creating who owns the a special sesGrovers Mill Coffee Company apsion, but Councilwoman Linda proached council to ask that it reGeevers took it a step further. "We visit the township sign ordinance to need a rule that limits the number make it more business-friendly. of minutes council members He said "we have to do somespeak." thing real in town to help the busiGeevers said she thought the ness owners," who face obstacles limit should be three minutes, but and restrictions in the township's she said she talked to Council Prescurrent ordinance when trying to ident George Borek, who was abadvertise their businesses. sent, and that he recommended a

businesses, and we want you to be successful," she said. Khanna agreed, saying a coordinated effort between the township and business owners is needed. It should extend to broader issues as well. "It should evolve into some kind of economic development committee," he said. ADA Compliance. An update on the township's ADA compliance with ADA issues is planned for the council's meeting on Monday, May 3. The update will be given in response to a report submitted by a group of residents last month, who detailed what they say is a lack of ADA compliance on the township's part. Resident Michael Ogg approached the Township Council

Continued on following page

2010 SPRING CRAFT FAIR 2010 SPRING CRAFT FAIR

GET IT AT THE GET IT AT THE WW-P HIGH SCHOOL NORTH WW-P HIGH SCHOOL NORTH P

NEED SPRING?

NEED SPRING....

Bryn Mawr-Wellesley 79th Annual Book Sale

Princeton Day School

650 Great Road, Princeton

Proceeds from the sale are used for to help students attend Bryn Mawr College and Wellesley College.

Wednesday, March 24 10AM to 6PM (*$20 admission ALL day and only day admission is charged.) Thursday, March 25 10AM to 9PM Friday, March 26 10AM to 9PM Saturday, March 27 10AM to 7PM Sunday, March 28 10AM to 3PM

Preview Sale* Official opening Half-price day Box day

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 2010 SATURDAY, MARCH20,0, 2010 9:30AM TO 4:00PM 9:30AM TO 4:00PM

CONVENIENT INDOOR LOCATION OVER 125 CRAFTERS & VENDORS FREE PARKING CONVENIENT INDOOR LOCATION COME OUT AND ENJOY A DAY OF SHOPPING & FAMILY FREE PARKING · FREE ADMISSION FUN! COME WEST WINDSOR PLAINSBOROA DAY OF NORTH OUT AND ENJOY HIGH SCHOOL SHOPPING & GROVERS MILL UN! 90 FAMILY F ROAD

PLAINSBORO, NJ 08536

OVER 125 CRAFTERS & VENDORS

Please see website www.bmandwbooks.com for special programs during the sale and procedures for Preview Sale and Box Day. Cash, checks and (new this year) credit cards (except AmEx) will be accepted.

WEST WINDSOR PLAINSBORO HIGH SCHOOL NORTH 90 GROVERS MILL ROAD PLAINSBORO, NJ 08536

16

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Continued from preceding page

to present the findings of a partial audit conducted by a group of residents to determine which items in the township's ADA Transition Plan -- adopted in 1992 -- had yet to be rectified. According to Ogg, who has multiple sclerosis and uses a wheelchair, the township was supposed to rectify all of the issues by January, 1995. Now, 15 years later, some issues are still unresolved. The group looked at the interior and exterior of the municipal building, the Ron Rogers Arboretum, Van Nest, Community, Hendrickson, and Zaitz parks, and the Conover Road Athletic Complex. In response, township officials said they would look into the claims. At the March 15 meeting, Hary said because the report is "lengthy in nature," he hadn't been able to "qualify or quantify" the group's claims. He did say, though, that there was still some funding available in 2010 for bicycle and pedestrian improvements that could be used to fund some of the ADA compliant projects. He also said that in the spring, officials plan to fix the sidewalk outside of the municipal building that buckled as a result of underlying tree roots. Hary said the process involves first identifying which claims are legitimate. "I know there are some items off the top of my head that I know we can do," he said. "There are some items I think are priority items."When pressed for more details on the process by Ciccone, Hary said he "wouldn't agree that we aren't ADA compliant." Responded Ciccone: "We're certainly not 100 percent; is that a fair statement?" Hary agreed. Truck Purchase. In other business during the March 15 meeting, the council approved the purchase of a new Chevrolet Tahoe for its canine unit. The truck will be purchased at a cost of $31,837 from Day Automotive of Egg Harbor.

In Plainsboro: Solar Array Project

Home Office Vehicles

Towing Ordinance

T

he Plainsboro Planning Board has approved an application by Firmenich for 65,000 square feet of solar panels to be placed on top of the parking deck on its property. Known as a solar array project, it is the first of this magnitude in Plainsboro. While there are other facilities, including Princeton University's library storage facility in the Forrestal Campus, this will be the largest in town. Firmenich, which produces perfumery and flavor chemicals in its complex on Plainsboro Road, will be able to use the power generated from the solar array to reduce its own energy bill and offset the installation costs for the solar panels. More Green News. The Planning Board will also hear an application on Monday, April 19, for a cogeneration plant on the site of the new hospital on Plainsboro Road. The cogeneration plant would use clean natural gas to produce both heat and electricity at once, making it up to twice as energy-efficient as traditional systems. Plans for the cogeneration plant were passed on to the Planning Board from the Development Review Committee last month. Also on April 19, Princeton University will present plans for its high-performance research computing center.

T

he Township Committee has introduced changes to two ordinances that would essentially prohibit the parking of home business commercial vehicles on residential roads. A public hearing is scheduled for Wednesday, April 14. Introduced March 10, the new ordinances would create additional restrictions for street parking and driveway use for commercial vehicles. Officials are looking to prohibit commercial vehicles from being "kept" on the street. The prohibition would not only be for commercial trucks associated with home businesses, but also storage units on streets. Officials said that the problem exists with the storage of vehicles and equipment, like pod storage units and trailers. The prohibitions would encompass the whole right-of-way, although driveways would be excluded from this section of the ordinance, to encourage use of the driveways for home construction. Driveways, however, would not be a place to park a commercial truck or other large vehicle associated with a home office occupation, under the changes being proposed. The regulations would not prohibit homeowners from parking commercial vehicles in the street or driveway for a short period of time such as a lunch break, but for longer term parking, those vehicles must be stored in a garage.

T

he Township Committee has introduced an ordinance that increases the rates charged for towing. A public hearing is scheduled for Wednesday, April 14. The ordinance, introduced March 10, sets a rate the towing companies are allowed to charge. It also sets a rotating log for the calls, so that the companies who have applied to be included on the list will be called for towing on a rotating basis. The fees a towing company is allowed to charge is set through ordinance, although the township makes no profit from towing. The township does not get a cut from those towing companies after they respond to a call either. Among the new fees that would be charged are: $115 per vehicle per hour for a tow; a clean-up fee of $45 per vehicle will apply for clean-up at the collision scene; a fee for absorbent material for fluids on the roadways at $20 a bag; and a fee for roadside assists, including changing flat tires, jump starting dead batteries, and lock outs, which will not exceed $50. The rate that is currently charged to a driver or the driver's insurance company is currently $85 in Plainsboro. Surrounding communities' rates average $140 a tow.

InterCap Lawsuit Back In Court

N

ew Jersey Superior Court Judge Linda Feinberg is expected to hear a motion by West Windsor to reconsider her recent ruling in a lawsuit that could lead the township's redevelopment zoning to be overturned. Oral arguments by the township, and InterCap Holdings -- the plaintiff in the lawsuit -- are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. on Friday, March 26, in the Mercer County Courthouse in Trenton. The township maintains that InterCap missed the deadline to challenge the redevelopment area when it was designated by the planning board in 2005. It also argues that

InterCap participated fully in the creation of the redevelopment plan -- adopted in 2009 -- and cannot now turn around and challenge it. InterCap sued West Windsor claiming that the town used a faulty process to determine that a 350acre area surrounding the Princeton Junction train station was in need of redevelopment. Steve Goldin, InterCap CEO, is unhappy with the amount of housing -- capped at some 500 units -- allowed under the redevelopment plan. The developer has said he wants to construct 1,440 units on his property alone. The 24-acre parcel is located in the redevelopment area on Washington Road. In a ruling in January, Feinberg allowed InterCap to challenge the designation and even acknowledged that allowing the argument

Clear Skin!

Student Special!

3 Treatments for

(40% Savings)

Offer good through 3/31/10. (Valid for one time only.)

$235

(plus tax)

A Complete Approach to Skin Care

Let our medically trained staff help to not only treat current skin

conditions, but educate you on how to prevent future breakouts.

The Aesthetics Center at

Princeton Dermatology Associates

Monroe Center Forsgate 5 Center Drive · Suite A Monroe Township, NJ 609-655-4544 2 Tree Farm Rd. Suite A-110 Pennington, NJ 609-737-4491

"creates the possibility that the des- the timeliness of InterCap's chalignation will be invalidated." That lenge and the question about the would, in turn, nullify the redevel- township's notification of property opment plan. owners "are the only two issues "The court's initial reaction... is that warrant extended discussion at that the Redevelopment Study on present, as their disposition rewhich the in need designation was solves or renders the other issues based is ripe with constitutional in- moot for the time being" because firmities," said Feinberg in her rul- they could invalidate the redeveling. opment designation if she rules in Goldin has been urging the Intercap's favor. township to bargain with him. "One would think West Windsor n the challenge issue, Feinresidents would urge the mayor berg agreed that InterCap did and council to settle the lawsuit." not file an objection to the Planning "They (the residents) are going Board's redevelopment designato start to listen to what local real- tion within 45 days, as required by tors are saying -- that `Plywood state law. However, she found that Junction' is something prospective "the court may enlarge the 45-day buyers see and ask about, and the time period where the interest of township's actions are now hurting justice manifestly requires such an residents' home extension." values," he Feinberg aladded, referring so sided with If the court rules the to the state of InterCap in its downtown township's redeveloparguments that Princeton Juncthe township ment hearing process tion, where may have viowas flawed, it could inthere are several lated the notice validate the entire redevacant buildrequirement ings on Route because it did velopment plan. 571 with plynot describe the wood-covered condemnation windows. implications of Township officials declined to a blight designation. comment on the matter. They The judge gave the township 30 maintain, however, that although days to submit transcripts and evithe court has the right under certain dence from the Planning Board's circumstances to lengthen the time redevelopment designation period to file an objection of a rede- process. The township has comvelopment designation, which plied with that order, according to Feinberg did in this case, doing so Planning Board Attorney Gerald in this instance is inappropriate. Muller. InterCap charges that prior to Feinberg also gave indications the Planning Board's adoption of in her ruling that even if the townthe redevelopment study in 2005, it ship is upheld on the notification isfailed notify property owners in the sue, there may be other problems study area that they could be sub- with its redevelopment plan. ject to condemnation. The lawsuit She wrote that there were "sigalleged that the state requires noti- nificant issues regarding the profication even if the township's in- priety of the in-need designation" tention is not to do so. in that half of the redevelopment The township argues that neither area was deemed to fall under the InterCap's property nor any other "underutilization" category -- one property in the redevelopment area that has been challenged and struck would be subject to condemnation, down in other cases. unless there is a need for road In the township's own redevelwidening. opment study, some of the parcels The notification requirement is were designated as "in need of rethe result of a 2008 court decision development" by using just the that was not in effect when the word "underutilization" and nothplanning board was conducting its ing else, she pointed out. redevelopment hearings. Town ofInterCap claims that West ficials believe it's unfair to enforce Windsor's findings that InterCap's the requirement on the township property and other properties in the retroactively. redevelopment area "were in colFeinberg ruled in January that lective need of redevelopment

O

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

17

were not supported by substantial credible evidence as required by redevelopment law." Councilman Charles Morgan recently used Feinberg's ruling as political fodder against Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh as evidence that the township has been mismanaged. During a council meeting earlier this month, Morgan said that because "we're suffering from a lack of leadership," the township has already "lost the first round of litigation in court." "Why? We did not give notice to the property owners," he said. He also said that while there was no notice requirement at the time the redevelopment area was designated, a ruling came down a few years later -- before the redevelopment plan was adopted. At that time, the township's lawyers should have picked up on the new requirement, he said.

found that Ford Motor Co. and its contractor, Edgewood Properties Inc., had shipped recycled concrete from the demolition of Ford's former Edison Assembly Plant on Route 1 to various construction sites around the state, including West Windsor. Tests later found the cement to contain polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Since then, DEP has allowed WWM to cap the site, which included removing a certain amount of material and capping the site, which entails paving the roads, sidewalks, and the slabs for the buildings. Once it receives a "no further action" designation from the DEP, the township will be able to issue building permits.

Mercer County Boathouse

GRAND REOPENING!

NEWLY RENOVATED!

WWM Performance Guarantees Denied

WW Installs New Bike Racks At HS South

est Windsor's Recreation Department has installed two new bike racks, which combined can hold up to 22 bikes at a time, at High School South. Recreation officials installed the new racks on March 17, said Department of Recreation Director Ken Jacobs. Funding for the $1,200 bike racks came from money raised during last year's Bikefest. The annual bike ride through township -- the seventh annual even takes place this year on Saturday, May 29 -- is run by a committee separate from the recreation department and the West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance. Bikefest members noticed last year, however, that there were no bicycle racks at South. "The ones that were there, back by the pool, were in poor condition," Jacobs said. "We've been lucky enough over the last six years to raise money for promoting cycling. Over the years, we've worked with the West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance and helped fund some of their projects with the money we raised." "Our idea was to put another set of bicyContinued on following page

W

T

he Township Council has denied another request by Edgewood Properties for a reduction of performance guarantees associated with the future WWM Properties shopping center on Southfield Road, across from McCaffrey's. According to the council's resolution, passed March 1, the performance guarantees are currently at 25 percent of the total estimated valued of site improvements. Edgewood had posted a $259,677 bond for the work at the site in March, 2005. Hary said Edgewood is still waiting to receive a "no further action" letter from the state Department of Environmental Protection that would indicate the remediation is satisfactory and construction of the shopping center could begin. Among the tenants expected to move into the plaza are a PNC Bank, a CVS Pharmacy, the Learning Experience daycare center, and several small retail establishments. Construction at the 12-acre shopping center was halted a few years ago after the state Department of Environmental Protection

· Ability to hold 110 people indoors · Outdoor Pavilion on the lake with seating for up to 200 people · Special Weekday, Funeral, and Seminar pricing

For Information: 609-586-0883 [email protected] · www.dndcatering.com

18

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Continued from previous page

cle racks in the back (of the high school), but at the time we were looking to purchase them, they were doing construction on the pool," Jacobs said, adding that those racks are still on the radar. For more information on Bikefest, check ww.westwindsorbikefest.com or call the Department of Recreation at 609-799-6141.

Overnight Traffic Shifts On Route 1

WW-P Winter Sports Wrap-Up

South Fencing Wins State Title

T

Town Hall Meeting

est Windsor Mayor ShingFu Hsueh will hold another Town Hall meeting on Thursday, March 25, at 7 p.m. at the municipal building. Hsueh specifically points to the municipal budget, cell phone tower issues, redevelopment, and traffic improvements as topics for discussion among other issues.

W

WW Gets $448,500

ercer County has awarded West Windsor nearly half a million dollars toward development of Duck Pond Park. The $448,500 grant is part of the county's Mercer At Play program and will be used toward adding improvements including a fishing pond, walking/jogging paths, a picnic pavilion, playgrounds, and court games, according to a press release from the township. Duck Pond Park, located off of Meadow Road next to Princeton Presbyterian Church, is the township's newest park.

M

raffic will shift on Route 1 over the Millstone River as construction crews working on the ongoing bridge replacement project set up a new construction zone on the northbound side of the highway. As a result, the state Department of Transportation will be shifting southbound traffic to the right and northbound traffic to the left -- which will result in two nights of lane closures on consecutive weekends. The first closure will be on Friday, March 19, when the DOT will close two southbound lanes from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Saturday, March 20. A single lane of Route 1 southbound will remained closed, however, until 9 a.m. Then, on Friday, March 26, the DOT will close two lanes on the northbound side from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. on Saturday, March 27. A single lane on the northbound side will remain closed until 9 a.m. During both of these traffic shifts, one lane of Route 1 will remain open in each direction. Once the new traffic pattern is implemented, Route 1 will maintain three full lanes of traffic in each direction over the Millstone River. The $18.8 million project will replace the structurally deficient Route 1 Bridge over the Millstone River. The project is scheduled for completion in October 2010.

F

Camp Information

Sign Up Before June 1, 2010 & Save 10%

Camp Dates/Times

June 28 - July 2 & July 19 - 23 - $230

· Day Camp ages 8-12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (lunch included)

June 28 - July 2 & July 19 - 23 - $100

· 1/2 Day Tee Ball Camp ages 6-8, 9 a.m. to Noon

June 28 - June 30 - $170

· High School Hitting Camp, ages 13-17 9 a.m. to Noon

encing, one of the fastest-growing sports in WW-P, has already gained the attention of hundreds of students at both North and South, who have signed up in droves over the last few years to try out for the program. Now, with its first state championship under its belt, albeit a squad title, South's fencing program stands to gain even more attention. That's not bad for a program that has only existed for five years. The boys' foil squad of Alex Guo, Steven Yang, and Howard Chen, won their first state championship by one victory, 38-37, over Columbia on March 6. The fencing title was icing on the cake for the winter season at WW-P, where many teams at North and South progressed into state tournaments. In the end, South earned two state titles. Two of the best swimmers in school history -- Rebecca Lewinson and Meredith Ketchmark -- combined with Jocelyn Yuen and Cori Michibata to bring home more accolades in the Meet of Champions on March 7. The foursome capped their run this season with a pair of relay titles, winning the 200-medley relay in 1:47.28 and the 4000-yard freestyle relay in a time of 3:33.73 for first place. In winter track, there are hardly any "firsts" left for High School North's Rosa brothers to accomplish. Jim Rosa, however, was able to accomplish another first when he won the boys' two-mile at the Nike Indoor Nationals in Boston on March 13, with a new personal best time of 9:00.36. The win was especially important for Rosa, who was upset at the Meet of Champions two weeks prior with a sixth place finish. The comeback was arguably his best race of the winter season. Also at the nationals, North's Corey Abernathy finished second in the shot put, with a throw of 593 1/2. North's Emily Scott placed 24th in the two-mile with a time of 11:11.20, while Jon Squeri placed 23rd in the boys' 5,000 with a time of 16:03.55. For South, Sam Macaluso, Brian Schoepfer, Doug Wallack, and A.J. Chavez placed third in the boys' distance medley relay. Jim Rosa and Corey Abernathy also had good performances at the Group III Indoor Track Championship in February, with Rosa finishing the 3,200 race with the fastest time in the county, 9:05.26. Abernathy placed second in shot put there and again at the Meet of Champions a week later. For South, Macaluso placed third in the 1,600, with a time of 4:14.57 at the Meet of Champions after taking home the title in the 1,600 with a time of 4:14.94, a new record, at the Group III Indoor Track Championship. South's Caroline Kellner took home the title in the 3,200, with a time of 10:56.59 at the Group III Indoor Track Championship in February, following it up with a fourth-place finish at the Meet of Champions.

Hall of Famers: North's Drew Kenavan, above left, South's Chris Matthews, above right, and Harvey Butler III, an eighth grader at Community Middle School, were honored by the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame at the Princeton Hyatt on March 14.

The team finished with a record of 15-10, one of its best performances over the last few seasons. The girls were boosted by senior Lexie Forsell and freshman Jacqie Klotz, who was a leading scorer and appears to have a promising future with the rising Knights. All of the WW-P basketball teams were able to make their way into the state tournament this year. Both of the boys' teams and South's girls' team fell in the first round. While it still made it to the state tournament, the boys' basketball team at South fared better in the 2008-'09 season, finishing that year with a record of 24-4 and making it to the state semifinals. It was more of an improvement for the North boys, who did not break .500 last year, missing the state tournament.

Girls' Swimming

North Kelly Covey placed 9th, with a time of 24.70, in the 50-yard freestyle at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions on March 7. She placed 5th, with a time of 53.52, in the 100yard freestyle. South The 200-yard medley relay and 400-yard freestyle relays teams each placed first at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions on March 7. The 200 medley relay team of Rebecca Lewinson, Meredith Ketchmark, Cori Michibata, and Jocelyn Yuen placed first with a time of 1:47.28. The same girls swam the 400 freestyle in a time of 3:33.73 for first place. Lewinson also placed fifth in the 200-yard individual medley, with a time of 2:09.61, and second in the 100-yard breaststroke, with a time of 1:03.91. Ketcmark placed seventh in the 200-yard freestyle, with a time of 1:58.63. Yuen finished 14th in the 50-yard freestyle, with a time of 24.95. She placed 16th in the 100yard butterfly, with a time of 59.53. Michibata placed sixth in the 100yard backstroke, with a time of 59.50.

A

t North, the ice hockey team also had another successful season, defeating Manalapan, 4-3, in the first round of the state tournament before falling to Montgomery on March 4. The team finished with a record of 18-5-1. While the wrestling programs traditionally do not perform as well as the rest of the winter sports teams, South saw vast improvement, finishing the season with a record of 8-4. Wrestler Alfonso Gonzalez, at 145 pounds, finished third in the District 20 tournament and made it to the Region V Tournament, where he fell in the preliminary round last month.

Boys' Fencing

North Robert Goldhirsch placed 11th in the state in the individual boys' foil on March 13. The foil squad, placed 9th at the state championships on March 6, with 20 victories. The boys' sabre squad also placed 9th in the state. South The sabre squad won the state championship on March 6, when Alex Guo, Steven Yang, and Howard Chen notched 38 victories. The entire fencing team at South placed 14th, with a score of 19 (-37).

Girls' Fencing

North Anjali Baliga tied for second and placed third, by one touch, in the girls' epee in the state individual championships oN March 13.

Girls' Basketball

North (17-9): A loss to Neptune, 53-41, on March 5 in the semifinal round of the Central Jersey, Group 3 tournament. Allen: 2-0-0-4; Davis: 00-3-3; Forsell: 0-2-0-6; Greenstein: 1-1-0-5; King: 1-0-0-2; Klotz: 1-0-24; McNeilly: 1-0-0-2; Pyfrom: 2-0-04.

Sports Briefs

North's Drew Kenavan and South's Christopher Matthews were among 30 high school students from Central Jersey who received the Scholar-Leadership-Athlete award by the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame, Delaware Chapter at its 48th Annual Awards Dinner. The dinner was held at the Hyatt Regency on March 14. Recipients were chosen for their outstanding academic performance, school leadership and citizenship, and football ability and performance. Harvey Butler III, an eighth grader at Community Middle, was also honored as the Pop Warner Little Scholar. NJ Adjutant General Major

July 19 - 23 - $275

· High School Day Camp, ages 13-17, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. (lunch included)

I

Register online at

www.earlyprospects.com

n basketball, the North girls' team made it to the semifinals of the state tournament, where it fell to Neptune, 74-31. The path to the semifinals was highlighted with the team's performance against Wall, where Jenna Greenstein hit a buzzer-beating three-pointer to win the game, 63-61.

Ice Hockey

North (18-5-1): A loss to Montgomery, 7-0, on March 4 in the state tournament.

Boys' Swimming

South Dan Druckman placed 6th in the 100-yard backstroke, with a time of 54.30, at the NJSIAA Meet of Champions on March 7.

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

19

General Glenn Reith also presented Butler with the Commander's Coin for his remarks at the podium. North graduate Scott Kelly had two hits and two RBIs for the baseball team at the College of New Jersey in the team's win over Monmouth, 11-5, on March 11 in Arizona. He also had an infield single in the team's loss to Wartburg College, 5-3, on March 10. Kelly went 2-for-3, with two runs scored and one run batted in, in his first game for the Lions, also against Monmouth, on March 8. South graduates Stewart and Steven Fernandez won 8-5 at first doubles for the TCNJ tennis team in the team's win, 8-1, over Carthage College on March 8. Steven Fernandez also won at first singles, 6-1, 7-5. In the team's loss to Skidmore College on February 28, 5-4, the pair won at first doubles. Plainsboro resident Joe Moore, a sophomore at Syracuse, recorded his first point of his career with an assist in the third quarter of men's lacrosse team's win over Denver, 159, on February 19. South graduate Austin Witter, a freshman at North Carolina A&T, played in all 33 games for the men's basketball team. He started in 15 of the games and finished with nine points against Morgan State.

South graduate Kate Winters, who now swims for Rowan, was named to the All-NJAC First Team in the 200-yard breaststroke and the 400-yard individual medley. North graduate Kerry Pehnke, a member of the women's lacrosse team at Rowan, had five saves in the team's win over Goucher. West Windsor resident Kelly

Rowland, a student at the Killington Mountain School, won the giant slalom at the J1/J2 Finals at Gore Mountain in Vermont. Rowland also placed fifth in the Killington Vermont Cup slalom in January. West Windsor resident Cole Howard placed 10th, with a time of 19:27.99, in the Robbinsville Interact 5K Run on March 13 at Robbinsville High School.

Wrestling Stars: Clockwise from left, North's James Mulhall and South's Andy Gonzalez; South's Alfonso Gonzalez and North's Matt Persico; South's Zachary Mozenter and North's Ethan Kaye; South's Liam Kiernan and North's Clemente Rodriguez; and North's Chris Bryde and South's Greg Ling. PHOTOS BY BRIAN MCCARTHY

20

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

DAY-BY-DAY IN WW-P

MARCH 19

Continued from page 1

Art

Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Art Exhibit, Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, 609-333-8511. www.photosgallery14.com. Opening reception for "Awakening" by Martha Weintraub, "Isolation" by Ed Greenblat, and "Cars and Bikes and Bits and Pieces" by Sally Davidson. On view through April 18. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Meet the photographers on Sunday, March 21, 1 to 3 p.m. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Author Event, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Appearance by Chris Cleave, author of "Little Bee." Rescheduled from February 26 due to snow. 7 p.m. Shabbaton, Princeton Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-2782. "Gays in the Garden and other Birthday Suit Dreams" presented by Rabbi Steven Greenberg, author of "Wrestling with God and Men: Homosexuality in the Jewish Religion," an Orthodox rabbi, and a homosexual. Register. 8:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Spring Concert, Artek, All Saints Church, 17 All Saints Road, Princeton, 212-866-0468. www.artekearlymusic.org. "From Venice to Vienna: New Music from the 17th Century." Baroque violinist Robert Mealy in a program of Italian and Italian-inspired music from the 17th century, accompanied by ARTEK's continuo section. $20 to $40. 8 p.m. Edward T. Cone Concert Series, Institute for Advanced Study, Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein Drive, Princeton, 609-951-4458. www.ias.edu. Piano duo Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn. Register. Free. 8 p.m.

Dancing

Jersey Jumpers, Central Jersey Dance Society, Unitarian Church, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. East Coast Swing lesson followed by an open dance. No partner needed. $15. 7 p.m. Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $15. 8 to 11 p.m. Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908-892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m. Karaoke Dance, American Legion Post 401, 148 Major Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-3299861. Cake to celebrate birthdays. Free. 8:30 p.m.

New Jersey Federation of Food Banks. Each table of customers is requested to donate $1. Each donor donates $1 for each check. Additional donations will be accepted before and after the performance. "When we heard that thousands of newly hungry children, seniors, and adults sought help at NJ's food banks, pantries, and soup kitchens last year while donations declines by 20 percent, we knew we wanted to do something to help," says Lon Bachrach, keyboardist and songwriter. "And what better fit could there be when it comes to feeding hungry New Jerseyans than the quintessential Jersey diner?" 5:20 p.m.

Don't Cry Wolf: `The Boy Who Cried Wolf ' is presented at Kelsey Theater, Saturday, March 27, 2 and 4 p.m. www.kelseytheatre.net.

trepiani.com. Free hors d'oeuvres. 10 p.m. tonpresbyterian.org. "Say Goodbye to Whining, Complaining, and Bad Attitudes in You and Your Kids" for parents of children through 18. Discuss effective parenting curriculum and day-to-day issues with other parents. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Comedy Clubs

Patrick DeGuire, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. A regular performer on Latino Night at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles, DeGuire began doing stand-up comedy as a form of self-therapy when he learned that he had optic neuritis and is legally blind. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m. Comedy Night, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Helene Gangley of West Windsor and three guest comics. Open mic follows. Sign up at 7:45. 8 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Register. 2:30 p.m. Happy Hour Yoga, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Vinyasa sequences inspired by yoga and dance. $17. 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Free Zumba Class, Lululemon Athletica, 36 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-2035. www.lululemon.com/princeton. Free Zumba class as part of Lululemon's March Madness week. Free yoga class each night this week and Saturday, March 20. 6:15 p.m. Vibrational Yoga, Planet Apothecary, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732-406-6865. www.planetapothecary.com. Restorative yoga and meditation with Jeanette Wolfe and Christa Pehl. $15. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Family Theater

Sesame Street Live: When Elmo Grows Up, Sun National Bank Center, 81 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, 800-298-4200. www.comcasttix.com. $14 to $36. 7 p.m.

Folk Music

Lou and Peter Berryman, Princeton Folk Music Society, Christ Congregation Church, 50 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-799-0944. www.princetonfolk.org. Performers who have recorded Berryman songs include Peter, Paul, and Mary, Steve Gillette, Cindy Mangsen, and Sally Rogers. $20. 8:15 p.m.

Lectures

Tax Assistance, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Music Program, West Windsor Senior Center, 609-799-9068. Ted Otten and Michael Kownacky present a program about Irish stereotypes on stage. 2 p.m.

World Music

Sam Rossitto and the Lotus Tattoo Band, Integral Yoga Institute Princeton, 613 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-2742410. www.iyiprinceton.com. Kirtan chanting with rock, pop, jazz, and original music. Register online. $10 suggested donation. 8 to 10 p.m.

Faith

Kid's Quest, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166. www.princetonpresbyterian.org. Games, stories, crafts, and Bible stories for pre-K to fourth grade. Register. Free, 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Literati

Poets' Night, D&R Greenway Land Trust, Johnson Education Center, 1 Preservation Place, Princeton, 609-924-4646. In conjunction with "Living Among Giants: Seeing the Forest for the Trees" featuring paintings by Clay Johnson with photography by Clem Fiori, Alice Grebanier, Mary Leck, Frank Magalhaes, Tasha O'Neill, Bennett Povlow, Maia Reim, Olga Sergyeyeva, Igor Svibilsky, and Barbara Warren. Register. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.

Live Music

Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Brick oven pizza and wine available. 5 to 8 p.m. Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. Solo jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m. Jackie Jones, Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-4194200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 11 p.m. Jacob Ramirez, Thomas Sweet Ice Cream, 1330 Route 206, Skillman, 609-430-2828. www.larrytritel.com. Guitar and vocals. 7 to 10 p.m. Ed Hamell, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-324-0880. www.the-record-collector.com. $12. 7:30 p.m. Johnny Pompadour & the Full Grown Men, Amalfi's, Lawrenceville, 609-912-1599. Rock, jazz, and blues. 8 p.m. Ossu, Borders Books, 601 Nassau Park, 609-514-0040. www.bordersgroupinc.com. Hamiltonbased band. 8 p.m. Arnie Baird, It's a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic pop. 8 p.m. Triple Trouble, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. Steve Lansing with rock and blues. 9 p.m. Cynics Haven, Sotto 128 Restaurant and Lounge, 128 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-7555. www.sotto128.com. Acoustic sounds from the last three decades. 9 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Sing and Play, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m.

Food & Dining

Cooking Class, Cuisine by AnneRenee, Hamilton Square, 609915-1119. www.cuisinebyannerenee.com. "Make Your Guest List: Hors D'oeuvres for a Party." Register. $50 to $60. 7 to 10 p.m. DJ Dance Party, Tre Bar, Tre Piani Restaurant, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-452-1515. www.-

Good Causes

Diners Donate Dollars Tour, Kindred Souls, Princetonian Diner, 3509 Route 1 South, West Windsor. www.dinertournj.com. Performance by original rock, blues, and jazz band in 21 counties during a 48-hour period. Benefit for the

For Parents

Parenting Support Group, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-987-1166. www.prince-

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

21

Ya Gotta Believe, Says This WW Runner

S

haron Chapman of West Windsor will run the New York City Half Marathon this Sunday, March 21, in preparation for the full marathon in November and as part of her fundraising efforts for the Tug McGraw Foundation, an organization devoted to helping those with brain cancer, post-traumatic stress disorder, and trauma brain injury. McGraw, a New York Mets pitcher from 1965 to 1974, died in 2004 from brain cancer. Chapman, a longtime Mets fan who had the opportunity to interview and meet McGraw in 2003, was raised on Long Island. A graduate of Barnard College and Boston University School of Law, she received a master's degree in library science) from Rutgers in 2007. "After the kids are out of the house, I would love to be a law librarian," she says. Her husband, Kevin, is a labor law attorney at Dow Jones for close to 15 years. "We moved to West Windsor from Manhattan in 1995 because of the schools," she says. Their daughter Samantha, 20, is a junior at NYU majoring in medieval and Renaissance studies while interning for Asimov's Science Fiction magazine. Connor, 17, is a junior at High School North; and Ross, 13, is an eighth grader at Community Middle School. Chapman, who began running three times a week in 1999, joined Weight Watchers in 2008 and began running daily to exchange activity points for food. She began to compare herself to actress Valerie Bertinelli, the Jenny Craig spokesperson at the time, who

wanted to lose 40 pounds and not become "ultra-skinny." Chapman entered a 10K race in Bermuda, but was not prepared for the steep hills, and did not complete the race. A year later when Chapman felt ready for the 10K she heard that Bertinelli had just run a half marathon. She had a new goal and ran her half marathon in Jersey City. "At first, I thought that would be it," she says. "But then the idea of running the New York Marathon started hitting me. When Kevin and I were in law school in Boston, I would watch the New York Marathon on television just to watch shots of New York because I was homesick." "To go from wistfully watching the marathon on television to actually running it is something I never imagined, and I realized that it's something that I need to try," she says. Chapman knew that may not get in through the lottery or by a qualifying time so she joined Team McGraw, a group of runners who participate to raise money for the Tug McGraw Foundation. Chapman runs on behalf of Connor McKean, a 12-year-old boy who is also a Mets fan. He was diagnosed with a rare form of brain tumor in 2007. "As the parents of two teenage boys and a girl in college, Connor McKean's situation makes us really appreciate our own kids' health all the more," she says. Visit http://www.active.com/donate/teammcgrawnyc2010/tmnycm10SChapma to make a donation. Chapman, who did run a 10K in Bermuda, also successfully ran a half marathon there. "Bermuda is,

Scrabble, Classics Used and Rare Books, 117 South Warren Street, Trenton, 609-394-8400. All skill levels welcome. 6:30 p.m.

truly, my favorite place in the world," she says. "I've been there 10 times. I've told Kevin that, after retirement, I want to find a temporary job so we can live there for six months at some point in our lives. I'm too much of an American to ever want to leave the country, but I'd love the experience of living in Bermuda not as a tourist at some point." About that meeting with McGraw: As a columnist for a New York Mets fan magazine, Inside Pitch, Chapman interviewed McGraw by phone in early 2003. "It was a great experience, and an instructive one," she says. "I was a novice and Tug teased me about things like not recording the conversation. He was also very personable, entertaining, and witty. The interview was basically everything one would ever expect from the man who coined the phrase `Ya Gotta Believe'". "The postscript to this story," she says, "is that my husband and I attended a Mets-Phillies game in the Phillies suite at Veterans Stadium in September of that year because we were involved in a local Cub Scouts group outing that season," she says. "I remember sitting down in my seat, looking over to the next section, and seeing a kid who looked like Tug McGraw's son Matthew. At second glance, I noticed that it was indeed Matthew, and that Tug was sitting next to him. I went over and introduced myself in person to Tug, who remembered me and was very excited to meet me in person. That was one of the biggest thrills in my life." -- Lynn Miller

tale of mismatched lovers, antics, and fantastical worlds. Dancers include students from Princeton Ballet School and Dance Power program. $25 and $30. 8 p.m.

First Presbyterian Church

22 South Main Street, Cranbury

609-395-0897 3 0

Worship With Us During Holy Week

Palm Sunday, March 28 10:30 a.m. Worship Service featuring children's palm parade One Great Hour of Sharing Offering Maundy Thursday, April 1 7:30 p.m. Tenebrae and Communion Service Combined service in our sanctuary with Cranbury United Methodist Church Good Friday, April 2 12:15 p.m. ­ 12:45 p.m. Community Worship Service at the Cranbury United Methodist Church Easter Sunday, April 4 7:00 a.m. Sunrise Service at Village Park 8:30 a.m. Worship Service 9:30 a.m. Coffee Hour (no Sunday School) 10:30 a.m. Worship Service Please join us for worship in this special season.

Rev. Dr. Louis Mitchell, Pastor Rev. Rosanna Anderson, Associate Pastor Joanne Petto, Parish Associate

DJ Bruce Mancia, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609585-5255. www.spigola.net. 9:30 p.m. The Mike Montrey Band, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. $5 cover. 10 p.m.

For Seniors

St. Patrick's Day Luncheon, West Windsor Senior Center, 609-799-9068. Register. $7. 12:45 p.m.

MARCH 28 PALM SUNDAY Procession with palms, telling of the Passion & Holy Communion at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. APRIL 1 MAUNDY THURSDAY Corporate Confession, Holy Communion, and Stripping of the Altar at 7:30 p.m. GOOD FRIDAY Service of Tenebrae at 7:30 p.m. EASTER SUNDAY Festive Resurrection Worship at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Easter Brunch, 9:45 a.m.

Drama

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Kelsey Theater, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Maurer Productions Onstage. $16. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. Open captioned performance. $15 to $55. 3 and 8 p.m. Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Continued on following page

Politics

Rally Against the Iraq War, Coalition for Peace Action, Statehouse, 125 West State Street, Trenton, 609-924-5022. www.peacecoalition.org. "Countdown to Withdrawal Rally" on the seventh anniversary of the Iraq War. Speaker include Jesse Hamilton, Iraq War veteran; Raed Jarrar, an Iraqi architect; and Reverend Robert Moore, executive director of Coalition for Peace Action. Also music by Sharleen Leahy. Vigil on the Morrisville side of the Trenton Makes bridge at 4:30 p.m. Noon.

Saturday March 20

Miscellany

Forum and Resource Information Fair, West Windsor Human Relations Council, High School South, 346 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609-799-2400. www.westwindsornj.org. "Coping with These Challenging Time: Advice and Resource Aids for Families, Adults, and Individuals" presents presentations by representatives of government agencies, communitybased organizations, educational institutions, faith based organizations, health care providers, business people, and elected officials. Information fair offers opportunity to speak one-on-on with organizations. Free. 2 to 4 p.m.

APRIL 2 APRIL 4

Schools

Zorro, Princeton Latin Academy, Route 518, Rambling Pines, Hopewell, 609-924-2206. www.princetonlatinacademy.com. Original operatic adaptation of Isabel Allende's novel. Register. 1 p.m.

What's in Store

Factory Sale, Ana Designs, 1 Ott Street, Trenton, 609-394-0300. www.fivestripes.com. Luxury candles, striped tapers, pillars, and large pillars. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HOLY WEEK WORSHIP

Palm/Passion Sunday - 3/28, 9:30 and 11:00am. We journey with Jesus down the path from the Mount of Olives to Jerusalem Holy Thursday - 4/1, 7:30pm. We celebrate communion as we remember Jesus gathering for the last supper in the Upper Room Good Friday - 4/2, Noon - We gather to worship to remember the sacrifice of Christ. 7:30pm - We focus on Jesus' hands, knees and sides through music and art. Easter Sunday Worship - 4/4. Come celebrate the risen Christ! Sunrise Communion Service - 6:30am (Outdoors at the front of the church, followed by Continental Breakfast) Festival Worship in the Sanctuary - 9:30 & 11:00am.

Dance

I'll Have What She's Having Dance Project, YWCA Princeton, Yvonne Theater, Rider University, Lawrenceville, 609-4972100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. Professional dancers include Nancy Musco of Plainsboro and West Windsor residents Henry Velandia, Mira Estaphanous, and Linda Mannheim. $20. 2 and 8 p.m. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Raritan Valley Community College, Route 28, North Branch, 908-725-3420. www.rvccarts.edu. American Repertory Ballet's artistic director Graham Lustig has reimagined Shakespeare's class

Singles

Princeton Singles, Elks Club, Blawenburg, 908-874-5434. Dinner. Register. $15. 6 p.m.

Socials

Luncheon, Rotary Club of the Princeton Corridor, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, 609-7990525. www.princetoncorridorrotary.org. Register. Guests, $20. 12:15 p.m.

Princeton United Methodist Church

Nassau Street at Vandeventer Avenue 609-924-2613 · www.princetonumc.org

22

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

MARCH 20

Continued from preceding page Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "This is Ragtime" is conceived and performed by Terry Waldo. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m.

Dancing

Salsa Sensation, Central Jersey Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Merengue lesson followed by open dancing. No partner needed. $12. 7:30 p.m. Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908-892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.

Roll Hall of Famer brings his repertoire of pop music classics such as "Summer in the City" and "Did You Ever Have to Make Up Your Mind," as well as the theme song to "Welcome Back, Kotter." Register. $30. 8 p.m.

World Music

West African Drumming Workshop, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com. Sharon Silverstein presents djembe drumming workshop, $20; community drumming circle at 8 p.m., $15. $30 for both. 6:30 p.m.

Film

Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville, 609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Screening of "Precious." $5. 7 p.m. and 9:20 p.m.

Literati

Writing Workshop, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. "Perfecting Characterization" presented by New Jersey Writers Association. Register. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Shabbaton, Princeton Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-2782. "Wrestling with Leviticus: Four Rationales for the Biblical Prohibition" presented by Rabbi Steven Greenberg, author of "Wrestling with God and Men: Homosexuality in the Jewish Religion," an Orthodox rabbi, and a homosexual. Register. Noon. Author Event, Barnes & Noble, MarketFair, West Windsor, 609716-1570. www.bn.com. Chris Donnelly, author of "Baseball's Greatest Series," the 1995 series between the New York Yankees and the Seattle Mariners. 2 p.m.

Good Causes

Adoption Day, A.F.E.W. Pets, CornerCopia, 299 PrincetonHightstown Road, East Windsor, 609-448-5322. www.afewpets.com. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mission Possible V, Millhill Child and Family Development Corporation, Rider University, Lawrenceville, 609-989-7333. www.ticketleap.com. Community honoree, Charles Geter, is a retired deacon at Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton. Benefit children and families in Trenton. Register. $100. 7 p.m. Benefit Auction, Princeton Charter School, Campus Center, 100 Bunn Drive, Princeton, 609-9240575. www.princetoncharter.org. "Spring Revival" is this year's theme. Register. $100. 7 p.m. Dancing with the Stars, Beth El Synagogue, 50 Maple Stream Road, East Windsor, 609-4434454. www.bethel.net. Joel and Donna Muroff will teach one ballroom dance and one line dance. Participant in the contest. Refreshments. $18 benefit the religious school scholarship fund. Register. 8:15 p.m.

Art

Tots on Tour, Grounds For Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. For ages 3 to 5. Listen to a story, become park explorers, make original works of art. One adult must accompany each child. Register. Free with park admission. Rain or shine. 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Jonathan Shahn Part II, Roosevelt Arts Project, The Factory, 15 Oscar Drive, 609-443-4616. www.music.columbia.edu/roosevelt. A collection of drawings, prints, and sculpture of the artist's family, friends, and himself. Screening of "The Head, Martin Luther King Jr.: A Sculpture" by composer and filmmaker, Wiska Radkiewicz, also of Roosevelt, documenting the various stages in Shahn's monument to Martin Luther King Jr. $5. Noon to 5 p.m. Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Art Exhibit, Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436. www.artworkstrenton.org. Opening reception to "Connect," a showcase of two-dimensional works by emerging and established artists from VSA Arts of New Jersey and ThisAbled. On view to May 1. 6 to 9 p.m.

fluid, propane gas tanks, pesticides/herbicides, pool chemicals, car batteries, used oil filters, paint thinner, oil based paint, stains, varnishes, anti-freeze, driveway sealer, gasoline, gas, oil, and insect repellents. Rain or shine. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Used electronics for recycling include computers, monitors, modems, printers, keyboards, fax machines, copiers, circuit boards, televisions, monitors, stereo equipment, laptops and laptop peripheral equipment, camera equipments, VCRs, microwave ovens, electric wire, networking equipment, and scanners. Proof of Mercer County residency is required (driver's license). They accept residential waste only. Do not bring latex paint, infectious waste, dioxin, heating oil, munitions, explosives, railroad ties, asbestos, agent orange, tires, metal and wood fencing, fluorescent light bulks, batteries, and air conditioners.

Craft Fairs

High School North, 90 Grovers Mill Road, Plainsboro, 609-7165100. More than 125 vendors from New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and New York City featuring ceramics woodcrafts, handmade chocolates, jewelry, children's items, soaps, candles, stationery, and dried floral arrangements. Clothing and soft goods drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the loading docks to benefit the post-prom event. Indoor fair, rain or shine, free parking. 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Handcrafted Fair, Robbinsville High School, 155 RobbinsvilleEdinburg Road, Robbinsville, 609448-5466. Juried show featuring regional artisans. Benefit for the high school's drama and instrumental music programs. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Classical Music

Faculty Recital, New School for Music Study, Kingston United Methodist Church, 9 Church Street, Kingston, 609-921-2900. www.nsmspiano.org. Piano recital by Lauren Thompson, Angela Leising, and Ramon Catalan features music of Mozart, Liszt, and Schubert. Free. 7 p.m. Edward T. Cone Concert Series, Institute for Advanced Study, Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein Drive, Princeton, 609-951-4458. www.ias.edu. Piano duo Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn. Register. Free. 8 p.m.

Lighten Up: Patrick DeGuire presents comedy, Friday and Saturday, March 19 and 20, at Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, West Windsor.

and women. Register. Free. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Spring Equinox Ritual, Integral Yoga Institute Princeton, 613 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-274-2410. www.iyiprinceton.com. Fire, water, mantra, sacred teachings, and snacks. Free-will donations invited. 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Comedy Clubs

Patrick DeGuire, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. A regular performer on Latino Night at the Laugh Factory in Los Angeles, DeGuire began doing stand-up comedy as a form of self-therapy when he learned that he had optic neuritis and is legally blind. Register. $22. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.

Food & Dining

Product Cooking Demonstration, Miele Design Center, 9 Independence Way, Princeton, 800-843-7231. www.mieleusa.com. Register. Free. Noon.

Pop Music

John Sebastian, Grounds For Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Rock &

Gardens

Home Gardener's School, Rutgers Cooperative Extension, Hickman Hall, Douglass College, New Brunswick, 732-932-9271. www.cperutgers.edu. Canning fruits and vegetables, perennials, establishing and maintaining the home lawn, heirloom tomatoes, bulbs for different seasons, flower arranging, shade gardening, history of cranberries, harvesting rain water, an appreciation of wine, and garden projects for you and your child. Boxed lunch available. Register. $60. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pruning Demonstration, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, 609-924-2310. www.terhuneorchards.com. Gary Mount presents a talk about pruning in the orchards, new varieties of fruit trees suitable for planting by the homeowner, and the difference between various rootstocks. Rain or shine. Register. Free. 1 to 2 p.m.

Miscellany

Household Chemical and Electronics Waste Disposal Day, Mercer County Improvement Authority, John T. Dempster Fire School, Bakers Basin Road, Lawrence, 609-278-8067. www.mcia-nj.com. Aerosol cans, household batteries, photographic chemicals, used motor oil, lighter

Faith

Prison Ministry Forum, Diocese of Trenton, St. Anthony of Padua Church, Hightstown, 609-4067400. www.dioceseoftrenton.org. "The High Costs of Security: How Recent Correctional Legislation Impacts Us All," a forum and panel discussion on the personal journeys of formerly incarcerated men

Church of St. David the King

1 New Village Road, Princeton Junction, NJ

609-2 75-7 111 2 7

Holy Week

Palm Sunday, March 28

Masses: Saturday 5pm, Sunday 8:30 am, 10 am, and 11:30 am Parish Lenten Reconciliation Service 7 pm

HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE Palm Sunday 3/28: 8 a.m., 9.30 a.m. & 11.15 a.m., Holy Eucharist. 3/31: 9:15 a.m. Holy Eucharist & Healing. 4/01: 7.30 p.m. Holy Eucharist; 4/02: noon, Stations of the Cross. 7.30 p.m. Passion Play and Proper Liturgy. 4/03: 7 p.m. Great Vigil of Easter. 4/04: Easter Sunday 9 a.m. & 11 a.m. Holy Eucharist.

Health & Wellness

Free Yoga Class, Lululemon Athletica, 36 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-2035. www.lululemon.com/princeton. Vanessa Kudrat teaches a free kundalini yoga class as part of Lululemon's March Madness week. 8 a.m. Blood Drive, American Red Cross, Tiger Schulman's Martial Arts, 233 Route 18, East Brunswick, 800-448-3543. www.pleasegiveblood.org. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Yoga, Trenton Friends Meeting House, 143 East Hanover Street, Trenton, 609-278-8484. Free-will donation. 9 a.m. Hatha Yoga, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.-

Holy Thursday, April 1, 8 PM

Mass of the Lord's Supper

Commemoration of the Lord's Passion & Death 3 PM Living Stations of the Cross 7:30 PM

Good Friday, April 2

d D

Regular services resume after Easter: Sunday services 8 a.m., 9:30 am, and 11:15 a.m. Church School and staffed nursery at 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m., Meditation Group Wednesdays at 9:15 a.m., Healing Service

Holy Saturday, April 3

Easter Vigil Mass 8 PM

Easter Sunday Masses, April 4

8, 9, 10:30 AM and 12 Noon

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

23

holsome.com. $15. 9:15 to 10:30 a.m. Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 11 a.m. Nia Dance, Functional Fitness, 67 Harbourton Mt. Airy Road, Lambertville, 609-577-9407. www.nianewjersey.com. Register. $17. 10 to 11 a.m. Chakra Yoga, Onsen For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton, 609924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. Register. $15. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Spring Yoga Detox, Four Winds Yoga, 114 West Franklin Avenue, Pennington, 609-818-9888. www.fourwindsyoga.com. Pranayama, asana, kriya, chant, meditation, and yoga nidra. For all levels. Register. $40. Noon to 3:30 p.m. Insight Meditation Open House, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Presented by Beth Evard. Register. Free. 1:30 to 3 p.m. Caregiver Support Group, Alzheimer's Association, Woodlands, 256 Bunn Drive, Suite 6, Princeton, 800-883-1180. www.alz.org. 2 p.m.

Family Theater

Sesame Street Live: When Elmo Grows Up, Sun National Bank Center, 81 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, 800-298-4200. www.comcasttix.com. $14 to $36. 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.

A Young Actor's NY Break

A

Lectures

Green Eveything Expo, Sustainable Lawrence, Mercer College, Kearney Campus, Trenton, 609895-1629. www.sustainablelawrence.org. Green building and remodeling, green health care, sustainable food and shopping, environmental home management, green lawn care and landscaping. 12 a.m. to 4 p.m. Networking Group, St. Gregory the Great Church, 4620 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square. Support in the job search process. Email [email protected] for information. 8:15 to 10:30 a.m. New Jersey Spring Conference, Junior State of America, Princeton University, McCosh Hall, 800317-9338. www.jsa.org. "One Small Step, One Giant Leap: America in the 21st Century," a conference focusing on how technological advancement has dismantled old institutions. The student-run organization has more than 300 high school members in New Jersey. Register. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Quilt Talk, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Meg Cox, an expert quilter and author of "The Quilter's Catalog: A Comprehensive Resource Guide," presents quilts and talks about the craft of quilt-making. 11 a.m. New Jersey Council for the Humanities, Trenton Public Library, 120 Academy Street, Trenton, 609-695-7048. Screening and discussion of "Revolution `67," a PBS documentary that reconstructs the six days in July, 1967, when Newark experienced deadly racial disturbances. Discussion presented by MaryLou and Jerome Bongiorno, the directors of the film, and Mark Krasovic, author of book manuscript, "The Struggle for Newark: Plotting Urban Crisis in the Great Society." 1 to 4 p.m.

History

Out of Town Tour, Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. "Glory and News in Washington, D.C." includes visits to the U.S. Treasury building, Newseum, and museums of your choice on the National Mall. Refreshments and dinner on the bus. Lunch on your own. Register. $105. 6:30 a.m.

ndrew James Gordon, 17, a senior at High School North, obviously knows how to succeed in show business -- perform, perform, perform. Gordon attends Mercer County Performing Arts High School and Mercer County Community College classes for drama. He is also in rehearsal as an actor in "The Pregnancy Project" in New York City. The play about teen pregnancy written by Lindsay Price, a Canadian playwright and dramaturg, features a cast of 15 girls and 5 boys from the tri-state area portraying a high school health class. Everyone wears a pregnancy belly to simulate what it feels like to be pregnant. Gordon plays the role of Andy, an angry teen from a dysfunctional family, who is a bit of a bully who thinks "Guys do not have to worry about being pregnant. Guys do not get pregnant. End of story." Gordon credits Georgine Hall, a drama teacher at Lewis School of Princeton and a Broadway and television actor, with setting him on the acting career path. Performing at home since he was five, he recently completed his

first role in Justice Productions' short film "Monster Goo," now in post production. A volunteer with West Windsor`s Twin W, Gordon is an emergency medical technician. "I have personally seen him running lines with his partner EMTs in between emergency calls," says EMT Assistant Chief Kimberly Fritz. Gordon feels that these two professions have a similarity in that they both need focus, determination, attention to detail -- and require good improvisation skills. Gordon is currently auditioning for entry into acting conservatories, including Britain's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London, and New York's American Academy of Dramatic Arts and the American Musical & Dramatic Academy. His two most precious possessions are letters from his acting idols, Kenneth Branagh and Sir Derek Jacobi, who wrote to him with encouragement and advice on auditioning and the business of acting. "I know acting is a very tough business," he says, "but in this economy there is no easy, safe occupation with guarantees. So with

dles, striped tapers, pillars, and large pillars. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

On the New York Stage: Andrew Gordon of West Windsor will appear in an Off Broadway play.

the support of my parents and my sister, Verity, I shall shoot for the moon and do what I love most of all." "The Pregnancy Project Health" performances are Saturday, March 20, at 3:15 and 4:30 p.m. at the Off Broadway Theater at the Roy Arias Theater Center, Times Square Arts Center, 300 West 43rd Street, fifth floor, New York City. Tickets are $15.

Outdoor Action

Field Trip, Audubon Society, Assunpink Wildlife Management Area, Imlaystown Road, Lake Assunpink, 609-737-0070. Lou Beck and Brad Merritt lead a walk looking for migrating waterfowl. Register. 8:30 a.m. Family Nature Programs, Plainsboro Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road, Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. www.njaudubon.org. "Animal Tales" with naturalist Corey Sperling. Register. $5. 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Singles

Wine and Dinner, Dinnermates, Princeton Area, 732-759-2174. www.dinnermates.com. Ages 30s to early 50s. Call for reservation and location. $20 plus dinner and drinks. 7:30 p.m.

Sunday March 21

Drama

Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 1:30 p.m. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Kelsey Theater, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Maurer Productions Onstage. $16. 2 p.m. American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. Post performance discussion. $15 to $55. 2 and 7:30 p.m. Continued on following page

Crafts

Pysanky Workshop, Middlesex County Cultural Commission, East Jersey Olde Towne Village, 1050 River Road, Piscataway, 732-745-4489. www.cultureheritage.org. Pysanky workshop presented by Olga Kobryn. Pysanky, a Ukrainian style of egg decorating, is considered a symbol of resurrection. Designs are written on the eggs with detailed patterns drawn in. Melted wax seals the color in. Kobryn learned the art as a ten-year-old. Two sessions. Register. $14. 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Sports for Causes

Tee Off Brunch, Executive Women's Golf Association, Central New Jersey, Crowne Plaza, 390 Forsgate Drive, Monroe, 732-828-4653. www.ewgacentralnj.org. Hot buffet, cash bar, vendors, networking, and information about upcoming social events. Register. $46. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Politics

Ready to Run: Campaign Training for Women, Eagleton Institute of Politics, Rutgers/ Douglass, 100 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-932-9384. www.eagleton.rutgers.edu. Bi-partisan program for women seeking public office, running for higher office, becoming community leaders, or working on a campaign. Keynote speaker is Celinda Lake, author of "What Women Really Want: How American Women Are Quietly Erasing Political, Racial, Class and Religious LInes to Change the Way We Live." Register. $135. 8 a.m.

Live Music

Darla Rich Quintet, Hopewell Bistro, 15 East Broad Street, Hopewell, 609-466-9889. www.hopewellvalleybistro.com. Dinner and dancing. $15 minimum. 7 to 9:30 p.m. Johnny Linden, Thomas Sweet Ice Cream, 1330 Route 206, Skillman, 609-430-2828. www.larrytritel.com. Guitar and vocals. 7 to 10 p.m. Jack Ass Flats, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. Bluegrass. $12. 7:30 p.m. Mad Cats & Beehives, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m. Off the Record, It's a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic pop folk. 8 p.m. Rick & Kenny, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609585-5255. www.spigola.net. 8:30 p.m. Latin Night, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. 9 p.m. Dan Sufalko, Wildflowers Restaurant, 2572 Pennington Road, Pennington, 609-737-2392. www.wildflowersinnrestaurant.com. Folk rock music by Plainsboro resident. 9 p.m. DJ Roka, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. $5 cover. 10 p.m.

Sports

Princeton Lacrosse, Class of 1952 Stadium, 609-258-4849. www.goprincetontigers.com. Penn. $8 to $10. 3 p.m. Annual Banquet, Ernest Schwiebert Trout Unlimited, Charlie Browns, Route 27, Kingston. www.esctu.org. Cash bar. Dinner. Register by E-mail to [email protected] $35. 6 p.m.

History

Civil War and Native American Museum, Camp Olden, 2202 Kuser Road, Hamilton, 609-5858900. www.campolden.org. Exhibits featuring Civil War soldiers from New Jersey include their original uniforms, weapons, and medical equipment. Diorama of the Swamp Angel artillery piece and Native American artifacts. Free. 1 to 4 p.m. Rosie the Riveter, The Meadows Foundation, Van Liew Suydam House, 280 South Middlebush Road, Somerset, 732-560-1977. www.themeadowsfoundation.org. 2 p.m.

Schools

Open House, The Lewis School, 53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org. Open house for alternative education program for learning different students with language-based learning difficulties related to dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college preparatory levels. 10 a.m. National Testing Day, Princeton Review, 252 Nassau Street, Princeton, 800-2review. www.princetonreview.com. Free college entrance exam tests for SAT or ACT. Practice with detailed score analysis. Register. Free. 2 p.m.

For Families

Workhorse Rides, Howell Living History Farm, Valley Road, off Route 29, Titusville, 609-7373299. www.howellfarm.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Camp Open House, Stony Brook Millstone Watershed, 31 Titus Mill Road, Pennington, 609-7377592. www.thewatershed.org. Nature and environmental summer day camp for boys and girls entering grades one to nine. 1 to 4 p.m.

Colleges

Open House, Raritan Valley Community College, 118 Lamington Road, Branchburg, 908-253-6688. www.raritanval.edu. For prospective students. Held in the West Building at the Branchburg campus. Meet with members of the RVCC faculty and discuss academic programs. Workshops on the admissions process, financial aid, and transfer opportunities. Campus tours included. Register. 10 a.m.

For Parents

Parenting Workshop Series, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. "Behavioral Teaching for Families of Children with Autism." Register. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m .

Retail Therapy

Factory Sale, Ana Designs, 1 Ott Street, Trenton, 609-394-0300. www.fivestripes.com. Luxury can-

24

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

MARCH 21

Continued from preceding page Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "This is Ragtime" is conceived and performed by Terry Waldo. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 3 p.m.

Classical Music

Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West, Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth largest carillon in the country. Free. 1 p.m. Concert, Hopewell Valley Chorus, Unitarian Universalist Church at Washington Crossing, 268 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville, 609-737-3177. "Spring into Song" featuring seven vocal groups. Benefit for Trenton Children's Chorus. Donations invited. 2 p.m. Central Jersey Choral Society, St. David's Episcopal Church, 90 South Main Street, Cranbury, 609-751-5805. www.stdavidscranbury.com. "Elijah" accompanied by Camilla Jarnot of Plainsboro. Christopher Loeffler directs. $15. 3 p.m. Organ Recital, Central New Jersey American Guild of Organists, Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological Seminary, 609-921-7458. Program of organ classics marking the 325th birthday of Johann Sebastian Bach presented by Justin Hartz, Ronald Hemmel, Kathleen Milly, and Eric Plutz. A solo organ recital by Stef Tuinstra at 7 p.m. Reception follows. Free. 4 p.m. Romance, Majesty, and an Orchestral Icon, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, 609-497-0020. www.princetonsymphony.org. Andrew Grams conducts a program featuring music of Schoenberg, Barber, and Tavener. Qiang Tu on cello. Preconcert lecture at 3 p.m. Following the concert, the audience is invited to a reception at the Princeton University Art Museum for a private showing of Byzantine treasures and icons. Artwork on display by middle school students was inspired by the orchestra. $16 to $64. 4 p.m.

Art

Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Photography Exhibit, Turning Point Church, 15 South Broad Street, Trenton, 609-393-9574. "Stations of the Cross," a photography exhibit by Mike Manion, chronicles the last 24 hours of Christ's life. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Art Exhibit, Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street, Hopewell, 609-333-8511. www.photosgallery14.com. Meet the photographers for "Awakening" by Martha Weintraub, "Isolation" by Ed Greenblat, and "Cars and Bikes and Bits and Pieces" by Sally Davidson. On view through April 18. Gallery hours are Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. 1 to 3 p.m. Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Gallery Tour, Princeton University, Firestone Library, 609-2582697. www.princeton.edu. In conjunction with "The Author's Portrait: O,' Could He But Have Drawne His Wit," an exhibition of paintings, sculpture, prints, drawings, photographs, and death masks dating from 1489 to 1989 that were formed over long conversations between artist and sitter. On view Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. 3 p.m.

Edith Silver and Pam Silver, drummer Doug Clark, and organist Michael McCormick. Soloist Karen Evanetz presents Irish folk tunes, and leads the audience in the singing of "When Irish Eyes are Smiling." Post concert reception. Freewill offering benefits the Christian Children's Fund. 3 p.m.

Faith

Shabbaton, Princeton Jewish Center, 435 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-9212782. "Adam and Adama: Biblical and Rabbinic Models of the Human-Earth Relationship" presented by Rabbi Steven Greenberg, author of "Wrestling with God and Men: Homosexuality in the Jewish Religion," an Orthodox rabbi, and a homosexual. Register. 9 a.m. Women's Seder, Har Sinai Temple, 2441 Pennington Road, Pennington, 609730-8100. www.harsinai.org. Bring a dairy main course, appetizer, dessert, or side dish large enough to feed 10 people. Register. $10. 11:45 a.m. Musical Meditation, Krishna Leela Center, 13 Briardale Court, Plainsboro, 609-716-9262. www.krishnaleela.org. Group meditation, chanting, and discussion. Noon to 12:45 p.m. House of Light Workshop, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Interactive dialogue and spiritual guidance. Register. $78. 1 to 5 p.m. Oneness Blessing, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-737-6780. www.princetonyoga.com. Process originating in India for inner transformation. Free. 6:30 p.m.

On the High Seas: `Heading Out,' a painting by Jan Purcell, is part of `Splash,' a solo exhibit opening Monday, March 29, at Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike, Princeton. Opening reception is Wednesday, April 7, 5 to 7 p.m., www.chapinschool.org

Health & Wellness

Partner Yoga Workshop, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Register. $22 per couple. 10 to 11:45 a.m. Yoga for Stress Reduction, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Gentle asanas, breathing, and meditation. $17. 10:15 to 11:45 a.m.

Pop Music

Chris Botti, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Memorial Drive, Trenton, 609-984-8400. www.thewarmemorial.com. 7 p.m.

Dancing

Smooth Jazz Dance Party, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609-585-5255. www.spigola.net. DJ Tony D. 6 to 10 p.m.

from New Jersey include their original uniforms, weapons, and medical equipment. Diorama of the Swamp Angel artillery piece and Native American artifacts. Free. 1 to 4 p.m.

For Families

Open House, Camp Saginaw, 740 Saginaw Road, Oxford, Pennsylvania, 856-428-6256. www.campsaginaw.com. Information about residential camp. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Chocolate Seder and Camp Open House, Jewish Community Center, Rider University, Lawrenceville, 609-219-9550. www.jcctoday.org. Chocolate seder from 3 to 4 p.m., $40 per family. Information about Abrams Day Camp and teen travel follows. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

World Music

Music for Bagpipes and Organ, Pennington Presbyterian Church, 13 South Main Street, Pennington, 609-208-9991. Irish and Scottish music features pipers

Food & Dining

Annual Pancake & Sausage Breakfast, Ladies Auxiliary Colonial Fire Co., 801 Kuser Road, Hamilton, 609-587-3452. Easter Breakfast. Adults, $6. Children, $3. Have photos taken with the Easter Bunny, $2. 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

History

Civil War and Native American Museum, Camp Olden, 2202 Kuser Road, Hamilton, 609-5858900. www.campolden.org. Exhibits featuring Civil War soldiers

Holy Week and Easter

at the

Family Theater

First Presbyterian Church of Dutch Neck

154 South Mill Road Princeton Junction, NJ 08550

Fellowship Baptist Church

826 Village Road West, West Windsor

Sesame Street Live: When Elmo Grows Up, Sun National Bank Center, 81 Hamilton Avenue, Trenton, 800-298-4200. www.comcasttix.com. $14 to $36. 1 and 4:30 p.m.

609-799-0712 7 0

www.dutchneckpresbyterian.com

Palm Sunday, March 28

9:30 AM Worship Celebration Service for all ages Rev. Paul L. Rhebergen Preaching

Rev. David J. Spiegel, Sr. 609-799-4585

Lectures

Jews of the World Series, Chabad of the Windsors, The Anew Center, 1300 Windsor-Edinburg Road, West Windsor, 609448-9369. www.chabadwindsor.com. "Eyewitness to History: The Miracle Rebirth of Israel," a conversation with former residents of Israel, David Kalmus, Ella Eisenberg, and Hemi Nae. Register by E-mail to [email protected] $5. 10 a.m. to noon. Guardianship and Kids Protection Seminar, Little Gym, 217 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609-818-0068. www.tlgwestwindsornj.com. Workshop for parents of minor children presented by Victor Medina, Esq.. Register. Playtime for children. Register. Free. 5:30 to 7 p.m. More Than a Concert Lecture Series, Princeton Adult School, United Methodist Church, Nassau and Vandeventer streets, Princeton, 609-683-1101. www.princetonadultschool.org. Eric

7 pm Maundy Thursday Service

dD

Thursday, April 1st

Holy Wednesday, March 31 - 7:30 PM

A Service of Wholeness and Healing

Maundy Thursday, April 1 - 8:00 PM

Service of Tenebrae with the sacrament of Holy Communion Meditation by the Rev. Paul L. Rhebergen

12 Noon Good Friday Worship

dD

Friday, April 2nd

Good Friday, April 2

12:00 Noon - 3:00 PM - Our Sanctuary is open for Reflection and Prayer 7:30 PM - Good Friday Service

Sunday, April 4th

11 am Easter Celebration

Easter Sunday, April 4

9:30 and 11:15 AM - Celebration of the Resurrection with the sacrament of Holy Communion. Christ is Risen! Alleluia! Rev. Paul L. Rhebergen Preaching

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

25

Dudley, assistant conductor for the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, discusses the works of Barber, Schoenberg, and Tavener. Participants are invited to sit in at rehearsal on Saturday, March 20, 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.; attend the concert on Sunday, March 21, at 4 p.m.; and experience a post-concert tour of the art museum's new exhibition, "Architecture as Icon: Perception and Representation of Architecture in Byzantine Art." Register. $110 includes part two on Wednesday, May 12. 7:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Musicology Colloquium, Princeton University Concerts, Woolworth, Room 102, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. "Camp Mementos from Krystyna Zywulska: The Making of a Satirist and Songwriter in AuschwitzBirkenau" with Barbara Milewski. 4:30 p.m. Asian Music Mondays, Westminster Choir College, The Playhouse, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Dharma Swara, a Balinese gamelan ensemble, performs traditional instrumental, dance works, and new compositions. Nyoman Saptanyana and Ida Ayu Ari Candrawati direct. Free. 7:30 p.m. Choir of the College of William and Mary, First Presbyterian Church of Hamilton Square, 3550 Nottingham Way, Hamilton, NJ, 609-915-0136. "Songs of Hope: A Celebration of the African-American Spiritual," a program devoted 19th and 20th arrangements and "Of Darkness and Light: Three Spirituals" by Brian Hulse, a work commissioned by the choir for its spring tour. Kelsey Rothera, a member of the choir, graduated by West Windsor-Plainsboro High School North, Class of 2008. Free. 8 p.m.

K

Singing Songs of Hope

Mary composer Brian Hulse expressly for this program. The Choir will also sing works by Palestrina, Kodály, and Georg Schumann. James Armstrong, Jr., director of the choirs, received his undergraduate degree from Princeton University and his masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Rothera has been singing in school choirs since third grade and undergoing classical voice training for the past five years. While at North, Rothera was a member of the Concert Choir and the a capella groups, Out of the Blue and Silver Lining. She served as president of both the Choir and Out of the Blue her senior year. A sophomore at the College of William & Mary, she has been a member of the Choir of the College of William and Mary for two years. She has also been a member of Reveille, a women's a capella singing group, and the Botetourt Chamber Singers. Rothera is a double major in music and business marketing. Born in Trenton, Rothera and her family have lived in West Windsor for almost 20 years. Her

Municipal Plaza, Monroe, 732521-5000. www.monroetwplibrary.org. Screening of "Made in L.A.," 2009. Free. 12:30 p.m.

Live Music

Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. Jazz brunch. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Larry Tritel and Guy DeRosa, Thomas Sweet Ice Cream, 1330 Route 206, Skillman, 609-4302828. www.larrytritel.com. Guitar, harmonica, and vocals. Noon to 3 p.m. Raja Jasdave and Tim Hooper, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 9 to 11 p.m.

Outdoor Action

Towpath Bike Ride, D&R Canal Watch, Griggstown Causeway, 201-401-3121. Round trip ride will cover 25 miles from Griggstown to the Route 1 overpass in Lawrence and back. Bring water and lunch. Helmets are required. 10 a.m. Winter Birds of the Park, Washington Crossing State Park, Washington Crossing State Park Nature/Interpretive Center, 609737-0609. Lou Beck leads walk for winter birds and early spring migrants. Register. Free. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Pop Music

Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Chorus, Forrestal Village, 112 Main Street, Plainsboro, 732-4693983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members are welcome. 7:15 p.m.

elsey Rothera, a graduate of High School North, Class of 2008, and a West Windsor resident, will perform with the choir of the College of WIlliam and Mary at two area concerts during the choir's annual spring tour. The program, "Songs of Hope: A Celebration of the AfricanAmerican Spiritual," will be performed on Saturday, March 20, at St. James Church, 115 East Delaware Avenue, Pennington, and on Monday, March 22, at the First Presbyterian Church of Hamilton Square, 3550 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square. Both concerts begin at 8 p.m. and are free. The program is a celebration of the concert spiritual for choir beginning with arrangements sung by the famed Fisk Jubilee Singers and the Hampton Institute Singers in the 1870s and proceeding through the much-beloved 20thcentury arrangements of Harry Burleigh, R. Nathaniel Dett, Hall Johnson, William Grant Still, Jester Hairston, Roland Carter, and Moses Hogan. Featured in the program will be "Of Darkness and Light: Three Spirituals," a work newly commissioned by the W&M Choir from William and

High Notes: Kelsey Rothera of West Windsor.

parents, Andrea and Robin Rothera, lived in Hamilton Square and attended the First Presbyterian Church before Kelsey was born. "When we moved to West Windsor, we decided to continue to go to FPC Hamilton Square versus transferring to Dutch Neck," says Andrea. "Consequently, Kelsey has attended FPC Hamilton Square her entire life, and this was a logical place to hold the concert. When the choir goes on tour, where they perform is related to students who live in the area." -- Lynn Miller

largest carillon in the country. Free. 6:30 p.m.

Crafts

Origami Workshop, Princeton Senior Resource Center, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, 609-924-7108. Create paper creations for Easter and Passover with Laura Kruskal. Paper supplied. Register. Free. 10:30 a.m.

Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. Rock and blues. 9 p.m.

Outdoor Action

Early Birds, Mercer County Park Commission, Mercer County Park, Marina, West Windsor, 609989-6540. www.mercercounty.org. Bring binoculars. Free. 7 to 8:30 a.m.

Pop Music

Bobby McFerrin, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. Combinations of jazz, folk, and world music by the creator of "Don't Worry, Be Happy." McFerrin will be joined onstage by 40 Princeton University students selected by Old Nassoul, Roaring 20, Shere Khan, Katzenjammers, The Wildcats, Tigertones, Tigerlilies, and The Footnotes. $40 to $52. 8 p.m.

Art

Senior Thesis Exhibition, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609-2581500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Opening reception for works of Saba McCoy and Victoria Lewis. On view to March 26. 6 to 8 p.m.

Schools

National Testing Day, Princeton Review, 252 Nassau Street, Princeton, 800-2review. www.princetonreview.com. Free college entrance exam tests for SAT only. Practice with detailed score analysis. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Gardens

Vegetable Gardening 101, Master Gardeners of Mercer County, 930 Spruce Street, Trenton, 609-989-6830. www.mgofmc.org. Register. $3. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Politics

Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Dodds Auditorium, 609-2582943. www.princeton.edu. "Military Force Planning and Decision Making" presented by Barry Pavel, principal director for strategy at the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. 4:30 p.m.

Dancing

Tuesday Night Folk Dance Group, Riverside School, Princeton, 609-655-0758. www.princetonfolkdance.org. Instruction and dancing. No partner needed. $3. 7 to 9 p.m.

Singles

Bowling and Dinner, Yardley Singles, Curtis Lanes, 45 Scotch Road, Ewing, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Register. 2 p.m.

Business Meetings

Plainsboro Business Partnership, Wyndham Conference Center, 609-936-4200. www.wyndham.com/hotels/ EWRCC/ main.wnt. networking event, featuring Rich Keurjian and Alysia Chester, free. 8 a.m.

Health & Wellness

Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Hot Yoga, Yoga Above, 80 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-6131378. www.yogaabove.com. Bring water, a towel, and a mat. $14. 5:30 p.m. Yoga Practice, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Register. 7 p.m.

Singles

Coffee and Conversation, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Coffee, tea, soup, sandwich, or dessert. Register at www.meetup.com/Princeton-Area-Singles-Network. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Literati

Mayhem Poets, Princeton High School, 151 Moore Street, 609806-4300. www.prspac.org. Spoken word workshop for middle and high school students from 6 to 7 p.m. Performance in the black box theater in conjunction with Black History Month celebration. The Witherspoon 5, five PHS freshman, perform an original poem, "Yesterday I Woke Up a Black Man." Postponed from February 10 due to snowstorm. Free. 6 p.m.

Socials

Bowling Party, India Foundation of Metropolitan Princeton, Colonial Bowling, 2420 Brunswick Avenue, Lawrenceville, 609-8827700. www.ifmpnj.org. Three hours of bowling and shoe rental. $10. Noon to 3 p.m.

Food & Dining

Sugar-less Vegan Baking Class, Whole Foods Market, Windsor Green Shopping Center, West Windsor, 609-799-2919. www.wholefoods.com. Register. 7 p.m.

Chess

Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. For advanced adult players. 1 to 5 p.m.

For Parents

Mothers of Preschoolers, MOPS, Princeton Alliance Church, 20 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-799-9000. www.mops.org. "Clothing and Toy Swap." Free. Child care available for $5. 9:30 a.m. Workshop, The Bridge Academy, Adath Israel Synagogue, 1958 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, 609-844-0770. www.banj.org. "Celebrating Calm," a calm kids workshop, presented by Kirk Martin, an expert on ADHD, anxiety, and special needs. Register. Free. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Tuesday March 23

Film

Spring Documentary Film Series, Monroe Public Library, 4

Health & Wellness

Gentle Therapeutic Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, Skillman, 609-306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Continued on following page

Classical Music

Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West, Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth

Outings

Trip to New York City, Adath Israel Congregation, 1958 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, 609-806-4977. www.adathisraelnj.org. "Restoration and Renewal: Synagogues of New York City" presented by Oscar Israelowitz. Register. $65 includes bus, admissions, and lunch. 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.

KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1967

Monday March 22

Film

Second Chance Film Series, Princeton Adult School, Kresge Auditorium, Frick Chemical Building, Princeton University, 609683-1101. www.princetonadultschool.org. Screening of "Goodbye Solo," USA, 2008. $6. 7:30 p.m.

Lectures

Crops and Cultures, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. "The Preservation of Heirloom Varieties" presented by New Jersey farmer Adam Forbes. 7 p.m.

Showroom Hours:

Mon - Fri 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM Sat 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM Evenings & Weekends By Appointment

609-581-2626

1351 KUSER ROAD Hamilton, NJ 08619

(Between Olden Ave. & Kuser Rd. Minutes from I95 exit.)

Live Music

Stringbean and the Stalker, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West

26

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

MARCH 23

Continued from preceding page Planning for Incapacity, Mercer County Connection, 957 Route 33, Hamilton, 609-890-9800. www.mercercounty.org. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Open House, Sunny Health Center, 16 Seminary Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-1227. Free 15minute massage. Register. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Caregiver Support Group, Alzheimer's Association, Clare Bridge of Hamilton, 1645 Whitehorse-Mercerville Road, 800-8831180. www.alz.org. 10:30 a.m. Blood Drive, American Red Cross, Nottingham Fire Company, 200 Mercer Street, Hamilton Square, 800-448-3543. www.pleasegiveblood.org. 2 to 8 p.m. Weight Loss Seminar, Harvest Moon, 206 Sandpiper Court, Pennington, 609-462-4717. "Spring Weather and Eating Well." Register. $30. 7 to 8 p.m. Transformational Breathing, Masimo Carrara and Aspasia Dassios, Hopewell Railroad Station, 3 Railroad Place, Hopewell, 609-309-5147. www.transformationalbreathing.com. Group session. Register. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Pilates, Anthony Rabara Studio, 329 Wall Street, Princeton, 609921-7990. www.rabarapilates.com. Beginner mat class. $18. 7:30 to 8:25 p.m. Healing Meditation Gathering, Healing Center of Light, 559 Drexel Avenue, Lawrenceville, 609-273-0856. www.thepathtoyourascension.com. Register online. $20. 7:30 p.m.

program for parents includes information on IEP process, special education law, how to manage documentation, and how to advocate for your child. Childcare available. Register. Free. 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Lectures

Tax Assistance, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Keller Center, Princeton University, Friend Center, 609-2587221. www.princeton.edu. Leadership dialog with Dan Warmenhoven, chairman of the board and executive chairman of NetApp. Reception follows. 4:30 p.m. Social Media Marketing Workshop, Princeton Merchant Association, Nassau Inn. www.princetonmerchants.org. "Marketing Through Social Media" presented by Nick Perold, a social media strategy consultant, includes a discussion of how Facebook and Twitter augment marketing efforts. Bring a WiFi-enabled laptop with a power cord or battery back up. Register by E-mail to [email protected] $50. 6:15 p.m. History of Home Remedies, Hamilton Library, 1 Justice Samuel Alito Jr. Way, 609-5814060. www.hamiltonnjpl.org. "Remedies from the Kitchen" presented by Judith Krall-Russo, focuses on folklore of remedies for coughs, sore throats, hiccups, and hangovers. Information may be practical, humorous, or bizarre. Refreshments will be served. Free. 7 p.m. Korean Culture, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. "Fifty Wonders of Korea" presented by the Korean Spirit and Culture Promotion Project includes a documentary film, displays of paintings, objects, and costumes, followed by a Korean dinner served in traditional Korean costumes. Limited to 100 participants. Register. Free. 7 p.m. Job Search Strategies for Older Workers, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-7990462. www.mcl.org. Carol King, director of the Center for Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers, presents program to help boomer general employees plan for retirement, part time employment, or an encore career. 7 p.m. JobSeekers, Parish Hall entrance, Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street, 609-924-2277. www.trinityprinceton.org. Networking and support for changing careers. Free. 7:30 p.m. Workshop, Men Mentoring Men, Spring Run School, 11 Minneakoning Road, Flemington, 908-707-0774. www.menmentoringmen.org. "Fathering Through Divorce," designed to help men navigate through divorce and fathering, is facilitated by Dr. Richard Horowitz, a relationship coach in Flemington.

David Kalmus, a longtime West Windsor resident and a native of Israel, speaks at `Eyewitness to History: The Miracle Rebirth of Israel: Conversations with Our Israeli Neighbors,' Sunday, March 21, Chabad of the Windsors, Anew Center, 1300 Windsor-Edinburgh Road, West Windsor.

Panel discussion includes men featured in the new book, "Fathering Through Divorce: A Handbook for Men Dealing with Divorce and its Impact on Parenting," written by Carol Patton. Register. $15 includes a copy of the book. 7:30 p.m. Jean Chatzky, Smart Talk Connected Conversations, State Theater, 15 Livingston Avenue, New Brunswick, 732-246-7469. www.Smarttalkwoman.com. "Money 911," presented by an award-winning journalist and bestselling author, who offers lifechanging financial advice. $50. 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday March 24

Municipal Meetings

Public Meeting, Plainsboro Township Committee, Municipal Building, 609-799-0909. www.plainsboronj.com. 7:30 p.m.

Faith

Lent Worship Service, Turning Point Church, 15 South Broad Street, Trenton, 609-393-9574. Service and light lunch. 12:10 p.m. Soup Supper and Program, All Saints' Church, 16 All Saints' Road, Princeton, 609-921-2420. "Questions of Faith" facilitated by Reverend Hugh E. Brown III, soup supper, and walking the labyrinth. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.

Live Music

Open Mic Night, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Chris Harford and the Band of Change, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 9 p.m.

Drama

American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. $15 to $55. 7:30 p.m.

Architecture

Envelope Conversations Series, Princeton University School of Architecture, Betts Auditorium, Princeton, 609-258-3741. www.soa.princeton.edu. "Global Technologies," a discussion of the technical aspects of envelope design, assembly, and operation presented by Matthias Schuler, Harvard University; Saskia Sassen, Columbia University; Marc Simmons, Princeton University; and Ulrich Knaack, Imagine Envelope, The Hague. Free. 6 p.m.

Politics

Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Dodds Auditorium, 609-2582943. www.princeton.edu. "Israel at the United Nations" presented by Shalev, ambassador of Israel to the UN. 4:30 p.m. Meeting, Republican Women of Mercer County, Nassau Club, Princeton. www.rwomc.org. Open to all Republicans. 6 p.m.

Food & Dining

Cooking Class, Cuisine by AnneRenee, Hamilton Square, 609915-1119. www.cuisinebyannerenee.com. "Hey, It's a Souffle." Register. $50 to $60. 9 a.m. to noon. Lombardia, Eno Terra Restaurant, 4484 Route 27, Kingston, 609-497-1777. www.enoterra.com. Five-course tasting menu with wine pairing. Register. $80. 6 p.m. Cooking For and With Your Child With Autism, Whole Foods Market, Windsor Green Shopping Center, West Windsor, 609-7992919. www.wholefoods.com. Larry Frazer, a chef with Eden since 1992, presents a class in preparing gluten-free and casein-free meals. Register. $15 benefits Eden. 6 to 8 p.m. California Cabernet Wine Tasting, One 53, 153 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-921-0153. Wine tasting and hors d'oeuvres. Register. $65. 6:30 p.m.

History

Public Tour, Cottage Club, 51 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, 609921-6137. www.princeton.edu/~cotclub. Tours of the Georgian Revival clubhouse built in 1906. Past members include James Forrestal `15, F.Scott Fitzgerald `17, Jose Ferrer `35, Governor Brendan T. Byrne `49, Senators William W. Bradley `65, and William Frist `74, John McPhee `53, and A. Scott Berg `71. The club is in the New Jersey and National registers of historic places. Free. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Dancing

Newcomers Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $10. 7 to 9 p.m. Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Dave Rupp with Dr. Twamley's Audio Snakes. Instruction followed by dance. $8. 7:40 to 10:30 p.m.

Singles

Princeton Singles, Charlie Browns, Main Street, Kingston, 609-392-1786. Lunch for ages 55plus. Register. Noon.

Socials

Men's Circle, West Windsor, 609933-4280. Share, listen, and support other men and yourself. Talk about relationship, no relationship, separation, divorce, sex, no sex, money, job, no job, aging parents, raising children, teens, addictions, illness, and fear of aging. All men are expected to commit to confidentiality. Call for location. Free. 7 to 9 p.m.

For Families

Toddler Story and Craft, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m. Pre-School Playdate, Bounce U, 410 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-443-5867. www.bounceu.com. $7.95 includes bouncing and a snack. 12:30 to 2 p.m.

Literati

Preview Sale, Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, 732-895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.com. More than 80,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women's colleges. $20 admission. Through Sunday, March 28. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Althea Ward Clark Reading Series, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Russell Banks and Chase Twichell read selections from their work. 4:30 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Ascension Support Group, Healing Center of Light, 559 Drexel Avenue, Lawrenceville, 609-2730856. www.thepathtoyourascension.com. Guided meditation. Register online. $25. 9 a.m. Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Weight Watchers, Gold's Gym, 4152 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609-275-8900. Meeting. $13. Noon. Mixed Level Hatha Class, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Register. $15. 5:25 to 6:35 p.m. Caregiver Support Group, Alzheimer's Association, Buckingham Place, 155 Raymond Road, Princeton, 800-883-1180. www.alz.org. Light dinner provided. 5:30 p.m.

Sports

Backpacking 101, Blue Ridge Mountain Sports, Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street, Princeton, 609-9216078. www.brms.com/insideBRMS. Free class in clothing, boots, and poles. Register. 7 p.m.

For Parents

Special Ed Families and Schools Together, Family Support Organization, 3535 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, 609-586-1200. www.mercerfso.org. Six-week

Classical Music

SciCore Academy Academic Summer Camps

One and Two-week day camps (9am-3pm) where your child learns with hands-on activities and one-on-one attention. Enjoy the results of our many years experience in delivering quality science, math and English camps.

Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West, Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth largest carillon in the country. Free. 6:30 p.m. Flute Choir, College of New Jersey, Mildred and Ernest Mayo Concert Hall, Ewing, 609-7712552. www.tcnj.edu. David DiGiacobbe, faculty advisor. Free. 8 p.m.

· Algebra 2 with Trig · High School Chemistry · Writing for the SAT and beyond · Middle School Mathematics · Robotics for Middle School · Video Game Creation

· MS Chemistry Lab · MS Electronics Lab · Elementary English & Writing, grades 3-4 · Elementary science, grades 3-4 · Early Readers Program, grades K-1 · Elementary Mathematics, level 1 & 2

World Music

Wah!, Integral Yoga Institute Princeton, 613 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-274-2410. www.iyiprinceton.com. Acoustic evening with Wah! on harmonium and Dan Johnson drumming. Free-will donations for the center's meditation labyrinth. Bring a cushion for sitting. 7:30 p.m.

History

Public Tour, Cottage Club, 51 Prospect Avenue, Princeton, 609921-6137. www.princeton.edu/~cotclub. Tours of the Georgian Revival clubhouse built in 1906. Past members include James Forrestal `15, F.Scott Fitzgerald `17, Jose Ferrer `35, Governor Brendan T. Byrne `49, Senators William W. Bradley `65, and William Frist `74, John

Camps start the week of June 28. $270 per week. Visit www.scicore.org for schedule and registration forms, or call 609-448-8951.

410 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. West Windsor, NJ 08550

SciCore Academy

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

27

McPhee `53, and A. Scott Berg `71. The club is in the New Jersey and National registers of historic places. Free. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Guided Tour, Drumthwacket Foundation, 354 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey governor's official residence. Register. $5 donation. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tour and Tea, Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-924-8144. www.morven.org. Tour the restored mansion, galleries, and gardens before or after tea. Register. $15. 1 p.m.

Ed Wilson, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 8:30 p.m. Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 10 p.m.

als to mentor minority women enrolled in healthcare training in area schools in eMentoring program. Applications online. 7 p.m. Hearts to Haiti Benefit Concert, Princeton High School, 151 Moore Street, 609-806-4300. www.prspac.org. Singer songwriter Laura Cheadle, her father, James Cheadle, a jazz keyboardist and her band; Grammy Award-winning Terrance Simien and the Zydeco Experience Band. Benefit for Shelter Box, American Red Cross, and Doctors Without Borders. The school district has been raising money through dinners, performances, and bike sales since shortly after the earthquake. $15. 7 p.m.

Help for All in Challenging Times

T

Politics

Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Dodds Auditorium, 609-2582943. www.princeton.edu. "U.S. and China Relations" presented by Xie Feng, deputy chief of Mission of the Embassy of China. 4:30 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Open Play, Pump It Up, 8 Commerce Way, Hamilton, 609-5865577. www.pumpitupparty.com. For children six and under. $8.95. 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. Hindi Class and Craft, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. For preschoolers. Noon.

Thursday March 25

School Sports

South Boys Tennis, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. Eastern High. 4 p.m. South Girls Lacrosse, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. Playday at North. 4 p.m.

Food & Dining

Happy Hour, Tre Bar, Tre Piani Restaurant, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-452-1515. www.trepiani.com. Free hors d'oeuvres. Drink specials. 4:30 to 7:30 p.m French Dinner Party, Daryl Wine Bar, 302 George Street, New Brunswick, 732-253-7780. www.darylwinebar.com. Classic French cuisine featuring Julia Child's boeuf bourguignon prepared by Chef Juan Carlos Fernandez, a graduate of the French Culinary Institute. Formal five-course meal with wine pairings. Restaurant closed to the public for the private dinner party. Register. $99. 6 p.m. Food and Wine Tasting, The Grape Escape, 12 Stults Road, Dayton, 609-409-9463. www.thegrapeescape.net. Food from Fiddlehead's Restaurant. Music by Darla and Rich. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.

For Families

Toddler Story and Craft, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m.

Drama

American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. $15 to $55. 7:30 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "Hurricane Season: The Hidden Messages in Water" is written and performed by Climbing PoeTree, a Brooklyn-based arts duo of Alixa Garcia and Naima Penniman. In partnership with D&R Greenway, Green Faith, Isles, NJ Conversation Foundation, Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association, Sustainable Lawrence, and Sustainable Princeton. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m. Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609-258-1742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 8 p.m.

Lectures

Distinguished Lecture Series, Mercer College, West Windsor, Communications 109, 609-5703324. www.mccc.edu. "Countdown to the 2010 U.S. Census" presented by Leonard Preston, chief of labor market information for the New Jersey State Data Center. He will provide an overview of the history and relevance of the U.S. Census. A graduate of Rutgers University, he earned a bachelor's and master's degrees in economics. Free. Noon. Lunch and Learn, Princeton University, Frist Campus Center, 609-258-3000. www.princeton.edu. "The Technology of History," Carla Zimowsk. Bring your lunch. Noon. Annual Economic Summit, Mercer Chamber, Mercer College Conference Center, West Windsor, 609-924-1776. www.mccc.edu. "Recovery: I Still Have Questions" is the theme of the event. Breakout sessions include "Management: How Do I Do More With Less?" and "Funding: How Do I Get It?" Workshop includes "Print Media & Internet: How Does the Market Identify With You" and a networking session. Register. 1 to 6 p.m. Tour and Dinner, Material Handling Society of NJ, Hyundai Parts & Distribution Center, 1122 Cranbury South River Road, Jamesburg, 732-477-5112. www.mhsnj.com. Tour Mobis Hyundai/Kia Distribution Center, followed by dinner presentation featuring Ron Palachko, Mobis general manager, at Crowne Plaza, 390 Forsgate Drive, Monroe. Register. $85. 3:30 p.m. Middle East Society, Princeton University, McCormick 101, 609258-3000. www.princeton.edu. "The Settlements; Why They Matter and What We Need to Know" presented by Ilene Cohen, who has been writing of events, articles, and books about Israel and Palestine. Free. 4:30 p.m. Flower Arranging Workshop, Lawrence Community Center, 295 Eggerts Crossing Road, Lawrenceville, 609-520-2005. Presented by Sheryl from Monday Morning Flowers, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro. Register. $20. 6 to 7:30 p.m.

he West Windsor Township Human Relations Council is sponsoring a forum and resource information fair titled "Coping with These Challenging TimesAdvice and Resource Aids for Families, Adults and Individuals" at the High School South library on Saturday, March 20, from 2 to 4 p.m. The event is cosponsored by the WW-P African-American Parent Support Group. The program will include brief presentations by representatives in government agencies, community based organizations, educational institutions, and faith based organizations, health care providers, business and elected officials who will share critical information to help all get through these challenging times in an extremely tough economy in New Jersey. There will also be an opportunity to speak one on one with the representative organizations to answer questions, provide helpful resource and referral information.

"It is extremely important that our government, educational institutions, non-profit and business community do whatever we can to provide families and individuals hurt by this challenging economy with the resources and tools that are available to help them survive and thrive. This program will do just that, and I look forward to our Township being in the forefront of giving back to our community residents in need," says, Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh. Representatives at this event will include representatives for West Windsor and Plainsboro and their libraries and recreation departments, representatives from Mercer and Middlesex County services, representatives from Assemblywoman Linda Greenstein and other officials, Princeton HealthCare Systems, Mercer County Community College and representatives from local faith based organizations and more. The program is free and open to the public. For more information contact Barbara Edmonds at [email protected]

cary.com. Chinese healing art with movements, visualizations, breath work, and meditations with Ruth Golush. Register. $20. 7 p.m. Asperger's Syndrome Presentation, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Arline and Henry Schwartzman Courtyard, 1 Robert Wood Johnson Place, New Brunswick, 800-483-7436. www.rwjuh.edu. "The Best Kind of Different: Our Family's Journey with Asperger's Syndrome" presented by Curt and Shonda Schilling, authors of the book by the same name. A retired major league baseball star, Curt and his wife share their families journey with Asperger's Syndrome, which their son, Grant, was diagnosed with in 2007 at the age of seven. Register. $30 for two people includes a copy of the book. 7 p.m. Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy Series, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. $42. 7:15 to 9:15 p.m.

For Families

Yoga for Budding Bodies, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-2791592. www.holsome.com. For ages 2 to 5 with adult. $14. 9:45 to 10:30 a.m. Picture Books and Craft, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m.

Health & Wellness

Mindful Parenting, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Presented by Maria Johnson. Register. $25. 9:30 a.m. Yoga, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. $14. Noon to 1 p.m. Blood Drive, American Red Cross, Abiding Presence Church, 2220 Pennington Road, Ewing, 800-448-3543. www.pleasegiveblood.org. 2:30 to 8:30 p.m. Hot Yoga 26, Yoga Above, 80 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609613-1378. www.yogaabove.com. Bikram style with 26 hatha yoga poses and two breathing exercises. Bring water, a towel, and a mat. $14. 5:30 p.m. Smoking Cessation and Weight Loss Workshops, Hypnosis Counseling Center, Edison JCC, 1775 Oak Tree Road, Edison, 908996-3311. www.hypnosisnj.com. Barry Wolfson presents workshops including hypnotic exercises and discussion. Optional CD, $18. Register. $40 each. 6:30 p.m. Highway to Health Series, Fischer Chiropractic Center, 320 Whitehorse Avenue, Hamilton, 609-585-9222. "Back Pain." Register. Free. 7 to 8 p.m. Qigong, Planet Apothecary, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732406-6865. www.planetapothe-

For Parents

The Explosive Child Workshop, Family Support Organization, 3535 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, 609-586-1200. www.mercerfso.org. Skill-building approach to decrease inappropriate behavior based on "The Explosive Child," a book by Dr. Ross Greene. Register. Free. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Special Needs, WW-Plainsboro Special Kids Special Parents, Plainsboro Municipal Building, 609-799-8036. www.wwpsksp.org. "Organization and Executive Function" presented by Vincent Varrassi, a former teacher of special education and currently serving on the board of ABCs of College Planning. Rescheduled from February 11. 7:45 p.m.

Dancing

Argentine Tango, Black Cat Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609-273-1378. www.theblackcattango.com. Beginner and intermediate classes followed by guided practice. No partner necessary. $12. 8 p.m.

History

Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture, Princeton Theological Seminary, Mackay Campus Center, 609-497-7990. www.ptsem.edu. "An Unlikely Convergence: W.E.B. Du Bois, Karl Barth, and the Problem of the Imperial GodMan" presented by J. Kameron Carter, Duke Divinity School. Free. 7 p.m.

Literati

Opening Day, Bryn MawrWellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, 732-895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.com. More than 80,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women's colleges. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

For Teens

College Admission Seminar, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. Presented by Princeton Review for students in grades 9 to 11 and their parents. Register. 7 p.m. Continued on following page

Kids Stuff

Open Play, Pump It Up, 8 Commerce Way, Hamilton, 609-5865577. www.pumpitupparty.com. For children six and under. $8.95. 9:30 and 11:30 a.m.

Classical Music

Afternoon Concert, Princeton University Chapel, Washington Road, 609-258-3654. Free. 12:30 to 1 p.m. Faculty Composers Recital, College of New Jersey, Mildred and Ernest Mayo Concert Hall, Ewing, 609-771-2552. www.tcnj.edu. Ralph Russell, coordinator. Free. 8 p.m.

Jazz & Blues

Martin Taylor, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Memorial Drive, Trenton, 609-984-8400. www.thewarmemorial.com. Solo jazz guitar. $29. 7 p.m.

Live Music

Bob Smith Trio, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609585-5255. www.spigola.net. Jazz, blues, and Bourbon Street specials. 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Patty Cronheim, Mediterra, 29 Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609252-9680. www.terramomo.com. 8 to 10 p.m.

Good Causes

Information Session, Institute of Wonderful Women Working for Empowerment, Lawrence Library, 2751 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, 609-466-2819. www.wonderfulworkingwomen.org. Seeking volunteers of professional or retired healthcare profession-

28

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

MARCH 25

Continued from preceding page

Rainbow Fresh, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 10 p.m.

Lectures

Seminar on Nonprofit Endowments, Princeton Area Community Foundation, Greenacres Country Club, Lawrenceville, 609219-1800. www.pacf.org. "Understanding Endowments; A Primer for Nonprofit Leaders," a breakfast seminar for nonprofit executive directors, trustees, and management team members. Presenters are Ralph Serpe, executive vice president of PACF; and Bordon Perlman, a third generation family owned insurance broker. Register. Free. 8 a.m. Consumer Affairs, Mercer County Connection, 957 Route 33, Hamilton, 609-890-9800. www.mercercounty.org. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Meeting, Toastmasters Club, CUH2A, 1000 Lenox Drive, Lawrenceville, 609-538-1943. www.cuh2a.freetoasthost.org. Prospective members invited. 11:50 a.m. Mortgage Day, Sun National Bank, 47 Princeton-Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-7161600. www.sunnb.com. Information about $8,000 rebate and rates presented by Mark Tirabassi. Refreshments. Free. 1 to 7 p.m. Dog First Aid, Princeton Adult School, Princeton High School, 609-683-1101. www.princetonadultschool.org. American Red Cross presents. Register. $40. 6:30 to 10 p.m. Princeton University Public Lectures, Princeton University, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. "This Filthy World" presented by John Waters, film director. 8 p.m.

Outdoor Action

Twilight Hike, Washington Crossing State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. Look for signs of spring. Wear books and bring a flashlight. Register. Free, 7:15 p.m.

duo of Alixa Garcia and Naima Penniman. In partnership with D&R Greenway, Green Faith, Isles, NJ Conversation Foundation, Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed Association, Sustainable Lawrence, and Sustainable Princeton. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m. Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609-258-1742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 8 p.m.

Singles

Divorce and Separated Support Group, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, Hopewell, 609-4660758. www.hopewellpres.org. Register. 7:30 p.m.

Film

Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville, 609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Screening of "Capitalism: A Love Story." $5. 7 and 9:05 p.m.

For Seniors

Women Now Alone Support Group, West Windsor Senior Center, 609-799-9068. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Lunch Club, Jewish Family and Vocational Service of Middlesex County, Concordia Shopping Center, Monroe, 609-395-7979. www.jfvs.org. Kosher lunch. $5. Noon to 2 p.m.

Art

Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Gallery Exhibit, Peddie School, Mariboe Gallery, Hightstown, 609490-7550. www.peddie.org. Opening reception for MAPL art competition. Gallery hours are Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Friday March 26

School Sports

North Girls Lacrosse, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. At Hun. 4:15 p.m. South Boys Volleyball, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. Wall. 5:30 p.m.

Benefit for Haiti: Laura Cheadle performs with her band at the Hearts to Haiti Benefit Concert on Thursday, March 25, Princeton High School, 151 Moore Street. www.prspac.org.

5050. www.ww-p.org. Korean cultural event features food, performances, and information. Foods include bulgogi, japchae, and kimbob. Performances include fan dance, drum dancer, flower dance, martial arts, Taekwondo, a Korean wedding, a play based on a folk tale, and a fashion show. Benefit for World Vision and Angel's Wings. $10 for dinner and show. 6 p.m. See story page 31. Happy Hour Yoga, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Vinyasa sequences inspired by yoga and dance. $17. 5:45 to 7:15 p.m. Open House, Transformations Physicians Weight Management, Gateway Building, 719 Route 206, Suite 101, Hillsborough, 908-281-6771. Presentation by Dr. Kathleen Hickey. Free. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Dancing

Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $15. 8 to 11 p.m. Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908-892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.

Drama

Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Studs Terkel is Listening, Actors' NET, 635 North Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215-2953694. www.actorsnetbucks.org. Staged reading of Walt Vail's new comic drama. $10. 8 p.m. American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. $15 to $55. 8 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "Hurricane Season: The Hidden Messages in Water" is written and performed by Climbing PoeTree, a Brooklyn-based arts

Good Causes

Bingo, St. Gregory the Great School, 4620 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square, 609-915-1553. One card per game, coffee, and dessert. Prizes from Vera Bradley and Longaberger. $25. 6:30 p.m.

Live Music

Arturo Romay, Hanami Restaurant, 15 Farber Road, West Windsor, 609-520-1880. www.hanamiprinceton.com. Latin jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m. Lynn Riley, Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 10 p.m. Funk Night, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. 9 p.m. Singer Songwriter Showcase, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. Hosted by Frank Thewes of West Windsor. 9 p.m.

Literati

Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, 732-895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.com. More than 80,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women's colleges. 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Author Event, Barnes & Noble, 869 Route 1 South, North Brunswick, 732-545-7860. www.bn.com. Lisa Scottoline, author of "Think Twice," her new mystery novel. Her signature Q&A sessions are usually complete with treats and flying cupcakes. Booksigning follows. Free tote bags to customers who purchase two or more copies of the book. 7:30 p.m.

For Parents

Parenting Support Group, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-987-1166. www.princetonpresbyterian.org. "Say Goodbye to Whining, Complaining, and Bad Attitudes in You and Your Kids" for parents of children through 18. Discuss effective parenting curriculum and day-to-day issues with other parents. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Comedy Clubs

Jason Good, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.

Faith

Palm Sunday Tea, Presbyterian Women's Association of Witherspoon Street Church, Carl A. Fields Center, 58 Prospect Street, Princeton, 609-924-2010. "Taking Tea in Style: Tea Tasting and Tea Talk" presented by Sharon Levy. Barbara King, jazz vocalist, performs. Donations invited in memory of Gladys Taylor for the Robeson House Fund of the organization. Register. $15. 2 p.m. Kid's Quest, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166. www.princetonpresbyterian.org. Games, stories, crafts, and Bible stories for pre-K to fourth grade. Register. Free, 6:30 to 8 p.m. Shabbat Services, Hadassah Trenton-Lawrence, Adath Israel Congregation, 1958 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville, 609882-4317. Members are helping to conduct the service. 7:30 p.m.

Lectures

Tax Assistance, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Meeting, Toastmasters Club, Mary Jacobs Library, 64 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-3060515. http://ssu.freetoasthost.ws. Build speaking, leadership, and communication skills. Guests are welcome. 7:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Bravura Philharmonic Chamber Players, Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, 609924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Yang Yi, founder and music director of the Eastern Culture and Performing Arts Center based in West Windsor, and Chiu-Tze Lin, director of Bravura Orchestra based in Plainsboro, present a workshop, "Traveling Around the World on 88 Keys," followed by a concert featuring the "Melding of the East and West," with music performed on Chinese Guzheng and piano. 7:30 p.m. Recital, Princeton University Concerts, Tapin, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. Pavaana Kumar on piano with works by Chopin and Ravel. 8 p.m.

Live Music

Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Johnny Pompadour & the Full Grown Men perform. Brick oven pizza and wine available. 5 to 8 p.m. Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. Solo jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m. William Hart Strecker, Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 10 p.m. Vance Gilbert, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. $25. 7:30 p.m. Music Fest, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Program features Gerald Edwards, CJ Barna, Dan Sufalko, and Chris Jankoski. 8 p.m.

Food & Dining

DJ Dance Party, Tre Bar, Tre Piani Restaurant, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-452-1515. www.trepiani.com. Free hors d'oeuvres. 10 p.m.

Pop Music

E OPEN HOUS&

20 Saturday, March 27, Saturday, March 10am-3pm

Every Tuesday & Thursday 10am-12N, Call for individual appointments

Carrie Underwood, Sun National Bank Center, Hamilton Avenue at Route 129, Trenton, 800-2984200. www.comcasttix.com. "The Play on Tour" with Craig Morgan and Sons of Sylvia. $35 to $55. 7:30 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Register. 2:30 p.m. Blood Drive, St. Gregory the Great, 4620 Nottingham Way, Hamilton Square, 609-587-2307. Walk-in or call for appointment. 3 to 8:30 p.m.

609-588-4442 609-933-8806

Email: [email protected] Web: www.quaker-bridge.com

World Music

Korean Festival, WW-P High Schools North and South, High School South, 346 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609-716-

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

29

Kevin Reavey and Jim Gaven, It's a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic original and covers. 8 p.m. Lofash, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 9 p.m. DJ Bruce Mancia, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609585-5255. www.spigola.net. 9:30 p.m. The Billy Bauer Band, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. $5 cover. 10 p.m.

Art

Jerry Garcia Art Exhibit and Sale, Westin Princeton at Forrestal Village, 201 Village Boulevard, 610-999-5880. Items once used by the late vocalist and guitarist for the Grateful Dead will be on display, along with original drawings, watercolors, hand signed lithographs, and pen and inks. Free admission. Portion of the proceeds benefits Haitian earthquake victims. 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Artists in Action, Grounds For Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-689-1089. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Accomplished artists demonstrate their expertise in a variety of media. Music performances. Free with park admission. Pre-register for workshops. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m Artists in Action, Grounds For Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Annual kick off to spring season with Motor Exhibits Building, normally closed to the public, open to visitors. Patron may speak with the artists who will be conducting demonstrations in their own studios. Music by Jim Gaven. Free with park admission. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Art Exhibit, Artworks, 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436. www.artworkstrenton.org. Slide Slam presented by artists in conjunction with "Around the Campfire, an exhibit of mixed media and clay that pays homage to Trenton's industrial history as home to dozens of commercial potteries in the 19th century. Wall of Voodoo features ceramic mugs and objects for sale. 5 to 9 p.m.

N

A Seventh Grader's Mitzvah Fosters Smiles

cate all of the proceeds of the race to children in India and China, where the greatest needs exist. His mother, Alyssa, works at the NJ Department of Environmental Protection as counselor to the commissioner; and his father, Sam Wolfe, is the director of legal and regulatory affairs at Viridity Energy. His sister, Laura, is a fifth grade student at Village School; and his brother, Jon, is a third grade student at Maurice Hawk School. The family has lived in West Windsor for close to 12 years. Noah, a former Cub Scout, is now a Boy Scout in Troop 40. He plays guitar and is a member of the Grover Middle School Chorus. He participates in the First Period Paws Program at Grover, where he writes, produces, and anchors live programming about life at Grover. A huge New York Mets fan, he loves to play baseball and tennis. Wolfe, who has an avid interest in sports, saw an advertisement for SmileTrain when he was reading Sports Illustrated. "He was moved by the pictures of the kids with cleft palate and by this organization which helps cure

closes the season prematurely. Register. $175 and up. 4 p.m. Golden Oldies Night, Covino's Ristorante, Our Lady of Peace Parish Center, 1740 Route 130 North, North Brunswick, 732-3989218. www.covinos.net. Threecourse dinner with music by John Kuse & the Excellents along with Billy Lawrence. Benefit for North Brunswick Food Bank. Register. $65. 6:30 p.m. Runway to Runway, Pennington Ewing Athletic Club, 1440 Lower Ferry Road, Ewing, 609-8832000. www.peachealthfitness.com. Fashion show, wine tasting, talent showcase, food, silent auction. Benefit for Sunshine Foundations "Dreamlift" program. Register. $25. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mark Twain's Last Stand (21st Century Humor from the Man Who Invented It), St. James Church, 115 East Delaware Avenue, Pennington, 609-915-2203. Performance by Alan Kitty, who has been impersonating Twain for 30 years. Benefit for the annual workcamp mission trip in July for youth and adults to help in the rehabilitation of homes for the elderly and people in need. $20. 7:30 p.m.

What's in Store

Factory Sale, Ana Designs, 1 Ott Street, Trenton, 609-394-0300. www.fivestripes.com. Luxury candles, striped tapers, pillars, and large pillars. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Singles

Divorce Recovery Program, Princeton Church of Christ, 33 River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889. www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Support group for men and women. Free. 7:30 p.m. Drop-In, Yardley Singles, The Runway, Trenton Mercer Airport, Ewing, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Music, dancing, and cash bar. Register. 9 p.m.

oah Wolfe, a seventh grade student at Grover Middle School, organized a charity 5K walk/run to benefit SmileTrain that will take place on Sunday, March 28, at West Windsor Community Park's pavilion. Race registration begins at 10 a.m. and the race begins at 11 a.m. Participants are asked to raise a minimum of $36 via sponsors to participate. Register online at www.tinyurl.com/SmileTrainSponsorForm. All registrants will receive free tshirts. Wolfe, a West Windsor resident and member of Adath Israel Congregation in Lawrenceville, was moved by the critical need to help poor children born with cleft lip and palate deformities, and organized the event as part of his Bar Mitzvah preparations. SmileTrain is an international non-profit organization that provides free cleft lip and palate surgeries to millions of children in developing countries, and provides medical training to doctors to perform these surgeries. "It's hard to believe that for only $250 and only 45 minutes, a child's life can be changed forever," says Wolfe, who has decided to dedi-

On the Run: Noah Wolfe of West Windsor

these birth defects and gives kids a chance to look and feel normal," says his mother. "When he had to come up with a community service project as part of his Bar Mitzvah preparations, he knew that he wanted to do something for SmileTrain." -- Lynn Miller

Socials

Luncheon, Rotary Club of the Princeton Corridor, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, 609-7990525. www.princetoncorridorrotary.org. Register. Guests, $20. 12:15 p.m. Scrabble, Classics Used and Rare Books, 117 South Warren Street, Trenton, 609-394-8400. All skill levels welcome. 6:30 p.m.

www.princeton.edu/utickets. Daniel Jaffe on trombone with works by Hindemith and Mahler. 8 p.m. Westminster Schola Cantorum, Westminster Choir College, Bristol Chapel, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. Spring concert includes excerpts of Stravinsky's "Symphony of Psalms" and Faure's "Requiem." The 97-voice choir is composed of students in their second year of study at the university. $20. 8 p.m.

Food & Dining

Make Your Own Mozzarella, The Grape Escape, 12 Stults Road, Dayton, 609-409-9463. www.thegrapeescape.net. Register. $85; $160 per couple. 9:30 a.m. Cooking Class, Cuisine by AnneRenee, Hamilton Square, 609915-1119. www.cuisinebyannerenee.com. "Condiments and Spreads." Register. $50 to $60. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Make Your Own Wine Infused Chocolate, The Grape Escape, 12 Stults Road, Dayton, 609-4099463. www.thegrapeescape.net. Register. $70: $120 per couple. 12:30 p.m. Bottle Your Own Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar, The Grape Escape, 12 Stults Road, Dayton, 609-409-9463. www.thegrapeescape.net. Register. $85: $160 per couple. 3:30 p.m.

For Seniors

Mercer County Widows and Widowers, Knights of Columbus, 1451 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-585-3453. Dance social $8. 7:30 p.m.

Good Causes

Adoption Day, A.F.E.W. Pets, CornerCopia, 299 PrincetonHightstown Road, East Windsor, 609-448-5322. www.afewpets.com. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefit Concert, Channing Hall of the Universalist Unitarian Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609924-1604. www.charlieliu.com. Charlie Liu, 9, of West Windsor presents a benefit solo recital featuring a program of works by Mozart, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Chopin. Donations benefit premature babies. $10. 3 p.m. See story page 36. Dance with the Dancers, American Repertory Ballet, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Trenton, 609-984-8400. www.arballet.org. 25th annual gala and performance honors Bat Abbit, Jennifer Cavanaugh, Peggy Petteway, and Kristin Scott, who have been with the company more than 10 years. Performance, gourmet reception, music by Amethyst, a 1980s cover band. The gala also

Dancing

Salsa Sensation, Central Jersey Dance Society, Unitarian Church, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Beginner, intermediate, and advanced lesson with Carlos Xiloj followed by open dance. No partner needed. $12. 7 p.m. Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Sue Dupre with Oy Diddle Diddle. Instruction and dance. $10. 7:40 to 11 p.m. Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908-892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.

Saturday March 27

School Sports

South Boys/Girls Spring Track, 609-716-5000, ext. 5134. Montgomery. 10 a.m.

Gardens

Orchid Programs, Duke Farms, 80 Route 206 South, Hillsborough, 908-722-3700. www.dukefarms.org. "Beginner Orchards: An Introduction" includes a tour of the greenhouses and potting an orchid to take home, 9:30 a.m. to noon. "Intermediate Orchids: A Deeper Understanding" includes an in depth look at diverse varieties, 1 to 3:30 p.m. Register. $35 each. 9:30 a.m.

Drama

American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. Audio described performance. $15 to $55. 3 and 8 p.m. Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "MotherSon" written and performed by Jeffrey Solomon. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m. Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609-258-1742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 8 p.m.

Comedy Clubs

Jason Good, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $22. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.

Literati

Half Price Day, Bryn MawrWellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, 732-895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.com. More than 80,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women's colleges. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Writing Workshop, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. "Perfecting Characterization" presented by New Jersey Writers Association. Register. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Continued on following page

Koran's Custom Cabinetry

· Kitchens & Baths · Entertainment Centers & Media Rooms · Home Offices & Libraries · Dining Tables & Sideboards · Fireplace Mantels · Built-Ins · Custom Molding & Trim Work

John Koran, Craftsman

Over 30 years in business

Film

Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25 South Union Street, Lambertville, 609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Screening of "Capitalism: A Love Story." $5. 7 and 9:05 p.m.

Classical Music

Concert, Westerly Road Church, Princeton Theological Seminary, Miller Chapel, 609-924-3816. www.westerlyroad.org. "Sacred Moments of Opera." $18. 7:30 p.m. Recital, Princeton University Concerts, Taplin, 609-258-5000.

609-558-9217

Custom designed, built and installed using high-quality hardwoods

30

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

For more listings visit www.princetoninfo.com.

Super Nanny

ABC's SuperNanny is searching for families in the area who are ready for a visit from Jo Frost, author of "Ask Supernanny" and "Supernanny: How to Get the Best From Your Kids." Producers are looking for families with out of control kids from every type of background. Apply by E-mail to [email protected]bal.net or call 323-904-4680, ext. 1025.

Opportunities

Opera New Jersey, based in West Windsor, seeks homes in the area to house artists during the summer season. Time periods vary from 2 to 7 weeks in June and July. Perks include tickets to rehearsals, operas, and opening night parties. Contact Jennifer Basten at 609799-7700 or E-mail [email protected] for information.

to discuss forming an area-wide artists' collaborative. Contact Sherry Rubel at 732-221-6678 for more information.

Good Causes

World Vision has teens from Princeton, Pennington, Ewing, West Windsor, and Ringoes joining "On An Empty Stomach" to help fight hunger for children worldwide. Funds raised will help feed and care for children in communities around the globe, especially earthquake victims in Haiti. Visit www.30hourfamine.org or call 800-7-FAMINE for information.

Gallery 125 seeks artists for "4 Elements," a graffiti show opening on June 11. Submit work on CD as jpg files by Friday, April 16, with a $20 check payable to TDA/Gallery 125. Send to Gallery 125, 125 South Warren Street, Trenton 08608. Visit www.gallery125.com or call 609-989-9119 for more information.

For Women

Cranbury Station Galleries offers "Women Watercoloring by the Sea" workshops. Thursdays and Fridays, April 15 and 16, and 22 to 23. Residential, $400; day tripper, $300. Call 609-921-0434 or 609-655-1193 for information. Institute of Wonder Women Working for Empowerment seeks professional or retired professional health care workers to be matched with a potential protege. Requirements include a willingness to contact the protege at least 20 minutes per week, have experience in any area in the healthcare field, and be willing to share expertise to enable the protege to graduate and obtain employment. A information session will be held Thursday, March 25, at Lawrence Library. Visit www.wonderfulworkingwomen.org or E-mail [email protected]

In Town

Plainsboro Recreation offers programs for special needs youth including music, art, movement, and aquatic classes. $20 to $35. Register at www.plainsboronj.com or call 609-799-0909, ext. 332. Annual James Tolin Memorial AIDS Benefit seeks men and women, ages 40 to 50, for "Sordid Lives," a black comedy about white trash written by Del Shore. Auditions are Saturday, April 10, noon to 4 p.m., at Mercer College campus. E-mail Tracy Antozzeski at [email protected] for appointment. Prepare a two-minute comedic monologue. Bring a copy of your resume and headshot. Mercer County Park Commission offers online picnic reservations in Mercer County Park East and West, Princeton Country Club, Rosedale Park, and Valley Road Picnic Area. Visit http://nj.gov/counties/mercer/commissions/park/picnic.html. Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Auditions

Somerset Valley Players has auditions for "Love, Sex, and the I.R.S." on Tuesday and Wednesday, April 6 and 7, 7:30 p.m. at 689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough. Five adult males and three adult females are needed for Jeff Dworkin's farce about a couple filing tax returns as married. Visit www.svptheatre.org or call 908-369-7469. New Jersey Performing Arts Center seeks actors ages 16 to 23 for "Rent," a summer musical collaboration with New Jersey Youth Theater. Open call auditions are Saturdays, April 3, 1 to 4 p.m. at Algonquin Arts Theater, 171 Main Street, Manasquan; and April 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in Victoria Theater, 1 Center Street, Newark. Rehearsals will be May 13 to June 19 on Thursday and Friday evenings, and weekends; and from June 21 to July 15, rehearsals will be six days a week from 3 to 11 p.m. Prepare a song from "Rent," and bring a photo and resume. www.njpac.org

Volunteer Please

Mercer County Wildlife Center seeks individuals to volunteer to care for animals brought to the Hopewell Township facility for medical treatment or a temporary refuge. The center is staffed 365 days a year. Volunteer orientation is Saturday and Sunday, March 20 and 21, 10 a.m. to noon. Contact Jane Rakos-Yats at 609-883-6606, ext. 103. Har Sinai Temple seeks volunteers to prepare and serve a "Lord's Table" meal on Sunday, March 28, at Church of the Sacred Heart, 343 South Broad Street, Trenton, at 9 or 11:30 a.m., or 12:30 p.m. Call 609730-8100 to volunteer or donate.

Call for Entries

Ellarslie Museum seeks contemporary ceramics, including pottery, sculpture, and decorative arts for "Ceramics Invitational," a show opening November 13. To have your work considered for the exhibition send jpegs by E-mail or on a disk to Brian O. Hill, Trenton City Museum, 319 East State Street, Trenton 08608 or E-mail [email protected] Friends for the Marsh invites photographers to participate in "Voices for the Marsh Photography Show, a juried show open to all. Adult and youth categories are judged separately. Photographs must be taken at the Hamilton Trenton Bordentown Marsh. Visit www.marsh-friends.org for guidelines and entry form. Deadline is Friday, April 2.

Health

Princeton HealthCare System offers an oral cancer screening on Thursday, May 6, 6 to 8 p.m., at the University Medical Center at Princeton, 253 Witherspoon Street, Suite B, in the Medical Arts Building. A skin cancer screening will be held on Thursday, May 20, 6 to 8 p.m. at the same location. Register at www.princetonhcs.org/calendar or call 888-897-8979.

Artists Wanted

South Brunswick Arts Commission seeks writers, dancers, musicians, and visual and performing artists to a meeting at South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, on Sunday, April 25, from 2 to 4 p.m.

MARCH 27

Continued from preceding page Sustainable Land and Green Home Maintenance, West Windsor Town Hall, Room B, 271 Clarksville Road, 609-379-2885. www.springgreenintentions.eventbrite.com. Free forum on "Green Intentions Outside Your Front Door and Inside Your Four Walls." A prelude to GroWW's June 26 garden tour. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Winter Olymp-EX, Robert Wood Johnson Hamilton Center for Health and Wellness, 3100 Quakerbridge Road, Mercerville, 609-584-7600. www.rwjhamilton.org. 90-minute cardio challenge. Register by E-mail to [email protected] 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thai Massage Workshop, Integral Yoga of Princeton, 613 Ridge Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-274-2410. www.integralyogaprinceton.org. "A Touch of Light" massage workshop presented by Levi Gershkowitz. Basics of giving and receiving massage, fully clothed. No partner required. Two hour practice session on Sunday, March 28, is optional. Register online. $85 is suggested donation. Limited to 20 participants. 1 to 6 p.m. A New You, Wynwood Forsgate, 380 Forsgate Drive, Monroe, 609409-7525. www.brookdaleliving.com. Meet personal life coaches about your business, career, life, and personal goals. Register. Free. 2 to 4 p.m.

For Families

Breakfast with the Bunnies, Middlesex County 4-H, 645 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, 732398-5261. Breakfast followed by egg hunt for ages 2 to 8. Petting zoo, face painting, games. Bring your own basket. Register. $8. 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. Princyclopedia: Treasure Island, Cotsen Children's Library, Dillon Gym, Princeton University, 609258-2697. www.princeton.edu. Interactive convention-style event for all ages features hands-on projects, demonstrations, take homes, pirate obstacle course, parrot zoo, art, dance, calligraphy, food, optical toys, puzzling poems, and puzzles. Free. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Beekeeping and New Faces Day, Howell Living History Farm, Valley Road, off Route 29, Titusville, 609-737-3299. www.howellfarm.org. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Summer Camps Open House, Mercer County College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, 609-586-9446. www.mccc.edu. Open house for young people's Camp College, Sports Camps, and Tomato Patch Camp. Meet camp directors, tour the facilities, and register. The camps seek counselors and area teachers interested in summer employment. Noon to 2 p.m. Camp College, for ages 6 to 12, offers a personalized schedule from 60 choices including calligraphy, Italian, pet care, and jewelry. Sports Camps, for ages 7 to 17, offers weeklong sessions in baseball, softball, basketball, soccer, golf, tennis, and in-line hockey. Tomato Patch, for ages 10 to 17, is for visual and performing arts with performance and exhibit at the end. Institute for Arts and Sciences, for ages 7 to 14, offers hands-on workshops, English, and pre-Algebra programs. Specialty camps in science, culinary arts, computers, chess, and aerospace, are also available. Open House, Hun School, 176 Edgerstoune Road, Princeton, 609-921-7600. www.hunschool.org. Day camp, American Culture

Health & Wellness

Yoga, Trenton Friends Meeting House, 143 East Hanover Street, Trenton, 609-278-8484. Free-will donation. 9 a.m. Hatha Yoga, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. $15. 9:15 to 10:30 a.m. Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 11 a.m. Nia Dance, Functional Fitness, 67 Harbourton Mt. Airy Road, Lambertville, 609-577-9407. www.nianewjersey.com. Register. $17. 10 to 11 a.m. Tinnitus Self-Help Group, First Presbyterian Church, 100 Scotch Road, Ewing, 609-426-6079. "Can Hypnosis Help You with Tinnitus?" presented by Dr. James Malone. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Breathwork Workshop, Volition Wellness Solutions, 842 State Road, Princeton, 609-688-8300. www.volitionwellness.com. Retreat for professionals considering the Integral Breath Therapy facilitator training combines breathing, meditation, and personal healing. Bring your lunch. Register. $45. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Chakra Yoga, Onsen For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton, 609924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. Register. $15. 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

History

Revolutionary Breakfast, Washington Rochambeau Revolutionary Route in New Jersey Association, Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, Princeton, 908-930-6491. www.w3r-nj.com. "Showdown at Yorktown" presented by Dr. Bruce Chadwick, author of "George Washington's War: The Forging of a Revolutionary Leader and the American Presidency" and "The First American Army: The Untold Story of George Washington and the Men Behind America's First Flight for Freedom." His talk highlights details of the Washington/ Rochambeau march and the Battle of Yorktown. Jacket and tie required. Register. $25. 9:30 a.m. First New Jersey Regiment, Washington Crossing State Park, Visitor Center Museum, Titusville, 609-737-9303. Revolutionary War reenactment group trains and prepares for battle. Free. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Have a Seat: Meet Mira Nakashima, the daughter of woodworker, George Nakashima, at Design Within Reach, 30 Nassau Street, Princeton, Sunday, March 28, from 4 to 6 p.m.

and Language Institute, academic session, baseball and basketball camps. Register. 2 to 5 p.m.

For Teens

Cafe International, 241 East Front Street, Trenton, 609-498-0123. Teen recruitment and scholarship drive for fostering fierce, fit, and focused young women presented by Reverend Jacqueline Glass, founder of At The Well Women's Conference. 3 to 5 p.m.

For Parents

Parenting Workshop Series, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. "Behavioral Teaching for Families of Children with Autism." Register. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m .

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

31

Family Theater

The Boy Who Cried Wolf, Kelsey Theater, Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net. Theatre IV presents. $10. 2 and 4 p.m.

String From Plants." Register. $5. 3:30 to 5 p.m.

Schools

Open House, Princeton Friends School, 470 Quaker Road, Princeton, 609-683-1194. www.princetonfriendsschool.org. 1 to 4 p.m.

Lectures

Great Decisions Discussion Forum, Monroe Public Library, 4 Municipal Plaza, Monroe, 732521-5000. www.monroetwplibrary.org. Register. Free. 10:30 a.m. Citizenship Workshop, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Workshop includes information about the application process, and working with trained volunteers, translators, and a photographer for passport photos presented by the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund. Register. 2 to 5 p.m.

What's in Store

Factory Sale, Ana Designs, 1 Ott Street, Trenton, 609-394-0300. www.fivestripes.com. Luxury candles, striped tapers, pillars, and large pillars. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Book Sale, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Hardbacks, $1; paperbacks, 50 cents; miscellaneous media and art at bargain prices. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Girlfriends Getaway Weekend, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-7374465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Jewelry, crafters, chocolate, cheeses, and natural care products. $5 includes an etched wine glass. Noon to 5 p.m.

com. An afternoon with the daughter of woodworker, George Nakashima. She presents the history of her father's work and how she is continuing his legacy through the Nakashima Foundation. Her works will be on display. Refreshments. Register by E-mail at [email protected] 4 to 6 p.m.

S

A Taste of Korean Culture

Students from various cultures are members in the club. "They have learned the Korean language and songs, cooked Korean food together, enjoyed Korean traditional games, and participated in many events with Korean cultural based programs," says Chai. "All those big and little activities were the stepping stones to bring this festival together. And all the members, both Koreans and non-Koreans are just happy working together to introduce the Korean culture." The Korean Club also participates in Plainsboro programs of Founders Day every May and Traditions every December. Members perform traditional and modern dances while demonstrating the martial arts, Taekwondo, and making Korean food to share with the community. "Through the preparation, the students involved in the making of the Korean Festival have learned about commitment, leadership, and cooperation," says Chai. "And the culmination of their efforts will have a positive impact on the community today and in years to come" -- Lynn Miller Korean Festival, High School North and South, at High School South, 346 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609-716-5050, www.ww-p.org. $10 for dinner and a show. Friday, March 26, 6 p.m.

Dancing

Community Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609-924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Janet Mills with Mad Band led by Louise McClure. $5; $15 per family. 3 to 5 p.m. Smooth Jazz Dance Party, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609-585-5255. www.spigola.net. DJ Tony D. 6 to 10 p.m. Argentine Tangazo Semi-Formal Dance, Central Jersey Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. All levels. Live band is Tango Duo features Tito Castro on the bandoneon and Pancho Navarro on guitar. No partner needed. Refreshments. $15. 7:30 p.m.

Live Music

Kenny Cunningham, Lambertville Public Library, 6 Lilly Street, Lambertville, 609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Acoustic guitarist, singer, and songwriter performs music of the 1960s and `70s. 2 p.m. Music Night, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Brick oven pizza and wine available. $10 includes one glass of wine. 7 to 10 p.m. Guy Petersen, Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-4194200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 11 p.m. Zydeco A-Go-Go, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. $12. 7:30 p.m. 3-26 and Eva, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m. Carol Selick, It's a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Jazz originals and covers. 8 p.m. Songs of the Greats with David Brahinsky, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com. Songs of Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot and other singer songwriters presented by Brahinsky on guitar and vocals, Guy DeRosa on harmonica, Phil MacAuliffe on bass, and Jennifer Sherry on vocals. A philosophy professor at Bucks County College, Brahinsky teaches music and singing in his Roosevelt studio. $15. 8 to 10:30 p.m. Afterdark, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609-5855255. www.spigola.net. 8:30 p.m. Cafe Improv, Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8777. www.cafeimprov.com. Music, poetry, and comedy. Register to perform. $2. 9 p.m. Ernie White and Tom Reock, Sotto 128 Restaurant and Lounge, 128 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-7555. www.sotto128.com. Acoustic rock covers and originals. 9 p.m. Dr. Doz Band, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. Classic rock and roll. 9:30 p.m. DJ Roka, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. $5 cover. 10 p.m.

Singles

Wine and Dinner, Dinnermates, Princeton Area, 732-759-2174. www.dinnermates.com. Ages 30s to early 50s. Call for reservation and location. $20 plus dinner and drinks. 7:30 p.m.

Literati

Box Day, Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton, 732895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.com. More than 80,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women's colleges. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. U.S.1 Worksheets, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Publication party for Volume 55. Open to the public. Poets will be reading from their works. Free. Refreshments. Copies for sale. 2 p.m.

Socials

Knit n Stitch, Cafe Ole, 126 South Warren Street, Trenton, 877-4728817. All skill levels welcome. Free. Noon to 2 p.m.

Sunday March 28

Drama

Great American Backstage Musical, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 1:30 p.m. American Buffalo, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. David Mamet drama stars Tracy Letts. Directed by Amy Morton. $15 to $55. 2 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "MotherSon" written and performed by Jeffrey Solomon. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 3 p.m.

tudents from High Schools North and South present the annual Korean Festival, a cultural event that shares a taste of Korean culture with the community, on Friday, March 26, at 6 p.m. at High School South. The festival is the combined efforts of the Korean bilingual class and the Korean Club. Their advisor, Janice Chai, teaches ESL and Korean Bilingual at South. A $10 admission, which includes Korean food and a show, benefits both World Vision and Angel's Wings. "The event is a blend of traditional Korea and modern Korea," says Chai. "The audience will experience the nation's history from the old days to nowadays through displays of food, a play, dances, martial arts, a fashion show, and a staged wedding." Korean foods presented include Bulgogi, a beef dish; Japchae, a noodle dish; and kimbob, a rice dish. "I can't say that the audience should expect a Broadway show, but I can guarantee a genuine cultural blend of the East and West," says Chai. The show presents Korea blended with traditional and modern cultures featuring a traditional fan dance, drum dance, flower dance, martial arts, Taekwondo, a Korean wedding, a play based on one of the Korean folk tale, Hungboo and Nolboo, and a fashion show featuring traditional and modern Korea.

609-924-2613. www.princetonumc.org. 9:30 and 11 a.m. Palm Sunday, All Saints' Church, 16 All Saints' Road, Princeton, 609-921-2420. 10 a.m. Musical Meditation, Krishna Leela Center, 13 Briardale Court, Plainsboro, 609-716-9262. www.krishnaleela.org. Group meditation, chanting, and discussion. Noon to 12:45 p.m. Oneness Blessing, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-737-6780. www.prince-

tonyoga.com. Process originating in India for inner transformation. Free. 6:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West, Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth largest carillon in the country. Free. 1 p.m. Richardson Chamber Players, Princeton University Concerts, Richardson Auditorium, 609-2585000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. "Blow Thou Winter Winds." $20 to $40. 3 p.m. Faculty Recital Series, Westminster Choir College, Bristol Chapel, 609-921-2663. www.rider.edu. "Shakespeare in Song" performed by Danielle Sinclair, soprano; Denise Mihalik, mezzo-soprano; Timothy Urban, baritone and recorder; James Day, guitar; and Kathy Shanklin, piano. Free. 3 p.m. Faculty Jazz Combo, College of New Jersey, Library Auditorium, Ewing, 609-771-2552. www.tcnj.edu. George Balog, Chris Clark, Gary Feinberg, Ralph Russell, and Bill Trigg. Free. 4 p.m. Nassau at Four Concert Series, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609924-0103. William Walker, bass baritone. Free. 4 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Art and Soul: Paint Your Heart Out Workshop, Volition Wellness Solutions, 842 State Road, Princeton, 609-688-8300. www.volitionwellness.com. Meditation, movement, painting. Presented by Janet Waronker. $99. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Continued on following page

Buy Lawn & Garden Fertilizer direct from the Factory

Art

Jerry Garcia Art Exhibit and Sale, Westin Princeton at Forrestal Village, 201 Village Boulevard, 610-999-5880. Items once used by the late vocalist and guitarist for the Grateful Dead will be on display, along with original drawings, watercolors, hand signed lithographs, and pen and inks. Free admission. Portion of the proceeds benefits Haitian earthquake victims. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Photography Exhibit, Turning Point Church, 15 South Broad Street, Trenton, 609-393-9574. "Stations of the Cross," a photography exhibit by Mike Manion, chronicles the last 24 hours of Christ's life. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Mira Nakashima, Design Within Reach, 30 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-0899. www.dwr.-

At Discount Prices!

Prepare for Spring

Sq. Ft. Coverage Our Price

15-3-5 w/Team Pro Crab Stopper - 50 lbs. 12,500 18-0-4 Dimension Crab Stopper - 50 lbs. 19-0-6 Dimension Crab Stopper - 50 lbs. 20-8-8 50% org. Spring Green - up 50 lbs. 10-20-10 Seed Starter - 50 lbs.

Good Causes

Book Adoption Party, Friends of the Princeton University Library, Chancellor Green Library, 609-258-3155. ww.fpul.org/bae. Rare books, manuscripts, coins, photographs, historic maps, and graphic materials may be adopted by donating the cost of acquiring the item or conserving it. Costs range from less than $100 to more than $2,000. Wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served. Register. $25 includes a full-color catalog of the 92 items available for adoption. 4 to 6 p.m.

$28.80 12,500 $31.10 12,500 $30.60 10,000 $15.95 5,000 $15.00

$105.99 plus tax · Covers 12,500 sq. ft.

If sold separately $126.99

Morton Water Conditioner Salt in Stock *extra coarse - 50 lbs. $6.70 Bagged Stone & Sand Plants & Shrubs · Annuals & Perennials

4-Step Lawn Care

Outdoor Action

Family Nature Programs, Plainsboro Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road, Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. www.njaudubon.org. "Native American Know How: Making

HOURS: Daily 8am - 5pm · Saturday 8am - 3pm

Phone: 609-655-0700

P Box 416 - Cranbury Station Rd. - Cranbury, NJ 08512 .O.

Faith

Palm/Passion Sunday, Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau at Vandeventer Street,

East off Rt. 130, Down Cranbury Station Rd. Exit

32

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

MARCH 28

Continued from preceding page Yoga for Stress Reduction, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Gentle asanas, breathing, and meditation. $17. 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. Meditation and Changing Gracefully, Menlha Buddhist Center, 243 North Union Street, Lambertville, 609-397-4828. www.meditationinnewjersey.org. Full day program of meditation to use in daily life. No experience necessary. Register. $40 includes tea. 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Workshop, One Yoga Center, 405 Route 130, East Windsor, 609-918-0963. www.oneyogacenter.net. Elemental flow intensive with Tracey Ulshafer. Register. 1 to 4 p.m. Rain Drop Therapy Training, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Essential oil technique presented by Nancy Orlen Weber. Register. $85. 1 to 5 p.m. Contact Yoga Workshop, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. The class begins with poses on a mat, on a wall, then with a partner, two, and the entire class. Register. $45. 2 to 4 p.m.

Retail Therapy

Book Sale, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. $3 for a bag. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Girlfriends Getaway Weekend, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-7374465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Jewelry, crafters, chocolate, cheeses, and natural care products. $5 includes an etched wine glass. Noon to 5 p.m.

Architecture, Betts Auditorium, Princeton, 609-258-3741. www.soa.princeton.edu. "Envelopes," an examination of the building envelope as an architectural element presented by Jeffrey Kipnis, Princeton University; Jesse Reiser, Reiser and Umemoto Rur Architecture; Alejandro Zaera-Poli, Foreign Office Architects, London; and Ben Van Berkel, Unstudio, Amsterdam. Free. 6 p.m.

Literati

Plainsboro Literary Group, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Nibbles, conversation, and readings. 6:30 p.m.

Singles

Etz Chaim Sociable Single Seniors, Monroe Township Jewish Center, 11 Cornell Avenue, 609655-5137. Discussions, socializing, and refreshments for ages 50 plus. Concert features David Scholossberg with classical and show tunes on the piano. $5. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Living with Confidence in a Chaotic World, Central Jersey Singles, Hamilton Area, 609-5857846. Supper, video, and discussion with faith-based approach. Call for information. Free. 6:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Recital, Princeton University Concerts, Woolworth, Room 102, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. "Leonard Bernstein's On the Town and the Politics of Race in Wartime America" presented by Carol Oja, Harvard University. 4:30 p.m.

Pop Music

Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Chorus, Forrestal Village, 112 Main Street, Plainsboro, 732-4693983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members are welcome. 7:15 p.m.

Chess

Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. For advanced adult players. 1 to 5 p.m.

World Music

Shakuhachi Zen, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. An evening of traditional Japanese bamboo flute music presented by Glenn Swann. The five-holed shakuhachi flute expresses a large range of naturalistic sound often used in meditative music. 7:30 p.m.

For Families

Open House, South Brunswick YMCA, 329 Culver Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-1150. www.campmason.org. Summer programs for children and teens. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Monday March 29

School Sports

South Girls Lacrosse, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. At Stuart Country Day. 4 p.m.

Ahoy, Mate: Princyclopedia: Treasure Island is presented by Cotsen Children's Library at Dillon Gym, Princeton University, Saturday, March 27, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., an interactive convention-style event for all ages featuring hands-on projects, demonstrations, take homes, pirate obstacle course, parrot zoo, art, dance, calligraphy, food, optical toys, puzzling poems, and puzzles.

Room 104, Princeton. Princeton religion professor Cornel West and University of Michigan Arabic and Islamic studies professor Sherman Jackson present "Reflections on the Problem of Black Suffering: A Conversation With Professor Sherman Jackson and Professor Cornel West." A book signing will follow the talk. Free. 4:30 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Hot Yoga, Yoga Above, 80 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-6131378. www.yogaabove.com. Bring water, a towel, and a mat. $14. 5:30 p.m. Weight Loss Seminar, Harvest Moon, 206 Sandpiper Court, Pennington, 609-462-4717. "Spring Weather and Eating Well." Register. $30. 7 to 8 p.m.

Live Music

Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. Jazz brunch. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Larry Tritel and Guy DeRosa, Thomas Sweet Ice Cream, 1330 Route 206, Skillman, 609-430-2828. larrytritel.com. Guitar, harmonica, and vocals. Noon to 3 p.m. Wayne D. Hughley, Salt Creek Grille, One Rockingham Row, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. 7 to 11 p.m. Like Bells, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. Indie rock band from Oberlin Conservatory of Music. 9 p.m.

Film

Second Chance Film Series, Princeton Adult School, Kresge Auditorium, Frick Chemical Building, Princeton University, 609683-1101. www.princetonadultschool.org. Screening of "Waltz with Bashir," Israel, 2008. $6. 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday March 30

Art

Senior Thesis Exhibition, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609-258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Opening reception for works of Daphnew Chen and Julie Neufeld. On view to April 2. 6 to 8 p.m. Full Moon Tour and Dinner at Rat's Restaurant, Grounds For Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Threecourse dinner for two followed by group tour lit by the full moon. Register. $55. 7 p.m.

Art

Art Exhibit, Chapin School, 4101 Princeton Pike, Princeton, 609924-7206. www.chapinschool.org. First day for "Splash," an exhibit of paintings by Jan Purcell. Opening reception is Wednesday, April 7, 5 to 7 p.m. 9 a.m.

Live Music

Stringbean and the Stalker, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. Rock and blues. 9 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Spring Break Camp, Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. "The Art of Japan" for children ages 5 to 12. Through Friday, April 2. Extended day is available. Register. $295. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Discover Nature by the Yard, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9249529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Naturalist Pam Newitt encourages kids ages 5 to 12 to discover the world that can be found in their own backyards. The program kicks off spring break Discovery Week at the library. 3:30 p.m.

Architecture

Envelope Conversations Series, Princeton University School of

Politics

Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Dodds Auditorium, 609-2582943. www.princeton.edu. "Afghanistan: Beginning of the Endgame?" is the topic of a panel discussion. Reception follows. 4:30 p.m.

Classical Music

Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West, Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth largest carillon in the country. Free. 6:30 p.m. Composers Ensemble, Princeton University Concerts, Taplin Auditorium, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. "New Works" with Relache Ensemble and Philadelphia and In Flux. Free. 8 p.m.

RESTAURANT & TOMATO PIES

Singles

Coffee and Conversation, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Coffee, tea, soup, sandwich, or dessert. Register at www.meetup.com/Princeton-Area-Singles-Network. 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Like eating at "Nonna's" House LIVE - Larry "D"

Original lead singer of The Grease Band Saturday, March 20th, 6:30-11pm

Lectures

Public Dialogue, Fields Center for Equality and Cultural Understanding, 58 Prospect Avenue,

Faith

Passover Seder, Temple Micah, Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church, 2688 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-921-1128. www.temple-micah.org. Second seder. Register by E-mail to [email protected] 6 p.m.

NEW at Marcello's

Our new chef from New York's "Little Italy," Mulberry Street

R Catering for All Occasions R

206 Farnsworth Ave., Bordentown www.ilovemarcellos.com

Still don't know your way around the kitchen? Invite Your Friends to Join You for a

Cooking Class for Beginners on a Budget

· Class is held in your own kitchen · Invite up to 6 guests · Instructor Holly Slepman will teach you how to make fast, easy, inexpensive recipes

Health & Wellness

Gentle Therapeutic Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, Skillman, 609-306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Open House, Sunny Health Center, 16 Seminary Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-1227. Free 15-minute massage. Register. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

[email protected]

609-298-8360

609-213-0329

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

33

Caregiver Support Group, Alzheimer's Association, Clare Bridge of Hamilton, 1645 Whitehorse-Mercerville Road, 800-8831180. www.alz.org. 10:30 a.m.

Dancing

Newcomers Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $10. 7 to 9 p.m. Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Bob Isaacs with Pub led by Martin Harriss. Instruction followed by dance. $8. 7:40 to 10:30 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Jersey Girls Craft Days, Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Make necklaces in honor of Women's History Month. For ages six and up. Register. Free. 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Discover Bubbles, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Jeff Boyer presents an interactive show for ages 5 to 12. 3:30 p.m.

Cher and Cher Alike: Steven Andrade, a Cher impersonator, entertains at Pennington Ewing Athletic Club's third annual `Runway to Runway' on Saturday, March 27, to benefit the Sunshine Foundation of Mercer County's Dreamlift. www.peachealthfitness.com.

Tour the restored mansion, galleries, and gardens before or after tea. Register. $15. 1 p.m.

Drama

Troilus & Cressida, Princeton Shakespeare Company, Princeton University, 609-258-1500. www.princeton.edu/psc. $10. 8 p.m. Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609-2581742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 8 p.m.

Kids Stuff

Hindi Class and Craft, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. For preschoolers. Noon. Discover Butterflies, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Rick Mikula presents an introduction to butterflies. 3:30 p.m.

Classical Music

The Music of Frederic Chopin, Ellarslie, Trenton City Museum, Cadwalader Park, 609-989-3632. www.ellarslie.org. "Variations and Permutations" presented by Vince Di Mura. Register. $20. 2 p.m. Spectrum Concert, Princeton University Chapel, Washington Road, 609-258-3654. "The Stations of the Cross" by Marcel Dupre features Ken Cowan on organ and Westminster Choir. Free. 8 p.m. Recital, Princeton University Concerts, Taplin, 609-258-5000. www.princeton.edu/utickets. Brad Baron, vocalist with works of Scarlatti and Massanet. 8 p.m.

For Parents

Special Ed Families and Schools Together, Family Support Organization, 3535 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, 609-586-1200. www.mercerfso.org. Six-week program for parents includes information on IEP process, special education law, how to manage documentation, and how to advocate for your child. Childcare available. Register. Free. 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Lectures

Tech Talk, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000. www.sbpl.info. Understand your computer's problems with My Expert PC professional help. Bring your computer and questions. No Macs. 3 to 7 p.m. Author Event, Windrows, 2000 Windrows Drive, Plainsboro, 609520-3700. www.princetonwindrows.net. Jasha Levi, author of "The Last Exile: The Tapestry of a Life" and a former Plainsboro resident, is the featured speaker. Levi, 88, will talk about his journey and adventures from Sarajevo in 1921 to New York in 1956. Register. Free. 3 p.m.

Art

Gallery Display, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. Fiber art, hand painted and printed wall hangings and quilts by Adria Sherman. On view to April 30. 9 a.m.

Lectures

Innovation in HIV Testing, Mercer County Community College, Communications Building, CM 109, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, 609-570-3324. www.mccc.edu/events. Tax Assistance, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Miscellany

Household Waste Drop-Off Day, Middlesex County Division of Solid Waste Management, Middlesex County College, 2600 Woodbridge Avenue, Edison, 732-745-4170. www.co.middlesex.nj.us. Accepted materials include pesticides, herbicides, flammable liquids, solvents, pool chemicals, used motor oil, oil filters, paints, batteries, anti-freeze, propane tanks, fluorescent light bulbs. Register to bring asbestos. No batteries, electronics, medical waste, appliances or medications. Open to Middlesex County residents only. Free. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Dancing

Argentine Tango, Black Cat Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center, Monument Drive, 609-273-1378. www.theblackcattango.com. Beginner and intermediate classes followed by guided practice. No partner necessary. $12. 8 p.m.

Live Music

Bob Smith Trio, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609585-5255. www.spigola.net. Jazz, blues, and Bourbon Street specials. 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Killola, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-324-0880. www.the-record-collector.com. $12. 7 p.m. Ed Wilson, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 8:30 p.m. Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 10 p.m.

Literati

Tea and Poetry, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. Howard and Tina Zogott read poems by Allen Ginsburg and Robert Frost. Refreshments. Register. 3 p.m.

Live Music

Open Mic Night, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Chris Harford and the Band of Change, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 9 p.m.

Benefit Evening, People and Stories/Gente y Cuentes, Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, 609-3933230. www.peopleandstories.org. Dessert and wine reception features a reading by Colm Toibin, author of "The Master," "Mothers and Sons," and "Brooklyn." The organization offers more than 38 programs in English or Spanish. Register. $100; $250 includes dinner with the author; and $500 includes an autographed book. 7:30 p.m. Continued on following page

Faith

Lent Worship Service, Turning Point Church, 15 South Broad Street, Trenton, 609-393-9574. Service and light lunch. 12:10 p.m.

Sports

Backpacking 101, Blue Ridge Mountain Sports, Princeton Shopping Center, 301 North Harrison Street, Princeton, 609-9216078. www.brms.com/insideBRMS. Free class in the pack and the sleep system. Register. 7 p.m.

Food & Dining

Prosecco Dinner, Grounds For Sculpture, Rat's Restaurant, 18 Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609584-7800. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Wines of Matteo Bisol, the oldest Prosecco vineyard in Italy. Register. Date changed from Wednesday, March 17. 5 p.m. Napa Cabs Wine Tasting, One 53, 153 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-921-0153. Register. $75. 6:30 p.m. Johnny Walker Scotch Tasting, One 53, 153 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-921-0153. Tasting blue, gold, green, black, and red, and hors d'oeuvres. Register. $65. 6:30 p.m.

8

We are expanding our store!

Good News!

More Space

4

9

Wednesday March 31

Municipal Meetings

Meeting, WW-P Board of Education, Grover Middle School, 609716-5000. Joint meeting with the township governing bodies followed by a public hearing on the budget. 6 p.m.

Thursday April 1

School Sports

For WW-P school sports information, call the hotline: 609-7165000, ext. 5134, www.ww-p.org.

North Boys Volleyball. Quad versus St. Joe's, Southern Regional, and East Brunswick at St. Joe's. 10 a.m. South Boys Lacrosse. At Johnson. 11 a.m. North Girls Golf. At Notre Dame. 3 p.m. South Girls Golf. South Brunswick. 3 p.m. North Boys Lacrosse. At Hun. 4 p.m. North Boys Tennis. Ewing. 4 p.m. South Baseball. At Trenton Central. 4 p.m. South Boys Tennis. At Trenton Central. 4 p.m. South Boys Volleyball. At Hillsborough. 4 p.m. South Softball. At Trenton Central. 4 p.m. North Girls Lacrosse. Hamilton West. 4:15 p.m. South Girls Lacrosse. Robbinsville. 4:30 p.m.

More Point Friendly More Low/No Carb More Low Fat More Gluten-Free Food Products

Visit the new improved DeLiteful Foods

Health & Wellness

Vinyasa Flow Yoga, Susan Sprecher Studio, 23 Orchard Road, lower level, Skillman, 609306-6682. www.yogasusan.com. $15. 9:30 to 10:50 a.m. Weight Watchers, Gold's Gym, 4152 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609-275-8900. Meeting. $13. Noon. Mixed Level Hatha Class, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Register. $15. 5:25 to 6:35 p.m.

LARGEST Selection of GLUTEN-FREE Foods in New Jersey

NOW filling the ENTIRE ORIGINAL STORE!

7

More Choice

Dance

Will Power and DJ Reborn, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609258-2200. www.princeton.edu/arts. An evening of hip hop theater with stories and excerpts from Power's "Flow" and "The Seven." Register. Free. 7:30 p.m. Paul Taylor Dance Company, McCarter Theater, 91 University Place, Princeton, 609-258-2787. www.mccarter.org. $42 to $53. 8 p.m.

Art

Visual Arts Lecture Series, Princeton University, Lewis Center, 185 Nassau Street, 609258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Donelle Woolford's painting and performances. Free. 4:30 p.m.

History

Guided Tour, Drumthwacket Foundation, 354 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey governor's official residence. Register. $5 donation. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tour and Tea, Morven Museum, 55 Stockton Street, Princeton, 609-924-8144. www.morven.org.

10% of Any Purchase of $10 of More

Sale items excluded. With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Offer valid with other 31, 2010. With this coupon. Not expires March offers or prior purchases. Offer expires 2/28/10.

Buy 4 Soft Serve (same size) Get one FREE (same size) with this coupon.

Not valid with other offers or prior purchases. Offer expires March 31, other With this coupon. Not valid with2010. offers or prior purchases. Offer expires 2/28/10.

34

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

Plainsboro

Disorderly Conduct. Vadim Sapunov, 26, of Lee Court, and Larissa Solway, 23, of Highland Park were charged with disorderly conduct on March 6. Corporal Russell Finkelstein said police were investigating a recovered stolen vehicle in the 2100 block of Hunters Glen Drive when Sapunov and Solway began interfering in their investigation. According to police, Sapunov dressed in a revealing female bikini bathing suit and approached several officers in the parking lot, attempting to act out a skit from the movie "Borat." Police said he began shouting movie lines and approached the officers as Solway attempted to videotape the incident and interfere with the unrelated police investigation. Solway then gave false identification to officers. Sapunov was charged with lewdness and disorderly conduct. Solway was charged with obstruction of justice and disorderly conduct. Endagering the Welfare of a Child. Vani Medisetti, 52, of Ravens Crest Drive was charged March 11 with endangering the welfare of a child after police found an unsupervised child left in the parking lot for a period of time at the apartment complex. Officer Joseph Breyta said the three-yearold was left in Medisetti's care. Identity Theft. A resident of Aspen Drive was the victim of identity theft between March 10 and 12. Officer Bruce Stankiewicz said someone used the victim's identity to open various charge accounts and subsequently make purchases totaling $3,650. A resident of Aspen Drive was the victim of identity theft and credit card fraud between February 10 and 22. Corporal Russell Finkelstein said the victim came to police headquarters and said that someone accessed his accounts and requested new credit cards to be issued. The new cards were never issued, but his Lowes credit card account was accessed, and a new user was added to his account. Purchases totaling $3,669 were fraudulently made between February 10 and 22. Soliciting Prostitution. A Hunters Glen Drive resident reported being harassed by a man who approached her as she was washing her clothes in a common laundry room and asked her if she would like to have sex. When the woman declined, gathered her belongings, and began to leave, the man, described as Indian, asked whether she would accept money in return for sex, said Officer Adam

From The Police Blotter

Wurpel. When she declined again, he asked if she knew anyone who would accept money for sex, Wurpel said. She returned to her home, and police searched the area, but could not find the man, Wurpel said. Burglary. A resident of Fox Run Drive was the victim of car burglary sometime between March 7 and March 9. Sergeant Jason Hanley said someone broke into the car, parked in Lot 1900 on Fox Run Drive, by cutting a hole in the convertible roof top. Stolen from the car were the passenger side seat, the car's stereo, and gear shifter knob. The total value in stolen and damaged property is approximately $2,400. Fraud. A Lakeview Terrace resident was the victim of fraud sometime between February 21 and March 16. Officer Thomas Larity said she had been in contact with a female from England over the Internet who was going to rent a room while attending school in the United States. Larity said the woman forwarded a $3,800 check from England to the victim, who deposited the check, which turned out to be a bad check, causing debt. The suspect also attempted to have the victim send money to agents in California and North Carolina. But when the victim was told of the bad check, she immediately called police. A resident of Clinton Court was the victim of credit card fraud sometime between March 12 and 16. Officer Thomas Larity said someone used the victim's credit card numbers to make unauthorized fraudulent purchases at several different places. The charges exceeded $3,000. Theft. Someone stole a platinum and diamond wedding band belonging to a female employee of Bristol Myers Squibb between 3:55 and 6 p.m. on March 1. Officer Joseph Breyta said the ring, worth approximately $7,000, was stolen from one of the employee bathrooms. Harassment and Simple Assault. Ravi S. Nimmagadda, 39, of Barn Swallow Court, was charged with harassment after he left threatening messages on the voicemail of the Public Works Department on February 25. Officer Joseph Breyta said Nimmagadda was upset over snow removal. In the voicemail, he allegedly threatened to harm staff in the Department of Public Works if his street was not plowed soon enough during the next snow storm. Two male Plainsboro residents got into a heated argument at the dog park in Community Park on March 7 when one of the residents accused the other of kicking his dog. Both men threatened to assault one another, but the incident did not become physical, and no charges were filed. Drug Arrests. Stewart Smith, 47, of Quail Ridge Drive, and Steven A. Smith, 23, of Brooklyn, face drug-related charges related to an incident on March 3. Officer Joseph Diggs said police were called to 4810 Quail Ridge Drive, where Stewart Smith resides, for a report of a disturbance. He said he found that Stewart Smith was in possession of drug paraphernalia and charged him as such. Steven Smith was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana under 50 grams, and possession of a prohibited weapon -- a set of brass knuckles with an attached knife blade. Police said all items were found in plain view. Lia A. Costabile, 21, of Princeton was charged March 4 with possession of marijuana under 50 grams. Officer Kevin Lowery said he was dispatched to the scene of an accident on Mapleton Road and Rout 1 and found Costabile's car had been struck by another car. While speaking with Costabile, however, he saw marijuana on the floor of the car and found she had a marijuana pipe. She was sent to Princeton Medical Center. She was also charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled dangerous substance in a motor vehicle. DWI Arrests. Robert C. King, 51, of Kingston, was charged March 12 with driving while intoxicated. Sergeant Joseph Jankowski said he saw him make an illegal Uturn at the intersection of Scudders Mill Road and Campus Drive. He also saw him driving recklessly, failing to maintain a lane, and nearly hitting curbs and other cars on the road. He said he stopped him and found him to be intoxicated. He was also charged with making an illegal U-turn, failure to maintain a lane, reckless driving, and failure to wear a seatbelt. Jonathan T. Patterson, 20, of Kenilworth, was charged March 4 with driving while intoxicated. Sergeant Jason Hanley said he saw him driving erratically on Route 1 North, stopped him, and found him to be intoxicated. He was also charged with reckless driving, careless driving, maintenance of lamps, failure to wear a seatbelt, and possession of alcohol under the age of 21. Alisa Molbert, 40, of Manalapan was charged March 4 with driving while intoxicated. Officer Timothy McMahon said she failed to use a turn signal as she turned onto College Road West from Village Boulevard. He stopped her and found her to be intoxicated. She was also charged with careless driving, failure to exhibit a valid insurance card, and failure to signal. Double Trouble. A township man is facing alcohol-related charges in connection with a motor vehicle accident on Plainsboro Road just after 9 a.m. on March 7. Officer Jason Mandato said he responded to the intersection of Plainsboro Road at Morris Davison Park for a report of an accident with injuries and found that Anthony J. Gaylord, 29, of Tamarron Drive, struck the rear of car driven by another resident, Denise Stimpson, 36. During the investigation, Gaylord attempted to run from the scene, but was tackled after a short distance and taken into custody after a brief struggle, Mandato said. Gaylord was charged with driving while intoxicated, obstruction of justice, being under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance, reckless driving, careless driving, following too close, failure to keep right, failure to maintain a lane, obstructing traffic, destruction of agriculture property, failure to wear a seatbelt, failure to change address, and three counts of failure to exhibit documents. He was sent to the Middlesex County jail in default of $1,500 bail. Stimpson complained of head pain and was evaluated at the scene by the Plainsboro Rescue Squad, but she declined medical assistance. Her car sustained moderate damage to the rear bumper, but was driven from the scene. Gaylord sustained facial abrasions from front airbag deployment but refused medical assistance. His car sustained heavy damage to its front end and was impounded. Armed Robbery. Justin Gaylord, 29, of Plainsboro was charged in Princeton Borough for allegedly assaulting a woman at gunpoint on Nassau Street on March 15, according to published reports. Police allege that he came up behind a woman who was walking on Nassau Street, grabbed her by the neck, and pressed a handgun to her head, demanding cash. Gaylord al-

legedly told the woman that her boyfriend owed her money. When police searched his Plainsboro home, they said they found a hand gun believed to have been used in the crime. He was charged with armed robbery, aggravated assault, criminal restraint, attempted theft, and weapons offenses. He was held on $200,000 bail.

West Windsor

Robbery. Shanore R. Ealey, 42, of Philadelphia was charged March 4 with robbery at Home Depot. Lieutenant Patrick McCormick said that Ealey, along with an unknown black male suspect, were in the process of shoplifting merchandise when an employee attempted to take the unknown suspect into custody. The unknown suspect used physical force to avoid capture. Ealey was taken into custody and charged as an accomplice and sent to the Mercer County jail. Theft/Burglary. A West Windsor resident was the victim of burglary, theft, and criminal mischief between October 23 and March 12 on Bear Brook Road. Officer Campbell Knox said someone broke into the victim's home through a rear door and stole a 50inch Plasma TV, a digital camera, and $1,000 in cash. The total value of the items was $3,600. A Lawrenceville resident was the victim of theft on March 10 in the Vaughn Drive permit lot. Sergeant Tom Moody said someone broke into the victim's car and stole two West Windsor Parking Authority permit tags. The victim said other valuable items were in the car, but not taken. Police could not determine whether the car was unlocked, and there was no sign of forced entry. A resident of Grenlynne Drive was the victim of burglary on March 6. Officer Lee Brodowski said someone shattered the rear sliding glass door in an apparent attempt to burglarize the home. The area was checked with the assistance of a K9 and handler from Lawrence police. The homeowner arrived shortly after the police and found that no items were taken and that the alarm scared off the suspect, police said. Shoplifting. Anna M. Wong, 53, of Hamilton, and Allen Wong, 60, of Hamilton were charged with shoplifting at Wal-Mart on March 7. Officer Walter Silcox said the couple were stopped by loss prevention. Silcox said they concealed over $136 worth of merchandise, including four electric kettles, and tried to leave the store.

APRIL 1

Continued from preceding page

spoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. $14. Noon to 1 p.m. Hot Yoga 26, Yoga Above, 80 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-613-1378. www.yogaabove.com. Bikram style with 26 hatha yoga poses and two breathing exercises. Bring water, a towel, and a mat. $14. 5:30 p.m. Qigong, Planet Apothecary, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732-406-6865. www.planetapothecary.com. Chinese healing art with movements, visualizations, breath work, and meditations with Ruth Golush. Register. $20. 7 p.m. Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy Series, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. $42. 7:15 to 9:15 p.m.

For Families

Yoga for Budding Bodies, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-279-1592. www.holsome.com. For ages 2 to 5 with adult. $14. 9:45 to 10:30 a.m.

Gentle Jazz, Nick's Cafe 72, 72 West Upper Ferry Road, West Trenton, 609-882-0087. www.cafe72nj.com. Al Oliver, sax and vocals; and Gerry Groves, flute. BYOB. No cover. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Singer Songwriter Showcase, Triumph Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. Hosted by Frank Thewes of West Windsor. 9 p.m. Rob Freida and Briann Quinn, Alchemist & Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-924-5555. . 10 p.m.

Jazz & Blues

West Point Jazz Knights, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Memorial Drive, Trenton, 609-984-8400. www.thewarmemorial.com. 7 p.m.

For Parents

CHADD Parent to Parent Class, Family Support Organization, 3535 Quakerbridge Road, Hamilton, 609-586-1200. www.mercerfso.org. Four-session class for parents and guardians of children with ADHD. Register. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.

Faith

Maundy Thursday, All Saints' Church, 16 All Saints' Road, Princeton, 609-921-2420. Holy Eucharist, foot washing, and stripping of the altar. 8 p.m.

Live Music

Arturo Romay, Hanami Restaurant, 15 Farber Road, West Windsor, 609-5201880. www.hanamiprinceton.com. Latin jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m. Cultural Art Expression, Grover's Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Open mic for poets and writers. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

Schools

Admission Tours, Princeton Montessori School, 487 Cherry Valley Road, Princeton, 609-924-4594. www.princetonmontessori.org. For infants through eighth grade. Register. 9 a.m.

Food & Dining

Happy Hour, Tre Bar, Tre Piani Restaurant, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.trepiani.com. Free hors d'oeuvres. Drink specials. 4:30 to 7:30 p.m

Kids Stuff

Fools and Funnies Craft Days, Historical Society of Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau Street, Princeton, 609-9216748. www.princetonhistory.org. Draw a cartoon character. For ages six and up. Register. Free. 1 and 3 p.m.

Singles

Divorce and Separated Support Group, Hopewell Presbyterian Church, Hopewell, 609-466-0758. www.hopewellpres.org. Register. 7:30 p.m.

Health & Wellness

Yoga, Holsome Holistic Center, 27 Wither-

MARCH 19, 2010

THE NEWS

35

WW-P News Classifieds

HOW TO ORDER

Mail, E-Mail, or Fax: Mail your ad to the News at P.O. Box 580, West Windsor 08550. Fax it to 609-243-9020, or use our e-mail address: [email protected] We will confirm your insertion and the price, which is sure to be reasonable: Classifieds are just 50 cents a word, with a $7.00 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are just 40 cents per word, and if your ad runs for 12 consecutive issues, it's only 30 cents per word.

CONTRACTING

Interior Painting: Carpentry services. Quality work. Fully insured. 20 years experience. 609-658-0073 or 609-897-9494.

BUSINESS SERVICES

ing and/or administrative needs. Many services available. Reasonable rates. Work done at your office or mine. Call Debra @ 609-448-6005 or visit www.vyours.com.

INSTRUCTION

Chemistry Tutoring Expert: 20 years experience teaching AP, Honors, and Basic Chemistry. Call Matt 609919-1280. Lessons in Your Home: Music lessons in your home. Piano, clarinet, saxophone, flute and guitar. Call Jim 609-737-9259 or 609-273-5135. Math, Science, English & SAT Tutoring: Available in your home. Brown University-educated college professor. Experienced with gifted, under-achieving and learning-disabled students. Free initial consultation. Call Bruce 609371-0950. Music Lessons - Farrington's Music: Piano, guitar, drum, sax, clarinet, voice, flute, trumpet, violin. $28 half hour. School of Rock. Join the band! Princeton 609-924-8282. Princeton Junction 609-897-0032. Hightstown 6 0 9 - 4 4 8 - 7 1 7 0 . www.farringtonsmusic.com. Piano and Flute Lessons Professional, M.A. All ages/levels welcome. Local studio. 609-936-9811. SAT and ACT Tutoring -- Reading, Writing, Math: Boost your scores with outstanding private instruction by experienced college English professor and high school math teacher. Let us help you succeed! Reasonable fee. Many excellent WW-P references. 609-6586914. Science and Math Tutoring: Biology, Chemistry, Algebra, Geometry. Taught by college professor. 17 years experience. Recipient of two national teaching awards. Discoverygenics 609581-5686. Too busy for an SAT course? Private instruction to fit your child's schedule. SAT, ACT, SSAT, or Writing.

INSTRUCTION

Princeton graduate with MA. Many WWP success stories. Call Kathy Doyle, 609-532-1133, doyletutoring.com Writing Tutor for All Ages: Get higher grades! Improve your essays and all other written work. Let me teach you correct grammar, punctuation and writing styles. Learn from college English professor. WW-P references. 609-6586914.

LANDSCAPING

Spring yard work: Mulching, trimming, mowing, planting. Call 609-7221137. Reasonable rates.

COMPUTER SERVICES

Computer repair, upgrade, data recovery, or maintenance. Free estimate. Call (cell) 609-213-8271.

OFFICE RENTALS

Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]

CLEANING SERVICES

Patty's Cleaning Service: Serving Plainsboro, the Windsors, the Brunswicks, and Brandon Farms since 1978. Thorough, honest, and reliable. Free estimate. 609-397-2533. Window Washing: Lolio Window Washing. Also gutter cleaning and power washing. 609-271-8860.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Bookkeeping Services for Your Bottom Line: QuickBooks ProAdvisor. Call Joan today at Kaspin Associates, 609-490-0888.

ENTERTAINMENT

Disc Jockey. Ambient DJ Service provides customized music and entertainment services for corporate, formal and family events. Please contact us at 609-672-1270 or [email protected] www.ambientdj.com. One Man Band: Keyboardist for your party. Perfect entertainment. Great variety. Call Ed at 609-424-0660.

TAX SERVICES

Tax Preparation and Accounting Services: For individuals and small businesses. Notary, computerized tax preparation, paralegal services. Your place or mine. Fast response, free consultation, reasonable costs. Gerald Hecker, 609-448-4284.

OFFICE RENTALS

Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected] SUB LEASE: Class A office space 1,650 square feet available immediately entirely or willing to share in Alexander Park, Princeton. Contact Audi, 732-6197631.

HOME MAINTENANCE

Bill's Custom Services: Residential repairs and carpentry. No job too small. Practical approach, reasonable rates, local references -- 32 years in business. 609-532-1374. Handyman: Electrical, plumbing, any projects around the house. 609-2756631. robthehandyman- licensed, insured, all work guaranteed. Free Estimates. We do it all - electric, plumbing, paint, wallpaper, powerwashing, tile, see website for more: robthehandyman.vpweb.com [email protected], 609-269-5919.

MERCHANDISE MART

Computer P4 with XP: In good condition $120. Cell phone (609)213-8271.

PERSONAL SERVICES

J&T Pools: Openings and closings. Special early price. All related duties. Call 609-737-9259.

WANTED TO BUY

Antique Military Items: And war relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. "Armies of the Past LTD". 2038 Greenwood Ave., Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00, or by appointment.

ADULT CARE

Companion - Retired RN. Will make light meals, assist you with shower, dressing, light housework, shopping, etc. Competitive rates. Call 609-2355579.

HOUSING FOR RENT

Bordentown Historic: Renovated first floor large bedroom, living room, kitchen, dishwasher, W/D hook-up, computer room, porch, yard. Convenient to Princeton, 295, train. No pets. $950/month, includes utilities except electric. 1.5 Month security. 609-5753399.

HELP WANTED

Teacher & Assistants: Childcare center in Princeton. FT or PT afternoons (12-6). Experience helpful. Call 609799-4411. www.harmonyschools.com

BUSINESS SERVICES

Bookkeeper/Administrative Specialist: Versatile & experienced professional will gladly handle your bookkeep-

CLASSIFIED BY PHONE

609-243-9119

For Seniors

Lunch Club, Jewish Family and Vocational Service of Middlesex County, Concordia Shopping Center, Monroe, 609-3957979. www.jfvs.org. Kosher lunch. $5. Noon to 2 p.m.

Dancing

Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.

2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. Free. 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Live Music

Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Brick oven pizza and wine available. 5 to 8 p.m. Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. Solo jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m. DJ Bruce Mancia, Spigola Ristorante, 3817 Crosswicks-Hamilton Square Road, Hamilton, 609-585-5255. www.spigola.net. 9:30 p.m.

Repertory Dance Theater, students and alumni perform the choreography of Ze'eva Cohen. $10. 8 p.m.

Drama

Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-1742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 2 and 8 p.m. Great American Backstage Musical, OffBroadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.offbroadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "The Reluctant Optimist" is written and performed by Mary Martello. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m. Troilus & Cressida, Princeton Shakespeare Company, TBA, 609-258-1500. www.princeton.edu/psc. $10. 8 p.m. Rosaleen, Princeton University, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-3000. www.princeton.edu.New musical drama written by Alexis Rodda, Class of 2010, with music by Maxwell Mamon, also Class of 2010, features a chamber orchestra and 12 young singers. Register. 8 p.m.

Friday April 2

Drama

Great American Backstage Musical, OffBroadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609-466-2766. www.offbroadstreet.com. Musical 1940s love story directed by Robert Thick. $27.50 to $29.50 includes dessert. 7 p.m. Solo Flights 2010, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and Montgomery streets, Trenton, 609-392-0766. www.passagetheatre.org. "The Reluctant Optimist" is written and performed by Mary Martello. $30. Includes pre-show reception. 8 p.m. Rosaleen, Princeton University, Richardson Auditorium, 609-258-3000. www.princeton.edu. New musical drama written by Alexis Rodda, Class of 2010, with music by Maxwell Mamon, also Class of 2010, features a chamber orchestra and 12 young singers. Reception follows. Register. Free. 8 p.m. Copenhagen, Theatre Intime, Hamilton Murray Theater, Princeton University, 609258-1742. www.theatreintime.org. Drama by Michael Frayn. $12. 8 p.m.

Classical Music

Piano Teachers' Forum, Jacobs Music, Route 1, Lawrence, 609-921-1510. $10. 9 a.m.

Comedy Clubs

Raymond the Amish Comic, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-324-0880. www.therecord-collector.com. $18. 7:30 p.m. Coleman Green, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $17.50. 8 p.m.

Singles

Divorce Recovery Program, Princeton Church of Christ, 33 River Road, Princeton, 609-581-3889. www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Support group for men and women. Free. 7:30 p.m.

Faith

Good Friday, All Saints' Church, 16 All Saints' Road, Princeton, 609-921-2420. Stations of the Cross at noon. Liturgy at 8 p.m. Noon. Good Friday, Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau at Vandeventer Street, 609-924-2613. 7:30 and 11 .m.

Socials

Luncheon, Rotary Club of the Princeton Corridor, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, 609-799-0525. www.princetoncorridorrotary.org. Register. Guests, $20. 12:15 p.m. Scrabble, Classics Used and Rare Books, 117 South Warren Street, Trenton, 609394-8400. All skill levels welcome. 6:30 p.m.

Lectures

Higher Education Conference, Policy Research Institute for the Region, Princeton University, 609-258-9065. www.princeton.edu/prior. "How to Fix a Broken System: Funding Public Higher Education and Making It More Productive." Speakers include Richard F. Keevey, Policy Research Institute for the Region;" and Darryl G. Greer, executive director of New Jersey Association of State Colleges and Universities. Speakers include "Putting the Issues into National Context," Richard Novak, Ingram Center for Public Trusteeship; "The Model for Funding Public Higher Education is Broken: How Do We Fix It?" facilitated by Dennis Jones, National Center for Higher Education Management Systems; "How Do We Increase the Productivity of Public Colleges and Universities?" facilitated by Jane Wellman, Delta Projects of postsecondary education costs, productivity, and accountability. Register. 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tax Assistance, Plainsboro Public Library, 641 Plainsboro Road, 609-275-

Art

Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-2583788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2 p.m. Art Exhibit, Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9248777. www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Opening reception for "East & West Clay Works," an exhibit focusing on the medium of clay and the pursuit of ceramic art features works of artists from Korea, Japan, and the United States. Monday, April 5 includes a morning of hands on demonstrations and an afternoon of visual presentations by the artists. On view to April 30. 4 to 6 p.m.

Saturday April 3

School Sports

For WW-P school sports information, call the hotline: 609-716-5000, ext. 5134, www.ww-p.org.

North Boys Lacrosse. New Egypt. 10 a.m. North Baseball. Old Bridge. 11 a.m. South Boys Lacrosse. At Rancocas Valley. 11 a.m.

Film

New Jersey Film Festival, Voorhees Hall 105, George and Hamilton streets, New Brunswick, 732-932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com. "Garbage Dreams," Mai Isklander. Free. 7 p.m.

Art

Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-647-1815. www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Dance

A Tribute to Ze'Eva Cohen, Princeton University, Berlind at McCarter Theater, 609258-1500. www.princeton.edu/arts. Utah's

36

THE NEWS

MARCH 19, 2010

C

Is Liu the Next Lang Lang?

Come Hear for Yourself on March 27

harlie Liu of West Windsor presents a benefit solo recital on Saturday, March 27, at 3 p.m. in the Channing Hall of the Universalist Unitarian Congregation of Princeton. The program includes works by Mozart, Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Chopin. This is his second solo recital in Princeton. Tickets are $10. Liu, 9, a fourth grade student at Millstone River School, has performed on the Oprah Winfrey Show, the Ellen DeGeneres Show, and is the youngest Lang Lang International Music Scholarship winner. "He has grown so much both as a performer and, literally, as a young boy and I am very proud of his achievements," said Lang Lang, the internationally acclaimed pianist, in a press release. "But I am even more proud to see him use his gifts in support of good causes, such as promoting music education and helping children and families in need through donations and benefit concerts." The March 27 concert is the second benefit event Charlie initiated this year. The first, "Young Artists for Haiti," also created and organized by him and his family, featured 10 young pianists from seven countries and four continents performing together to help raise awareness and funds for development efforts in Chile and Haiti. Visit www.charlieliu.com for more information Liu has performed at music venues and events on both coasts -- including all three of the Carnegie Hall concerts halls. Audience members include Queen Rania of Jordan, Bono of U2, Hugh Jackman, Rupert and Wendi Murdoch, and Sanford and Joan Weill. He has entered 16 piano solo competitions -- and won each one. Proceeds from the concert benefit premature babies at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics Foundation. "We chose it because Charlie was born there and he spent a month in the neonatal intensive care unit there," says his father, Mingyi Liu, a bioinformatician at Bristol Myers Squibb. "We

thought it would be exceedingly nice to have him contribute back to the hospital that help him get started in this world." The family is in the early planning stages to do something to benefit the WW-P school district and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. His mother, Jen Xie, is a physician in SUNY Downstate anesthesia department. His brother, William, 4, is a student at Bristol Myers Squibb Bright Horizons preschool. Charlie was born in Iowa and lived in Massachusetts before moving to West Windsor in July, 2007. He began studying piano when he was four, won his first piano competition when he was five, and performed his first solo recital at age six. His teachers include Soo Kyung Cho of West Windsor, and Ingrid Clarfield, professor of piano at West-

What's After Oprah? Charlie Liu, 9, left, has already performed on Oprah and the Ellen Degeneres Show. He is the youngest Lang Lang (above) International Music Scholarship winner.

minster Choir College. A member of the Princeton Mites and Squirts travel hockey teams, he practices and plays four or five times a week. "Young artists like Charlie need a lot of support but they have something unique to give back -- the healing power of music," said Lang Lang, who began piano lessons at age three and at age five won first place at the Shenyang Piano Competition and performed his first public recital. Benefit Concert featuring Charlie Liu on Saturday, March 27. Channing Hall of the Universalist Unitarian Congregation of Princeton, 50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, at 3 p.m. 609-924-1604. www.charlieliu.com. $10.

Bhatla-Usab Real Estate Group

Why Choose a Single Agent When You Can Have A Whole Team Working For You?

REAL ESTATE

Harveen Bhatla 609-273-4408 · Dr. William Usab, Jr 609-273-4410

www.Bhatla-Usab.com

$1,300,000 $925,000

[email protected]

$750,000 $525,000

PRINCETON JUNCTION ­ 16 Sleepy Hollow Lane ­ MAGNIFICENT 6 BR / 5.5 BA CUSTOM HOME SET ON A 1 ACRE WOODED CUL DE SAC LOT IN PRESTIGIOUS WINDSOR RIDGE. This one of a kind luxury home has everything... a must see!

PRINCETON JUNCTION - 5 Newport Court. East-facing 4BR/3.5Ba Cedarbrook Federal Model in Woods at Millbrook. 2 sty foyer, LR, DR, FR w/ flr-ceiling stone fplc, remodeled Kit w/Granite counters, Study w/built-in bookshelves, MBR w/sitting area, MBA w/Jacuzzi. Fin bsmt, 3 car garage, Sec Syst. 24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID# 274 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

PLAINSBORO - NEW CONSTRUCTION - 223 Cranbury Neck Rd . 3500 SF, 4 BR/2.5 BA on 1.6 ACRE LOT. LR, DR, EIK w/Granite Counters, FR, Hickory HW floors on 1st floor. MBR w/Lrg Sitting Area/office, MBA w/Granite & Maple His/Her Vanity, Hall Bath w/Granite & Maple Vanity. Full bsmt, 2-Car Garage 24-INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID#124 Visit www.NJDreamhomes.us

SE U PM O H 1-4 N 1 PE /2 O N3 U S

PLAINSBORO - 55 Marion Drive. Princeton CrossingColonial on .2 acre lot. 3 Br/2.5 ba. 2 story LR w/fplc, EIK w/sliding doors to Paver patio, MBR w/cath ceiling. 2 nd flr laundry. Full Fin basement w/bar and pool table. Fenced back yard. 2 car garage 24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID# 94 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID#334 Visit www.NJDreamhomes.us

$525,000

$500,000

$375,000

$280,000

PRINCETON JUNCTION - 172 Line Road. Completely Updated 4BR/2.5ba Colonial on .69 acre backing to Preserved Land. EIK w/new cabinets/tile floor/refrig, Sunroom, Large FR w/brick fplc and new carpet, Formal LR and DR, remodeled full baths. Full Bsmt with walk out, new roof, 2 car gar.

PRINCETON JUNCTION - 56 Normandy Drive. Windsor Ponds. Quite Cul-de-sac location w/view of forest & lake. 3BR/2.5ba. 2 story light filled formal LR, DR, EIK w/oak cabinets, FR w/recessed lights/sliding glass doors to porch, MBR w/cathedral ceiling/2 walk-in closets, MBA w/Jacuzzi/2 vanities/upgraded tile. 2 car garage. 24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID# 214 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

WEST WINDSOR - 16 Lancaster Ct. Windsor Ponds. 3BR, 2.5B, Amherst Model. 2 story Living Room w/ gas fireplace, kitchen w/sliding glass doors to patio and a beautiful view of woods. 24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID#54 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

PRINCETON JUNCTION - 86 Honeyflower Lane. Village Grande at Bear Creek-Brookhaven Model. 2 BR/2ba, EIK w/Oak Cabinets & Oak HDWD, DR, LR w/fireplace & Brazilian Walnut HDWD, Master bath w/Jacuzzi, Sun Room addition w/oak HDWD, Paver Patio, Porch, 2 car gar. 55+ community

24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID# 314 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654 ID# 244 Visit www.NJDreamHomes.us

100 Canal Pointe Blvd. · Princeton, NJ · 609-987-8889

Information

untitled

36 pages

Report File (DMCA)

Our content is added by our users. We aim to remove reported files within 1 working day. Please use this link to notify us:

Report this file as copyright or inappropriate

1268045


You might also be interested in

BETA
untitled
untitled
untitled